Garbaruk 10 x 50 Wide-Range 11-Speed Cassette for SRAM XD Drivers - Review

Apr 9, 2018 at 12:29
by Richard Cunningham  
Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers


If you want the wider range of SRAM's 12-speed Eagle, but don't want to pony up for a new drivetrain, Garbaruk makes an 11-speed cassette with 46, 48 and 50-tooth options. Their 11-speed, 10 x 50 cassette matches the 500-percent gearing range of 12-speed Eagle, costs $265 USD, and weighs only 319 grams. Garbaruk is a family owned business that hails from Kyiv, Ukraine, where they design, CNC-machine, and manufacture a number of problem-solving drivetrain components like chainrings, booster cogs and complete cassettes.


Construction and Features

The Garbaruck 10 x 50 cassette that we review here
Garbaruk XD Cassette Details:

• Construction: One-piece CNC-machined chromoly steel, with aluminum driver cog
• 11-speed, Fits SRAM-type XD drivers
• Cogs 10-12-14-16-19-22-26-30-36-42-50
• Options: 46, 48, or 50-tooth final cog
• Compatible derailleurs: SRAM Type 2.1/3 11-speed NX, GX, X1, X01, XX1 - Shimano 11-speed with cage upgrade.
• Weight: 310g to 319g
• MSRP: $250 to $265 USD
• Contact and purchase: Garbaruk
is designed to fit SRAM-compatible XD-driver freehubs. Construction is quite similar to SRAM's high-end 11 and 12-speed cassettes and they share the same spline tools. The first ten cogs are machined from a single piece of chromoly steel. The block of ten steel spockets index into largest cog, which is carved from aluminum and secured with three screws. Garbaruk machines and profiles the cassette teeth to assist shifting when pedaling in the right direction - and also to keep the chain on the correct cog while pedaling in the wrong one. The steel monoblock is chrome plated, and the anodized aluminum driver cog is available in red, black or silver.

Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers
The first ten cogs are machined from a single bar of 4130 alloy steel.

Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers
Garbaruk machines a number of ramps and tooth profiles to assist shifting.
Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers
Three screws and a number of machined pins secure the aluminum driver cog.

Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cage for SRAM Type 2 rear derailleurs
Shimano 11-speed derailleurs require Garbaruk's extended cage for 48 and 50-tooth models.


Garbaruk offers comprehensive installation instructions on line, but the simple process is almost exactly the same as installing or removing a SRAM XD cassette, so it will not pose a problem for the initiated. The one difference is that the Garbaruk cassette uses an aluminum screw-on cap that stabilizes the outer end of the body. The spline is the same as the XD tool used to install the cassette, but Carbaruk furnishes a special tool with each purchase that does a better job.

Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers
Garbaruk's construction is beautifully executed. The steel cassette block is impressively lightweight.

In their instructions, Garbaruk strongly suggests that you purchase their extended derailleur cage ($71 for SRAM and $59 for Shimano) if you are planning to use the 48 or 50-tooth options with SRAM 11-speed changers, and they say that Shimano 11-speed changers are reluctant to shift any cog larger than a 46, so check their website to be sure your model can handle the wider range.

My experience with SRAM's Type-2 11-speed derailleurs is that they can shift reliably up to 50 teeth if the chain length is correct and the B-tension screw is accurately adjusted (as demonstrated by the XX1 changer on my Diamondback Release test bike).

Warning: some rear suspension designs have excessive chain growth, which will exceed the capacity of SRAM's 11-speed changer at full compression and rip it from the bike. If you suspect this, do a full-
Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers
The SRAM X1 11-speed changer is pushed to full capacity by the 10 x 50-tooth cassette, but shifting was smooth.
compression check to ensure correct chain length and cage capacity before you ride, or purchase Garbaruk's aftermarket cage as cheap insurance. It's easy to install.


How They Compare:

Views: 8,797    Faves: 0    Comments: 1
Garbaruk shifting using standard SRAM X1 Type-2 changer with B-tension adjustment and two additional links.


Garbaruk 11-speed

• 10 x 46*- 310g ($255)
• 10 x 48*- 314g ($260)
• 10 x 50 - 319g ($265)
Cogs: (10-12-14-16-19-22-26-30-36-42-50*)
*Only the last cog changes.
SRAM 12-speed

• XG-1299 10 x 50 - 362g ($429)
• XG-1295 10 x 50 - 356g ($367)
• XG-1275 10 x 50 - 450g ($195)
Cogs: (10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-36-42-50)



Trail Report

I installed the Garbaruk 10 x 50 on a Diamondback Release 3 that was equipped with a SRAM X1 rear derailleur and a XG-1150 11-speed cassette. The 32-tooth chainring, combined with the 42-tooth cassette cog provided a sufficiently low climbing gear for the 27.5-inch wheels, so fit riders would reap the most useful benefit from adding a wider-range, 50-tooth cassette by switching from the 32 to a 34-tooth chainring. That would maintain your original climbing gear, while offering more top speed on the flats and descents. I rode the stock 32 and a larger 34-tooth chainring to try both options.

Setup: I like fiddling with mechanical things, so I opted to try the stock derailleur before replacing its cage with Garbaruk's longer, reconfigured upgrade. In a testament to SRAM, the X1 Type 2 changer operated the wider range cassette beautifully, requiring only a few turns of the B-tension screw with a 3mm Allen key to maintain the recommended pulley height over the 50-tooth cog. Using the stock 32-tooth chainring, I only needed to add two links to get the shifting correct. That said, if you watch the video comparisons, it is clear that the X1 changer is at max capacity. I'll call my installation a win, and it saved 71 dollars. That said, the extended-cage option assures users that all will be right, especially for the 50-tooth conversion.
Garbaruk wide range 11-speed cassette for SRAM XD drivers

Gear spacing: On trail, Garbaruk's 500-percent range 11-speed does not give the impression that it has larger gaps than SRAM's 12-speed Eagle, which was a bit of a surprise. Much of that similarity is because the first four and the final three cogs of the Garbaruk 11-speed are the same as SRAM's 12 speed cassette. Garbaruk's choice of a 19-22-26-30 progression in the center of the cassette is where the two diverge. The delta between Eagle's mid-cassette shifts ranges between 12 and 15 percent, where the Gabaruk's mid-range gearing varies between 14 and 18 percent.

How those numbers translate to actual riding is much simpler to explain. Garbaruk's wider spacing feels intuitive in singletrack situations, where the gradients rapidly change and a more closely spaced cassette would have me double-shifting in both directions to maintain cadence. Closely spaced shifts are more beneficial when the gradients are sustained, because they allow the rider to fine-tune cadence and power output. All-mountain descending, however, usually favors wider spacing, because gravity enhances acceleration. Since most of the time spent reviewing the Garbaruk wide range cassette was technical trail riding, I enjoyed the wider gear spacing. I seldom needed to double or triple shift to match speed and grade changes.

Switching from the 32 to a 34-tooth chainring moved most of my riding to the center of the cassette. Using the 32-tooth ring, I was often in the 10 and 12-tooth cogs at pace and most often climbed in the 42, leaving the 50 for the steepest grinds. With the larger chainring, I used the entire gearing spread and often climbed in the 50.

