Interview: DVO's First Season With the Giant DH Team

Jul 26, 2018 at 14:13
by Richard Cunningham  
DVO suspension tech story
DVO's Ronnie Dillon.

Ronnie Dillon has been with DVO for over five years, and he's been a suspension tech and test rider for more than two decades. This season, the Southern California suspension maker has teamed up with Giant for the DH World Cup series. That's a huge commitment for a large brand. Double that for a small company like DVO, but the benefits of the World Cup's steep learning curve and failure-is-not-an-option work environment are invaluable for a high-end suspension company that aspires to remain on the cutting edge. PB photographer Ross Bell spoke with Dillon as he was dialing in Team Giant's suspension for the World Cup at Val di Sole, Italy.

How did DVO become involved with Giant's downhill program?


Man, this is something that has been in the works for a while. It's something that made us a little nervous in the beginning, because we know what it takes to compete at this level. It turned out to be even more work than I thought it would be going in, but these guys are a lot of fun to deal with. They know what they want and they ask us in the correct way - they have their terminology down. That helps us to nail down their tunes.

What are the primary reasons DVO has teamed up with Giant DH? Exposure? To move the products forward?


A little bit of both. These guys are a huge asset in helping us develop the product even further than we would be able to do on our own. It's nice to be able to work with the team, because it gives us a different perspective on what they need to do their jobs rather than what we bring to them. It helps us to develop a much better product for a racer, and then it gives us a little more perspective on what a consumer may want to purchase right away.

Those two things are lot different aren't they?


Two completely different animals!

DVO suspension tech story
DVO suspension tech story

How do you balance that?


That is actually very hard, because if we threw an average consumer who was really good at a bike park on one of these tunes, they would get rattled to death. It would be obvious. After a few runs, they wouldn't be able to hold onto the bike. Vice-versa, if we gave one of these guys a standard tune, really bad things would happen - it would be visually obvious if you watched them ride.

How far removed are these forks and shocks from the ones you already have on the market?


You know what? Not much at all. We don't have very many of the Onyx forks out in the market right now. These guys are really setting the standard for that race tune and then we will take that tune and strip it down and figure out what the consumer actually wants. A lot of the stuff in the forks is exactly what will come in OEM or aftermarket product. The shocks, on the other hand, are actually specially tuned for the Giant guys, so what you get on the Giant bikes will be slightly different than the shock that you would buy aftermarket.

DVO suspension tech story
DVO's Jade coil shock.


In terms of rider feedback, did the team have any specific stuff they wanted you to work on?


Yeah, it was a little tough in the beginning, because they were used to a different brand of suspension. They were a little intimidated, because there was a different range of settings. We had to start from ground zero on all the shim stacks. We set aside some testing time at a couple of different locations and met up with them, and actually managed to produce some pretty cool tunes for these guys. We started with "A, B, and C tunes" and figured out which ones were garbage, then worked from the tune that they like best into a different level that really worked well for them.

In the future, do you think that you will be working with more teams?


It's easy for us to do one team right now. We're still a very small company, so this is something that we are basically going to take our time with. We have one tech out here working with about ten riders. The stuff they ask from us isn't outlandish, but you have one chance to nail it and it needs to be done properly every time. There's no point in us overwhelming ourselves.

DVO suspension tech story


As an OEM supplier, are you also working with Giant as well?


We signed up a pretty sweet OE deal with Giant. That is something we have been working towards for a while, and at the same time, it's kind of intimidating working with [a high-level] product and a company of this scale. We have to schedule our steady production for aftermarket sales, along with large and immediate OEM orders for Giant. So, we're working!

The bikes are using coil shocks in the rear?


Giant's downhill bikes are, obviously, using coils in the rear. Their trail bikes are all using air shocks. The EWS guys are running a little bit different setup, so they have one of each for their enduro bikes. They can choose to run either their air shock or their coil, but for the most part, they are sticking with the air shock. The Topaz is a favorite of theirs. They can play with air pressure, the pressure in the reservoir and basically, get it done immediately. They've found that it is more convenient to leave the shock on the bike, and it's giving them the range of adjustment and useability that they thought they were getting from a coil shock.
DVO Topaz T3 Air Review by Vernon Felton
Topaz air-sprung shock.

