Propain Announces the Bam Bam 14" Run Bike

Mar 29, 2022 at 2:34
by PROPAIN-Bicycles  

PRESS RELEASE: Propain

With the Bam Bam, PROPAIN Bicycles adds a 14" push bike to their Kids Bike Range, offering kids the perfect introduction to the exciting world of cycling.

It allows children to learn to balance on two wheels, whilst learning fundamental skills and increasing agility. A push bike gives children self-confidence, they can feel safe and can progress and learn at their own pace. The Bam Bam’s design is eye-catching and chic with the added benefit of being equipped with numerous useful details. The frame and fork are particularly lightweight and perfectly adapted to children.

They remember their first bike forever!




Key facts

• Aluminum frame with rounded tube ends
• 14" wheels
• Recommended for children between 90 - 110 cm
• 4.5 kg bike weight
• Mountable disc brake (not included)


Components and Specs

We’ve cherry picked the best components to suit the Bam Bam’s riders, from small diameter grips to allow them to grip firmly, to knobbly 14” tires for extra grip and a kid’s specific saddle for extra comfort. High quality and reliable parts are a must for PROPAIN owners of all ages.


With its low stand over and height-adjustable saddle, the Bam Bam push bike is suitable for children between 90 cm and 110 cm tall (equivalent to about 2 to 4 years). The seat clamp is easy to operate with an Allen key for height adjustments as they grow. The foot platform offers enough space and safety to give the kids a good feeling while pushing the bike and putting their feet up.


PROPAIN’s own experience has shown that younger children lack the finger strength to safely operate brakes, so brakes have been left off the spec. But as they grow in strength and confidence, a rear disc can be easily added if required. This will help teach the fundamentals before they move to a pedal bike.


Availability and prices

The Bam Bam can be ordered in Europe starting immediately at a price of € 279 EUR on www.propain-bikes.com. Delivery is expected to start mid of April.

In North America, the new push bike can be purchased on www.propain-bikes.com/us for $ 279 USD excl. taxes. Delivery is expected to start at the end of April.





118 Comments

  • 169 0
 Ahem, and my sippy cup goes where exactly?
  • 12 1
 Signs that your little one will be a trail rider
  • 13 0
 No in-frame storage for their stash either
  • 4 1
 This is an all-time comment gold for me.
  • 5 0
 Thanks for this - a good chuckle in the morning is so welcome. Also I'll now always be referring to my water bottle as my sippy cup, and asking "why not more sippy cup mounts?" about all bikes. Fits nicely with my other habit of calling protein shakes "formula for grownups".
  • 3 0
 @Woody25: If you have kids, you will know that you are the mule. No matter what you have in your hands, your pockets, or any kind of receptacle that you've brought along, they will have something that you must hold at the most inconvenient time.
  • 3 0
 @kinematix: You're so right. It's for that exact reason that Spec carbon balance bike made sense; it was never about how it rode for the kid, or some sort of wealth flex, it was always just about making it lighter for the parent who was going to have to carry it when junior decided that they had never, at any point in their entire existence wanted the balance bike they were riding two minutes before.
  • 55 0
 Wow just when I thought high pivots were taking off
  • 8 0
 … Propain goes and does something like this… and totally redeem themselves!!!
  • 16 0
 Without mentionning that they completely missed the 12/14" or 14/16" mullet versions. Pfffff
  • 46 0
 What? No carbon option?