Overall performance: Comparisons between the stock 10 x 42 11-speed and the wider-rage Garbaruk cassette are largely positive. Shifting is a few percent slower using the wide-range cassette in both directions, but never a perceivable difference while riding. Both the SRAM 10 x 42 and Garbaruk 10 x 50 could be pedaled backwards without jumping off the larger cassette cogs, which is a plus in my book, and the Garbaruk cassette could be shifted crisply under full power. That's all a cassette really needs to do.

I can think of only one issue that may raise its head, and that is the close proximity of the aluminum locking ring to the rear dropout. Fouling that gap with a piece of wire or brush could back out the ring and cause damage, but no such thing occurred while I was testing the cassette. Finishing in a high note, Gabaruk's cogs seem quite durable, with only cosmetic wear on the aluminum cog and nothing worth a mention on the plated steel cogs.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesGarbaruk's wide-range cassette options for SRAM XD drivers are a worthwhile consideration for 11-speed owners who want a more go on the top and more grunt on the bottom end of their gearing. The elephant in the room is the fact that, if you add the cost of the booster cage to the cassette's MSRP, the upgrade begins to approach the price of a basic SRAM 12-speed GX Eagle drivetain. That said, the Garbaruk option saves over 130 grams of rotating mass from the rear suspension over GX, and offers three alternative low gears. (And, you'll still have a spare cassette.) Consider also that a large number of 11-speed 29ers sold are geared too tall, and Garbaruk's lower-geared cassettes already have a waiting audience.RC







269 Comments

  • + 155
 Garbaruk, I need a 9-45T cassette made out of solid steel. Same range, lighter weight, no dinner-plate-sized aluminum cog that wears out super-fast. If e*thirteen can do a 9T cog, you can too.
  • + 12
 UP UP UP ^
  • + 18
 Oh and forgot, a little cheaper please.
  • + 60
 @magiko9: cheap light and strong, pick two.
  • + 120
 @treekilla: Cheap and strong. I can take a dump before riding.
  • + 15
 @treekilla: I don't need it to be GX-SLX level cheap. Just a little cheaper.
  • + 22
 @cantheit: Amen. I can live with an extra 80g on the rear axle. Especially when I remember that i'm rolling on 1100g tires.
  • + 3
 @treekilla: I'd argue you can get affordable, light, and strong in this case. One-piece construction means less labor and more efficient machine time, though it is a slightly larger block of steel. I think Garbaruk could match the XG-1275 in price on a one-piece cassette.
  • + 10
 Can someone explain me why not 9-54?
  • + 37
 10 speed 9-45t and make it cost $150 - you'll sell thousands.
  • + 11
 @WAKIdesigns: Apparently 45-46 is enough for some people to their type of riding, they do not want the extra heft and frankenstein look of a giant cassette and a ground-licking rear mech.

I can't argue w anyone wanting a 54, it is just too much for me.
  • + 38
 Sunrace makes 11-46 Steel for $50ish dollars. That's what i rock all day.
  • + 3
 @redsled137: I'd get one.
  • + 48
 No offense, but anyone who is in the granny gear enough to wear it out might want to look into a smaller front chain ring.
  • + 1
 @dadunc205x: you know nothing. I need 50t to pedal up efficiently but I also need lower range because suddenly I turn into standing pedalling monster on descents. Sarcasm. Nevermind Nino won 2 titles on 10-42, nevermind world’s fastest downhillers used 36t front to 11t rear and if you say you need a harder gear then you should think twice because you are saying you spin more than Minnaar. People saying 10-50 is great are like enduro bike reviews: climbs like a goat, descends like a DH bike. Hence I claim, why not 9-54?
  • + 37
 @WAKIdesigns: There is absolutely no need for a 9-54. Get in shape Waki.
  • + 18
 @WAKIdesigns: LOL @ using the example of one of the greatest riders on the planet to relate to average every day riders.
  • + 7
 @cyrways: Yep, that's good option.
I like the Shimano XT 11spd cassettes... way cheaper than Sram ones (or this reviewed option)... they work flawlessly with a Sram shifter, derrailleur, chain.
  • + 10
 @zdebruine: Coming from a company that exclusively makes CNC parts, its likely a lot cheaper to not do one piece. All that milling is slow and expensive, and doesn't get cheaper with scale production. I honestly cant believe that the current one piece cassettes are as cheap as they are.
  • + 6
 @zdebruine: Id respectfully disagree that once piece construction leads to more efficient machine time, otherwise shimano and sram would be doing the same. Id imagine this one piece takes substantially longer to machine than if it had been done with 10 individual components riveted together.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: 9-54 adds extra unsprung weight and requires a longer derailleur cage. 10-42 is already enough range at 420% in my opinion, but a little bit more would be nice. 9-45 should work with any stock 11 speed derailleur and give you the same 500% range as eagle, which seems like a good amount possibly even slightly overkill. 9-54 is 600%. That just seems a little ridiculous to me. I would not be using both ends of that cassette enough to justify the aforementioned trade offs of a larger cassette.
  • + 7
 Guys chill!

@zdebruine Man look what I've found: Leonardi Racing General Lee 11sp 9-45T

Check it out Wink
  • + 7
 @zdebruine: One piece construction would require a whole lot more machine time since you would have a hell of a time hollowing out the billet from the back side of the cassette. That last (largest) cog has to be the one to have splines that drive the XD driver body. It is the only logical way to design it from a load transfer standpoint.

I suppose you could do some sort of torque tube driving off one of the smaller cogs, but that would require a lot more strength at the small end of the cassette since it would then see huge stress when climbing in a large cog.

All steel is easy. One piece construction is not.
  • + 7
 @dlxah:: 9-54 is ridiculous but 10-50 is the best thing ever #confused
  • + 12
 @WAKIdesigns: why don'y you try two chainrings at the front? i heard it can work wonders... (it's called 2x10 or 2x11 and few companies released it recently )
  • + 5
 @cyrways: i have their 11-46 CSMX8 for $69 (nice). really happy with it so far.
  • + 4
 I've noticed a resurgence of "the cottage industry" similar to the 90's filling the gap left by the big industry players!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Who said 10-50 is the best thing ever? It's all subjective man. I was just trying to explain why somebody might prefer 9-45 over 9-54 (namely better ground clearance, less unsprung weight, slightly cheaper without the need for a new cage) since you literally asked. But how much range you need is obviously entirely up to you. I'm running 10-42 and perfectly happy with it. Sure, some people might use the extra range enough to justify the downsides. But I also wonder how many of them actually need more than 500% range or really just need to adjust the size of their chainring to make better use of the range they already have.
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I think an even wider range cassette would be useful for lots of people, even if they're unwilling to admit to it here. I also think weight and cost would be a limiting factor to a lot of people. $200 for a GX cassette was praised for it's relative cheapness, but it's still too much for lots of riders for a part that wears down and needs replacing. I bought a bike with a GX eagle drivetrain and I think SRAM was genius for getting so many brands on-board for speccing it as OEM. Now I'm looking at either ponying up at least $200 every time I need a new cassette (it's the cheapest 12-speed option), or doing an even more expensive switch to go down to 11-speed so that I can afford the cassettes in the future.
  • + 2
 @redsled137:
You think a lot of the riders still using 9spd drivetrains are also running XD Drivers that could accommodate a 9T cog, huh?
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: hahaha, too true brother.. these real men on big front cogs, and want smaller cassette, fools....
  • + 2
 @zdebruine: Round is a shape. Smile
  • + 9
 Here's every current cassette:

goo.gl/CEVL6f

Couple of interesting options from Leonardi and Now8 you might try.
  • + 2
 Why would you need anything below 11T cog on an enduro rig with 2.5 tyres.
OK, you're not on an enduro bike...then 10-42 is more than enough anywhere else.
Unsprung weight is the enemy of rear suspensions.
The benefits of a 1x drivetrain are weight & simplicity, if you start adding weight (like Eagle), then why not use 2x?
  • + 2
 Even 10-46 all steel 11 speed. Hell just something as durable as the gx cassette but a bit more range:
  • + 2
 @dlxah: who? You’ll accuse me of conspiracy theories but those who lashed out XTR Di2 cash with 2 mechs on single ring analog drivetrain?

