Check Out: Fenders, Flat Pedal Shoes, a Protective Pack & More - June 2019

May 29, 2019 at 15:06
by Richard Cunningham  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is a monthly round-up of anything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to review. And, sometimes it's a crazy, unsolicited doodad, and we're having a laugh.



Bontrager Flatline Shoes

Bontrager Flatline shoes

Bontrager Flatline shoes
Elastic bands keep the padded mesh tongue in place. The profiled insole is washable.
Bontrager Flatline shoes
The toes are reinforced and each end of the sticky rubber Vibram sole have tough gripper inserts for off-the-bike scrambling traction.


Features

• Vibram sticky rubber outsole
• Directional tread at toe and heel for off-bike traction
• Shock absorbing EVA midsole
• Synthetic leather upper
• Ortholite insole
• Sizes: 36 - 48 in half sizes
• Colors: Black or red
• Weight: 680g (size 42.5)
• Women's-specific range offered
• MSRP: $129.99 USD
Bontrager

bigquotesThe folks at Bontrager's gear department have been on fire in recent years, I've been especially impressed with the manufacturing quality and function of their soft goods, and this Flatline shoe follows suit on both accounts. It's lightweight, Only 680 grams in my 42.5 size, and that's without any shortcuts.

The toe boxes are reinforced. Vibram soles are molded in a wide, rectangular grid to maintain consistent grip on flat pedals, while high traction inserts at the toe and heel provide scrambling traction. A stiff heel cup ensures proper power output, while the mid-sole is padded to mute harsh terrain. The out-sole is synthetic leather and stitching is pro level. Other details are a ventilated mesh tongue, stabilized by elastic bands inside the shoe, metal eyelets, and an elastic batten to stow the laces.

I'll be riding flat pedals for a while later this summer, so I'll most probably post a full review at that time. Until then, if you are looking for a good flat shoe, Bontrager's Flatline, with its very reasonable $130 MSRP and excellent features should be a top performer. Bontrager believes you'll like them, and they back it up with an unconditional guarantee: "Ride it and love it. If not, We'll take it back."



Mucky Nutz MugGuard

Mucky Nutz Mug Guard

Mucky Nutz Mug Guard
The extended coverage comes in handy on those extra-wet days.
Mucky Nutz Mug Guard
Installation is quick and easy, and a roll of Velcro wrap is included for riders who plan on installing and removing it regularly.

Features

• Made in UK from recycled material
• Short MugGuard: £19.99
• Long MugGuard: £24.99
• Compatible with 26", 27.5" and 29" wheels
• Clearance for up to a 3" tire
• Weight: 75 grams (short), 105 grams (long)
muckynutz.com


bigquotesIn a perfect world, summer time would mean the end of muddy, wet rides, but that's not always the case. Mucky Nutz's new MugGuards 3D-molded fenders only take a couple minutes to mount up, and they provide plenty of coverage for those extra soggy days. I installed one in time for the opening day of the Whistler Bike Park, and it worked exactly as intended, blocking most of the mud and water that was being flung up by my front wheel. There are two versions, short and long, but even the shorter option covers much more real estate than your typical flat fender. They do cost more, but I'm willing to pay a little extra if it means I can ride down a saturated trail without needing to constantly stop and wipe my goggles or eyeballs. Mike Kazimer



SQlab Insoles

SQlab insoles
According to SQlab's chart, I need the yellow, medium-arch insole.

SQlab insoles
Perforations, crease-lines, and a molded arch support all work to balance the pressure from heel to toe.
SQlab insoles
Molded guide lines virtually guarantee you won't mess up the final fitting process.

Features

• Molded arch support
• Thin, highly engineered cushion material
• Four sizes, three different arch heights
• Washable and anti microbial


• Comprehensive size and fitting chart
• Replaces standard shoe insole
• MSRP $30.99 USD
SQlab

bigquotesHigh quality insoles are not on the radar of most riders, but maybe they should be. We pound over rocks and roots for hours at a time, but not many of us worry about the beating our feet take in the process. SQlab offers a range of insoles designed with three different arch supports, and further sculpted to ensure that all of your foot is sharing a portion of the stress. Pressure graphs show that the correct insole dramatically reduces stress concentrations, which SQlab says, provides increased power in addition to less fatigue and discomfort.

