Oneup Components 42-tooth Cog for Ten-Speed Cassettes - Reviewed

Dec 31, 2013 at 11:08
by Richard Cunningham  

Oneup Components makes a CNC-machined 42-tooth cog that retrofits to most Shimano and SRAM ten-speed cassettes. The aluminum cog does not alter the spacing of the original cassette, and Oneup's instructions are quite simple: Unscrew the lock ring, remove the 17-tooth cassette sprocket and its accompanying spacer to make room for the big 42 tooth cog and then reassemble the sprockets. The addition of the 42 gives riders the low gear that is missing from conventional single-ring drivetrains - without having to reduce the chainring size and sacrifice top speed. Oneup Components sells its 42-tooth cog for $100 USD at its webstore.

Oneup Components 42 tooth cog test review installed

Oneup Components' 42-tooth chainring installed on a Pivot Mach 5.7 completes the ideal one-by-ten drivetrain. With 26-inch wheels, it provides a stump-puller low gear. The big cog should make a lot of 29er riders happy for the same reason.






Details:
• 42T sprocket material: 7075-T6 aluminum
• 42T sprocket weight: 71 grams
• 12 upshift points optimized for most 11-36 cassettes
• Fits most SRAM and Shimano 10-speed cassettes and derailleurs
• Compatible with 1x10 and 2x10 drivetrains
• Uses standard freehub driver bodies
• Gearing: (11-13-15-19-21-24-28-32-36-42)
• OneUp-adapted cassette weight increase: 51 grams
• Three-by to a one-by drivetrain weight decrease: 367 grams
• Cassette gearing range improvement: 17%
Contact: Oneup Components




Tech Info

Oneup's 42-tooth cog will fit any SRAM or Shimano 11 by 36-tooth, ten-speed cassette that has loose cogs from the 11 through the 17. SRAM XO type cassettes, which use a full-width aluminum spider to support the cogs, are not compatible. We used a Shimano XTR cassette and an old-school non-clutch XTR long-cage rear derailleur. SRAM X5 through X9 and Shimano XT and XTR ten-speed rear derailleurs will work in both medium and long cage versions. Oneup Components has a compatibility page that is regularly updated with exact part numbers and gearing ranges should you need further confirmation.

Oneup Components 42 tooth cog test review cogs in order

All lined up, the new wide-ratio Shimano XTR ten-speed cassette awaits reassembly. The removal of the 17-tooth cog and its spacer (top) from the original cassette makes room for the new 42. The steel washer below the Oneup cog is placed in front or behind the aluminum sprocket for SRAM or Shimano applications.



Oneup machined six shift gates into their aluminum sprocket that match up with the gates on Shimano and SRAM's 36-tooth cogs to ensure seamless shifting (Oneup says that there are 12 mathematical shift locations on their 42). The original cassette ratios are: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32-36, and with the elimination of the 17-tooth sprocket, the wide-range ratio is: 11-13-15-19-21-24-28-32-36-42. We were concerned that the four-tooth jump between the 15 and the 19 would be an issue because it is preceded by a two-tooth jump and followed by a smaller, three-tooth change. In reality, we never noticed the difference, although we are sure that more 'retentive' riders would take notice. On the large end of the cassette, the addition of the 42 creates a logical step from the 36 tooth - just like SRAM's 11-speed XD cassette.

Oneup Components 42 tooth cog test review 11 by 42 ten-speed cassette

The assembled cassette. Note the larger jump between the 15 and 19-tooth cogs (fourth sprocket from right) where the 17 was removed.



Shimano and SRAM May Be Angry

It should be noted that SRAM and Shimano clearly state that the largest cog that their ten-speed rear derailleurs can handle is a 36 - definitely not a 42. We are sure to get grief from both establishments for posting a story that encourages their customers to force their mechs to handle a 42 - but, because neither have ponied up with a wide-range ten-speed cassette and rear derailleur to give existing ten-speed owners a lower priced wide-range gearing option, we're not concerned if they get their panties in a bunch. So, here's what you have to do to get their derailleurs to shift to the 42:

Most rear derailleurs have a B-tension screw in the body behind the hanger that rocks the derailleur back and away from the largest cassette cog. The function of the B-tension screw is to adjust the position of the upper pulley to ride as close to the largest cog as possible without interfering with shift action, or causing the pulley to rumble on the sprocket teeth. To get the rear derailleur to sit above the big 42-tooth cog, you'll need to run the B-tension screw almost all the way in for Shimano and for some SRAM derailleurs, you may need to remove the plastic thread-locker washer below the screw so you can run the screw in another few millimeters. Rocking the rear derailleur back requires the addition of some chain - as does the addition of the 42. Oneup Components says you'll need two links more, but we added three because the extra length puts the lower derailleur pulley farther back when you are in the big sprocket. This eases the angle that the lower run of chain must take from the pulley to the chainring, which reduces noise and improves shifting.

Oneup Components 42 tooth cog test review B tension adjustment

The B-tension screw (left) is located in the rear of the derailleur body and it lines up with the hanger. We ran it in most of the way to get the Shimano XTR derailleur's upper pulley to clear the 42-tooth cog (right).



When you have the rear derailleur shifting properly, it will look completely wrong, but do not worry, because Shimano and SRAM have evolved their mechs to such a high degree, that they will shift marvelously when compromised as such (although, you may hear a different story from them if you ask for warranty instructions). So: Assemble cassette - Check! Crank B-tension screw - Check! Add chain - Check! Ensure shifting is adjusted properly - Check! All that is left is to go ride some hills.


Ride Impressions

We installed the Oneup Compinents 42-tooth conversion on a Shimano XTR-equipped Pivot Mach 5.7 that was previously converted to a one-by using an MRP 32-tooth chainring and chainguide. The conversion took less than an hour including the photos, so anyone with basic skills who has replaced a cassette and adjusted a rear derailleur could crank out the conversion in a half hour. We didn't even have to readjust the shifting, because Oneup's chainring duplicated the location of the original cogs perfectly.

On the dirt, shifting was quick and sure throughout the entire range of the cassette and, as mentioned, there was no discernible leap in resistance when we shifted between the 15 and the 19-tooth cogs, where the 17-tooth cog was removed. Having nearly the equivalent low gear of the Shimano 24 by 36 triple-chainring drivetrain with a single-ring setup was sweet on the steeps and the conversion might allow those who want a slightly taller gear to add a couple of teeth to their one-by chainrings. As far as wear goes, we expect the Oneup 42 to outlast the front sprocket by a considerable margin because it sees less overall use, and also because it has more teeth than any other sprocket in the drivetrain, so each tooth sees less action.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesOne hundred dollars for an aluminum chainring may have some PB readers up in arms, but that is pennies compared to the cost of purchasing an 11-speed shifter, rear derailleur and XD cassette from SRAM to achieve a similar end. The cost of an XD cassette is $400 alone. Oneup Components went the extra nine yards by engineering its 42-tooth sprocket with the shifting gates and clearances to assure that the conversion from an 11 by 36 ten-speed cassette to a working wide-range 11 by 42 would be as seamless as possible for average garage mechanics. In our opinion, that is a cheap $100. Oneup's 42-tooth cog is the missing link that riders who swear by one-by-ten drivetrains have been waiting for. - RC



408 Comments

  • 297 6
 "we're not concerned if they get their panties in a bunch. So, here's what you have to do..." What a BAMF comment for such a global mtb social network to make. Pinkbike has balls, big pink ones.
  • 51 56
flag dbox123 (Jan 1, 2014 at 3:37) (Below Threshold)
 With respect to SRAM they do have a solution to running a 42t cog at the rear, its called XX1 and X01. I know that its expensive but they have started to offer cheaper alternatives, im sure there working out how to produce a cheaper X9 or X7 version 11speed becasue they know that they will sell bucket loads when they do.

I dont think they are going to compromise all the R & D that goes into designing a rear mech and the XX1 I'd rather they consentrate on bringing the price down for their 11 speed system rather than trying to retro fit some cheap alternative to a product they allready have.

Shimano on the other hand need a kick up the arse.

(Front Mech RIP)
  • 14 20
flag hitarpotar (Jan 1, 2014 at 5:33) (Below Threshold)
 Then who's gonna buy the XX1 and XO1 drivetrain?
Don't think i'm not a fan for a X71 group, but come to think about it - the sales of the XX1 and XO1 groups will vanish much like the dinosaurs did. Big Grin
  • 20 1
 Thats just not true. With your logic nobody should be buying X0 mechs becasue they can buy X9 or X7? I dont know but I would guess that sales are strong all across thier range.
  • 32 7
 SRAM has already stated there's going to be a long wait before the 11-speed cassettes trickle down much further because the cassettes cost so much to make. So no, they don't have a solution.
  • 12 8
 @dbox123 do you mean front mech rot in hell rather than RIP? you should
  • 35 37
 i dont get it.... how can a whole set of rings (lets say 9) can cost about 30$ (some of the cheapest) and ONLY ONE RING that has a little bit more material and a little bit more teeth can cost 100$... thats insane... "its not easy to make".?!?!? Come on... pleeease..... Once you have the machinery and the program pattern for the cutter its all the same... it costs nothing more or less than a 32 or a 22 or a 12 ring to make except for the more material needed because of the bigger diameter... sure... but 100$ for 70grams of aluminum... hell no...
  • 25 4
 11spd is marketing. The jumps between a wide range 10spd are fine.
  • 22 2
 price for this component is set by demand not how much it costs to manufacture the part, in other words if there's no competition and there's buyers for the product sellers can place the price they want
  • 36 0
 @spoiler you obviously have no idea what your talking about... those cheaper options you are talking about are made with a completely different process. they are stamped out with a press rather than made with a CNC machine. I currently work in a machine shop and the going rate for machine time is about $100 an hour. Also this part would require 2 machining operations (one for each side) that would take at least 10 minutes a piece. So after its been marked up several times the price for this looks about right to me (mind you it gets 100% mark up at least twice, one from the manufacturing company and one from the distributor so a $25 part to manufacture instantly becomes $100). I'm not saying that its cheap by any means but its definitely not a absurd price....
  • 106 4
 here we go again...

"XX1 and X01 are so expensive! Grr! SRAM makes me so mad! I hate brand new, top of the line products that will eventually trickle down just like everything else throughout bike history!"