@JaredHarzan - if Shimano released 8-60 as XTR Di2 Yumeya you’d find folks who say it’s a game changer. Humans just work this way even they are either unaware of it or don’t want to admit it.
  • + 1
 @alexdi: Thank you for that link. Awesome list, never heard of some of those manufacturers. Ingrid seems top quality indeed, but considering price and availability I think nothing can beat e*13 TRS series.
  • + 1
 @redsled137: This for all of us that are not ready to jump off the 10spd boat as our bikes are only a couple years old. Hell I am climbing a 34t/11x42 as is right now.
And pretty sure that SunRace has similar offering for 11spd at half that price, could be aluminum though.
  • + 7
 Has anyone ever actually worn out a 50t alloy cog? I don't know a single person who has, even if you have long steep climbs in your region. There wear is just spread across so many teeth...
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: 7-65 FTW
  • + 2
 9t cogs are ridiculously inefficient(they are triangles not circles), wear fast(both the cog and your chain), and tend to be noisy(all that grinding away at your chain. lol).
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: 9t cogs are hiliariously inefficient and wear quickly while making a bunch of noise.

TLDR: they suck
  • + 4
 @addatx: Sunrace 11-42 10 speed cassette. Lighter and cheaper than shimano 11 speed.
  • + 11
 How to be a mountain biker.

"Pick a cassette size range and be a dick about it."
  • + 5
 @cyrways: Both my wife and I used the 11-42 10sp Sunrace cassettes when we first went 1x. They shifted almost as well as Shimano SLX cassettes they replaced (with a bit of delay on the big cog of course) and lasted for a good long time. Can't really fault them, solid product, good value for money. But with Shimano's stuff getting cheaper and cheaper and working really well, that part of the market is getting squeezed out pretty hard.
  • + 3
 Y'all can keep sippin' 1x coolaid. Well, it isn't that bad...if you like it, that's cool. I don't care for it...snagged some nice 2x bits on clearance...droppin' the boat anchor(cassette) off the back...redistributing the weight off the suspension. Still miss the old school Friction shifters to be honest....could rack up or dump gears in a single throw Big Grin
  • - 1
 Meanwhile Shimano is busy making fishing reels or something. Campy's probably going to be back in the game before Shimano figures out how to make anwide range cassette.
  • + 2
 @magiko9: For 11S, I'd put my money with Garbaruk. They're the only ones duplicating SRAM's (awesome) one-piece cassette design.

Shimano's upcoming 12S looks pretty interesting. The hub design for that one is supposed to be silent, I'm surprised they haven't announced it yet. Hopefully at Sea Otter.
  • + 0
 E-13 just copied Leonardi Factory cassette....
  • + 1
 @P-Munari: Exactly, I run 11-42 on my xc race bike with a 36t on the front and I can climb anything
  • + 0
 @cyrways: and the offer better shifter then shimano or sram. Love my sunrace
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: hand you dealt with the two piece design of the E-13 cassette to accommodate the 9 tooth? Its a f*cking pain
  • + 4
 *coughs quietly, stands up*
SUNRACE ALREADY DO THIS BRUH
*sits back down, adjusts tie*

9 speed: www.sunrace.com/en/products/detail/csm990 (tho only 40t)
10 speed: www.sunrace.com/en/products/detail/csms3 (414g!) (full range)
10 speed: www.sunrace.com/en/products/detail/csmx3 (385g)

etc. etc.
  • + 2
 @dadunc205x: Granny gear IS the front chainring.
  • + 3
 @alexdi: That spreadsheet is f'kin awesome! Well played.

@zdebruine @TheGnarlyCenturion: Yeah I've been running all-steel Sunrace cassettes for a couple years now. After snapping six teeth off my alloy XT 46T in the first dozen rides, I looked for an all-steel alternative and they've been great. Currently using the CSMS8 EAZ I believe. The first versions had back-pedal issues but have since been fixed. Shifting is super crisp, even works great with my Di2. Highly recommend, and they're damn cheap too. 11-46T is plenty range for what I do, that's running with a 36T oval in the Sea2Sky, BC.
  • + 2
 @alexdi: Thx for the chart link..most helpful!
  • + 2
 @redsled137: Sunrace 11-42 CSMS3, full steel 10-speed. 50€ and 30T or 32T upfront. Cheapest one-by, I am riding it and I love it.
  • + 4
 @zdebruine: One piece for something like a cassette means a multiple axis mill and a huge chunk of Cromo that is mostly turned to recycling swarf.
As counter-intuitive as it sounds, it's much more cost efficient to cut multiple cogs from plate and stick them together as an assembly.

I'm not buying a Garbaruk, but for $260 retail, it's an an impressive hunk of metal they've got there.
  • + 0
 @BitchinCamaro: So great to hear from you and some of the other CNC milling experts above!! I'd be all in for the biggest cog being machined separately (from steel) and then pinned to a one-piece dome.

I am sick and tired of people thinking they need a FIFTY TOOTH cog. Insane. Just design the stupid cassette more efficiently. Do it however it has to get done.
  • + 1
 Yes yes yes
  • + 3
 @zdebruine: they need a 50t cog because they hammer insane climbs. You should come and see them before you criticize. Or maybe you are just too weak and you push.
  • + 1
 @TheGnarlyCenturion:
Does SunRace make one that runs on a XD Driver body?
  • + 4
 @zdebruine: We're talking about $5000+ bikes. The word "need" doesn't belong on this site at all. We don't "need" carbon framed superbikes, we don't "need" $1000+ 12-speed drivetrains...and so on.

In the end, a 50t cassette is just another option for those who would like to use it. I tried one out and will be going 50t on all my bikes when I need to replace cassettes. For me, the pluses far outweigh the negatives. But if you don't want a 50t cassette, then there's great news for you - you can get cassettes in 46t, 42t, 40t, 36t, and 32t sizes.
  • - 2
 @TheRaven: yes that is exactly why I asked why not go 9-54.
  • - 2
 Or 10-60. 11-72. I mean options. Just options.
  • + 1
 @dadunc205x:...................... That's a big 10-4
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Waki there's nothing weak about pushing up a steep hill on a 42t instead of a 50t. I happen to ride mountains on a 10-42 no problem, some people need a 50t, but why machine a 50t when you can start with a 9t in the rear and go up to 45t instead?