SQlab offers a free sizing kit on line so you can assess your arch type and foot size. Insoles are color coded to simplify the process: 216 Blue for low arches, 215 yellow for medium height arches and 216 red for high arches. A number of sizes are offered, and guidelines are molded into the toe area so you can further trim the inserts to fit your shoes. These are not simply contoured foam. There's a molded arch support, a reinforced heel cup and every square centimeter of the sole is perforated or grooved differently to control flex. Do they work? I put some in my Specialized 2FO's and they are feeling pretty good. It will cost you $39 USD to find out, but if you know anything about SQlab, it's a sure bet they'll deliver on their promises.
RC



Silca Viaggio Travel Pump

Ever wish that you could pair your phone with your Bluetooth floor pump and see your tire pressure in large, easy to read decimals on a touch-screen? Me neither, but if you did, Silca's Viaggio floor pump is waiting for you at up-scale retailers world wide. "Travel pump" refers to the Viaggio's detachable handle, fold-up feet and its waxed canvas carry bag. Hidden inside the sleek, polished pump is Silca's trademark leather-sealed piston for smooth action. Perched at the end of its authentic rubber hose is Silca's acclaimed Hiro air chuck - its smooth, ergonomic metal lever gleams understated quality, and a discreet magnetic latch displays it well.

The pump's Italian minimalist narrative prohibits unsightly external pressure gauges. Instead, a hidden i-Gauge compatible Bluetooth-enabled sensor telegraphs your tire pressure (accurate to less than one percent) to your handy smart phone, which also ensures proper inflation when you must delegate the task. Silca's asking price for the Viaggio Travel Pump is $275 USD

Features
• iGauge compatible Bluetooth® enabled pressure sensor
• Premium 731 leather piston gasket
• Brass check valve assembly
• Detachable handle & folding feet support
• Schrader chuck & HIRO locking Presta chuck with a magnetic dock
• Weight: 2.95lbs/1.34kg, Length: 57cm,
• Max PSI: 220
• MSRP $30.99 USD
Silca

Silca's Hiro air chuck fits both Presta and Schrader valves.
The canvas carry bag you won't want to hide in the trunk of your auto.


"Traditional travel pumps sacrifice too many features in the name of portability. We set out to design a compact, folding pump that incorporated the stability and ergonomics of a full-sized floor pump combined with a highly accurate and easily readable gauge solution." - Silca: Why we designed it.


bigquotesSo, there you have it. Silca's mic drop turns out to be a darn good pump. The only thing it leaves us wishing for is an external gauge.RC



EVOC Neo 16L Airshield Backpack

It's a conundrum that riders many times face if they're riding bigger days in the backcountry or even hauling gear around in the bike park - how to stay safe while still carrying a bag. The Neo uses EVOC's Airshield system which is positioned between the pack and the rider to keep the protective lattice structure close to the thoracic and lumbar spine.

It's made of a nanotech elastomer for durability and the back protector can deform if exposed to the tension or pressure of a crash but then it returns to its original form. This also helps the protector adapt and conform to the rider's spine. There are twelve elastomer pads with mesh structure that form part of the lattice layer. The pads are positioned to provide carrying comfort and have minimal contact points on the back and a snug fit with minimal slippage so the backpack won't slide in the case of a fall. The Airshield system allows for lots of ventilation and moisture wicking from the back.

EVOC claim that the hexagonal elements also help distribute the impact force and absorb a large amount of the impact from a shock. It maintains its protective qualities in temperatures ranging from -20 to +40 Celsius (that's extremely cold to hotter than you'll typically ride in for those in the States).