Are you planning to offer an air shock for downhill? The field seems to be split exactly in half between air and coils.


We are working on something. I'm not saying that it's coming out soon, but it is definitely in the works. I've seen some of the stuff that the guys in the office are doing and they are probably going to kill me when they hear this. We have some stuff that we are working on, but because of the stuff we are in the middle of with Giant, we have had to pull back a little bit, but it's going to happen.

It's been interesting this year, for sure. Before, it was only two brands in the pits, and now you guys are popping up...


I think people are a little more willing to accept the idea of using a brand outside of Fox and RockShox. There are options out there and they don't exactly need to be affordable options, because I don't think that people are looking for suspension that is affordable - they want something that is actually usable, and that isn't something that you would see mainstream, every day. I love seeing DVO product on all kinds of brands of bikes. Users that want to tinker usually end up on our stuff. There are a couple of other brands out there that have that same range of tuneability, so it's cool to see that.

Marcelo Gutierrez looked on form today but that shouldn t be surprising with the Colombian being consistently strong on all tracks.
Giant's Marcelo Gutierrez at the Leogang round of the World Cup DH.

You got Eliot Jackson racing Crankworx events, and then Marcelo Gutierrez and Jacob Dickson have polar opposite styles on the bike. How's that going to work out?


These guys are unreal. Jacob's a lot of fun to deal with. I've only had the chance to work with Jacob during testing days and a couple of race venues where we were working on tunes. I've actually wanted to work with Marcelo for a long time. I've watched him grow through his career, so I saw an interesting opportunity to work with that guy. When I found out Giant was going to happen I thought, "This is going to be awesome."

DVO suspension tech story
Team Giant mechanic Grant Sides prepared Marcelo's Glory. DH bikes use DVO's air-sprung Onyx DC fork and a Jade coil shock.