*a new, cheap alternative is introduced*

"This new extremely cheap alternative is too much money! $100 for all the benefits of a $1.5k+ grouppo without having to wait for it to trickle down over the course of several years? Blasphemy! I'll buy it at Wal-Mart when it's $15"

you guys are unbelievable.
  • 13 1
 No, SRAM does NOT have a solution.

THIS product in the solution; to SRAM, Shimano and the issue of a larger rear cog.

They are not one of the big accessory/component producers, so of course their price is going to be higher. Makes sense, and I'll probably end up trying it out - LONG before the big two have any affordable options...
  • 3 1
 Thanks! Just bought it.
  • 8 0
 As millsr4 pointed out, the manufacturing cost is reasonable. Plus, there are people who designed this thing - and design costs money (such as making prototypes, CNC time, etc). Sure, it's not as cheap as a single chainring, but hey - these guys need to make a profit at the end of the day too.

XX1 is waaay too expensive, and this is a great alternative.
  • 16 0
 @TomBasic - that thing looks pretty sketchy. Their 41t cog appears to be stamped steel and is very thin - a big concern for chewing up the carrier. It weighs 233g! compared to 70g for the One Up and doesn't have any shift ramps and rather poor looking tooth profile. You generally get what you pay for.
  • 8 0
 Maybe PB isn't a shill for the establishment. Major credit is due for this level of truth. I can't help but think Team Robot has something to do with this.
  • 2 0
 @Dbox123 - yeah, their sales are strong for now. But i guess this has to do something with the fact that only 2 1x11 groups are available now - the XX1 and the XO!. Which have a very, very small difference in prices and weights.
If a X91 and more importantly, a X71 group is made, my guess would be that weight won't go so much higher, but the price will go down significantly. And then many people will have the opportunity to try 1x11 without the crazy high prices of XX1 and XO1. Smile
This was my idea at first. Smile
  • 4 0
 h82crash, I agree with everything you say. The ebay one IS an alternative; perhaps not a good one, but when I first saw it I was grateful somebody was making something that had a reasonable price.
  • 4 0
 @tom & @jerry: can we get a review?
  • 5 0
 The problem with xx1 for me is not the price, it the fact that I need to buy new wheels along with a new drivetrain. This seems perfect. Eric
  • 2 0
 XO1 and XX1 are priced right where they should be for top of the line equipment - and relatively in line with SRAM's 10 speed offerings. Both 10 and 11 speed cassettes feature the XDome technology where the cassette is cut from a solid block of steel. The XX 10-speed cassette retails for right around $400, while the XX1 11-Speed goes for $425. The XO level (1080) 10-speed cassette goes for about $280, while the XO1 11-speed goes for about $400 (which is a significant jump, but the cassette does have much more in common to its XX twin than the two 10-speed cassettes do).

It's XO and XX level equipment. It's supposed to be beyond compromise. As is XTR. Until either company trickles the technology down, you gotta go for the high test stuff.
  • 1 0
 I should also add that full retail on an XTR 10-speed cassette is $350. Although, they can easily be had for less than $200.
  • 5 4
 The problem with the 11 speed is there are 11. We already all jump a bunch of gears every time we shift. Do you really want to jump more?
This shows the 11 doesn't improve your range in a real sense. It is a gimic. A really pricey, buy all new crap, including wheels, gimic.
1up is a populist movement in response to a top down psuedo innovation pushed by marketing more than any need. I bet some sram engineer thought of this and the boss sand no, it won't be profitable enough.
I hope shimano produces a 10speed mega range instead of an 11 speed, but if they don't that's fine to. Let these guys have a chance at some market share. In fact, i'd like some stock in 1up
  • 3 0
 @jmusperman I think the issue (and advantage here) is that if my bike has a 2x10 setup thats already somewhat new I don't want to have to spring for $1000 to ditch the front shifting. Here I can for $100 and then sell my front shifter/deralleur and maybe even a chainring to make back my $100
  • 8 0
 hamncheez, I've not bought the Ebay cog. I'm actually still in the Dark Ages, running a 2 x 9, gasp!, setup. And, I've only just gotten this setup. Up till now, I've been running an 8-speed cassette (Blasphemy!!!).
  • 4 2
 There's nothing wrong with 9-speed. Less shifting, stronger chain, longer drive chain life. If it works for you and you like it, who cares what everyone else is doing?
  • 3 2
 I run a 9xhammershmidt. A 2 x 9 is really all you need, unless you want to ditch the front derailleur.
  • 4 2
 The chains are not stronger nor is the drivetrain life longer with 9 speed compared to 10.
  • 2 1
 ^^ Truth.
  • 5 1
 Considering SRAM have stated they're not interested in making it more affordable because they're enjoying the monopoly they've got with XX1 and now X01, a big F YOU to them is hardly unjustified.
  • 10 9
 stop being wankers and go ride your bikes. WHEN it breaks or wears out, replace it with what you can. This crap wont make you faster or ride better. Riding will. Some of the fastest guys I know ride single speed most of the time.
  • 13 3
 Makripper, the point of the 1up is you don't wait until your bike breaks. You can order it today. You may not be faster because of it, but you will have one less derailleur, cable, and shifter to maintain. Kind of a duh statement I thought, but apparently somethings bear explanation, even if they are obvious. Speaking of obvious, Don't get on a forum and tell people not to discuss stuff. We are here because we like talking about this stuff, especially when we can't ride our bikes because we are in the middle of a blizzard, or whatever. If you don't want to discuss it simply DON'T COME ON THESE FORUMS BECAUSE THAT IS WHAT THEY ARE FOR! Duh.
  • 9 17
flag makripper (Jan 2, 2014 at 14:39) (Below Threshold)
 this isn't a forum. It is a pointless comment article string. I get that you can't ride. you don't have to whine to me about it. I still ride my bike in the snow, and I snowboard and enjoy other things in the offseason. It's a cassette add on. Have you ever heard of shimano mega range a-la walmart bikes? this isn't anything new or exciting. I dont care if you buy one today or tomorrow or never. My point was that people spend so much time speculating and arguing over stupid crap that you are missing the point of biking. If you can't handle a 32 ring, 11-36 cassette, maybe you shouldn't skip leg day anymore?
  • 7 3
 You are totally right about how i am so rude to make you read my posts against your will! Haha! I am just so mischievous like that. And you can't turn away! Mwahahaha. I am not whining. I am saying this component is a good thing. You are whining that you don't need it so it should not exist. Plus I am saying I enjoy talking about bikes. You are whining about it.
  • 3 11
flag makripper (Jan 2, 2014 at 14:58) (Below Threshold)
 I'm not saying that it shouldn't exist and I don't need it. Thanks for wasting 23 seconds of my life.
  • 2 0
 Taletotell... yeah, this one gear allows me to ditch my front mech and still have a wimp-out gear when I'm feeling weak Smile -- I do WANT the ratio that the 11th cog offers. Even though, technically, its the 10th, at least on my drive train. I don't really want 11 gears. I don't really want 10, or 9...

I don't need half the gears between the top and bottom, so in that sense - I agree with you. But that's not really what's happening here, is it? Its not a company adding more ratios in between everything, they are REPLACING one, not adding to it.

I'll post up my impressions when the ebay cog arrives. I'm skeptical, but hopeful...
  • 4 2
 Help us all and have China make it, $20 tops!
  • 3 1
 And then the US becomes an even larger bitch to China...
  • 3 0
 What's so bad about China purchasing a couple more trillion of debt?
  • 4 0
 Totally...I just don't want to be around when they repo everything we owe them!
  • 4 4
 their economy is completely dependent upon us no matter how much gold they accumulate if we stop buying their stuff they collapse
  • 4 2
 They aren't accumulating gold. They are accumulating other countries debt. And it's not just the u.s. that buys their product. Sheesh. Do some research before post.
  • 8 0
 Who dies with the most debt wins!
  • 2 0
 Makripper is right. Also if china begins consuming its own goods in larger quantities (becomes a consumer based economy) they will be more independent of the USA, and the prices of goods will rise.
Get ready in the next ten years to see cheap foreign goods meaning mexico, while Asian means expensive because of Chinese demand. Especially if Japan and China go to war.
But this begins to feel like a forum at NPR, not PB.
  • 1 0
 China is already reporting a total debt of $3 trillion, now that's minor compared to the USA's but still, eventually they're going to stop buying US bonds and then you're all up the creek.
  • 4 0
 China will never be a consumer based economy, lol. That's the delusion of eternal growth that many westerners are brainwashed by. They are a slave based economy and the only way that will stop is if we stop buying their goods.

When the US dollar collapses, China collapses. There is no alternative scenario. Explain one of you think there is, nostradamus. Hell, pretty much everything will collapse then, which is why our pile of meaningless bonds and fake money continued to have perceived value. The idea that China will someday own everything cause they are buying all the worthless debt is ridiculous, because the debt itself is worthless. None of it will EVER be repaid. .. there is only collapse for
all parties involved at the end of this tunnell... which is why they will continue to buy our debt even though they occasionally grumble about it.

You guys pretend that US economy is a legitimate enterprise that is actually
based upon facts on the ground or something that actually exists, your naivity and that of others is actually what keeps the whole system afloat, lol.