How am I supposed to motivate Jr. to study hard and take over my dental practice if there's no carbon option?
  • 1 0
 Is Jr. a baby or a Yeti?
  • 43 0
 Aluminum frame, good tires & optional brake make it a great option. I've spent far too much time researching toddler bikes.
  • 3 0
 It got a Production Privee Mini Shan with very similar specs for my little guy. Another option.
  • 4 0
 Not to mention the low profile axle bolts/nuts. Byebye scuffed ankles.
  • 2 2
 Not sure why these boutique bikes don’t copy the woom frame, no top tube-reduce weight. Have to agree about the breaker though, daughter can’t use it, maybe boys can?
  • 1 0
 No seat stay either on woom. Guess the two year olds have a discerning eye for frame aesthetic.
  • 1 0
 I think it's the same frame as the commencal Ramones push bikes. They also have disc brake mounts. Iirc the rear hub was even already a disc hub
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: Our Mini Shan will soon be passed on to kid #2. Great bike!
  • 2 0
 I love the brake option, I spent too much time machining a disk mount for my daughter's push bike only to never buy a hub to match it. My oldest burnt through about 6 pairs of rain boots in about 3 months in our hilly neighborhood. The youngest is almost big enough for the kick bike, so maybe she'll get a brake mount.
  • 4 0
 Woom makes a nice one with a hand brake for like 150 or 200$. Hand brake is a must imo. Kids learn on these bikes to sit down and drag their feet to slow down or when scared. Then when they move up to a pedal bike they do the same damn thing and wreck themselves (pavement is common riding surface at that age too). So then they are stuck learning how to balance while pedaling AND figure out how to use a hand brake. It’s dumb and a needless variable that could be learned on the balance bike. My kids transitioned fine but others haven’t. “I’m scared!” -execute sit and drag feet.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Good point. Just for giggles I looked up weights: 6.6 lbs for woom 9+ pounds for these w/o a brake. No contest. 3 extra lbs is a lot for a 25lb toddler.
  • 43 0
 @mikelevy when can we see Jason do a huck to flat on this?
  • 1 0
 Too soon, too soon
  • 1 0
 Those ankles gonna hurt
  • 13 0
 Side effect of your kid riding this bike: they will wear out a pair of shoes every two months.
  • 45 2
 They’ll grow out of the shoes before they wear out
  • 5 2
 Buy some Keens. That hideous toe guard actually serves a purpose in this regard!
  • 3 0
 @nicktapias:
No. It’s shocking how quickly the holes form. Two months of regular use and my son was Fred Flinstoning.

Commencal makes great kids bikes too. Got a 12” and 16”. It’s not really surprising that kids ride better, and enjoy riding more, on good bikes. I mean, I do too.
  • 4 0
 Make them ride barefoot. Then they will learn to keep their balance much faster!
  • 1 0
 @vectorforces: Yeah rain boots lasted about 2-3 weeks with my daughter riding neighborhood laps everyday.
  • 1 0
 This is a fact.
  • 10 0
 14” wheels is a miss in my opinion. It’s too big. The bike is too big to be a kids first bike, and also big enough that most kids are already pedaling by this time. I have three kids (one is still a baby), the other two have gone from Adam’s runner bike to pedaling 12” wheels by 3 years old. So, make it if they like, but I wouldn’t market so hard about it being a “first bike”, cause it’s too big for that.