Features
• 16l of storage, Two sizes - S/M, L/XL
• Colors: Gold or Carbon Grey
• Rain shell
• Certified according to TÜV test standard PSA 1621-2
• Free crash replacement
• Weight: 1580g (S/M)
• 250.00 €
EVOC
EVOC Neo 16L

EVOC Neo 16L
EVOC's Neo 16l has plenty of room for gear, organization for tools, and a rain cover.
EVOC Neo 16L
The back protector is designed to be comfortable and durable with plenty of ventilation and a nanotech elastomer that conforms to the rider's back and absorbs impacts.


bigquotesThe Neo 16 has all of the organization anyone can really want in a backpack. It's designed to carry plenty of gear on a big day in the backcountry and protect your spine while you're on the bike. It's not the lightest, but its comfortable fit and the protection it offers more than make up for that heft. It's price you'll be more than willing to pay the first time you tomahawk yourself into some rocks on your backcountry heli-drop.Daniel Sapp





142 Comments

  • + 156
 'Ever wish that you could pair your phone with your Bluetooth floor pump and see your tire pressure in large, easy to read decimals on a touch-screen?'

Hell no. What kind of cretin do you think I am?
  • + 97
 Sounds roadie af to me!
  • - 29
flag enduroNZ (Jun 11, 2019 at 3:12) (Below Threshold)
 Sound f*cking awesome. @gkeele I think it's good that at least you admit that your a cretin
  • + 12
 So i don't need to wear my glasses anymore to inflate my tires
  • + 21
 @Radley-Shreddington: I was thinking the same thing. It screams, "My cologne sets off alarms, and I do so love tight underwear!"
  • + 6
 I just want a pump with an accurate gauge. My floor pump is only three years old and it's off by 10 pounds at 30 psi.
  • + 3
 @enduroNZ: So fill your boots mate (except we all know you're not going to buy the pump). I'm a cretin with $275 to spare.
  • + 14
 Dear Silca:

I like your stuff. Its real shiny. The chuck I bought from you for my air compressor works great. Can you please make an affordableish high volume pump with a gauge that goes to 30?

Sincerely,
Your dirtbag MTB bros who are cheap but like nice things.
  • + 2
 @craigcanucks: how much is it in feet square inch per lb? Thx
  • + 3
 Bluetooth, the flakiest of all connectivity tech...
  • + 3
 @craigcanucks: Most accurate gauge I've used in the last 10 years is a Lezyne digital gauge floor pump.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: If you have shitty firmware, sure. If you use good products that have good software, its rarely ever an issue.
  • + 5
 hahahaha millennial perception of reality Wink
  • + 1
 @T-woot: agreed. Use it in industrial environments no issue
  • + 2
 It's $30.00.
  • + 3
 @lognar: Lezyne overdrive floor pump comes in a high pressure or high volume options. Gauge is very accurate. It looks nice (not silca nice though) and feels sturdy. I like it. Check it out

www.amazon.com/LEZYNE-Alloy-Drive-Bicycle-Silver/dp/B072MHV6YX/ref=sr_1_3?crid=2754LM1K8NV4X&keywords=lezyne+high+volume+pump&qid=1560301851&s=sporting-goods&sprefix=lezune+high+volu%2Csporting%2C215&sr=1-3
  • + 3
 When can we expect a bluetooth tyre system that lets us know how much tubeless fluid is left inside? And I want it measured in Korean gallons as well..
  • + 1
 @lognar: What chuck specifically? Because my prestaflator is driving me nuts and needs a replacement.
  • + 0
 @JDugan: I have a l lezyne pump. their chucks are trash, i find their gagues to be innacurate but maybe thats the blown out chuck's fault. having to screw something onto my valve for a floor pump isnt something I want to do.
  • + 1
 @atourgates: i just put this on the end of a standard air compressor trigger. no gauge but works just fine.
silca.cc/collections/accessories/products/disc-wheel-mini-chuck