121 Comments

  • + 71
 The real question; will giant go green or DVO go blue?
  • + 22
 They should meet in the middle and have a yellow special edition bike. Although then I'd be green with enve.
  • + 6
 Both! 2019 Reign advanced 0 is blue, advanced 1 is green!
  • + 1
 They went both... the advanced 0 has blue and the glory 1 has been.. the 2019 bikes have just been released.
  • + 1
 @fatalityBMX: 170mm on the front of the reign and 180mm on the sx now? Still no 29ers.. smh
  • - 3
 Does Giant still make bikes or are they sold out of everything? I used to be a Giant dealer and had to tell every customer sorry,,,, you have to buy that bike 12 seconds after it arrives from china.
  • + 10
 @fecalmaster: not china, they're made in taiwan like basically any other quality mountain bike. and uh if I'm correct I believe not only do they make bikes but they are currently the world's largest manufacturer of bikes.
  • + 0
 I love obsessive compulsive disorders.
  • + 3
 @fecalmaster: HAHA...we are a giant dealer and most of the 2018 bikes are out of stock. I think they make 25 of each model.
  • + 2
 @DaveJube: plenty of stock in aus
  • + 9
 @DaveJube: sounds like the manager has a hard time forecasting sales and making orders on time....
  • + 2
 @DaveJube: Luckily I've owned and ridden every bike giant has, even the commuters. My favorite was always the reign but the trance was also very caspable. Honestly their DH bike was a bit to low for my style of east coast mega bolders. The weird part was calling them with a customer sold and they were sold out by April. Someone in their establishment needs to look at that because I would sell the next best at same price point every time. Have faith in your product or don't advertise to sell it. Yes we selling every brand all day because you're "out of stock" bs
  • + 1
 @fecalmaster: my glory advanced sat i the shop for a year while i was restoring my atx team. They just couldnt sell it. Was $5500 i offered him $3850 and walked away with it
  • + 1
 @fecalmaster: Well, if it makes you feel any better Specialized was the same way. They could sell out a certain bike before the season even starts. I guess they have to determine how many of a certain model they would produce and they couldn't guess the popular bikes. Some would be 50+ stock while others we sold out until the next model year.
We just started selling trek and it's the same way. The Roscoe 8 was a very popular bike and I sold one in june that I needed to order and I didn't even consider they were out of stock. WHen I logged on I saw they were all sold out. My outside sales rep was pretty good and tracked one down for me. By the time I called the customer to let him know I could get it, he already found one at another shop. I was pissed I lost the sale.
  • + 2
 @takeiteasyridehard: someone has the tough job of predicting which bikes are going to be the hot seller. This problem isn't limited to Giant as we sell a few different brands and it happens across the board.
  • + 2
 @DaveJube: Hahahaha I was a specialized dealer also and they were slightly better than giant. I have also seen models from both companies sit for years then sell cheap. It's the popular modeles like the reign that would be gone before the summer. Many customers scratching their heads. I saw this trend and would get mine for pennies on the dollar every year.
  • + 1
 pretty obvious answer ? DVO s are blue here just look Eek
  • + 2
 @DaveJube: there has to be a certain distribution of bikes in any given shop. Stock up on bread and butter sell throughs... make your money there. Those also tend to have more available reorder points through the year. Then stock a few specialty bikes, and order early, with no expectation of selling for much profit. These will make the shop look full and cater to everyone. It's tough in any market area. But it can be done well if planned appropriately. Be ready to clear product/discount at the right time, to make sure you can do the same in August when next year's product comes out....
  • + 1
 @takeiteasyridehard:
I pretty much run the shop and I am responsible for most anything that takes place including running low on stock BUT I do not have the power to order whatever bikes I want. I merely make my suggestion as to what we should bring in and hope that the owner sticks to my suggestion. But it's not my money to spend and I understand that but I have a better idea of what sells and what doesn't since I am actually the one selling these bikes. As it is now over half the bikes I sell are special orders, even the bread and butter hybrids. Sometimes you just can not sell a bike if the customer can't see and feel the bike. Most of the time if I have a bike in the correct size and it is similarly equipped to the one the customer wants I can sell it even if I have to order it. My shop fails in not having enough stock because some people want a bike and they want it that day. They don't want to wait 5 days or even 1 day. So if we had more bikes I can sell more bikes.
It doesn't help if i spend an hour painting a picture for a customer what a bike will be like and how much they will love it before we order it then going online to check the manufactures inventory only to find they are sold out. Then I have to scramble to find a replacement. But I do the best I can do and always have good sales numbers. But I don't feel like I am selling bikes, I feel like I am helping people pickout the perfect bike for what they envision.
  • + 2
 @cdmbmw: There was talk of a Trance 29er but haven't seen anything yet! But the fox 36 on the trance looks sexy...
  • + 2
 @DaveJube: that's tough. I was once in your shoes. It sounds like you're probably doing all you can with the powers you have. Owners need to give full regulatory authority to the manager. The small shops usually dont. I dont miss being in your position.
  • + 1
 @takeiteasyridehard: How true you are. My owner refuses to give me the power I need to make this place run better. I understand that he wants to have the final say but by him trying to micromanage everything it actually hurts. I am fully responsible for all the bad shit that happens like when people are complaining it took 2 weeks to get the bike they ordered, or if someone forgets to order a part or any of the 1000 things that can go wrong daily but he won't give me the power to make things run the way they should.
Don't get me wrong, I really love what I do and I do like the fact that they trust me with the responsibilities that I have. But at the end of the day it's not my credit that would be destroyed or even my reputation that would be ruined if I ran the place into the ground. So I just do the best with what I have to work with and I think we all do a really good job at running this small local bike shop.
  • + 21
 If DVO wanted to really be different they would make easily servicable coil sprung fork with 34-36mm stanchions for 120-180mm travel bikes.

Titanium coil, open bath damper, oil seals. Sure it would be 10-20% heavier than light air forks but would perform much better and more consistent.