Your front chainring size should be set according to your abilities and desires.
  • + 1
 @magiko9: I'd buy like four of them.
  • + 2
 @lccomz: I said 10 speed. You can get an XD driver for about $50 for many wheels. You're also going to need a wide range derailleur solution. But overall its a superior setup vs. 12-speed eagle.
  • + 1
 @mxjeremy: By far the better solution. They also offer a 11-46t 10-speed that's about $70 and 435g.
  • + 1
 @shirk-007: Aftermarket cassettes are the most exciting thing happening in mountain bike components these days.
  • + 4
 @zdebruine: The problem with that is that front chainrings can only go so small. Furthermore, when you go below 32t you start to mess with the kinematics of your rear suspension. With a 10-50t Cassette, I can run a 30t on my 29er and a 32t on my 27.5er and thats a pretty much perfect set of ratios for the super-chunky trails I ride. Honestly I'd be just as well off with an 11-50t because the kind of speed needed for a 10t gear is just not attainable on the trails I built these bikes for (wouldn't really use the 11t either). Anyway, in order to maintain the same gearing with a 9-45t I would need a 28t chainring and that doesn't exist for any of my cranksets.
  • - 1
 @zdebruine: I am just asking a hypothetical question, when is it rnough, can there be enough? I can climb all day with DH tyres on 34-40. I’m a stupid troll that doesn’t ride but Ghawd gave me legs that can do a couple of weighted pistol squats Wink
  • - 1
 @TheRaven: same here, shortage of chainrings - if I was to ride with 50t I would need a 40t narrow wide chainring. Hard to find one just like a chainguide that would take it. I would need to buy a 29er and then I'd use 38t. Off course given it's an Enduro bike with heavy ass tyres, because on XC bike I'd probably go 42t front. 42-10 Wooow - Maybe on some Alpine fireroad i could crank that out. I just can't imagine pedalling at that speed but that's just me Big Grin
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: Ah, I hear ya! It does depend a lot on riding style and getting the right suspension feel. I do a lot of flat gravel and a lot of chunky XC on the same bike. There are a lot of direct mount chainring options, my favorite is the OneUp Switch, I have a 28T, 32T and 36T. I can switch at the parking lot whenever I want in a minute or less, and I do it all the time. I'd rather have a do-it-all cassette and a switch-able front chainring than a cassette which limits what I can and can't do. Personal preference, though.
  • + 1
 @zdebruine: Come up to Searle Pass and say you don't want All TheTeeth on your rear cog.
  • + 0
 @hirschmj: or Thorung La pass, you may need a spare granny for that 50t. Nah, I'd just put oxygen tank into bottle mount and wait for you up there while you spin your 90-110RPM bobbing like a Joey Wink
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: So then you don't need a big-range cassette. It actually kinda sounds like you don't even need 11-speed. Good 'ole 11-36t 10-speed would save you a ton of money and a little weight. Lucky you.
  • + 1
 @zdebruine: So I would think that you would WANT the big range cassette then...just swap chainrings before the ride and you'll have a massive gear range perfectly aligned for that day's ride.
  • - 1
 I would say the goal of this should be to reduce chain tension, thus reducing both chain and gear wear. With the same torque from your legs, a larger chianring will induce less tension in the chain. Larger cogs use less chain tension for the same wheel torque. As long as the weight isn't unreasonable, bigger is better with gears to me. Get the biggest cogs you can bare to look at, and the biggest chainring you can handle so that you only use the pie plate when absolutely necessary.
  • + 0
 2x ....lol
  • + 1
 @magiko9:make it yourself then
  • + 2
 @alexdi: sick datasheet, very well researched and interesting.
  • + 0
 @shirk-007: ;-) 22-30-38/11-32 9sp FOREVER
  • + 2
 @redsled137: Lemme guess, you’re still running 10spd? 26” wheels as well, by chance?
  • + 2
 @sooner518: emm but I think, sun race cassettes are soft and wear off easily.. I ve used csmx 11-40, but then, the 11,13 became horribly worn out within 1 year..
  • + 1
 @magiko9: Sunrace is your options, if you want more cheaper.
  • + 1
 @Dd7: I had an alloy top 11.40 that worn out on me after a little over a year of riding, the 36t was done, but that was my fault for not having changed the chain after close to 800 miles from what I calculated. That was the only ring that would not "stay" because of the teeth being so destroyed. Moved up the MS (all steel) version and have not had any problems with it in close to a year of riding (think I am at about 600 miles now).
  • + 2
 @razorjack: 2 x 10 and 26 inch ftw!
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: sounds like you need an ebike
  • + 1
 @kingbike2: ???? I am the motor, screw that noise! Gotta get out there an earn my turns.
  • + 28
 Shimano XT M8000 and SLX M7000 derailleurs DO NOT need a special cage to handle a 50t cog. They don't even need excessive b-screw, 50t is well within their range. The XTR M9000 is different though, I personally use a Shark cage but regardless of the brand I recommend an offset cage for the XTR derailleur.

This looks like a great option, but still relatively expensive. The Sunrace CSMX80 will get you 11-50t on the standard shimano freehub for $80. That's incredible. If you really want that extra 1t on the high end, you can add-in OneUp's mini driver and mini cluster for another $85. That's 10-50t for $165. Can not be beat.
  • + 5
 They can handle 50t but not officially though. Have you tried backpedaling in the 42t and 50t cogs? IMO it does not work well.
  • + 2
 And btw. you need a special minidriver freehub for the one up mini driver.
  • + 5
 I have a OneUpped 11-47 xt cassette on my bike but got an 11-48 Garbaruk for my wife. I would say that my setup weighs twice as much as hers, plus the Garbaruk cassette looks dope. The SunRace cassette is quite affordable but (I believe) over 500 grams heavy.
  • + 5
 @IluvRIDING: The backpedal drop is dependent on the chainline of your particular setup, not the drivetrain alone. You could have the same exact drivetrain on five different bikes and have the backpedal drop on 3 of them but not the other 2. I've had it on two bikes so far, and no backpedal drops at all on either.

Futhermore, in all my years of riding, i've yet to see why this backpedal drop is a problem.

Finally, the OneUp "Mini Driver" is the freehub, the "Mini Cluster" is the 10t setup for it. Both of them total $85. Both are mentioned in my initial comment.
  • + 6
 @santoman: I swapped my OneUp "Shark" kit for the Sunrace CSMX80 just for simplicity. I currently have the CSMX80 combined with the OneUp Mini Driver and Mini Cluster. Combined weight is 487g, which is lighter than the stock CSMX80. That's about 40g heavier than an Eagle GX cassette, and quite a bit cheaper, not to mention you don't need the overpriced 12-speed shifter/derailleur to go with it.

I highly recommend it.
  • + 2
 @TheRaven: Well it wasn't clear that you need a new freehub. It really limits your rear hub options.

Sometimes in very technical climbs you need to backpedal, if you push them, its not a problem.

Backpedalling on the CSMX80 with reasonable chainline just does not work for me, but it might be just me.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: Sun race actually produces a much cheaper speed deraileur and shifter.
  • + 5
 shorter chainstays are more prone to backpedal dropping because while the chainline might be spot on...that's in the middle of the cassette... go to the extremes and the chain is under a greater side load.
  • + 2
 True, Sunrace is an amazing option for people wanting to do it on the cheap. Quality falls flat though when it comes time to acutally use their cassettes.
Not even their 42T cassettes can keep the chain on while backpedaling. Why then should anyone assume that the newer pie plate will work any better.

I appreciate that this review goes straight into addressing the backpedaling issue. Manufacturers (*cough cough Shimano*) have been pretending it's a non-issue for long enough. The whole bike needs to work, in every applications guys!
  • + 13
 @IluvRIDING: Yeah it depends on the nuances of your particular setup.