I like accurate tire pressures so I almost always use a dedicated pressure gauge for fine tuning after I inflate w a compressor.
  • + 1
 @lognar: I do agree screwing on the air chuck sucks. But it's anti bleed just like the kind you use on a shock pump, it has an air bleed button and so far mine has been flawless. I use the high volume low pressure one and the gauge is dead accurate.
  • - 1
 @JDugan: check it out at your LBS not the machine of amazon
  • + 2
 @T-woot: Local bike shop doesn't have and add with pictures. Mine was purchased at LBS. Just posted that for illistrative purposes
  • - 1
 @JDugan: The freakin manufacturer does, break your addiction to amazon dude. People are freaking amazon zombies. So sad.
  • - 1
 @T-woot: You're a f*cking douche bag go f*ck your self
  • + 0
 @JDugan: withdrawals already? You should go find the amazon truck bro... it'll tie you over until you can log on later and look and product you don't need.
  • + 2
 @robwhynot: agreed, but miles ahead of infra red that existed before
  • + 1
 What, there's pressure in my tyres?
  • + 2
 @JDugan: 20 bucks says T-woot has 'some books you should read maaaaan'
  • + 84
 $275 USD for a pump?

At that price I'd expect it to blow me too!
  • + 66
 if you keep the garage door closed then what you do is between you and your pump.
  • + 32
 @unrooted: not if your bluetooth pump app manages to link to your insta...
  • + 32
 @johnnyboy11000: Great, now all the millennials will know that I'm hung like a presta valve???
  • + 5
 Weird it says 30.99 in the description. For a second I was like, ya not bad. For 275 bucks I would expect it to at least air up my tires without any pumping..
  • + 14
 @jlawie you snob. $275 is cheap. I mean...you can't buy a bag like that anywhere. It comes with a bag dude. It's own...bag. It's even says the brand name on the bag, so you know it's worth that much.
  • + 8
 @ssteve: Funny thing is, 275 buys you a compressor and one of those Park Tool shop inflater attachments...
  • + 0
 This wins the interwebz for today!!
  • + 3
 $275 buys you 2 excellent Bontrager flash charger pumps and a couple rounds of beer. No thanks.
  • + 38
 I'll take 3 floor pumps! I wished they would be really more expensive! Can't wait to have a Bluetooth connected saddle to have some live infos about my ass while I'm riding.
  • + 9
 Let me know when you start the live stream. I got a friend who would be into that channel....
  • + 16
 "I'll be riding flat pedals for a while later this summer, so I'll most probably post a full review at that time. Until then, if you are looking for a good flat shoe, Bontrager's Flatline, with its very reasonable $130 MSRP...."

So many conflicting statements here. Have you have you not used those shoes? How can you comment on weather the shoe is good or not. $130 for a shoe isn't reasonable.
  • + 2
 +I really dont Care about weight or how Well they look.
My Impacts look goofy, are heavy and are hot during summer but they grip like no other- thats why I'll buy 5-10 again.
Make a better gripping shoe and I'll buy it over the Impact or Freerider
  • + 3
 I have been using them once a week for like 3 months. They are incredibly comfortable. What sold me was the 30 day test period then you can return them if you don't like them. Considering I bought about 3 pairs of shoes before settling on my current clipped setup, that alone is worth the price premium.
  • + 1
 The problem with non flat pedals users reviewing flat pedal shoes is that they haven't had enough experience with a variety of "good" flat pedal shoes to know what to compare them to. You can't trust a review from someone who has only used one type of product. It's like a YouTuber review from someone who has been riding for 6 months making a video called "is this the best Enduro bike ever?"
  • + 12
 So, with the leather pump seal, when it inevitably fails, what's the cost to replace it? I have a 25 year old Blackburn pump that has become my work pump that I leave there for my commuting duties. It has twice failed during my ownership and it uses a standard $.05 o-ring.

As far as the Silca air chuck is concerned, it does look nice and is super well made but on 36 spoke rims it's a PITA. It was the reason I opted for a Bontrager pump, which was also 1/3 the price. Also I don't recall if the Silca chuck has a air bleed button, which my pump has.

I actually do like the idea of an accurate gauge, even if it is Bluetooth connected. My pumps all display different pressures, with my good pump being the only one that is accurate. The nice thing about not having a "physical" gauge is their being prone to damage. Pumps fall over, a analog gauge can easily get damaged when it impacts the ground.