Nate
  • 5 0
 Another good option, if your kid is a little bit bigger, then Trek has the Precaliber for $300, which has gear set, and includes training wheels (throw them in a box). You can then just remove the cranks and chain, and voila! Balance bike to pedal bike when they are ready.
Anyways, the Propain balance bike looks awesome and would definitely turn heads.
  • 2 0
 We just took the pedals off of my son's Prevelo Zulu One when we got it for him. He was already a pretty capable balance bike rider but was unsure of the pedals. He stridered it around for maybe a week, got used to the feeling of the bigger bike and the brakes, then we put the pedals back on and he took off. If he hadn't been balance biking previously, I think a bike like this makes more sense, but I can't really see upgrading to a 14 in balance bike when there are so many decent 14 in pedal bikes out there that your child will likely be ready for pretty quickly if they have gotten comfortable on a balance bike already.
  • 8 0
 Optional brakes should be standard on all bikes...
  • 6 0
 Standard bikes should be optional with all brakes..
  • 3 1
 @mi-bike: Standard optionals should be on all bike brakes....
  • 4 1
 @dmackyaheard: A brake should be put on all optional bike standards
  • 1 0
 Cleary made a 12” balance bike with front and rear brakes about 3-4 years ago. Unfortunately, nearly all bikes in this category have no brakes. This teaches bad habit of braking with feet instead of developing muscle memory with hands. I live in a hilly area and take kids on singletrack trails.
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: I had a stroke reading that
  • 1 0
 On all standard bikes brakes should be optional.
  • 2 0
 like the optional brake on my fixed gear that i decided to remove
  • 8 2
 @PROPAIN-Bicycles: 1) love that Celeste paint. 2) Laufrad translates to "strider." ("Run bike" is not a thing in N. America)
  • 2 0
 They refer to it as a push bike. A push bike is a regular bicycle in Australia. As there are more photos of the thing than words defining it I guess we have to just switch on our brains to figure it all out. Some refer to them as balance bikes. Strider may refer to a pc game, adult exercise machine or even the name of a Lord of the Rings character.
  • 5 0
 Seems like a great opportunity to mount a brake that costs more than the bike….
  • 3 0
 Then it is probably a brake well worth taking along from bike to bike. Seems like the era of changing brake standards is over so you'd be safe if it fits PM tabs. Would only be a shame to cut the Goodridge hose this short so maybe get regular plastic hoses for those early bikes. I suppose you're talking about Trickstuff or Hope brakes.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: brakes that are more like a novelty item, more than a actual good working brake. Don’t get me wrong Hope and trickstuff brakes work good but they are quite over priced in my book.
  • 1 0
 @danielenduro5: No personal experience with either of those brakes. What I like about them is that (from what I understand) they'll always stock or produce spares which implies your brakes can always be serviced and/or repaired. So over the course of a long time, they may actually be cheaper than similarly performing brakes with a lower sales price. Question of course becomes whether people are even willing to hold on to them for this long but that's more a mental thing. If you want to be on the bleeding edge then you'll never be happy for long. If you just need strong brakes that work, you should be good.
  • 3 0
 nice, if i knew a 14in balance bike existed i wouldnt have pushed my daughter to jump from the 12 inch balance bike to the 16 inch pedal bike
  • 3 0
 Why not a 14 in pedal bike? You can take the pedals off while she gets comfortable and let her use it as a balance bike (though it sounds like this might be past tense).
  • 1 0
 Or a 12” pedal bike (12.5). Our little guy was on a cleary gecko, it was sweet.
  • 1 0
 @nateb: nah they outgrow them too fast.
  • 3 0
 That's a lot for a balance bike with no brakes. The LittleBig bike is cheaper, but can also grow into a pedal bike.
  • 2 0
 Time for some Trick Stuff!
  • 1 0
 All I remember about my first bike is that it was possible blue, I'm sure any kid with this bike won't remember how much their parents paid for it when they get older.
  • 4 0
 Retro geo. No thanks.
  • 1 0
 Nope....they don't remember their first bike anymore. Now that I have my kiddos on bikes as 1 yr olds and on their second bike as 3 yr olds.... childhood amnesia.
  • 1 0
 Exactly what I was thinking, yeah I remember my first bike, it had training wheels. I have no memories of being 2 or 3 years old.
  • 3 0
 Ahhh finally they released a Remy Metailler signature frame!
  • 3 0
 It's not carbon ! How can my kids been seen with the Specialized kids ?
  • 3 0
 What!? No frame only option?
  • 5 4
 unpopular opinion - striders are cancer on pump tracks and skateparks. Give the kids a chance and bring them when they can pedal a BMX.
  • 6 2
 unpopular opinion - race BMX riders are cancer on pump tracks as they go 20x faster then balance bikes, scooters, skateboard, skates or basically any other vehicle on the track and often get ridiculously frustrated because of that.
  • 1 0
 Exactly.
  • 1 0
 @bressti: nah it's more just if you need your parents to push you up the bumps you're probably in everyone's way that can pedal a bike or ride a skateboard or scooter, so that's everyone else at the pump track over 6 years old.
  • 2 0
 @Bro-LanDog: Yeah, I kind of agree. I'm no good at pump tracks (bouncy trail bike I'm sure doesn't help vs BMX and jump bikes) but its quite easy for all abilities of riders to gauge one another's speeds and figure out how to share. Apart from the really young kids who can't get up an upslope due to either lack of strength or lack of speed. You dont know if they are going to stop, or decide to turn around, or whatever. Its not always balance bikes.
  • 3 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: I'm not worried about the kids going on their own power, even if they can't make it up the bumps they can at least walk/ride off the side of the track by themselves. Every time I'm at the pump track there's a helicopter mom or five with her sweet precious little future Nino Schurter who has to push them up the hills while they coast down the side just to eat it when they go uphill again. The poor kid would have more fun on a sloped driveway for crying out loud and wouldn't put a section of the pumptrack on indefinite hold while the tears are consoled.
  • 1 0
 This looks almost identical to the Cuda Runner 14 which is awesome and even has a v brake - difference is the Cuda costs £109
  • 1 0
 Given the bike industry’s eye for opportunity, it’s almost a surprise that no manufacturers have considered an adult sized version…
  • 1 0
 Nice to see a regularly priced push bike on here. How TF did we ever get to a point where specialized can make a carbon $1k push bike?
  • 2 0
 I try to keep my kid away from Propain going bam bam.
  • 3 4
 It looks too squashed up compared to my son’s Strider - I thought new bikes were meant to be lower/slacker/longer.