Right now so many companies are doing the same and there's absolutely no market differentiation between them.

10 or 20 years ago Marzocchi was one of the major manufacturers and their good forks used to cost 1/3 or 1/2 what new brands without any track record in making forks (looking at you MRP) are charging now. What's up with that? Who pays 1000+ for a new fork?
  • + 4
 I agree except for the open bath part.. you can have user-serviceable closed cartridge. I only have dvo shocks but other forks because they dont have a coil (or coil convertible) one....they are late to the party... cheers
  • + 3
 Agreed. I’m in the market for a 180 fork and the options are very limited, and non existent in coil.
  • + 12
 Mrp is basically white bros. Been in the game for some time.
  • + 7
 DVO was started by Marz employees after Marz went to shit, they are the new Marz. I'm sure you remember Marz for their good stuff, but they also made crappy entry level forks with awful orifice dampers to pay the bills, while DVO only sells high-end product. Between low volume and high expectations today you've gotta expect high prices from these niche suppliers.
  • + 3
 www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/components/forks-suspension/product/review-marzocchi-z1-rc2-eta-anniversary-fork-10234

10 years ago, 500-600€ fork (half the price companies are charging now.
RC2 damper, titaniun coil, secondary air chamber for progressive travel etc.

PUSH is charging as much for ACS3 now. Industry (or better said customers) have really gone down the crapper in the last decade or so....
  • + 1
 @FindDigRideRepeat: get a used Metric HLR or Roughcut and convert it to coil.
(Relatively) cheap and performs better than all other Brands.
  • + 1
 DVO has the onyx SC fork, 36mm stanchions and 160-180 travel going into production in September. Not coil though.
  • + 2
 @NotNamed: or a coil vengeance...difficult to find in some places though.. I have a MRP Ribbon Coil and couldn't be happier....
  • + 9
 @msusic: Well since Marzocchi almost went bankrupt, I wouldn't use them as an example of good pricing or business approach.
  • + 4
 @Pedro404:

Didn’t you listen to Bryson Martin on The Inside Line?!?! Awesome.