However for $275 I can buy a Topeak handheld digital gauge, a decent travel pump and about $200 worth of booze.
  • + 1
 Silca is a boutique pump, I was always surprised how quickly the seals wore out on them.
  • + 0
 "As far as the Silca air chuck is concerned,"

Also a copy of this: www.amazon.com/KUWAHARA-HIRAME-Pump-Head-Yoko/dp/B003EIIXSG
  • + 1
 @Flowcheckers: Man, that's sucks to hear about the seals. I have two Silca pumps that were made well before they sold to the US firm and for years they've been super reliable. I've used them for everything from pumping up car tires to high psi tires. And that price - crazy.
  • + 2
 Word. My $75-in-today's-money WrenchForce pump that I bought 21yrs ago is still working great, pumps to 160psi, and has a bleed button. The lens on the gauge is getting a little cloudy, but guess what? It's removable, so I can polish it right up again.

$275. maaaan, that's crazy. Leather seals? It's not 1908!!!
  • + 8
 i've have 3 pairs of 5.10s soles delaminate over the last few years ( freerider, freerider pro, kestral boa ). I wanted to try an alternative and I've been wearing those exact bontrager flatline shoes since last summer and they've been great. They aren't as outright sticky as the freeriders, but with good pedals pins i don't think they need to be.

flatlines + oneup pedals = definitely recommend
  • + 3
 That's my exact set up, and it's great.
  • + 4
 Yeah, I don't understand why everyone keeps praising 5.10...soles delaminate within months. Happened to me too. I'd trade off a little bit of grip for a longer lasting shoe any day.
  • + 1
 What size shoe do you wear? I’m a 48/49 and haven’t had a chance to try these on yet. (LBS was out of stock today)
  • + 1
 @sngltrkmnd: I’m a US 10.5 in 5tens but i found these bontrager shoes to run small and ended up with a 44 ( us 11 on their chart )
  • + 8
 The Bontrager Flat Line Shoes are amazing. They’re extremely comfortable, light, and dry out quickly. Plus they don’t tear up the bottom of my feet from my flat pedal pins like the competition does. They do seem to fit 1 size small. Luckily they make a size 14 for my big ole feet.
  • + 1
 Came here to determine this. I was a longtime Shimano DX shoe (and pedal) customer but the newest AM series shoes in 48 no longer fit me. My 5.10 White Tigers are totally beat and these Flatlines look the business. And a good price too!
  • + 6
 I like Evoc's backpacks I have a FR enduro for around 5 years and it's still solid but the prices are going too high. I got it for 140€ retail and now they want 250€, it's too big of a difference for a largely unchanged product (good thing as the old one was good already).
  • + 6
 Exactly what I wanted to write. Three and a half years ago bought FR Enduro Blackline model (their top one at the time) and it was 180 euro at a full price which was considerably more expensive than the competition. 250 euros for this kind of backpack really is much more. The backpack I have is holding up great, but the competition isn't bad at all from my experience.
  • + 5
 Funny to read in other reviews (giro riddance shoes reviev if last yearthat the vibram sole has lower grip compared to stealth rubber from 5/10, while here it sounds like it's the messiah of compounds... These opinions confuse me
  • + 7
 Seriously we are still designing fenders with zip tie mounting? #jesustakethewheel
  • + 4
 . Flat pedal shoes are basically skate shoes, and for some reason they can't evolve into more than that. $130 for flat pedal skate shoes is not reasonable for what they are. Its just the norm for mountain bike gear.
  • + 23
 If you haven't tried 5-10s I can see why. But I get a whole season of dh out of them every year and loads more grip, support and protection. Sometimes you gotta pay to play
  • - 7
flag Alcan (Jun 11, 2019 at 4:55) (Below Threshold)
 Shhhh... don’t tell all the sheeple.
  • + 20
 @freeridejerk888: you hit the nail on the head. 5-10 are expensive but if you've never worn then you wouldn't understand. Skate shoes do not support your foot over a long day like a well designed pair of cycling flat shoes.
  • + 22
 This would ring true if the cheapest skate shoes were suited to skating, but they're not, they're just 'fashion' shoes.
  • + 4
 I wish 5.10 or someone would make shoes that the sole/bottom half is identical to 5.10s but the upper is not as thick and heavy, more like a cross country shoe. 5.10s are heavy and clunky to begin with but once they get wet they weigh 10 lbs!
  • + 10
 @gtill9000: try out the freerider pro's, they're pretty damn light
  • + 4
 @gtill9000: Have you tried the Freerider Pro? I live in a VERY dry environment so I don't know how much water they would hold, but compared to my regular Freerider shoes they seem like they wouldn't hold nearly as much.
  • + 5
 @gtill9000: The Freerider is absolutely hilarious at soaking up water. Six stream crossings last ride and was nowhere close to saturation. I've poured half a cup of water out of them after really wet rides. Like pedalling with a concrete boot on!
  • + 3
 Check out unparallel shoes. They are made by the original 5ten owners. @freeridejerk888:
  • + 1
 Clips are just cleat on a rigid shoe, don't see how it can evolve
  • + 1
 Good skate shoes are also $130. Want high performance skate shoes = $130+ which also happen to suck at as a mountain biking shoe. Want a high performance flat pedal mountain bike shoe = $130+ which also happen to suck as a skate shoe.