The Fed "taper" isn't really happening either, just another way to tweak numbers to give the perception of economic "recovery" for the masses.
  • 4 0
 Why can't there be an unfollow button for review discussions.... i'd rather not keep getting notices for dribble that has nothing to do with the original review.
  • 2 0
 homeschooled, chill out man, is not delusion, its actually an economic law, Smith's evolutionary law, and it applies both westeners and easteners, martians and all, to every society that Trades, the question is when will it happen for China to be consumer based, it wont be our lifetime IMO.
  • 2 0
 @narro2 "homeschooled" clearly doesn't have an education in economics or basic global market knowledge, even regarding his own country. He made this obvious in his first comment about China's gold accumulation...... time to move on in life haha
  • 3 2
 markripper you probably should move on since you have now created the most worthless string of internet forum comments I've seen lately but I'm going to stick around and call you on your bs.

www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2013-10-25/chinas-gold-reserves-least-25-times-higher-reported-%E2%80%98de-americanisation%E2%80%99-cont

That article essentially sums up the situation i described, and this article goes into detail speculating why China is accumulating massive reserves and how and why they aren't revealing how much they have.

m.seekingalpha.com/article/1843792
  • 8 0
 Free trade is good, ditching front shifter/derailleur is good, MOVE ON
  • 8 0
 Bikes are fun.
  • 1 0
 Bikes? Who said anything about bikes? LOL
@HohmSkulled
The easiest way to turn to a consumer based economy is to go to war. (Japan) Private contractors will supply weapons that china will buy. These contractors will hire a new middle class that displaces the jobs lost in iphone construction. These people will consume stuff.
Eternal growth is a myth, but you can make a consumer economy. It just crashes after a few decades. There is plenty of slave labor elsewhere in Asia and Mexico to keep it afloat for a while.
Get ready for more bikes stamped "Made in Mexico" and "Made in Vietnam".
  • 1 0
 @HohmSkulled, that was a interesting take on things. If it is true, the West is not a free market economy. Instead it would be a "welfare economy" that is dependent upon the donations of the Chinese. And you don't have to be a genius to know that the Chinese are hording gold, expecting a "economy" they don't believe in to collapse.
  • 1 0
 @HohmSkulled You do not know now China, and now China is not entirely dependent on exports to, and in the last economic crisis, most companies have to shift attention to the country, and we have been able to feed most of the consumption level of Chinese enterprises. You stop buying Chinese goods will only make some people unemployed, will not affect the overall
  • 1 0
 I will wait for your amazing solution...
  • 1 0
 Of course it does. The best option is too ignore the ridiculous comments of "tools" like him he has no clue how much work goes into a product like this.
  • 1 0
 I have to agree with a lot of this - a cassette wears away over time and yes this will have more teeth so it will have less wear and is made of a stronger material than a basic cassette ring but the advantage would have to be so drastic that if you're already running a set up similar will there be any real difference? That's a hard one to judge other than a gimmick of adaptability in this component. It makes sense as to why it's being brought about and available but the actual use of this will be up to a very particular person.
  • 4 1
 I realize bringing up a week old thread is a sin, but I just ran across this

canfieldbrothers.com/components/9-tooth-rear-hub
  • 4 1
 Hope has a similar step-down freehub in the works, same 9T smallest cog, and unlike the canfield one which requires a new hub and wheel build, the Hope will replace their existing freehub bodies on their Pro2/3 series hubs.
  • 2 0
 fyi homoskull is protour... still. no one cares about your crap.
  • 2 1
 i don't get why the cassettes are so much to make if all it takes is to add a big sprocket - exactly the same the add on guys are doing. in fact they should soon make their own ones else they lose sales to those aftermarket guys
  • 2 1
 Way to bump a months old thread... but the reason isn't simply a larger cog, there's also a smaller cog to go along with it, so they can go to a single chainring and still keep the same wide range of gearing that a double-ring crank allows. To go to less than a 11T cog and still fit into the area an existing cogset fits, requires changing to a new freehub body design.
  • 1 3
 Hahahaha
Who was winning this argument anyway?
  • 83 1
 It still blows my mind that Shimano have sat on their hands during this whole 1x revolution.
  • 8 1
 I think after Ocatlink, rapid rise and Dual Controls they decided to wait and see what the market decides before making any big sweeping changes. I'm hoping for wide ratio cassettes and mechs all coming out at once, like when they brought ten speed along for everything from XTR to Deore in twelve months. Hopefully that'll happen and kill the dumber aspect of XX1 (random BCD cranks, XD hub driver, $400 cassette etc) stone dead. While I'm wishing, I'd love to see SRAM make a XO110 ten speed version of XO1, I'd go out and buy it tomorrow.
  • 2 0
 I'm sure they're working on something. 36 tooth cassettes seem to work for lots of people, and a good portion of the remainder are fine with a double in front. One issue though is that we will probably start to see a lot of frames designed for 1x which will lose Shimano the high end oem market.
  • 9 1
 The Japanese never jump into anything until they know it will work and there is demand for it. Wait for the summer and I think you'll like what Shimano shows you for 2015! 1x, 2, electronically, etc., etc.
  • 5 1
 Yeah I don't think Shimano could go too wrong releasing a wider range (even a 11-40t) 10spd cassette and some single ring cranks right now.
  • 4 0
 Don't worry, just because it's not on market yet doesn't mean they haven't been in the lab.
  • 5 0
 I'm all for wider range cassettes I'm often dropping/picking up gears 2 at a time, it's only on gradual climbs that i like the option of adding or dropping one gear... This is making me think of going 1x on my next bike...
  • 2 0
 Shimano will do it right, when they're ready...
  • 3 0
 Well, I was ready for whatever they have coming about 3 years ago...
  • 1 0
 They may skip right over 42 tooth cassettes who knows let's wat and see ... For now I'm golden on 32x36
  • 1 0
 Getting ready to downsize the front crank from a 3x10 to a Xx10. Hoping shimano goes 1x11 for 2015, if not I'll go 2x10 most likely.
  • 50 0
 Pb's New Years resolution - wind up SRAM and shimano, great stuff lol
  • 32 0
 and the best option to avoid the gap from 15 to 19 is to remove both 15 & 17 cogs and fit a 16 one from an old cassette sneaking somewhere in your tool box, still with a 10 speed spacer (a 9 speed cog is working perfectly with a 10 speed system).
  • 10 12
 Or just take off the 11t and normal 12t and then put a 12t end piece on from a 25-12 or similar cassette and have no jumps at all...
  • 16 2
 No, taking off the 11t does not make any sense as it reduces the range, 34x12-42 isnt much different than 32*11-36, except it weighs more. You are better off downsizing your front ring than changing your cassette to 12-42, both have the exact same effect but the smaller front ring solution is cheaper and lighter.
  • 2 0
 An issue with that idea is that the 17 tooth sprocket is riveted to the others.
  • 1 1
 I have a spare 9sp cassette.

So there's no difference between a 10 and a 9sp cog? It' just a matter of spacers? (sorry if the question is silly, I didn't imagine that could work)
  • 1 1
 I was wondering the same as Gamestorming
  • 13 1
 Even better would be to get an SLX 11-36T cassette, split the 15-17-19-21-24T cluster, and replace the 17T and 19T sprockets with an 18T sprocket (Ultegra do one - part no. Y-1ZD 1800E). Then you'd have 11-13-15-18-21-24-28-32-36-42T - perfect!
  • 2 3
 ^Agreed
  • 5 2
 ^^ not agreed. Ultegra/Dura Ace cogs have a different shifting pattern than say an XT cassette. I've tried the 16T Dura Ace cog on a 11-42 XT cassette, and it just wouldn't shift properly. I'm running a 16T cog from a 9spd XT cassette, and it works brilliantly.

Yes taking the 16T from a 9spd cassette (as long as you just take the cog and use 10spd spacers) will work.
  • 1 0
 Thanks @ploutre, if I decide to go with a single big cog solution (be it oneup, or WT, or AbsoluteBlack, or mirfe...) I will try this tweak to improve shifting.
  • 2 0
 ^^ Thanks for that info Ploutre. I'm quite surprised they're different as I would have thought there was an optimum shifting pattern that Shimano would use for both road and MTB. Maybe a better option would be to buy a cheap 11-32T cassette (eg HG62) and take the 18T sprocket from it (you'd have to split the cluster). Seems a bit wasteful though, buying a whole cassette for just one sprocket...
  • 1 0
 I thought they'd be compatible too, and bought 2 dura ace cogs. But after I figured out the shifting was rubbish, I inquired. The Dura ace one is more squared than the XT and the ramps are different.

If you wish to buy one, you may want to see either with your LBS, he might be able to get some, or I believe Rose bikes have some (that's where I bought 2 Shimano XT 16t cogs)
  • 16 0
 shimano were the f/ck are you ? it's 2014 man wake up, we want a cheap 1x10 (11,42) cassette just do one
  • 21 7
 I don't see the big deal. I've been running 1x9 for the last 5 years. Save your money and push harder.
  • 7 6
 I ditched my front derailleur on all my bikes in the late 90's.
  • 18 1
 I've climbed a few hills that were one of the steepest I ever climbed and I struggled on the granny... Then a 60 years old dude passed me on a single speed with what seemed to be a 30 up front and a 19 on the rear. That proved me that not having that 42t cassette is not what's holding me back and the problem is probably sitting on the saddle.
  • 1 0
 ^awesome
  • 2 0
 This is the truth! I wish I could + your comment all the way up to the top. Sadly people are more willing to spend money than get fit.
  • 1 1
 pumping a 16" DH wheel w/ 42x32 @ 40 rpm on 165-170mm crank = 2.8mph. A 36x24 @ 40 rmp = 2.1mph. Its not a double or triple granny gear, but its worth trying and faster than pushing on steep fire/logging roads.
  • 3 2
 I'm surprised you have clearance for your pedals with cranks that long and that small back wheel.
  • 16 2
 One up Shimano, Sram. Happy new year.
  • 10 0
 I don't get all the hating going on here, it's a way to modify your bike to suit your needs, if you don't like it don't buy it. I have one ordered. I decided to go this route because most of my drivetrain was trashed, so it was time to try 1x10. I had a 2x9 setup and "gasp" actually used my granny gear a fair bit. I did the math on it and to get the same granny as my 2x9 offered I would have to use a 28t chainring with this product. I realize that I will run out of gearing fast so my plan is to go with a 30t chainring, and if I can handle more, go to a 32t in the future. Ya, maybe the price is high, but since when do we pay what it actually costs to manufacture bike parts....never. This product is designed to broaden the range of your cassette, not so much give you an ultra granny gear, so even you super human athletes could benefit by increasing your high range.
  • 11 1
 i think its a good idea, how about a 39t option as well though, surely a drop of 6 teeth in one go must feel like a big change in gearing, going from a steady spin to a flat out spin instantly
  • 9 2
 Thats what I thought , and surely it's not gonna be a smooth gear change either ? Sounds like a lot of people are gonna end up with their balls on the top tube to me.
  • 28 1
 Think of the 42t cog like a granny ring. If it's a steep enough hill ahead, get into it early and spin up. Learning when to shift will never go out of style.
  • 3 0
 you are gonna have to either slow down enough at the bottom to make the gear usable or sprint at the hill and coast until you can get power down again surely?
  • 7 1
 Yes, I would think so with a jump that large in gear ratio. Are you currently applying full power while shifting? How's that working for you?
  • 3 2
 No of course I don't pedal full beans when shifting , but a jump that big while climbing is gonna be a pain in the ass surely .
  • 6 0
 36T to 42T is the same jump as 12T to 14T or 18T to 21T, both of which have featured on Shimano and SRAM cassettes for years.
  • 27 0
 ^^^ Ducky is correct, the percent of change is what is important, so as you go from the 32t to the 36t, it's roughly a 14.5 percent increase. The shift from the 36t to the 42t is a bit more than 15 percent, so the shifts feel like a natural progression. This is why the cassettes look like a parabolic arc in profile.
  • 1 0
 But 15t - 19t becomes a large gap of around 25% so that could be where people feel a bigger jump in certain terrain
  • 1 1
 a 39 or 40 is also easier on the rear mech. do you really need 42?
  • 7 0
 Thanks for looking and for all the comments.