Also I’m repping the Topaz on my Stumpy and it’s been great.
  • + 1
 @jaame: er... i'm pretty sure the Onyx's in DC and SC are both coil are they not?
  • + 1
 @miff: I could be wrong because it's just from memory. I don't work for them or anything. I saw a video from Eurobike on a German website with one of the DVO guys. I think he said they were air, but I have heard that coil may follow.
  • + 1
 I'd be on board with that open bath coil sprung fork. Sometimes I watch the emerald oil change video with the lights low and a candle lit.
  • + 2
 Bugs me to no end. Fox 40: Air only. Boxxer: Air Only. 180 travel forks: always air. Then there is the line, just get the push conversions kit. Yeah, spend 150 more dollars on an already expensive fork. People love coil because it feels great. It's heavier, but who cares, I pedal a 40 plus pound bike, and I'm absolutely fine. Many may hate on Marzocchi's business methods, but few can deny the amazingly supple and stiff ride of the bomber 66!
  • + 2
 @sspiff: not basically, but it is. They bought them a few years ago. If you have a White Bros, send that leaky POS into MRP and it will come back sealed and functional. Really good customer service out of those guys!
  • + 1
 @mdrrich: i hear you.. i have an old boxxer, 2013 coil r2c2, buttery smooth... beautiful on my darkside.. yeah, 26inch .. dont care
  • + 1
 @msusic: had this z1 rc2 and the even better 55 rc3 ti and now riding the cane creek helm coil. Feels as good as forks from five years ago!
  • + 1
 Fox 40 Elite is titanium coil.
  • + 1
 @Lagr1980: Open bath with no compression adjustments (only LSR) on one leg, and a coil spring on the other, and they would make an awesome trail to enduro forks for like 300USD for the "new" Trances and Reigns, way less than the crazy price on the Push ACS3 kit.
  • + 1
 @mdrrich: Coil isn't un-popular because it's heavy. It's un-popular because having to swap springs to find the right rate is too much of a pain in the ass for the majority of riders who just want to buy a bike and hit the trail, and of course it's also a pain for the manufacturers and retailers who have to stock a range of springs.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: There's a good Inside Line Podcast about this. Marz is 'cheap' again being rebranded Fox suspension. I guess the bittersweet things is the name is still alive.
  • + 11
 DVOs customer service has been excellent - they answered my questions before I bought a topaz so quickly and thoroughly that it made me pull the trigger, pretty sure it was Ronnie who answered my emails too. He even offered to talk through the process of changing the stroke length over the phone if I had any trouble with the written instructions. The topaz has been stellar too, way more support than a Monarch Plus RC3 and plusher and smoother than the DB air I had previously. Love it.
  • + 3
 Sane here, I’ve sent questions and Ronnie is usually the one who answers. I started with an emerald then put a diamond on my 29er. I also like that they offer all the spare parts directly on their website. I feel like it sometimes a nightmare to find parts for a fox or RockShox product.
  • + 4
 They have a great service! And Ronnie is a very cool dude. I purchased a compression assembly from him, he gave me a mad military discount and free tune. Customer service is a huge factor for me when purchasing a product.
  • + 8
 Topaz is on my list to get. My diamond has been the best fork I’ve had.
  • + 5
 do it. the Topaz is amazing, as well as the jade...cheers.
  • + 1
 Topaz is amazing! Raced at a DH race on a tough Pro course with my 125mm Transition Scout (all I own right now). I was able to place in volume spacers in a jif when needed, find the perfect balance for sensitivity, and achieve solid rebound really quick. Never felt like I bottomed at all when I did the couple times & performed great. On front was a 150mm Diamond, which smashes like a DH fork at any travel. So highly recommended.