That's the price, deal with it or go get some Walmart New Balance and stfu.
  • + 0
 @gkeele: It's also their cheapest and shittiest shoe. It's the one they make for new riders who are blown away at the cost of entry into the sport and cheap out on the shoes. Once you graduate to their better shoes it's not an issue anymore.
  • + 3
 @islandforlife: Mate you're so edgy I might just cut myself, but I wouldn't call £80 shoes cheap and shitty, and their shoes are largely at exactly the same price point and just serve different applications. I'm aware other shoes won't hold the water as much, but I'd rather have soaking feet than a broken toe...
  • + 3
 My 5.10s are way to stiff for skating, and my nice skate shoes are too soft for MTB. When I go to the skatepark with board and bike I wear the skate shoes as the best compromise but would not wear them on the MTB trails because the 5.10s perform better.
  • + 2
 @gkeele: freerider pros have more of a reinforced toe box than standard freeriders, they're also lighter and wont hold as much water, but you've gotta pay to play...
  • + 1
 @gtill9000: 5.10 makes a “wet weather” freerider. www.adidasoutdoor.com/five-ten-freerider-elements-mens-mountain-bike-shoe/FT16.html
It has a dwr finish that should help with soaking, although I haven’t tried it.
  • + 2
 I was about to reply that i have freerider pros but turns out I just have regular freeriders. I'm guessing by the comments that they're very different.
  • + 4
 I have a pair of the Bontrager Flats, Been on them for months and they are amazing in feel, grip, and durability; which is the one of the biggest thing I care about. Comfort is #1 and I work in them all day and they feel good.
  • + 1
 Thank I'll take a peek at them. I usually just use Ye freeriders but I would like to try freerider pros out @MelvieD:
  • + 2
 @freeridejerk888: There's a definite tradeoff between longevity and grip, just like with tires. I keep rationalizing that if I were running or playing tennis or basketball, I'd be replacing shoes more often that I do mountain biking.
  • + 2
 I bought 5.10 approach shoes with stealth soles. They gripped like clipless. They were amazing.
  • + 5
 @islandforlife: Lol not at all. DC pro models regularly go on sale for 40% off sale price. I got a pair of Evan Smith high tops I love for $23 shipped.
  • + 2
 Did you guys not just see a guy do a World Cup in jeans? Oh, yea you definitely need $100 plus shoes to ride your bike.
  • + 1
 @reverend27: those red ones are Puke-tastic!
  • + 0
 @Alcan: why do people care so much about how other people spend their money? nobody said you need them, they're just a lot better for biking than simple skate shoes. wear whatever the f*ck you want
  • + 0
 I personally don’t care what people do with their money. I’m guilty of buying useless sh!t all the time. I’m just throwing my 2 cents in the ring because I can. Just like you can do whatever you want with your money. Oh yea and Kyle Straight did rampage in “fashion shoes”. So do you need $100 shoes to ride your bike? @arrowheadrush:
  • + 2
 i paid $30 for my last pair of vans on ebay, shipped. i cant stomach spending $130 on shoes that i cant also wear to work. i borrow a pair of 5.10's and yeah, they grip better, i just cant afford it
  • + 1
 @LumberJake: time to get a better job
  • + 0
 @freeridejerk888: or bigger lumber??!! LOL
  • + 3
 Insoles are smart but those are rudimentary. Footprint GameChangers are what you want FOR SURE. They are nearly a custom orthodic for skateboarding and have some impact padding along with being very rigid. You hear mold them and the supportive foam molds around your foot. You can tune them a bit too.
  • + 2
 Another vote for footprints. I run them in my 5.10s and my snowboard boots. Why MTB shoes don't come with a heat moldable inner I don't know. it makes way more sense than the thin, flat, near pointless pieces of foam we see across most shoe makes
  • + 2
 @Backdoor: because profits.
  • + 1
 Superfeet (local product where I live, so they became sort of a big deal around here before they started being a staple at REI and such) seem to straddle a nice middle-ground between the seriously generic stuff and the full-on custom fit niche, as they come in a variety of support levels. Skiiers around here have been using them religiously for years.
  • + 1
 @g-42: I like superfeet but their price is outrageous for a product that they state won’t last more than a year or two depending on use. Keeping my options open for more reasonably priced options even though I like my superfeet
  • + 3
 Bontrager Flatline is one of the best shoes I've worn. Very light, comfortable, lots of grip, ..you feel in the shoe not on top.
  • + 1
 @richardcunningham : do the insoles change the flex of the shoe?