Be sure to check out our compatibility and shipping pages before ordering.

www.oneupcomponents.com/pages/compatibility
www.oneupcomponents.com/pages/shipping
  • 2 0
 Clutch derailleus?
  • 2 0
 Derailleurs** and what about them? They work... end of story
  • 2 3
 bholton: "Why 10 speed at all? Most of my shifts are double shifts. So give me a five or six speed with these ratios and I'd be happy..."

I agree with bholton completely. I have a 1x9 and most of the time I'm still double-shifting.

OneUpComponents, your FAQs page specifically states that this is not compatible with 9-speed cassettes. How long do us 1x9 folks have to wait for a 42T option?
  • 1 0
 *** scroll up -- add on to Jwick's question.

-- when you have to dial that B Tension waaay in so the rear D is set way out, l bet you'll get a lot of gear skipping when you're in the high gears (small cogs)... skipping because the chain isn't link'd up with enough teeth because the rear D is push out.

when you add a full squish into the picture, you gotta be careful cause there's a lot of bikes out there where the chain line is stretched when the suspension is compressed. Barry Biker who is aware of this is going to jack up his products the first time the suspension gets maxed out.

those B tensions screws are pretty weak -- they can't handle a lot of stress, having them dial'd waaay in only adds to the flexin' factor.


then there's the trail-side F-up factor -- let's just supposed the chain gets tossed into the spokes -- which can happen with pretty anyone's system. good luck getting that chain un-stuck with a cog that size.

usually, if this happens, it's not going to be a good thing so.. that's just a side note. just seems like it'll be even worse because that cog is so large.

Chain slapping on the tire --
l have seen a bunch of full squish bikes where when you're in the granny gear, the chain rides really close to the tire -- when you're all slamma-jamma, riding really technical stuff, you'll hear the chain rubbing on the tire. with the cog being that large, it'll likely ride even closer to the tire. --- not saying every bike is like this but l sure have seen a few that are.

l had one other thing l thought of when l first posted my note but, it escapes me right now.

l don't write all the well, hope you catch my drift.
In person, l'm much better at pointing things like this out.
  • 6 1
 Germans were the pioneers of 42T big gearings cogs for around 60$.

fstatic0.mtb-news.de/f/wy/xb/wyxbf6cmxwky/large_RitzelT4210fachXT.JPG?0
or
fstatic0.mtb-news.de/f/ml/th/mlth0tq1ai1y/medium_image.jpg?0

Weight is also @80-88grams and shifting is nice, no Problem after a full Enduro Season with one of these cogs.
  • 4 0
 yeah and the first "mirfe" chainrings costs only 35€ and works fine.
  • 1 0
 Who sells it? That'll ship to the UK though?
  • 1 0
 who is the source for the "MIRFE" ?? and do they have other sizes??
  • 1 0
 mirfe is a german guy who invested his free time and used his access to cnc machinery to create a ring that more or less equals the one above. he takes commissions for around 35 euro, i doubt he makes any real profit from that. if anyone is interested in a way of contacting him, pm me, as i am not comfortable with sharing contact info for other people entirely too freely. but be warned: as he does this not as a profit oriented job, commissions are worked on in order of money arriving at his account and he doesnt guarantee any shipment dates or such.
  • 1 0
 It is not about who invented first, it is about who can produce a quality product with competitive pricing and be able to Deliver it in large quantities to the market.
  • 1 0
 The Mirfe guy is RW ? if so I've got 2 of his cogs. They are pretty solid, well made, seem to be rather long lasting, but I still ordered a OneUp to try out.
  • 1 0
 If anyone is interested in the second Cog, just send me a PM. The Guy who produces it is a Mate from me and spends his freetime producing these nice things.
  • 1 0
 This definitely look like a redesign of RW's cog Big Grin
  • 9 1
 How badly does it dig into the freehub body?
  • 4 3
 probably just as bad as a 12t ring does.
  • 5 1
 That was actually the main point I wanted to see addressed.. Frown
  • 10 1
 A 42 tooth cog will exert alot more torque into the cassette body than a 12 tooth ever will, especially if the cog will be used for climbing or technical terrain. This is why the higher end cassettes use an alloy spider to hold all the larger cogs together rather than the smaller ones. So yes, it's a valid question, and I also want to know the answer as well.
  • 3 0
 It looks like it is as wide as it can be where it interfaces with the freehub body, which I guess would reduce how much it digs into the freehub body. Most of the time I've seen cogs dig in have been when they are only as wide as the thinnest part of the cog. But, yes, I too would like to know. Being a Shimano fan this is something I'd be looking for. With 1x10 I can't get up the steep loose climbs I could with 2x10.
  • 3 0
 also it is aluminium so shouldn't be as bad as a steel cog on an aluminium freehub body
  • 3 0
 riding my german "mirfe" 42tooth for over 3 months now, and the single steel chainrings doing much more damage than the thicker 42 aluminium chainring.
  • 2 0
 If there is room just run a shifter cable between it and the cassette body and the cassette/ring, distributing the pressure and creating the illusion of better engagement.
  • 1 0
 It depends which material is harder. Steel free hub bodies will stand up much better than alloy ones with this setup. It will be interesting to see the long term feedback on cog/ free hub wear.
  • 5 0
 The drive spline width is very similar to an XX1 cassette. In testing this has not been an issue.
  • 11 5
 Put a banana seat on that 1x10 with 42 set up so you can get forward enough to keep the front end down on all those steeps you think you're going to climb now.
  • 8 0
 shimano!! just make a 40 tooth cassette!
  • 6 2
 marketing hype -- www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xgx4k83zzc

peeps can chat all the pro's they want, l just dont see the need. l have tinkered with all sorts of gearing combos through the years with single speeders, 1x7's, 1x8's, 1x9's, 2x8's, 2x9's, "mega range", rapid rise, 1x1, fixie road and mtb's, you name it, l tried it..
l think there's more reasons NOT to use that type of product than there are reasons for using it.
  • 3 0
 Care to elaborate on the NOT? I still love the idea of getting a heavier bike up rough climbs with the simplicity of a 1x drivetrain. Whats NOT to love here? Not a dig, just curious to hear from such vast experience.
  • 2 0
 length of the chain

l'm not really a big fan of messing with large gears like that when the peeps at Shimano or SRAM never intended that large of a cog to be used with their system. Shimano had/has the "Mega Range" cassette on a bunch of hybrid bikes. This cassette is one where the last three "low" gears are much large than the first 5 or 6 (not sure if they made a 9spd version). l found they were very sloppy when the rider is down in the smaller cogs, the chain is very loose. Sloppy cause the chain is pretty long so it's able to go into those larger rings then when you're in the smaller cogs the chain is really kinda longer than it needs to be.
  • 1 0
 You certainly have an interesting point about chain length. With all due respect I hope your wrong, as i've already ordered a one up cog to give a spin. I'm hoping a clutch derailleur can handle the extra length and tame the inevitable slop.
  • 1 0
 yeah --- zero doubt, the chain needs to be longer than normal -- when they are super long so they can get into all gears, they're sometimes too long when they're down in the "high" gear cogs. you see this type of problem more often with cyclocross and hybrid gearing where they're set up with odd ball gear sizes. cyclocross often have a BIG big and and a sorta small middle (no granny). chain it fine when it's in the big ring but when it's in the small, it's too floppy when you're in anything other than pure granny gear (biggest rear cog).

just my two cents
  • 12 5
 Why 42? Why not 38? That would be sweet! Or 40 even.
  • 7 2
 Because it would be absolutely ridiculous to spend 100 bucks for 2 more teeth. Make the calculation and you'll see it's almost no difference to a 36t. That would be less than half a gear difference. 40 and 42 make sense. Less then stick to your standard cassette: shifts better and is cheaper
  • 15 0
 Why 10 speed at all? Most of my shifts are double shifts. So give me a five or six speed with these ratios and I'd be happy and the whole drive train would last a lot longer.
  • 1 0
 Because i would have a chainring 32T or 34T rather than a 30T ... I ordered mine in November with the 15% discount ... Hope to receive it after middle January. Really happy to give it a go Wink
  • 4 1
 Meh! I have been using the General Lee 11-40 cassette from Leonardi Factory,beautifully machined from one piece aluminum billet and much lighter then the three top cogs on my XT cassette for about 50.00 more then Oneup. also available 11-42,much cleaner looking too! Been using for several months now and works flawlessly in all the nasty winter riding conditions here on the East Coast.
  • 1 0
 I'm thinking about 1x10, and I believe my freewheel hub would be happier with General Lee. Can't understand why Leonardi reommends Long cage X9 for 42t, while Oneup states Medium cage would work.
  • 4 1
 Longer the cage better the shifting, however worst the chain tensioning. Id say for single ring setup with long cage you'll need a narrow wide chain ting or proper chain guide with lower roller. Medium cage works bad enough for chain retention but short one won't work with a 42t cog
  • 1 0
 I use Med on 11-40,but do agree on long cage for 42t.
  • 1 0
 I think I will test 1x10 with 40t as bigger cog, as I don't want to replace rear derailleur or I'd waste large part of the saving over xx1.