However, I really have trouble understanding how anyone, who is in a situation where they need to be cranking on a 50t cog, can afford to let up on the pedals at all, let alone actually backpedal. I have yet to encounter such a situation. When i'm downshifted all the way to my 50t, i'm in some crazy sh!t, and putting 100% of my personal HP down on the up pedal. If I let up even 10% in such a situation, it's over, i'll be stuck pushing. So it's very difficult for me to reconcile that this backpedal drop is ever really a problem.
  • + 2
 @jm2e: I've personally found Sunrace cassettes to be longer-lasting than Shimano or SRAM.

Shimano isn't pretending that the backpedal issue doesn't exist nor is SRAM. It's not directly either company's fault. Sure they have the power to fix it, but the problem isn't directly due to their products.
  • + 20
 @IluvRIDING: I pedal forwards, not backwards.
  • + 1
 I have about 100 miles on my Shimano M-9000 XTR medium cage derailleur on my Garbaruk 11-48T without any issues. The drivetrain is a little more noisy than a stock Shimano cassette, not not so much that it is a deal breaker. I have heard that running a SRAM Eagle chain will quite it down a bit, but have not confirmed myself.
  • + 3
 @TheRaven: +1 backpedal chain drop wouldn't bother me because I don't do it more than 90°, Now if I was dropping chains while ratcheting, that would be a problem.
  • + 3
 @TheRaven: Agree re: backpedaling. I have the 11-46 SunRace and it does move up a gear if I backpedal in the 46t (YT Jeffsy 27). But I am never backpedlaing in the granny gear because it's only useful for grinding up steep sustained climbs. If I am ratcheting on technical stuff I'm a few gears up so I can actually generate some power to get over an obstacle.
  • + 1
 @gramboh: Yup that's why I can't understand the problem.

Aside - I had that exact cassette on my Enduro 29 last season and now have it on my Fatboy, no drop on either one. However, the original drivetrain on the Enduro (SRAM XO1) did have the backpedal drop. Note i'm not blaming the cassette, that was a DM crankset and 42t cog while I used a Shimano 104bcd crankset with a 46t cog later on. That changes everything.
  • + 4
 I been using the Sunrace 11-46 CSMX80 since last season and it works great. No issues back pedaling, doesn't shift as good as the 11spd Shimano and SRAM cassettes but still very acceptable performance. Weight is around 470 grams so it's not that heavy. What I also liked was the gearing, the top 3 are 36-40-46, no big jumps. Plus it was less than $100
  • - 1
 @IluvRIDING: You need to pedal forward to mtn bike. If you're backpedaling, you're doing it wrong! lol
  • + 1
 Yes, you don’t need special cages check out this photo!, this has no special cage!Smile @https://ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb15685359/p4pb15685359.jpg
  • + 0
 @TheRaven: What is your setup like? I bought the 11-50t sunrace for $65...just bc I was curious. Don't wanna alter my XT rd cage if I don't have to.
  • + 1
 @p00kienrayray: XTR M9000 with CSMX80 cassette and OneUp MiniDriver/MiniCluster combo. I use the Shark cage on the M9000 derailleur because the M9000's cage is very different than the M8000 cage. If your derailleur is the RD-M8000, you don't need to do anything, it works perfectly in stock form.
  • + 1
 @jm2e: if your chainline is fkd even 11-36 cassette will have this issue.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yup - poor chainline and or poorly setup cable tension can cause the chain to drop while back pedaling. Rarely nowadays is it actually the fault of the cassette.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 13, 2018 at 12:04) (Below Threshold)
 @Grmasterd: that’s why boost is a God Send Big Grin you keep old cranks and your chainline is ace. At the same time the first XT M8000 was absolutely horrible. I was dropping chain after less than half of a rotation of the cranks. I was dropping it ratcheting! Now on XTR 9001 much better
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Again, it had nothing to do with the model of cassette. It's all in the combination of drivetrain parts you have and the frame they are mounted on.
  • + 1
 @jm2e:
Sounds like you have chainline issues. Non-boost frame?
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 13, 2018 at 13:31) (Below Threshold)
 @TheRaven: erm, that’s a statement that cannot be proven thus I believe you completely. All I know is that XTR works better for me in chain drop department than XT and I have as good results with it on Hope and SLX cransket. Nevermind.
  • + 1
 @lccomz: No, in fact it doesn't have as much to do with chainline as a lot of people think. If it did, we would be seeing a much bigger emphasis on chainring offsets as people discover the supposed silver bullet for fixing the problem. Though there is some difference in offsets between companies, it doesn't play as crucial a role compared with other factors. The tooth profiles on the largest cogs plays a big role. But also people running small chainrings have more issues as the chain is approaching the cassette at a sharper angle. And chainstay length will play a role too. All these things are why you'll always get contrarian anecdotes from people who call bullshit because it worked fine for them.
As WAKI said, the first gen XT M8000 cassettes were the worst for it (from the Big 2). I've run the same bike with Sram 10-42 and didn't have as much of an issue. Now, the chianline IS inherently better on the sram driver, but with the M8000 cassette, the chain would even drop from the SECOND biggest cog as well, which has a better chainline than the Sram cassette in it's largest cog. By adding an Eagle drivetrain to our stable, I again see that Sram's continued improvements are directly focusing on backpedaling because the 10-50 cassette holds a chain better than any other cassette I'm running right now. Ironically, I'm still running a 10 speed Sunrace 11-42 cassette on one bike and it's by far the worst culprit of the bunch for dropping a chain when backpedaling.
  • + 3
 @chrisingrassia: To you and all the other "Just-don't-back-pedal" choir; God bless you all for your superior skill and intellect. I'm sure there are many other areas of riding where you excel and I look forward to seeing you pepper your wisdom into other thrilling online debates.
The reality is, some of us occasionally drop a foot in technical climbs because we grow tired, or finally get defeated by the difficulty of the trail. In these instances, it can prove difficult to time your dismount with perfect crank clocking. I like to start off with my right foot in the 2 O'clock position. So If I come off with my foot in the 7 O'clock position, I will ratchet the cranks back around before starting again. If the chain has started to drop, you can imagine the horrible grinding that follows.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: That's good to hear. Yea I'm running the XT SGS long cage. Many shops advise getting a special cage, with Oneup claiming their cage significantly reduces wear and increases performance over stock cages. I'm a little skeptical about that...And you're right, who really cares about backpedaling chaindrops in granny gear?...Well, I guess if you're stuck on a steep tech section, and have to backpedal to get going again?
  • + 1
 @jm2e: Oh, ok cool. The 10spd 42T Sunrace cassette works just fine on my wife’s 429 Trail. Just lucky, I guess. I thought maybe you were running an old 142 spaced Knolly or something like that.
  • + 1
 @IluvRIDING: I have the Sunrace CSMX80 11-46 cassette on my Knolly Warden and it works wonderfully. Never dropped a chain once, even back-pedalling. Highly recommended.
  • + 2
 @TheRaven why is the Xtr m9000 different and need the cage but the rest don't?
  • + 1
 @jm2e: Many of the factors you cited make up "chainline". Chainline is not just the lateral alignment of the chain as it passes from the chainring to the cassette. The size of your chainring and cassette's biggest cog also affect chainline. The frame's design does too. It's not in question - the number one factor in the backpedal drop phenomenon is chainline. Chainring and cassette teeth absolutely have an effect, but it's much farther down the list.