I've been riding in Adidas Terrex Swift Solos lately and the rubber is much grippier than the stuff on their cycling model (I suspect it's the softer stealth). The only issue is that the flex is really soft for a bike shoe. Would this make them a bit stiffer?
  • + 1
 Problems with insoles such as SQLab is you try to match your foot to their product. WHY?! If you cannot afford $200 for custom footbeds (which I know must of us can't), $39 is a great option. But everyone's feet are different; even your left is different from your right. A pair of EZ Fit insoles from MasterFit at least adapt to your foot and not the other way around. And they're also $39.

*I don't make a single dime from this. I just believe in a product that is far superior
  • + 0
 "Each end of the sticky rubber Vibram sole have tough gripper inserts for off-the-bike scrambling traction."

Wait a minute... the rubber on my 5.10s is derived from rock climbing thus the ENTIRE sole is suitable for off-the-bike scrambling traction. Unless I want to tippy toe my way around the woods.
  • + 2
 Rock climbing rubber/patterns are meant to adhere well to smooth, hard rock. They are bad for dirt and other loose stuff you fine on trails.
  • + 2
 $130 for those sneakers is laughable. Dressed up skateboarding shoes. The bike industry loves to rape its customers.
  • + 2
 Sooo glad somebody makes a hi-top flat pedal shoe that isn't garbage! Oh wait... Nevermind
  • + 2
 A bladder full of water in the back pack does wonders for those crashes straight to your back and it's considerably cheaper.
  • + 4
 Unless you crash at the end of your ride and emptied your h2o
  • + 1
 It's been my "cheap ass" life saver for years but I did realize I would run out of luck some. Plus of course by the time your bladder runs empty, the hard tools or whatever else you carry in that pack may actually hurt your back when you crash! I now typically ride with a pack with the bladder low and a dedicated back protector (Ergon BE1). The many cases either bladder or backprotector saved my back made me wary to ride with my back unprotected.
  • + 4
 @vinay: When I'm riding "gnarly" terrain I'll blow air into my bladder for light, cheap back protection.
  • + 1
 @vinay: there was a guy who fractured his spine out riding, the injury appeared identical in shape to the end of his shock pump Frown www.bicycling.com/training/a20016773/pack-wisely-to-save-your-spine
  • + 1
 @korev: Yeah, obviously be careful how you pack your pack. As mentioned, my backpack has a back protector so if it protects against a root, rock or anything alike then it would protect against my pump too. That said, the one he seemed to have been using has a horrible shape. I'm using a regular cylindrical shaped tire pump (something from Leyzine, forgot what it was) and a shock pump (Topeak Microshock), both without pressure gauge. I carry the Topeak Shuttle Gauge which can be connected between pump and tire or fork valve so I enjoy one accurate gauge for two pumps/purposes. The Topeak Microshock may be least likely to cause injury out of all shock pumps, but the workshop type tool that poor riders was using was probably the worst shape to carry on your back. The average shock pump again wouldn't be more likely to cause injury than a branch, root or rock lying there in the wrong spot. That said, not having your back covered leaves it exposed to whatever you crash onto. Safest would be full back protection without any tools or hard stuff in there, I'd say worst would be the hip pack. Without having seen any test, my guess is that it would subject the lower back to some odd loads if you land on a full hip pack with bottles, tools etc.
  • + 3
 "42.5 size"