  • + 1
 @dasendurbro: great. That’s what it’s going on, a scout. How many volume spacers did you put in? Did you add any spacers to the rock shox before you picked up the topaz? I take this bike anywhere. Diamond is at 150 but I’ll probably put it back to 160. It didn’t climb much worse in 160 but the 10 mm height and travel was nice on the down(with the works -1 headset it’ll be between 65.5/65 ha in 160). I won’t be racing any dh races on it though, guaranteed haa
  • + 2
 Had one on my Reign for a couple of years now - amazing shock.
  • + 1
 @miff: good to hear the long terms. 3rd season on my diamond
  • + 2
 @won-sean-animal-chin: Oh sick! I'm pretty lightweight at 135lbs, so I ran 2 spacers at around 180psi or so (just a hair lower than normal). It felt great, still had some suppleness, but I needed a little less psi to compensate the volume spacers. The bladder I always run 170psi as well. As for the Rock Shox, I never did much to it, as I ordered my Topaz right when I got the bike. But I managed to blow the shock out after 2 rides, so that says something haha! And running 160mm on the bike should be totally fine. I like 150mm with a 1/4in spacer under my stem, which is a 35mm and 780mm bars (got a short torso/long leg ordeal going on). The bike is ultra capable, which is why I've never ridden anything else. But it's def time to upgrade to a Sentinel. Put an Onyx/Topaz/Jade combo & you're set for anything! Next year though. Let me know if you need any advice when you get it!
  • + 1
 @dasendurbro: right on! Thanks. That’ll help. The rs has been ok w factory tune. It’s leaking now and I suspect it can be better in every function that the topaz would offer. I’d consider a jade if they made them in a short e2e and stroke w a compression switch. Topaz sounds more supple than most other air shocks though. I originally had my diamond at 160 and thought I’d try 150. It’s ok at 150 but I prefer 160 and the steerer tube is maxed for height where it’s cut. I’m opposite of you w short leg long torso so tend to run higher front end. Thanks again. Just have to convert to 170lbs but I’ll probably go w the 2 spacers regardless
  • + 6
 Only two brands in the pits, weren't Ohlinns already there with specialized last year ?
  • + 6
 Yeh there is more then 2 i think the guy interviewing is a noob... ohlins, polygon are using suntour, brendog is using bos suspension
  • + 18
 Interview is taken from a pretty casual chat and I didn’t type it up, pretty sure those weren’t my exact words but whatever... Just making reference to the fact that it’s way more interesting now there are a lot more brands involved with the likes of DVO, Bos, Formula, SR Suntour, Ohlins. Rather than being dominated by FOX and Rock Shox.
  • + 3
 @rossbellphoto: 100% agree its good to see a mix up
  • + 4
 I been testing DVO since the beginning and i have to say that it's the best suspension out there and the guys are good to talk and excellent customer service i have to give them 5 star .
  • + 1
 I have had a Diamond for a while. Before that a Pike, after that, a Selva. Both Diamond and Pike were good as long as you do a complete overhaul every other week. Servicing the Diamond is a ridiculous complex task, heat this, million washers etc etc. I have a Selva now, better by a long margin. It does not get stuck and it is very easy to service. Besides being twice the fork on all other aspects.
  • + 1
 I have been running a Diamond since last September. I feel a bit guilty because it’s never been opened up or serviced. Besides adjusting the pressure and OTT between rides, it has performed the same every ride every day.