Someone should tell oneup their "compatibility" page is a bit optimistic on medium cage derailleurs.
  • 1 0
 So, I wonder what works/feels/shifts better: using the Oneup cog or the General Lee approach?
  • 3 0
 Very happy to read this today, as I have already ordered a black version few weeks ago.... I also ordered a 16t cog to replace both 15t and 17t. All of this will be matched to an XTR cassette and Medium X0 Type 2 rear derailleur. Up front is matched to a X9 crank with a direct mount 28t narrow wide gear from Works Components. I'm ending up saving close to 500gr with the removal of my chain guide, front derailleur and spider... Can't wait to try this set up.....
  • 4 0
 Am I the only one who thinks its funny that guys are stoked to have a 28 on the front? When i started mtb the granny gear was a 26, lol.
  • 7 0
 Bring some 40 teeth for us 9speed cassette dinosaurs!!!
  • 3 0
 Personally I think the canfield brothers 9-36 ten speed is the best idea, it has a 300% ratio change while xx1/xo1 is only 320% and you can run a smaller chairing and keep your top speed.This only about 265% but the price is good.
  • 1 0
 oops, 280% not 265%
  • 1 0
 I may be missing something but the point of the Oneup cog seems to be that you can run your current hub rather than a specific hub to accommodate a cog smaller than 11T. The Canefield solution is much more costly once you factor in new hub and new cassette.
  • 1 0
 I know that but just saying its the best system and I hope is the future. So I was just trying to put the word out because don't think most people are familiar with it but I could be wrong. The hub/cassette package is on sale for $300 right now which seems like much more for your money, that said I think this is good idea but i'm not to sure about that 15-19t jump
  • 2 0
 I think the Canfield setup looks great. I was just about to go for it but I had already bought a new Shimano cassette and Canfield hub requires Sram. I'm also wondering if you could use this Oneup with the Canfield hub for an awesome 9-42 range. That with a NW 30 tooth up front would be perfect for me
  • 1 0
 That's a really good idea but I think you would need to remove the 16t conversion cog leaving you with a jump from 13t to 19t. Correct me if i'm wrong
  • 3 0
 Interesting idea!

As front chainring sizes (below 30t) are limited, perhaps I could get away throwing away my horrible x9 crank (with 28t ring) with BB drive side plastic cone sliding outwards to the right and creating play in the crank -- buying a reasonable (not NEXT) 30t Race Face SS crank with better BB- and all that because I could switch to 42t in the back. Don't worry if it does not make sense, you have to be someone like me riding through this not so pleasant experience of lateral play in the crank....

However, I need to know how likely is this new ring to score the free hub body. And that is a crucial question for expensive hub owners. It would be nice to see this kind of review- heavy dude pedalling uphill on North Shore for 6 months and then showing us pictures of damage is any. Then I will splurge 100 bucks...maybe.

Honestly, I hope Shimano comes up with reasonably priced SS cranks in the range of 22-36 or so interchangeable rings.
  • 3 0
 Mine is in the mail. Can't wait!

I love how everyone is saying you must not be fit if you need this.. Meanwhile SRAM is selling 1x11 by the boatload.. Also do you not think it kind of matters where you live? As in some areas are more hilly than others?
  • 3 0
 To everyone talking about "just get fitter" - I've been running a 1x9 with a 32 up front recently. Most places the 34 on the back is cool but if you're out for the day on fells with sustained steep climbs over soft ground and, like me, loath front mechs and also loath the thought of giving SRAM between £700 and £1100 this thing is a top idea. Well done yous.
  • 3 0
 As an employee of a small bike shop I would like to point out that this company is direct only and will not be selling to LBS's. Wolf tooth components will be producing a similar product which will be both made in the USA and available from your local bike shop. Cheers!
  • 8 2
 100$ for 71 grams of aluminium - best deal ever
  • 3 0
 Lol at the people coming out of the woodwork to question the utility of this gadget. 11-36 with 32 front works fine for me but sram 11 speed shows there is a market for wide range cassettes.
  • 4 0
 Well, some people actually earn their descents. And afterwards they really feel like going faster than 40 km/h
  • 3 1
 I done some maths on a calculator, and if the maths are right, this is what came up. If you had to set your bike up with a single chain ring in front with a 36t and a 42t in the back (removing the 17t), you would have the same gear ratio as if you had a single chain ring in front with a 30t and a 36t in the back.

Correct me if I'm wrong but I'm 99% sure it's the right maths I done.
  • 1 0
 Only on the granny end (without doing any math, just assuming you are correct). Think about the faster end, same 11 tooth cog, 36 vs 30 ring. I'm thinking you'd spin out the 30-11 very frequently. Depending on your local terrain of course.
  • 1 0
 Sorry dude - you're wrong...

36 : 42 is a ratio of 0.857 : 1
30 : 36 is a ratio of 0.833 : 1
31 : 36 is pretty close to 36 : 42 at 0.861 : 1 (but I don't know of anyone who makes a 31T chainring).
  • 1 0
 Aagro yes your right in fact I was referring only as the same ratio as on the granny, (lowes gear vs lowes gear) I just forgot to state that, thank you for pointing it. And Rubber-Ducky your right to 31t would be the closest but since no one will make you a 31t I thought id make no sense saying that a 31t is the perfect ratio (on granny mode) Smile but thank you for pointing that too
  • 2 0
 I noticed that many people are saying that you will never use the so, low gear, but have you even thought that the reason in the first place to use this 42t ring is to go for a front single speed, and if you had a 36t single ring in front with the 42t in the rear it's the exact as when you are in your granny 22t in front and 26t in rear so it's no more easy to pedal then that gear ratio you already have, it would not make sense to do the 42t in the back if you are going to keep your 2x speed in front, but then again it would be stupid to read this review if you don't want to change to a single chain in front, because that's what the review is all about !
  • 2 0
 @ One up components: I have one major concern, and perhaps its been addressed somewhere in the general comments: typically the largest cogs are held together with pins and mounted to a larger shim on the freehub body to do 2 things: stabilize the cog from bending under non-linear loads (like when you're cross-chaining on a 2X or running a 1X setup), and to keep the full torque and long lever arm afforded by the larger diameter cog from gnashing into the freehub body. The smaller cogs don't afford as much torque, so it makes sense to keep those separate. With this new cog, I wonder how many freehub bodies will be destroyed? The only solution to this is to instead make the cog a little wider, and then get rid of the 11T cog, which is already wider... compensate with a larger ring up front. Anyone have any thoughts on this? I would love to buy this, but am worried it will gouge my cassette freebody as already happens enough with the smaller cogs on my dt swiss and i9 hubs.
  • 4 0
 Thanks for the questions.

Regarding stabilization of the sprocket. The standoffs that are located around the ring make contact with the backside of the 36T ring. In doing so, the 42T ring can not flex outward when cross-chaining.

We have not had any issues with gouging freehubs. This is a more complex issue than just pedalling torque. The reason that people (myself included) see damage to their freehub in the 13,15,17 positions is not due to straight pedalling torque. These are the gears you're in when you get on the gas out of a corner or hammer up a short pitch. It is the shock load created when the freehub engages combined with thin steel cogs that causes this damage. In our experience, this shock loading is significantly lower when you're spinning your lower gears. If you look at an XX1 cassette the spline through which all 11 gears are loaded (including the ones that generate these shocks) is only ~4mm wide.

I hope that helps.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the response. Just wanted to make sure this was thought about up front. I have found the one-piece XX1/Sram RED cassettes to be well thought out in that they engage on two points, adding some good stability to the overall. Indeed, a higher-pawl cassette goes a long way towards decreasing that start-up shock. Best of luck - and if you ever are interested in doing any engineering testing/design or field testing, there are a number of world-class climbers/engineers in our locale that put some 30+ hrs a week on bikes on top of their day job. Would love to be able to take one of those cogs out to compete at Snake Creek Gap this winter. Just finished the 1st of 3 icy cold races across some of the rockiest trails east of the Mississippi. Could have used a smaller cog to spin through the rocks!
  • 2 0
 As soon as I stopped using my 22t granny I was able to make all those tech climbs I had struggled with for lack of torque...

The only reason I would want something bigger than 36t in the back was so I could run something bigger than 38t in the front..

Im now running a 34t front 11-36 cassette and dont really know why people would want less top end than that? I actually preferred a 36t up front..it forced me to hammer the whole time..No problems doing rides with over 5,000' of vertical of climbing..

I also dont understand the hate for the front mech..mine NEVER gave me trouble riding trails better suited for a dh bike than a trail bike...if you want that type of gearing just keep a 2x10
  • 1 0
 But then your bike wouldn't have the cool 1x DH look. Yeah, a front derailleur is probably the most reliable part on a bike
  • 2 0
 Everyone I ride with around here (Northeast) that went single-ring this year rode less and pushed more which equals less fun...so they all went back to a double in the front. Unless I decide to ride/race purely XC; the technical steeps here demand a granny and the fireroads and doubletrack demand at least a 36T up front. It is all about fun, after all.
  • 4 0
 Absolute Black has something like this but lighter and with better machining.
  • 2 0
 But 40t "only", like general lee so not sobad of a range but i'll be happy with 42t, leaving me a bigger chainring upfront. Each find it's best. Oh weight difference is marginal.
  • 3 0
 What would be the best size front ring to match up with this? I'm thinking 32 or 34 for general trail use and steep climbs...!? This setup looks genius!
  • 1 0
 You could go bigger than that. I run an 11-36t cassette with a 32t front ring, and that's on a 29er so the gear inches are higher.
  • 1 0
 Hmm my largest ring at the rear is 32t, my middle front ring is 32 also, I frequently use my granny ring for the steep loose climbs around my area. I guess I'll have to count some teeth and do the maths to see what I can get away with..
  • 3 0
 Expensive and made from aluminium. It would see a lot of use on my bike and would not last nearly as long as a steel ring. How about a nicely machined stainless ring guys?
  • 1 0
 How often do you honestly stay in your granny for? I bet it still lasts longer than a chainring.
  • 1 0
 I stay in the 36 for the majority of some of my climbs.
  • 7 2
 Looks like my shimano MegaRange when i was 10
f*ck*** ugly!!!
  • 2 1
 Hate the color. Nothing a little White Lightning degreaser wont fix!
  • 8 0
 or just get the black one.
  • 2 0
 That works as well
  • 2 0
 So happy to see this. Best buy one before the lawyers find a way to shut it down. I hope they can't, but you never know these days. Patents tend to stifle innovations like these.
  • 2 1
 I am more interested in mirfe ritzel thing.
this one up is kinda over price for 100 dollar.
yes it would save alot compares to xx1, but you can buy another XT cassette for such amount.
anyone know how to contact or buy mirfe ritzel??
Pleas pm me if you have the info. Tx.
  • 3 0
 Actually Sram and Shimano are probably really happy about this 42t cog. As the derailleurs start exploding, their sales will go up!
  • 1 0
 I know Shimano expressed concerns with free hubs not be able to withstand the forces of a 42 tooth cog. Both the XX1 and X01 systems use a one piece cassette to distribute the forces throughout the entire free hub body. I like the idea here but am personally going to wait for long term tests to make sure this product does not become known for causing hub issues or premature wear.