...showoff
  • + 1
 I'd rather have my face full of mud than riding with that fender attached to my fork!! :-P
  • + 1
 pretty sure the only reason the mudguard is up there is because of cathro lol
  • + 1
 Cathro was promoting themudhugger.co.uk/, the one in the article is Mucky Nutz.
  • + 2
 Whats with the £100++ shoes, leave it out
  • + 4
 That's inline with the offerings from 510 and backed up with an unbeatable 30 day return no questions asked
  • + 1
 @allenfstar: my last 5tens were £89 which is enough for shoes of any kind.
  • + 1
 @nwmlarge: this shoe is meant to compete against the freerider pro. I've used this shoe and currently have the freerider pro. The pro has features the $100 freerider doesnt have and an extra $30 is worth it to me to not have a broken toe
  • + 1
 @allenfstar: There is still no way it cots this much for a pair of bike trainers.

They need to calm down and keep the sport accessible.
  • + 1
 @nwmlarge: there are plenty of cheaper option this is aimed to be a top tier option
  • + 1
 Case of Co2 cartridges, press on inflator and Topeak D2 Smart Gage is my go to setup.
  • + 1
 Hey @mikekazimer what length fender is pictured?
  • + 1
 You had me at flat pedal shoes
  • + 1
 I might have to invest in a set of insoles!!! $40 ain’t bad
  • + 1
 Someone is getting pumped if they buy that pump!!!
  • + 0
 Why do these shoes for flat pedals always have laces? Cycling shoes with laces are a horrible idea.
  • + 34
 coz they'd fall off your feet Jeff
  • + 2
 I never have a problem with my laces. I also don’t want to wear shoes that look like a 4 year old would wear who doesn’t know how to tie his shoes lol. Laces allow more adjustability too.
  • + 4
 At $130 a pair I'm not willing to pay extra for BOA Lacing or to settle for geriatric velco straps in lieu of laces.
  • + 4
 Because most of us learned how to tie laces in preschool and have since then found them to be a rather fool-proof way of fastening shoes to feet? Snark aside, a BOA system evens out pressure along the whole enclosure, which sounds great until you want to achieve something different, like leaving the toe box loose to accommodate a wide forefoot while snugging up the top to prevent heel slip. Regular laces allow you do that to some extent, and if you want to go nuts on that, you can lace two sets of laces in, one for the top, one for the bottom, to really fine tune that bit.
  • + 0
 totally agree, I really like the simplicity of BOA on shoes. If you don't have them, these shoes should drop at least $30 or $40 in price. Laces aren't exactly patented or expensive technology these days.
  • + 1
 When I first saw those shoes my heart skipped a beat
  • - 1
 that was bad Razz
  • + 0
 You want insoles don’t mess about open the wallet and get solestar
  • + 0
 When will we see the shoot out of Down Country saddle bags?
  • + 3
 Cant wait for that.
  • + 2
 Sram could make one. With DropBag™ technology, BatterySlip™ for the AXS battery and PredictiveMount™. Oh and Quarq integrated torque meter in bolts.
  • + 0
 To be honest I'm surprised no one has yet developed a saddle with integrated storage. It is quite common for motorcycles, mopeds etc but I haven't seen this in a bicycle saddle yet. The front part would suit a multi-tool and maybe even a CO2 cartridge, the rear could house bigger stuff like a spare tube etc. Once these hit the market, saddle bags are considered the stuff for amateurs.
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