I've wrenched on a ton of bikes in the 1x11 generation, and in my experience i've seen the problem much more frequently on SRAM drivetrains. That said, i've also wrenched on a lot more SRAM drivetrains. So it could very well be an equal distribution of occurrence for all I know.
  • + 1
 @Marvd135: The M9000 cage is carbon, and it's also completely different than the m8000 cage. The pulley is not offset as far and the distance between the upper and lower pulleys is different.
  • + 1
 Excellent. I could use just a hair more than the 42t and I run XT derailures. I'm pretty much in if I can run a 45t out back without modding the derailure and get good performance. My current SRAM10-42 is about due for a replacement. Perfect timing.
  • + 4
 @jm2e:

I run an 11-46T CM-MX3 on an GS-8000 mech and it doesn't drop while back-pedaling. Can spin back forever in top or bottom cog without a drop. Depends entirely on your chain line.

Cheaper, lighter and much more sensible ratio gaps than XT - what's not to like?
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: emm this 1 is rare.. my sun race only lasted for 1 year.. I ve used csmx 11-40 before.. I noticed that the 11,13 cogs wear off easily.. maybe I ve been on road too much lol
  • + 1
 @Hookem34: What chain are you running at the moment?
  • + 16
 @WAKIdesigns seriously the amount of jibberish that comes out of your mouth is astounding. Very rarely have you made any sort of valid point without trying to be overly smart. You're probably one of those self congratulatory people that things they're so clever.
  • + 5
 I think you’ll find he’s mostly having a laugh.
  • + 3
 He's a Troll remember? It is his hobby to piss of somebody...
  • + 8
 isn't zee derailleur only 10 speed? why pic description says 11 speed shimano?
  • + 1
 It's just to illustrate the aftermarket cage.
  • - 1
 Anyone who tells you this is talking crap! A derailleur isn’t indexed, the shifter is. So you can use any mech on any amount of cogs. Just adjust the limit screws and maybe use different jockey wheels, if a narrower gauge chain is being used. Never had issues setting up 7sp on 9’s, or a 9 upgrade to 10 for example.
  • + 4
 I've been seeing these cassettes online for months now, they look amazing. They also offer 11 speed for Shimano freehubs, and a 10 speed wide range 11-45t that is super light. Best prices I've found from R2-Bike in Germany. Thanks for doing a review!
  • + 2
 r2-bike is amazing

great prices and super fast delivery even overboard, bought hope e4 for like 120 euro cheaper than my local online shops (330 instead of 450)
  • + 1
 Garbaruk gonna make Ukraine great again!
  • + 3
 @RichardCunningham Would you say durability is in line with a sram 1195 cassette? How many miles did you put on it for the test? I’m super happy they are making a 10-46... the weight/cost of Eagle just hasn’t sold me yet and this seems like a great way to continue using 11speed with a little extra range for long rides in bigger mountains.
  • + 5
 Haven't kept track of the distance. I've been riding it on the Diamondback in between other test bikes for a while, so it's been racking up the miles over the winter/spring months (in good weather). Wear is as least as good as the SRAM 1195 cassette. (Note: silver teeth don't look as worn as black ones do, because they don't change color.) The Garbaruk's aluminum teeth look the same as my Eagle XX1 over the same time.
  • + 1
 The E13 9-46 cassette is just as light, has more range, and is cheaper...I've been using mine all year with great results!
  • + 2
 @covekid: Not quite: the TRSr is more expensive, while slightly lighter (306g), and the TRS+ is heavier (339g) but a bit cheaper. Done a lot of research on E13s while squeezing the last few hundred miles out of my two XX1 11spd cassettes. The main reason I'd consider this Garbaruk option over E13 isn't really cost or weight, it's noise. Is your E13 quiet? Complaints that they need constant regreasing are a bit too common for comfort...
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: In your experience, how does this Garbaruk cassette compare to the offerings from E13? In particular, how does it compare in terms of shifting performance and noise?
  • + 2
 @Veloscente: I have been in my TRSr for a year and have no noise at all. E13 cassettes had this issue more with the 9-44 cassettes. They addressed the noise issue with an additional plastic sleeve on the TRSr and TRS+. All their cassettes now come with this sleeve so all good. PB even did and article on this if I recall. Shifting has been super smooth as well. I find it better than the 11-46 XT cassettes.
  • + 5
 Just get fitter - it’ll save you a fortune you can still run 10 speed and everything Wink
  • + 0
 Rule #5
  • + 2
 Please add a note that when doing something like this, you need to check derailleur tension and chain length at full suspension compression. Otherwise you could be fucked. I added the Wolftooth 49t cog to my Sram NX 11x cassette, the derailleur handled it easily but I needed a new longer chain to handle the big cog and full suspension compression.
  • + 1
 Bigger diameter...
  • + 2
 From personal experience for me I don't see a need to have a 50 tooth cog (maybe if I had a 12 speed drivetrain) but for my current 11speed I run the Shimano XT 11-46t paired with a 36T Shimano XTR front chain ring and it's done great for everything here where I live.

Which is why I'm still eye balling the e-thirteen 9-46T cassette once my current cassette wears out.
  • + 2
 you can also combine a SRAM 11speed shifter with a 12sp. eagle gx derailleur and the garbaruk 1050 cassette. (hence no need for the garbaruk cage). Downside is that the cassette doesn't fit all XD-Drivers/Hubs. I've heard of problems with Hope Pro 4, Newmen SL and Syntace hubs...
  • + 1
 Yup. I just got one for my hope evo 4 hub and the end cap fouls the locking ring. I had to file the flange down on the end cap. All good now. The cassette is excellent.
  • + 3
 Looks like a good option for XD driver folks... expensive though. Spoke to a rep at Sunrace USA last week and he said they should have XD driver options by the end of the year!
  • + 3
 This post made my day! Eagerly awaiting this
  • + 2
 I have had the 11-48 version for Shimano free hub for about 10 months now on my hardtail 29er with 34 on the front. I went for 48 as the Garbaruk's website suggested a Shimano mid cage mech would work fine whereas the 50 would require they're modified cage. Well I'm using xt shifter and mech and it's great. It's lighter, I've now got a lower bottom gear and a higher top gear than my previous 32 X 11-42. The price is acceptable for the quality, extended range (with smooth steps) and it's lighter.
Based on this I got another for my Smuggler although I'm running that with a 32 front.
I've used it with both Shimano and SRAM chains and think the shifting is marginally better with Shimano.
I'd buy them again.
  • + 2
 The cassettes that I've been using for the last 15+ years are 11-23 with one or two up front, I think that it's the perfect gearing, I can climb any hill I want to and leave most people in the dust, as they're spinning a silly low gear because that's all they have.
  • + 3
 That is EXACTLY what I’ve been waiting for. Nice work. I am quite happy with the E 13 9-46, but this would move the chainring size back up to what most suspensions are designed around.
  • + 2
 Waiting for my 10s shimano to wear out which is taking a while, so I can run 10s garbaruk 10-42, maybe try thier chainring as well. They make cool stuff. Kind of neat that it seems to be a solid product coming from a small company.
  • + 4
 I'd like to see a review of SunRace's 11 and 12-speed cassettes that allow Eagle-range on a standard freehub body, for those running non-sram hubs.
  • + 6
 Pinkbike (or any magazine/review site for that matter) only reviews things that the manufacturers actually send them to review. Sunrace usually submits their stuff to Dirt Rag or MBA..things still in print format.
  • + 1
 Hope makes a really nice cassette. OneUp makes a hub adaptor to fit a Hope cassette onto a DT hub. Hope made these driver to open shimano standard hoping that other hub makers would pick up on it. It's just a slightly shorter Shimano driver so that they could go with the 10 tooth cog. No biggie. It's gorgeously machined and made out of two pieces. Steel and aluminum. Easy to replace the worn out piece for only around $80.00. I like those folks in Barnoldswick.
  • + 2
 "Used the 50t with the 34t chainring" what is he climbing? A wall? A 38t ring and with the 50 is slightly easier than a 32t ring with the old 11 speed 42t cassettes and even that is almost pointlessly easy.
  • + 1
 Emm but I still want to know regarding the long term usage of this cassette.. planned to buy e13 but many users complain of its durability.. they are soft and easily wear off.. hopefully this steel cogs performed better compared to e13.. the best is if its as durable as the sram's cassette
  • + 1
 bigger diameter cogs such as a 50 tooth don't shift well. The reason is that the B screw must be back out more to prevent touching the largest diameter cog. The further this screw is backed out--away from the largest diameter cog--the poorer the shifting: slow up and down shifts.
  • + 1
 Installed the Wolftooth 49t cog on my Sram NX 11x cassette and didn't notice any changes in shifting at all. It actually felt exactly the same as pervious except now I had a magic bailout/climbing gear. I recommend the upgrade to everyone!
  • + 1
 This shifting under load, is that a new thing or was it always possible? Last Wednesday I joined a training with some XC riders. We sessioned some climbs. I ride with 32t (oval) in the front and an 11-32t (9sp) cassette. SRAM X9 rear mech, X7 shifter. In less than a half hour I broke the derailleur cage in half. Not sure but I may have shifted gear indeed, something I usually don't do on a climb. Usually if I'm in the wrong gear and I don't make it, I get off and walk it out. But they seemed to be shifting so I gave it a shot too. I have to admit I do nearly all my riding (climbing included) with a low saddle and standing up where I thing the other riders were climbing seated. So now I'm curious, do modern rear mechs cope better with shifting under load?