On another note I choose a system like this one over the Sram systems because I don't like Sram drive trains. Every time I rent a bike with a sram drive train I leave the trail frustrated from shifting problems. That includes the XX1 drive train. So for some of us it is not about the cost of an XX1 drive train but simply preference of Shimano.

On a third note, when will Shimano get on board with 1X drive trains?
  • 5 0
 This is only a concern if you plan to keep your 22 or 24T granny (Which we do not recommend). Anything bigger than a 26T ring on the front will put less torque into the freehub than a typical granny ring.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the info. I run a 30t or 32t single ring so should not be a problem. Do you have any plans to make a full 11-42 10 speed cassette?
  • 1 0
 If you are a light rider it is ok to keep the granny. Under 170 lbs.
  • 1 0
 I totally get and understand the need for this ring. For a few of my riding buddies, it's the need because their bikes came with a 32t 10 sp. This mod makes perfect sense. Stick it to them PB. But me? I'm not sure yet. I'm still running a 34/22 with 11/34, rarely use the 22. For me to switch over to single ring 11/?? is going to cost big bucks. So just to throw out my front derailleur which doesn't cause issues (rear more than front) to be part of the "single ring" crowd, it just isn't fiscally smart (SRAM, Shimano, are you listening????).
  • 1 0
 It would be hard to give up the Saint clutcher, running my 28t x 11-36. But I think short cage would work with a 40. I've trying stretching it out past the 36 and there is plenty of room, with maybe a longer B screw. Build a 40 and I'm in.
  • 1 0
 I'm fat, really unfit and running a 1x9 setup with 12-36 rear and a 38 tooth front on my 29er. I have problems with my front wheel lifting and wandering on steep climbs long before I run out of gears. Just like everything else in life, it seems you can save your money and put in the effort to get where you want, or you can spend the money to get to the same point in a much easier fashion. To each their own i guess...
  • 1 0
 I was 16 stone of unfit 38 year old man, 34 tooth front with a 11-36 rear and could climb anything on that why do you need more? yes a little hard to start with but give yourself 4 weeks and your legs will build, it's meant to be tough ffs grow a set and sweat a little,
  • 1 0
 Looks good to me for SoCal - San Bernadino mountains. A typical ride for me is 7 miles, 3000ft gain (Monroe Truck trail). Nothing super steep (avg 8%) but I'm in 26/36 enough of the time and my friends hoof sections. A steeper, shorter ride (Palmer-Potato) is a couple miles with an average grade ~15%. I'm oldish and ride for fun.
  • 1 0
 I have used one of these with a 36t front chainring. It worked great until I put the power down in the smallest gear and the chain kept slipping due to the fact that there is not enough chain wrap because the b screw has to be wound all the way out. I tried it with a new chain and cassette and it still slipped. Once I wound the b screw back in it was fine but I couldn't get into the big cog. I do have quite strong legs so this may not be a problem for everyone but it isn't a solution for me. On another note I pulled a 16t cog off another cassette and replaced the 17t on the cassette to make the jump less dramatic.
  • 1 0
 If only I had these 42t when I first started mt. Biking 13years ago cause I was 20lbs overweight and rode a steel frame monster! The more I rode, the stronger I got, I've no use for it now. Good thing though, cause I would have stayed unfit and fat. Why have a bike that's $3-7K with gears as big as dinner plates that you could walk faster than riding it?
  • 1 0
 I note the only photo of the Oneup cog running the chain is on the RC/Pinkbike article, Oneup show a nice green sprocket with the chain at the other end of the cassette. My concern would be rear mech performance/combatibilty (I'm not totally convinced by RC's statement). Incidently, if it was a simple one cog replacement, wouldn't Sram have addressed that? That said, I'll probably give it a go, any new technology carries an element of risk. 100 bucks/£60 seems okay for what it promises.
  • 1 0
 Going though and reading the garbage that some of you write is just hilarious!!!!

For those who are complaining about the cost of xx1 or x01~ Here's a tip! Go get a job and all your complaints will end! Money cannot be taken with you, so spend it and have all the fun you can while you can!

For those complaining about the alternative cost of $100 dollars? My suggestion is for you to get out of MTB all together! Maybe step onto a beach cruiser with a 6 pack rack and show your strengths on the seat of one of those...
  • 1 0
 I did it today on my new Marin mount vision xm8 , but I had to take 13tooth out instead of 17 and I have to take off about half of a millimeter on the 11 tooth ring by sand paper as it leaving not enough gap that cause chain just rubbing on chain stray. Also adjusted limit screw as shown in this page, now it's so sweet, I have 1x10 with 42 at the back paid $121 NZD. Did it all by my self and I am a chef/restauranter.
  • 1 0
 What's with all this anger? I wish that I didn't have to work 12 hours a day and lived closer to any real off road riding spots than I do then I'd have the time and opportunity to get fitter as I believe the best way of improving fitness for riding is riding itself. In the meantime, I have ordered a 40t one up ring. It's my personal choice to help me get more out of my ride.
If this product doesn't suit your riding style or is unnecessary because of your superior fitness and strength, then good for you. It's not necessary to tell others what they should be doing.
Not all riders from the UK are so arrogant.
  • 1 0
 Is this thread still open? I'm wondering if I can convert my sram 2x10 32t/48t front and 28t/11t rear. Would my rear derailleur take this new size? I'm no bike mechanic... FYI. Next spring I am cycling New Zealand from North to south on trails with gear so I need the biggest granny I can get. Appreciate any help or advice.
  • 7 6
 Whats the big deal about a 42 cog? How often would you use that cog anyways? You will probably get up the climb quicker hiking the bike, instead of sitting in the sadle spinning away to seemingly nowhere.
  • 13 0
 Thats not the point. Why would i want to walk a bike when i can ride it. Having this low of a gear is really useful when riding up technical ascents where spinning those pedals is key.
  • 5 2
 If you are running a 42t rear you'd better be running something bigger in the front. This super low gearing is silly.
  • 10 0
 you realize that a 22/34 or 24/36 with 36er cassette has an easier gear than a 32 to 42er? and those arent called "silly" even though some people are not too fond of them.
  • 3 5
 They're silly.
  • 3 2
 I haven't used a granny ring in many years. I don't like to spin. I'd rather stand and mash it out. But that's just me.
  • 2 1
 @DrSanchez me too, which is why I ride rigid SS mostly
  • 3 0
 ok. you like it better that way - good for you. if you dont need any easy gears because you are so well trained - even better for you. i am not, and i guess, as the interest in these things suggests, many other arent either. so we'll have to agree to disagree or whatever Wink

@thomdawson: well, could have known that someone would be tempted to do what you did. so, your comment es silly in itself.
  • 2 3
 I'm not well "trained". Its just my preference.
  • 4 0
 i ride a single speed with a 500 tooth chainring and a four tooth cog out the back and i like to spin.
  • 1 1
 hahahaha!
  • 1 0
 Sorry dude, couldn't resist. Not a personal dig! I am baffled why anyone would use anything but a 1x10 though. I admit that some peoples terrain may necessitate taking bigger bikes up bigger hills but I've ridden all over the UKs trail centres last summer on a 1x10 and never run out of gears. Up or down.
  • 2 0
 @drsanchez lol sry, my english is not perfect. "in shape" or something along those lines was what i was going for. and i think preference is only possible to develop if you got a real choice. as in, if you are not strong enough to do steep climbs with normal 1x10 you dont have this choice hence no "preference", just need for bigger ring Wink

@thomdawson Big Grin you are completely right, though, if you are fine with normal 1x10, why should one consider more teeth? i dont know your terrain in UK, but sometimes in the alps you might just need those extra teeth for a long, steep climb. doesnt even have to be technical. still there are always people who go do these climbs with a normal 1x10, rocking a 34 chainring out front, just to depress me. if you are one of those, lucky you, i hate you :-P
  • 1 1
 hate is a strong powerful word jts-nemo...
  • 2 3
 Anybody running derailleurs is a complete Pussy who should not be on a bicycle.

Is it supposed to boost my ego if I say stupid tough guy things like that? Didn't work for me.
  • 1 0
 Thomdawson,trail centres are ok,but try 1x10(11/36) in the dales or the Peak District for 30 milers,very tough
  • 1 1
 I live in the peak dude. I'm glad to hear you say that, I often find our local rides far more demanding than trail centres. I still think that 1x10 is plenty, the ability to climb comes down to more than just gearing. I'm not a super fit Xc racer, I'm a weekend warrior. My bikes not an Xc bike, it's a steel hardtail with 150mm forks that is set up well for me personally - The way everyone's bike should be.
  • 1 0
 Fair comment mate,used to ride 1x10,but either I'm getting old or-unfit,probably a bit of both to be honest.just stick to 2 x10 now,no biggie.
  • 2 0
 Wanted to go 1x10 but not giving up my existing drivetrain(as well as moving to SRAM) this seems like the solution - now to look for a chain guide and new ring.
  • 1 1
 I'm sorry but i just dont find this useful whatsoever, youre risking breaking your 200 dollar deraileur, the extra cog is just so high geared that youre never gonna use it and most of all it cost 100 bucks, Overall i think that if shimano or sram had thought it was a good idea they would have implemented it. Their products go through tons of tests to get the best ratio but this company apparently think that they are out to get you
  • 1 0
 The extra 42t is good if you want to go for a single front speed, and that's were endure is going, if it was not like that sram would not made there 1x11 system (XX1) in the first place, this guys are offering you the same exact think only with a missing 17t ring and you are saving 1100 euros compared to a full XX1 from sram, the only thing I agree with you is that it is expansive at $100 but since neither sram or shimano seem to want to offer a reasonable cassette (10 speed 11,42) well I think it's worthy a try, after all this are doing the work that SRAM and SHIMANO should have done in the first place, if they really wanted to help people, but the only think they want to do is make their pockets fat
  • 1 0
 Want one. will get one. Hundred bucks verses thousands for Sram set up. One ring up front with a mega climbing gear !!!!! With the correct spacers you can mount this on an old 8 speed cog set.
  • 2 0
 Re: comments about where Shimano are while all this is going on.