At least it checks the box for being ridiculously expensive.
  • 2 0
 Need a Remy vid for this thing...
  • 2 0
 What is this - a bike for ants?!?!
  • 1 1
 why not put a bottom bracket for the option of putting cranks and pedals for after they learn to balance, is this not an option for balance bikes?
  • 2 0
 Does it fit a 240 mm rotor?
  • 1 0
 Definitely too expensive, but hey I guess people have a lot of money to burn.
  • 1 2
 What an odd name for a bike brand. It looks like they make great bikes, obviously have some great riders. But Propain? I’m either getting hurt on the highest of levels or misspelled cooking burgers….I tell you what.
  • 1 0
 And Propain’s website is still broken on mobile devices. It must be costing a fortune in sales for a mostly DTC brand.
  • 1 0
 Ahem, I’m thinking 29” push bike … low pro stance… could be the next hot thing :-)
  • 1 0
 What a time to be a kid.... again
  • 1 0
 Is it a Propain release without a Phil Atwill shreddit?
  • 1 0
 With some Pro Pain tunes cranked in the background? The "Foul Taste of Freedom" album should do.
  • 1 0
 Scrolled down directly to find the price
  • 2 0
 Me, too.
There are tons of used ones on the market for next to nothing. I get the "only the best for my little one," but what about reusing something?
  • 1 0
 @mcocchio: Usually you already buy or get them used and give them away. For actual mountainbiking, doesn't Hope have a program where kids can get an actual properly spec'd mountainbike?
  • 2 0
 It's retail therapy for bikers who are too tired to ride because they haven't slept for two years thanks to their little bundle of joy/pain.
Someone suggested that we get a standard used decathlon 12 incher and take the whole transmission off, BB and all. So we had a strider with 2 brakes that I then put the transmission back on when balance was achieved, to obtain a kid who was pedalling on 2 wheels before his 3rd birthday. Thanks for coming to my smug ted talk.
  • 1 0
 don't worry they ship it with less plastic
  • 1 0
 @mcocchio: I looked used and couldn't find one with brakes mounts for my little dude. Plenty of like basic striders and stuff but nothing with a brake mount.
  • 1 0
 Best name for a run bike!
  • 1 0
 I’m going to need Remy to send some steep slabs with this.
  • 1 0
 I read these thinking I’d by one for myself
  • 1 0
 US buyers also have only two shipping options, costing $99 or $199. wtf?
  • 1 0
 Foot out, Flat out! (the photo of the kid railing the berm...)
  • 1 0
 These kids look old enough to pedal...
  • 1 0
 I wonder how long the R&D was?
  • 1 0
 I bought a used GT strider for my kid for $40...... looks just as rad
  • 1 0
 $279 or €279 gotta love #Ebikes
  • 1 0
 Shred the Ruble…
  • 1 0
 Barcia signature model?
  • 2 3
 IMO, these strider bike are teaching kids poor habits... a foot pegs scooter would develop better balance....
  • 2 0
 But what if the child raises their feet when coasting and rests them on the bike? Much like coasting on a two wheeler...
  • 1 2
 @buckwheat23: the frame should be larger around the 'BB' area to facilitate a child standing and learning to pump... sitting is not a normal MTB riding position.
  • 2 1
 Do you have a link to the product you're suggesting? Yes I 100% agree that standing up gives you a better feel for the bike, but what I'm seeing from scooters is that kids often use one foot for propelling and the other to step on scooter. They rarely change left and ride whereas I feel these striders allow for a more balanced development left and right. On the pumptrack, yes a scooter will probably give them a better opportunity to learn to pump. On dirt, I'm not too sure whether they'll learn this. But yeah, both have their merits. I'd say on a pumptrack (or at least a place that can be pumped with their small wheels) they could be better off on a scooter. But if they can't pump it, maybe they're better of on a strider like this. Then still, kids so small they'd ride something like this can't really pump on a regular pumptrack. They'd need bumps of maybe 30cm tall or so. It sounds small but for them to develop a proper pumping motion and a feel for what they're doing and what is working, they'd need bumps that small.
  • 5 0
 @AntN: If a child is ready to pump, then a child is ready for pedals.
  • 4 0
 If you make that standing area large, how are the kids going to run without hitting themselves in their heels?
These bikes are about teaching them balance and steering.
In no time they get the hang of it and then it's time for a "real" bike.
And it is only then that the time of pumping, jumping, hucking and suicide no handers etc has arrived.
  • 3 0
 @AntN: "sitting is not a normal MTB riding position". I don't know about you, but I generally use my saddle to sit on. In a sitting position, on my MTB. Pretty normal riding position for me. I often see other mountain bikers sitting on their saddle as well. Maybe it's a Canadian thing?