I recall over a decade ago I also experimented with a grip shift for the rear mech. Because you can apply much more torque with a full fist, you can shift under any load. But it also meant that I bent a couple of rear mechs back then. So I went back to trigger shifters after that. So now I'm curious, are modern rear mechs up to this? I currently have Shimano Saint (2007, no rapid rise) on my fully and I've got Shimano Zee (10sp, wide range) ready for when my next hardtail frame lands. But obviously I don't want to keep destroying these mechs through shifting.
  • + 1
 Dear SRAM, if you can see this, could you please upgrade your 11-speed drive train with Eagle's butter-smooth X-Sync 2.0 shifting. If not, how about an Eagle 12-speed cassette with 9-42 range? Personally, I would run a 28T up front (lighter than Eagle, nearly the range.)
  • + 1
 I have the HG driver version 11-50t, running it with SRAM mech and the extender cage. It was a bit painful to get dialed and was very noisy until the drivetrain wore in, but now that I have put some miles on it's great. Shifts smooth, tad bit slower than my 10-42 though. And it looks killer.
  • + 3
 Why didn't you test Garbaruk 11-46 ?

not everyone needs 10 cog, especially the gap between 10 and 12 is just too big to be useful ...
  • + 1
 I have been seriously considering a Garbaruk 10-46 but with the cost of the driver it was just getting ridiculous for a consumable part (nearly the same price as a set of Hope brakes for example). Settled for a Sunrace CSMX80 11-46 instead. 486g and no issues back-pedalling or set up with a SRAM X1 DR. Bug bear? Why does it have to have a red lock ring and spider (the heavier CSM80 has them in black)?! Come to think of it...why are so many cassettes mainly black these days. I love a good silver cassette
  • + 1
 Looks like a good product, but not sure it's unique enough for me to stop using the E13 9-46. I get more range with the E13 cassette, it's just as light, and it's cheaper (can be had for $225 at most online retailers). Good to see more options though!
  • + 5
 the video is password protected I think I want one!
  • + 1
 Shimano has 9t cassette system Capreo, and Specialized used to use 6 speed cassette (9 to 26t) with prototype DT hub on their demo8. But why don't Shimano use Capreo system on their MTB group?
  • + 1
 canfield used carpeo system for many years before xD
  • + 1
 Is anyone seeing higher failure rates of their freehubs with these huge rear cogs? I just blew up a 36 tooth DT Swiss star rachet. Never had one fail before going to 46 tooth cassette.
  • + 2
 Ill take my 11x Shimano 11-44 cassettes for 70€.

If you need a dinner plate on your bike you should think about skipping some dinners so that you dont need 50t...
  • + 1
 This has generally my train of thought too. Howevee, I think the benefit comes in the harder gears. You can run a bigger chainring up front and get the same climbing ability, but then you can also get faster gearing. Not everyone needs that, but some do. I run a 28t with an 11-42 and it works well enough for me. There's one trail that I ride a few times a year where I think I could use a harder gear. I don't ride it often, but I notice it every time.
  • + 1
 @jojotherider1977:

I dont have the problem with the harder gear luckly- I ride an 32t with the 11-42t ... maybe thinking about switing to an 34t front for more DH stuff tought
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: its all a balance. I personally don't get spun out in the hard gears very often. As mentioned, there's only one trail I ride that I can think of that this happens. I like that can get through all the climbs near me with the 28t. With a 30t, I was spending a lot of time in the biggest cog, but with the 28t, I can be in the second biggest cog and have the 42 as a rescue/recovery. I'm also getting in better shape so that helps things.
  • + 0
 Careful with this “company”
I purchased a black direct mount ring for a middleburn crankset like 2-3 years ago and within a month the anodizing faded to red. After many emails and weeks and weeks of waiting, they replaced the ring with one that was so poorly machined, I couldn’t even hammer it onto my crank. To this day I have yet to receive a response or proper replacement. Be mindful of your purchase or spend your money on something else. Cheers all, just my two cents take it for what it’s worth.
  • + 3
 Thats a huge bummer. My experience with them has largely been quite positive.
  • + 0
 I'm still waiting for Shimano to make a 100 gram titanium cassette for the XD driver that only dentists can afford, but there pretty set in providing the user serviceability of their freehub over having stupidly light cassettes which is fine Imo.
  • + 1
 Isn't the shimano freehub the opposite? As in a sealed replacement part unlike XD which is simple to service as it's just pawls or star ratchets?
  • + 2
 @StevieJB: i'm referring to their cassettes ability to swap out individual cogs
  • + 1
 $265 where do they pull these numbers from? i need to replace my x1 cog but thats insane . if you have the xd driver already spend the extra $100 and buy a eagle gx cog / derailur /shifter
  • + 1
 This cool. I'm waiting for an aftermarket direct 12-sp Eagle cassette replacement at lighter weight and price point. I mean give me a fully machined cassette and slight premium to the GX eagle price.
  • + 1
 I don't understand these massive cassettes at all. I'm running an 11-42 with a 36t chainring on a Zesty 927 and that is easily low enough for any hill. Seems to be a case of "if it exists then I need it"
  • - 1
 The usual misinformation from PinkBike. The tester never tried Shimano but claims: "Shimano 11-speed derailleurs require Garbaruk's extended cage for 48 and 50-tooth models", which is false. My 1048 with Shimano XTR works perfectly without. And no, Shimano derailleurs are not "reluctant" with cogs bigger than 46. And no, the price does not approach the cost a SRAM eagle XX1 cassette, to which it should be compared. You can buy almost two Garbaruk ($263 + $24/34 cage) at the price on one XX1 ($421)!!!