*maybe this belongs here, just saying

www.campyonly.com/shorts/14speed.html
  • 1 0
 Would of been cheaper to make an adaptor to take a std off the shelf shimano 42t chainring, they could of been punched or laser cut then, not as blingy but at £15 a go it'a lot cheaper !!!
  • 1 1
 I have XX1 and Shimano 2x10 XT/XTR. I honestly think the drivetrain debate is hype. If you want the lightest go 1x Whatever and get your leg strength up. XX1 is indeed the lightest group-set on the market and I REALLY like that for my trailbike. Taboot, it has a better up shift feel by far compared to Shimano, however one way lever engagement and single downshift are the bumps they need to conquer to completely beat Shimano.
  • 2 2
 what the hell everytime i make a real comment its taken down, what the f*ck ?????????
why bother having this stupoid comment section when you leave bullshit on here and them erase real comments????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????.
no point even bother to read any comments any more if i have f*ck hitler that takes off real comments and leaves other bullshit up, go a head ban me
  • 1 1
 The way the part is made will not work on some hubs. Make sure your hub will fit properly. The cassette adaptor needs something to back up against. And this cassette dose not sit against the high parts of the free body only the low parts. So if u have a king hub or a hope it will not work. Google some images and then look closely to what will stop the cassette from going on to far and hitting the spokes or hub body. It's a good idea. Just needs some refinments. And will work on mavic hubs, easton. And lots of other hubs that have a flat serface to sit up against.
  • 1 0
 I´m not sure I got this right... do you know whether it will fit a CB Iodine hub?
  • 1 0
 wow loads of hate for this on here. I think its a great idea. You get more range out of a 10 spd dirvetrain so dont need to run more then one front ring. Ordered. Will probably pair it with a 36t Narrow/wide on the front.
  • 1 0
 @ One up components: I´m concerned about a comment saying it won´t fit some hubs. Do you know if it will fit Crankbrothers Iodine hubs? I´m looking forward to ordering from you, I just have to make sure it will fit.
  • 4 0
 Me gusta...
  • 3 0
 How long before other companies start making these?
  • 1 0
 Absolute Black does a 40 tooth, will that work with a short cage RD? And has anyone tried to use a short cage RD with this chainring? Just curious.
  • 1 0
 In theory it should. I think X9 short cages have a capacity of 30T, so it should be able to take up the slack in an 11-40. Although things in theory don't always work in practice.
  • 2 0
 True that! An X9T2SC is what l have and what l will try.:-)
  • 7 6
 O.k so when in the last few years of mtb did the hills get steeper ?? seriously bigger cogs on the rear ? Put some bloody leg muscle into it, damm
  • 6 2
 They didn't, dudes were just crawling around in the 22x34 or 22x36 while running 22/32 doubles up front. Now those same dudes want cool looking single ring drivetrains like their fitter friends run. Enter a $100 cog. They're happy, Oneup's happy, everybody wins.
  • 11 2
 you guys live in flat places
  • 1 0
 first xtr that came out that i had when i was 14 (1992)was 26-36-46 and a 11-28 8 speed cog,
  • 1 0
 xx1 or x01 are the perfect transmission u can have in a mtb but it's too expensive but if SRAM build x7 or x9 like xx1 or x01 it's perfect!
  • 3 2
 All the british hate in here is purely misdirected anger at losing the ashes to Australia and probably going 5-0, so now one-up is copping the blame.
  • 1 0
 can someone help me out .. i have a 1x10 setup wth a 11-25 on the rear and a zee short cage mech, am i right in thinking my mech is too short for this?
  • 1 0
 Don't think it will work mate.
Shimano do 2 Zee short cage rear mechs...one for 23-28T close ratio (DH) cassettes (which is probably the one you have), and one for 32-36T wide ratio cassettes.

I have the 32-36T and would also be interested whether it works...as changing the rear mech too suddenly makes it even more expensive!!

OneUpComponents can you tell us...??
  • 2 0
 Based on the specs of the Zee derailleur it shouldnt work. Both the DH and FR versions if the Zee have a capacity of 25t. Meaning 11-36 is the max you could go otherwise the cage won't take up the chain slack in the smaller cogs.
  • 1 0
 Just read below...they don't recommend Saint or Zee short cage mechs, due to chain growth on full suss bikes.
I'm out! Frown
  • 1 0
 I was tempted by this (i currently have 32t front and 11-36t rear) but I love my Zee clutch derailuer but as its short cage it looks like it aint gonna work, although as others have mentioned...my ability to ride uphill is more to down to my fitness than gear ratios Smile
  • 1 0
 I also use zee with 11-36, and got an answer form oneupcomponents that it would not work, BUT than i saw this thread here:
singletrackworld.com/forum/topic/xt-11-42-cassette-for-free

This guy made a custom 11-42 cassette and says that he runs it successfully with an ZEE FR rear derailleur!!!
How would you explain it, other than that it is possible?!
  • 1 0
 It may be physically possible for example if you have a slack chain, it will stretch around the 42 gear...and be fully stretched tight but then when you are in 11 gear it would prob still work but there would be a lot of slack it in and it would be flapping about..no doubt the chain would stay on if you have clutch mech, narrow/wide ring and chain guide but the chain may be noisy and/or hit your frame and cause damage.
  • 1 2
 OR, you could just go to this guy:

www.ebay.com/sch/mtbtools/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from