I think most people buying these for their 3 year old aren't all that concerned about pumping. They just want to get their kids rolling with comfort and confidence.
  • 1 0
 Well, that's the interesting bit isn't it? Is pumping so advanced that kids need to learn to pedal before they can pump? I don't recall kids when kids were able to keep a swing moving (without someone pushing them) but it seems to me that when you can do that, you can accelerate a bike too with pumping. I do recall that already when my girls were little and I had one in front of me and the other on the back seat, when I had to climb up a steep section like a bridge or something, they'd swing back and forth in sync with my pedal stroke and it was definitely helping. And obviously in such a situation, you really had to make it up the bridge as you can't safely jump off nor can you stand up to apply more force when you have a kid in front of you. So yeah, I do actually think that kids can learn to propel a two-wheeler (scooter or bike or anything in between) with pumping before they can pedal. But the bumps should be somewhere between knee- and hipheight. Which is pretty low for a kid this small and these are pretty hard to find that size. But yeah, when you have them (or build them) then it will be easier to get going on a scooter than on a strider where you need to sit down. Obviously landing jumps, hucks and suicides is more comfortable on your feet than on your ass, but an early Jackson Goldstone video shows he didn't seem to mind.

But either way, I think the stage on such a strider is short and it gives a kid some mobility on smooth terrain. So does a scooter. Either way, the kid will learn to balance and soon will get on fine on a pedal bike where it can both pedal and pump.
  • 1 0
 @AntN: eh?
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: If the purpose of the kids bike is to teach them to ride/balance then facilitatly standing will lead to quicker progression is my point.
  • 2 0
 @AntN: I was being facetious. Mostly.
  • 1 0
 sehr günstig
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Ramones.
  • 1 3
 Disk brake mount on a radially spoked wheel? Really?
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