Other than that this is a great product. Works perfectly after 8 months of use. Lighter than eagle XX1 by 40 grams, it demonstrates that you do not need 12 speed on a MTB at all.
  • + 2
 some bikes the shimano stock stuff combined with these "larger than the derailleur was designed for low gear cog" works great, some not so great. there is a reason for this. the derailleur hanger to axle geometry is a standardized range that all drivetrain companies use. But the actual hangers can vary from compny to company. thus, some will hold the der a bit further from the cogs (allowing use of a bigger cog) some will be tight within design tolerances thus the upper jockey wheel will hit the huge rear cog. point is. bike to bike, some will work great, some not so much. 1 bike is not a universal standard to make sweeping assumptions about this issue, becasue of this tolerance variation.
  • + 1
 @tadgercat: "1 bike is not a universal standard to make sweeping assumptions about this issue, becasue of this tolerance variation.", 1 bike would beat RC who never even tried the product and makes statements about it ... but is more than 1 bike, Garbaruk 11 speed have been out for quite a while: check MTBR drive train forum, where the agreement is that Shimano works fine up to 48-50 cog.
  • + 1
 No need for more range than 11-42 with 34t provides. At least this isn't 12 speed though. 6 speed 11-42 would be nice, and weigh much less.
  • + 2
 You people always want more. They give you more, you want less? #makeupyourdamnminds
  • + 2
 i just pretty much need a steel 42 to go on the three sram cassettes i have...
  • + 1
 Wolf Tooth makes an allow one that works fine. Don't think steel would press onto the tabs well
  • + 1
 @peleton7: it would be fine for the tabs... and it would last longer... i saw those wolf tooth ones... they are cool... but more of the same... i would roach that in like 2 months.... i have 3 XX1 cassettes that i have broken the 42 cog... they just fold over under power... my GX cassette is perfect...
  • + 1
 This and SunRace . It's nice to have options for wide range cassette. I'm using a SunRace eight speed with a 40 tooth large cog. Works great with my Saint derailleur.
  • + 1
 This is very promising. I like it a lot and might just have to get myself one. I’d probably go 48 because 50 is just to big for around my area
  • + 0
 The quality looks impressive for that price! Let's hope Putin keeps his grubby paws of Kyiv so we can all get these easily Wink Glad they're not in Donbas!
  • + 1
 tell me why you would need this when you can buy a full GX Eagle grupo with a sunrace cassette for $420Cnd.........?
  • + 1
 Anybody remember the Mountain Tamer 4 chainrings in the front from the late 90's? 4X12. 48 speed - Yeah!
  • + 2
 The nexet level is 250 tooth geared rim
  • + 2
 is it made out of an old atomic submarine
  • + 1
 I get the feeling nobody cares about the large jumps between ratios on these wide range cassettes...
  • + 1
 Wait, I'm reading that this won't fit a Hope Pro 4 XD hub/driver?? Can someone confirm?? (mine is 12x142 if it matters)
  • + 2
 Yup. I just got one for my hope evo 4 hub and the end cap fouls the locking ring. I had to file the flange down on the end cap. All good now. The cassette is excellent.
  • + 2
 @mikeep: Thanks for the reply! Damn, not sure why Hope needed to stray away from standard XD specs. On the new pinch bolt version of the E13 9-46 a shim is required to install it. My Hope stuff is awesome, but sometimes you don't need to reinvent the wheel.
  • + 1
 11-50 works great for me with Shimano XT with their cage. Quality stufff
  • + 1
 Like the compatibility list but did anyone tell them that sunrace is 126 CAD?
  • + 1
 Too expensive son. Does sunrace make an xd compatible equiv? They are all shimqno driver cassettes.
  • + 1
 10-50 is the end. No need for anything else, just chose your front ring...for those that choose 36....????
  • - 1
 That’s the street price for a Sram GX eagle with cassette, dérailler, chain and shifter. What’s the point ? A few grams maybe.
  • + 4
 Where can I get a GX Eagle groupset for $265?
  • + 3
 Ebay price for the parts you described is $350 btw...

...and doing the math...

...yup that's still more expensive.
  • + 1
 @SectionThirtyOne: Please do... You'll be my new favorite person Razz
  • + 0
 German website, total is 260 euros, so 320$.
Yes a bit more expensive bu you have the complete drivetrain instead of just a cassette.
  • + 0
 I've seen so many of the GX Eagle mechs fail from the chain jamming next to the deraileur body. They warrantied mine when it did it on the first muddy ride, but I've since gone back to 11spd mechs as I found them to be much more durable.
  • + 1
 @mrtoodles: Tons of muddy rides on my GX Eagle with well over 1000 km on it, no issues so far.
  • + 0
 All this story shows me...........People hate going uphill. So why all the hate on e-bikes?
  • + 1
 Can I get it in cornflower blue?
  • + 1
 RC, how do you like that release?
  • + 1
 Gawd, your thumb would be worn out downshifting one gear at a time! Ouch
  • + 1
 pretty sure thats a 10 speed zee deraileur
  • + 1
 You have payment! This is all I need for my 11-speed X1 based drivetrain.
  • + 2
 Isnt zee 10 speed
  • + 1
 2x9 is working flawlessly....
  • - 2
 yep, my 3x9 is doing just great AND i can go faster downhill and still pedal
  • + 1
 @fruitsd79: I'm there with ya bud.
  • + 0
 Good product, good price.....yet they whine. Guess you can't please everyone.
  • + 1
 Better get em now, before the war starts....
  • + 1
 Why didn't the show the 45T cassette for 10 speed?
  • + 1
 How does this compare to the current options from E13?
  • + 1
 Dream drivetrain!
  • + 1
 I like the red.
  • + 0
 What, no gearbox! Yo gearbox people, where you at?
  • + 1
 hahaha troublemaker !!!
  • - 2
 I'd rather go Sunrace. Option two would be One Up. I love that company. Then Shimano, then "insert yet another chainring maker company" and then SRAM at the end.
  • + 1
 If you can live with an 11-tooth small cog you can run a Sunrace cassette for about one half the price of this.
  • + 0
 @Skooks: I can’t. So little range. My friends have more and I cannot stand that.
  • + 0
 Titanium driver cog, please!
  • - 1
 so what about the high speed gears? i have an idea....maybe we could develop extra front cogs for increased range?
  • + 1
 RC has a dope job
  • + 0
 Make one for shimano drivers too please!??
  • + 2
 Cant put 10 tooth sprocket on shimano freehub, it just don't fit.
  • + 0
 Why? You can get the Sunrace CSMX80 for $80 if you have the shimano driver.

I don't see them producing much for the Shimano freehub because there's already several cheaper options.
  • + 1
 I have the one they make for Shimano, only goes down to 11t though
  • + 4
 @TheRaven: and much heavier...
  • + 1
 @razorjack: Than what?
  • + 0
 BOX one 11-46 FTW!
  • + 4
 Box is just Sunrace im pretty sure....
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