I love my Diamond!
  • + 2
 Thinking about throwing a Topaz shock on my Jeffsy to replace the stock Deluxe RT3 that has no tuneability outside volume spacers and rebound... heard good things.
  • + 1
 Oh, let me know how that goes. I’m running a DB Air (after they fixed their issues with the first ones), always curious about different YTs, reallly any straight to rider companies, that are running different specs than out of the box.
  • + 0
 Commented this above, but I'll repaste for you as well. Topaz is amazing! Raced at a DH race on a tough Pro course with my 125mm Transition Scout (all I own right now). I was able to place in volume spacers in a jif when needed, find the perfect balance for sensitivity, and achieve solid rebound really quick. Never felt like I bottomed at all when I did the couple times & performed great. On front was a 150mm Diamond, which smashes like a DH fork at any travel. So highly recommended.
  • + 1
 Your RT3 has plenty of tunability. You just need to know what you want from it and take it to a shop to get it tuned. I'm all for you buying a DVO, but a custom shock tune is way cheaper than a new shock.
  • - 1
 @bulletbassman: which is exactly what no one wants to do.

95% of riders should be able to get a basic tune from their shock by themselves. Paying to send it off to some chump who has no idea how or what you ride and weeks between tuning and testing... yea sounds great for your everyday rider.
  • + 2
 Dude, for sure you should have had some response regarding Elliot Jackson and not let this trail off without commentary on such a bright, warm hearted !guy
  • + 2
 The best thing about owning DVO products is being able to call up for help and hearing the sweet, sultry tones of Ronnie's voice on the other end of the line. Dude's the man.
  • + 2
 My Intense tracer 29 came truely alive when I put a Topaz on it, best air shock there is
  • + 2
 Why are racers setups so much different? Hit things faster / harder or because they are fit enough to hold on? Or both?
  • + 2
 Both
  • + 2
 Overall speed is much higher than average people, and also they only care about speed, comfort is not so relevant.
  • + 2
 Go watch a pro race trails you are familiar with or go to a WC race. It's nuts how fast they go over very tech terrain or hit berms with. I used to race semi-pro and still feel pretty fast compared to the average guy in his 40's. Pros are on a different scale
  • + 2
 I'm looking forward to a DH air shock. New rig gets built in two years, hopefully it's out by then.
  • + 2
 I remember the DH Air Shock being hinted in 2014 hahaha. But seriously, you can't be mad for it not coming out after looking at the accomplishments they've done over the past few years. Been stoked on their product since 2014 & won't stop loving DVO. The 'Jade Air' is going to be amazing!
  • + 1
 Why would you want an air shock for a dh bike though?
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Tuneability and weight.
  • + 1
 @bulletbassman: weight yes but not tuneablity and surely the increase in performance beats out weight on a dh bike.
  • + 3
 Why arent the running the inverted dual crown?
  • + 2
 Weight, emerald is almost 1 kg (2 lbs) heavier than boxxer wc
  • + 2
 lower weight and less flex were said (in a different interview) to play a role in the decision to go with the Onyx instead of Emerald.
  • + 1
 @ka-brap: yes, and I think image and public perception also play a part.
  • + 2
 Why not use the upside down forks? Is RSU really an intrinsically better design with the third 'brace'?
  • + 2
 yes. Moto uses it because they can increase stiffness without drastically increasing the overall weight, but with bicycles it's more of a significant weight gain, and more directly affect's the athlete's performance.
  • + 0
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: but the sprung to unsprung ration would be far better on the inverted forks
  • + 1
 Motor cross forks are all inverted mainly because of ground clearance issues. With 300mm of travel in order to have enough bushing overlap and long enough lowers they would extend far below the front axel on conventional forks. This wouldn’t be a problem bar the giant ruts that form. Basically you’d get massive rut steer as soon as you meant the bike over. Obviously as well and sprung to unsprung mass ratio, bushing overlap (as the upper bushing is fixed on the stanction, thus increasing bushing overlap as it goes through the travel) Motorcycle forks always had an oil seal so there was no added stiction by going inverted, some was lost as the oil seals were always sitting in a bath of oil.
  • + 3
 Pardon my ignorance, but what does OEM stand for?
  • + 4
 Original equipment can’t remember the M, manufacturing maybe. But essentially stuff that comes as standard.
  • + 5
 Original Equipment Manufacturer
  • + 4
 Owned by Every Moron.....hihihihihi.
"An Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) is a company that produces parts and equipment that may be marketed by another manufacturer. For example, if Acme Manufacturing Co. makes power cords that are used on IBM computers, Acme is an OEM." - Wikipedia
  • + 2
 @lepak1corner: wikipedia to the rescue
  • + 20
 Isn't it nice when you ask a question on a website and someone just politely answers it and helps you out?

See Pinkbike audience, it is possible to not be a dick about everything.
  • + 2
 @WolfRidge08: And it’s not ignorance if you want to learn! It’s ignorance if you’ve been taught and couldn’t care less :-)
  • + 1
 @cunning-linguist: Not necessarily, it can just be the absence of knowledge. For example, I'm ignorant about quantum mechanics, and it's not a negative thing to say. Depends more on context and intention of use.
  • + 2
 @ka-brap: ignorant have a negative connotation, partly due to it's root word. unknowledgeable is more accurate.
  • + 2
 I just genuinely didn’t have a clue!
  • + 2
 I always thought it was Original Equipment Market, as opposed to Aftermarket. Good old Wikipedia hey.
  • + 1
 I reckon they should make emerald stanchions. Would look insane against the blue lowers. Then put the emerald coloured spring back on too
  • + 1
 Could be to do with the surface finish hence why almost all stanchions are done black/grey/kashiwa ?
  • + 4
 Bring on the Emerald SC!
  • + 2
 That would be the ultimate. From my understanding, I don't believe the ultimate ever happens.
  • + 2
 I would save my money for that, maybe even stop drinking alcohol altogether for it, and get my life on track. I honestly just wish I was in the position to make parts, but as they say, "the grass is always greener on the other side".
  • + 1
 @Kramz: ultimate would be Emerald SC travel adjust 100mm - 180mm in 10mm increments.
  • + 2
 Best of luck DVO. I love having your forks on my bikes. Best stuff on the market!
  • + 1
 Fully serviceable Air Shock for DH, that's the thing I was waiting! DVO will be soon on my wishlist!
  • + 1
 With the 29er tide rushing in to take over, how long will Giant resist and lose sales.
  • + 2
 Not long, I am hearing whisperings about a 29er Trance
  • + 1
 That blue and black. looks. so. clean...
  • + 1
 which photo are you referring to?? We might be thinking the same thing!
  • + 1
 Ronnie da man!
  • - 3
 Race teams are so cool. It should really be my goal to join a race team.
  • + 2
 I just joined one and it is really cool.
  • + 1
 I don't know man, that sounds like a lot of work.

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