And get something similar for less than half the price. Granted, this option will be heavier than the aluminum offering, here.
  • 1 1
 What if the smallest 11T was remove instead of 17T.. It would provide a smooth transition between all the gears till the 42T is reached. MTBR did a review too and someone did mentioned that would be an option too.
  • 1 0
 my 10sp shimano chain completely died after 3 weeks, what am I doin' wrong? never had any issues with 9sp, chains and cassettes lasted for years
  • 1 0
 My mongoose special from Costco had this gearing, it was called mega-range. I didn't know I was ahead of my time when I was 13.
  • 1 0
 I also use a CNC machined 42 tooth Cog since June 13 or about 500 km. After a few try's i use 36 tooth in front with a hope chainguide. It works great!
  • 3 0
 The raging intolerance of some of the posters on this thread is amazing.
  • 2 0
 am i the only one who thinks it would be so rad to have a brakedisc in this design Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
  • 3 1
 Does it shift better than the general Lee ?
  • 3 1
 Can it shif worse than General Lee? Only had issues with that one, including cassette lockring getting loose all the time. So i've been hesitating paying again for an adaptor but the price of sram xo1 shifter and derailleur are very hard to justify so i made the jump and just ordered this one up thing. Looking forward to receiving it!
  • 4 2
 it has shifting ramps so it should shift better, I think the general lee lacks that...
  • 5 0
 the general lee has been updated now,
www.actionsports.de/de/Komponenten/Cassetten/10-fach/Leonardi-Factory-General-Lee-29-42-Z-10-fach-Shimano-Kassetten-Adapter::59666.html
should be much improved. i will be trying one on the weekend.
  • 4 0
 You won't be sorry,and a weight saver too!I went with 11-40 and fits my needs nicely,no complaints!
  • 2 0
 Has shift ramps and have no shifting or loose lock ring issues after several months of almost daily use?
  • 1 0
 I dorms have any shifting issues with my general lee
  • 3 0
 my next buy...
  • 5 4
 42 ?!?! Whatever happened to unsprung weight ?!?! might as well integrate the rim with a sprocket.....eventually haha
  • 5 4
 hahaha replace your whole carbon 29er wheel when your cassette is worn!
  • 2 0
 Great simple idea, well done - me want
  • 2 0
 i don't think this will work with eiher the saint or zee wide range mecks
  • 2 0
 no, cage wouldn't be long enough to take up slack chain
  • 1 0
 actualy that is not quite true. i have a zee (obviously FR version) going nicely on a 42-mirfe-ring (see above for detail on german homebrew-version of this for 35 euro).
  • 1 0
 I couldn't see it working, especially on a full susser with some chain growth at full travel
  • 1 0
 well it is nice for you to know it's not working when never having tried. mine is Wink Spec SX Trail in M. it IS pretty stretched in the easiest gear, you are right. but it works just fine.
  • 4 0
 We don't recommend the Zee or Saint RD. It may work on some low chain growth or HT frame designs but will get you into trouble on other setups.
  • 1 0
 i guess shimano or sram dont "recommend" using the ring at all Wink it is true, though, that large chain growth is going to be a problem with short cages. on the other hand, i never use the easiest gear on stuff, where the suspension is 100% active. might just be me though.
  • 1 0
 jts - but how does the Zee handle all the slack when you are in the hardest gears? That is where I would think the potential problems would occur. I thought the Zee's only had a capacity of 25T, meaning that 11-36 would be the max range it could handle and still take up all the chain clack in the smaller gears.
  • 1 0
 I am using a short cage 10 gear SLX shadow plus , with a 9 gear sram trigger together with a 9 speed cassette including the 42 chainring on my enduro lapierre spicy 2009. Nobody ever thought this could work but it did. If you are willing to try and error and perhaps modify the rear mech its possible. Most of the cases you only need a longer c-screw
  • 1 0
 @sino idk, it handles it ok i guess. there a two versions of zee, mind. a DH for small cassettes and FR for up to 36 teeth. i have a Fr and it does the job. dont have a NW chainring though, so still in need of a upper chainguide of sorts.
  • 1 0
 I could be wrong but I thought both of the Zee versions still had a 25T capacity. Is there alot of slack in the chain when you have it in the smallest cogs?
  • 2 0
 I can't imagine either version has a different capacity as that is dictated by cage length and they are both short cage.
  • 2 0
 well take a look here: www.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/news_and_info/news/introducing_zee.html first paragraph. it has a little bit of slack on smallest cog but it still works for me.
  • 1 0
 Well if you have the slack on the small cogs that would make sense, and is what I thought would be the case. But hey, if it works for you and the extra slack isn't an issue, then thats great.
  • 2 0
 Ordered. BOOM. Now wait until February booo
  • 5 7
 Everyone rides different I guess and I like mods like this so I'm all for it. I ride with a 34 up front on a 11-36 and barely ever use the 36 or 32 and hardly ever out the saddle when climbing so it does make me wonder whether these super low gears are really necessary. I suppose it would allow you to winch a DH-end machine up but in such a low gear you lose all momentum and tech stuff just stops me dead. Maybe my bike isn't heavy enough to necessitate the low lows...
  • 8 1
 Maybe you don't have the long and steep climbs that others do. In my group everyone has and uses a granny every ride because we ride in the mountains. On easier more rolling terrain I can do without the granny but that is not the norm here.
  • 4 6
 Nope. I regularly ride on steeps and on long ascents. I wouldn't have made the comment otherwise, it wouldn't have been valid.
  • 3 2
 England doesn't look like The Shire!
  • 2 0
 You clearly haven't been to British Columbia or the northwest.
  • 3 0
 I think it all depends on the terrain. I use an 11-36 with a 32 up front and never have a problem. I barely use the larger 2 gears. But the mountains where I live just aren't that big. I do think that many riders could get by without the easier gears if they just got out of the mindset that they are there to bail them out. But there is no doubt it many areas it's needed, even by strong riders.
  • 1 0
 CJP - not sure why that's relevant at all? My terrain is bigger than yours? Or something?
Sino - I agree with you, I think people should look at other ways to improve climbing technique rather than just sticking these crazy low gears on. That said if it makes your ride more fun then why not. Would be good on a 29er maybe?
  • 4 0
 its not relevant. Cuz you'd crush big mtn climbs anywhere without even using your 32 or 36 and totally in the saddle on your amazingly light bike.
  • 4 0
 OR you could increase your front ring size and have a faster fast gear and the same low gears. More range is better for more people IMO
  • 7 2
 Listen people I'm sorry if I hurt your feelings by implying you're a pussy if you use super low gears, it's not what I meant at all. My mates all ride granny on climbs and they are pussies but everyone on pb is super hardcore, particularly those from canadimerica. My point is, as cool as this ring is, should we really be striving for lower gears? At 3mph are you even really riding?
  • 1 2
 Nato - good point. But increasing front ring size is detrimental to a 1x10 setup IMO. Still think you're right that more range is better for more people though.
  • 4 9
flag nato (Jan 1, 2014 at 10:55) (Below Threshold)
 Ever heard of tech trail riding / trials riding? Riding pretty much stopped but not putting your feet down and still making a section of trail is a pretty rad feeling even you are using "pussy gears"
Fighting on the inter webs is like winning the special olympics, even if you win your still phucking wee tard ed
  • 2 0
 How would it be detrimental? Just wondering. Lack of ground clearance?
  • 2 1
 I didn't realise it was a fight? I guess I'm super retarded.
My trials bike doesn't have gearing this low.
  • 1 0
 Yeah one of the main reason I like a 1x10 is the clearance and weight saving so a large ring goes against that a little. That's just me though, I do like the idea of more range and still having a 1x10. I'm just not sure it needs to be all on the lower end..?
  • 2 0
 LOL no fight, sarcasm button broken. cheers!
  • 3 1
 I think working on fitness and technique is more important than trying to compensate by adding a larger gear. I rode a fully rigid 29er with a 1x10 (32t up front 11-36t back) for several months on some very steep technical terrain. It was damn painful and hard as shit the first few weeks. But after the second month and a few hundred miles I was killing ever climb and even taking on stuff I could never do on my old more traditional bikes. Sometimes not being a bitch is hard but it always pays off. Granted, not everyone bikes for the same reasons. I bike for the challenge, others might bike just for the scenery.
  • 3 1
 GB has like no mountains. I see why the OP needs no granny Wink
  • 2 1
 Looks great, i would prefer it to be made out of steel. That way it would be CHEAP and durable.
  • 3 3
 Awesome way too add a big hunk of rotating weight…It would also tare apart you free hub body.
  • 9 0
 Aluminum is a much better choice because it can be made stiffer (thicker) without a significant weight penalty - so it won't fold over or flex like early Shimano XTR cogs did when they upped to the 36t (the aluminum carrier solved this). Also, where the 42 engages the spline, Oneup made the cog the full width of the sprocket and its spacer, so it won't gouge into the freehub spline like a thin steel cog would.
  • 5 4
 Only available in green and black? Are they trying to make it look like a dork disc on purpose?
  • 1 0
 nice looking product , downside is i would have too buy a new rear cog-set and derailleur so not a $100 upgrade for me .
  • 3 0
 40t would be nice too
  • 1 0
 for AM I think Hammerschmidt X 9 (13-42) ... that would be great in my area
  • 1 0
 shieettt im still running a 1x9 with a 34 rear..wow how the times have changed.
  • 1 0
 Looks pretty sweet to me. I'll be riding one this spring. Ordering it tomorrow.
  • 1 0
 I'm a Freerider and i got a full Saint 2014 transmision... Is that sproket compatible? PS; Srry for my bad english.
  • 1 1
 This cassette adaptor does not fit all hubs. It won't work on a king or hope. And some others. So just be careful. Look into it first.
  • 1 0
 anyone know if this would fit on a 9 speed cassette without removing any smaller cogs so it would make a 10 speed?
  • 2 0
 Looks sick too!
  • 1 0
 Genius, amazed its taken so long for someone to come up with this
  • 3 2
 I still want to see a 40t option in blue.
  • 1 0
 Can somebody explain why this single ring is worth $100??
  • 5 7
 because unfit jokers with loads of money will pay for it!
  • 15 1
 So all the pro enduro riders running X01 or XX1 w/ a 42 cog are unfit?

It is $100 because it is way less than the 11spd alternative, and at the moment there is little or no competition. While the machined hunk of aluminum itself is a small fraction of that, there is the R&D, set-up and marketing that has to be covered. And they probably are a bit unsure of how many units they will move.

As soon as you move out of your parents basement and enter the real world, this will all make sense...
  • 1 0
 R&D costs are so minimal for such a basic and simple component. Its basically exploitation. I'm sure many wouldn't buy this ring simply out of spite.
  • 3 1
 That's a pretty liberal use of the word "exploitation"…

We're all bunch of bike nerds who own 1 or more mountain bikes that cost…maybe on average $2500? Plus all the gear.
Let's be real.
  • 1 0
 Well if this ring costs $100, the Race Face carbon crankset that I just ordered at $500 seems like an absolute bargain!
  • 1 0
 The pro's has it on their bikes to satistify their sponsors and for MARKETING PURPOSES! They'll be too slow to climb using this gear!
  • 1 1
 They should make a 40t. Decrease the jump between 36&42.
I think Absolute Black is doing a 40
  • 1 0
 even 42-34 works fine.

There is a CZ company offering 40t chainrings called Colonel Werk 10speed
www.werk.cz/html/e-shop
  • 1 0
 Sorry I can't read that
  • 1 0
 me neither Smile
send them an email, or left side: kazerty -> kazety MTB to have a look
  • 1 0
 100 usd for a Cog in a fugly green colour??? GEEEEEZZZZ
  • 2 5
 i ride my 50lb dh bike to and from the mountain running 36 front and 11-32 rear with a 170mm crank, its enough to climb anywhere i need getting to the top.
If youre running 32 or 34 in the front and a 11-36 rear on a 6" travel bike, you have nothing to complain about ! better spend that money on some new tires and get more out of your riding season. good tires are very very important IMO, be it your bicycle, motorbike or car.
what this large rear chainring is actaully good for is the ability to increase your front sprocket size and still be able to climb like before. more top speed !
I also wish they started making quality 5 or 6 speed casettes like in the XO or Saint range (i know the saint is easily moded thats not the point, cant climb with that shit after...) because what I really use are 5 of the 10 rear gears at most, the largest to go up and the smallest 3 just riding or going down, the rest are just a weight penalty.
  • 2 0
 How would you get from the largest three to the smallest three with no cogs in the middle?
  • 1 0
 i dont know what exactly you mean , by cog spacing or by number of teeth ? ...anyway, 5-6-7 speeds are old casettes, would work the same just with more and less teeth on the first/last cog than the old casettes. for example like 11, 15, 20, 26 and 34 or 36 for climbing... all you need is to limit the derailleur, i beleive the saint can be stopped/ locked for a 5 speed casette
  • 1 0
 What I mean is, if you use the smallest three, which I believe are 11-15, and the top three, which are 24-36 (roughly), how do you get from the 15 to the 24?
  • 1 0
 thats why i tried to make an example above, like cog one -11 teeth, #2 -15 teeth, #3 -20 teeth, #4 -26 teeth and the 5th one with 34 or 36 teeth for climbing. I realize thers much more to it but thats just as an example and its something i really want to test with in the coming season.
there is bound to be a gap, even a big one, in gearing by eliminating cogs ( which are useless in my case ), thats what im getting at. because i dont shift them one by one. shifting down from the easiest one, i go 3-4 cogs, so instead of clicking at the shifter always passing those gears it would be a one shot deal! = faster, easier and less weight/ unsprung mass...

also those who neg propped my first comment, i would like to hear your opinion/ input on the matter
  • 2 0
 You might need those intermediate gears to aid shifting, 26-34 or 36 is a big jump and I doubt a rear derailleur can handle that kind of tooth difference.
  • 4 3
 Buy XX1 you pikey f*ckers, job jobbed ;-)
  • 1 0
 Ill just carry my bike up hill
  • 1 0
 Discovering Megarange once more.
  • 1 1
 如果这个真的科学的话,还有市场的话,为毛不直接出10速42或者40T的飞轮呢
  • 1 0
 Would this work with a 11-36 ZEE shadow plus mech ?
  • 1 0
 Just had a fast response email from these guys and no it won't work with a ZEE mrch
  • 1 0
 check here for other people commenting on the ZEE dr. It works just fine!
  • 1 1
 get stronger guys.... i ride a road block on my xc bike and i am only 13......
  • 6 0
 You're my hero
  • 1 0
 can you run this on a 11-25 set up thar would be sick to see
  • 1 0
 Shimano xtr 1x10 11-36 all the way!
  • 1 0
 soon we will get fully anodized cassettes, looks pretty sick tbf
  • 1 0
 When's it in the UK
  • 2 1
 I live in New Zealand and have ordered one. Free world wide shipping, supposedly shipping late January
  • 1 0
 That's awesome
  • 1 0
 hmmmm mrp 3
  • 3 3
 Bringing a physically demanding sport to a wider audience : (
  • 2 0
 Most entry level bikes are 3x8, so I kind of doubt it.
  • 1 0
 lawed go single speed!
  • 1 0
 MASSIVE
  • 1 0
 Hammerschmidt.
  • 2 3
 1x9 cheap simple effective...oh but you needs legs...
  • 3 6
 Or you can just get fitter :/
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