OneUp Switch Chainring System - Review

Mar 6, 2017 at 3:46
by Richard Cunningham  
Switch Chainring System


Widespread acceptance of one-by cranksets has created additional opportunities for innovation, and one of those is OneUp's new Switch Chainring System. No surprise if quick-change gearing isn't on your short list of must-have accessories. It's a fresh concept. Most trail riders grew up with fussy front derailleurs and multiple chainrings, while gravity and all-mountain riders wrestled with single-ring cranksets enshrouded by complicated chain guides. Once you got all those bits working correctly, the last thing on your mind was experimenting with different size chainrings.

Until recently, if one wanted taller or lower gearing, the default was a new cassette - an expensive purchase, but much less complicated to install. Even if the thought did occur that it would be great to customize your gearing for a full day of climbing or for a gravity day at the bike park, the negatives far outweighed the positives.


OneUp Switch Chainring System 2017
OneUp offers spiders that fit all popular direct-mount cranksets, Switch chainrings (round or oval) interchange with all spider configurations.


OneUp Switch Chainring System

Today, however, single-chainring drivetrains with narrow-wide sprocket profiles have turned that equation up-side down and OneUp Components gets it. An 11 or 12-speed cassette can cost upwards of $500, while chainrings are priced around $40. OneUp engineered a small spider that interlocks with the sprocket. The chainring is secured with four Allen screws, but they only need to be backed off two revolutions to release the sprocket. All the hardware remains in place, and the width of the spider and the design of the chainrings is such that the sprocket can be removed or installed over the crankarm and the pedal. Switching to a different chainring can be done in less than two minutes, using only a four millimeter Allen key. OneUp's Switch Chainring System makes it practical and inexpensive to match your gearing to the task at hand.
Switch Chainring System
The chainring interface unlocks in a clockwise direction.


Carriers (Spiders): All types, $23 USD
• Race Face Cinch - Standard, Boost, SuperBoost
• SRAM style 3 bolt - Standard, Boost, SuperBoost, BB30 short spindle
• Hope - Standard and Boost
• E*Thirteen - Standard and Boost
• Cannondale - Standard, Ai, FatCAAD
Chainring Sizes: USD
• 28T oval and round - $40
• 30T oval and round - $40
• 32T oval and round - $42
• 34T oval and round - $44
• 36T oval and round - $44
(All chainrings fit all carriers)


Beyond the obvious, the Switch Chainring System also helps to future-proof your crankset. Spiders are available to fit popular direct-mount cranksets from Race Face, SRAM, Cannondale, e*thirteen and Hope, and for Boost and standard chain lines. Oval and round chainrings are available in even-tooth increments from 28 to 36. All Switch spiders cost $23 USD, while chainrings range from $40 to $44 USD. OneUp's options ensure that you can update your next bike or crank purchase to accept your selection of chainrings, and also reduces the cost and complexity of replacing worn sprockets.

Views: 10,345    Faves: 13    Comments: 1


Rear derailleurs are a limiting factor. Both SRAM and Shimano mid- and long-cage derailleurs have enough wiggle room to absorb chainrings one size larger or smaller (narrow-wide chainrings require two-tooth increments). Depending upon the chain length, when dropping down to a smaller sprocket, it may be necessary to adjust the B-tension screw to fine tune the derailleur cage's tension.

OneUp Switch Chainring System 2017
The locking interface rotates into place (front view)...
OneUp Switch Chainring System 2017
...And is secured by a standard, reversed chainring bolt (rear view).


Jumping up one size larger usually can be done without any adjustments. So, in most cases, if your chain length is set for a 32-tooth sprocket, you can swap between a 30, 32 and a 34-tooth chainring without adding or subtracting chain links. Want to go huge? Assemble a two or a three-link chain segment and use a second quick-link to adjust the chain length so you can jump back and forth from a 28 to a 36 tooth sprocket with a minimum of additional fussing.

Switch Chainring System
Switch Chainring System
The spider design allows the sprockets to clear the crankarm and pedals for easy removal and installation.


Ride Report

I installed the OneUp Switch Chainring System on a Race Face Next crankset, as well as a SRAM X01 and Eagle XX1 cranksets with no difficulties. I anticipated that I might have issues with the quick-change interlocks either loosening or creaking over time, but neither occurred. OneUp's system is still running silently after nearly three months of unseasonably wet riding for sunny Southern California.

The quick-change feature is as simple as simple gets. With practice, I could switch chainrings in under two minutes. An unexpected plus was that I could install or remove the sprocket with the chain in place out from under a chain guide. OneUp sent me the chainring options that I use most (30, 32, 34 and 36-teeth) so I set the chain lengths of the test bikes for the middle of the three options I planned on using (32t for a 30 x 34 range and 34t for a 32 x 36 range). There was no noticeable difference in shifting while riding the three options with SRAM Eagle, XX1 and Shimano XT rear mechs - and, as long as the chain was not set too long, there was no need to adjust the B-tension screws.

Did I find the option to switch gearing useful? Yes, but it took a few times to get into the habit. Initially, I forgot that I could easily pop a more suitable chainring on the bike until I was midway into a long, technical uphill slog and my legs were screaming. Now, I'll put a 36 on my enduro bike if I am shuttling downhill trails, and if I need to pedal the 30-pound monster to the top, I am not ashamed to drop down to a 32, so I can cruise the climbing trails and be fresh for the downs.

Beyond legs and lungs, however, there is always the extra wear and tear on the expensive drivetrain parts that occurs when the chain is dragging on the sprockets at extreme angles to consider. And, perhaps more important is that most rear suspension designs are tuned to react best when the rider is using the middle ranges of the cassette gears. Adapting your chainring size is a simple tool to move the gears you pedal most often in towards the center of the cassette, where suspension kinematics are optimized and the transmission is more efficient.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesI am sure that many riders will question the usefulness of quick-change gearing, but the bottom line is that, until you've tried it, you'll never really know. OneUp's Switch Chainring System is intelligently designed and simple to use. I doubt that many enduro racers would do it, but the possibility to drop down two or four teeth would make it much easier to top those monster liaison stages that seem to be popular on the EWS circuit. An extra chainring weighs almost nothing, and OneUp's clever interlock makes it both possible and practical to switch to your race gearing at the top. (Whether that would be legal is another story.)

For the rest of us, OneUp's Switch Chainring System offers an affordable, do-it-yourself option that, at the very least, should encourage riders to experiment with different gearing or oval chainrings. And, in its best expression, OneUp's system will enable riders to better match their gearing to the terrain and optimize the use of wide-range cassettes.
RC







258 Comments

  • 586 44
 Hey, here's a really innovative idea - how about having two chain rings on all the time - and we'll call it a 2x!!!
  • 341 10
 Don't be daft. That sort of technology is years away!
  • 246 8
 But how would you shift between the chainrings? You would have to devise a contraption that would somehow derail the chain, as it were...
  • 82 1
 I like this product because it's unexpected, clever, and possibly useful, but I like your comment because it's hilarious. The first thing I thought of after reading this article was Tullio Campagnolo in the freezing cold, struggling to remove his rear wheel to flip it over and change gears.
  • 58 180
flag ryanbpoquette (Mar 8, 2017 at 0:49) (Below Threshold)
 who would ever want 2x when you know 1x exists?

I have a 32 up front and a e13 trsplus with (9-46) not only do i have all the gears i would ever need, but i never ever drop my chain and my bike is also way lighter without a 2x setup. Try riding a double black trail on your 2x, you eill drop your chain 100 times
  • 151 4
 Well Played... Switch was designed with ring maintenance, ease of use and wide coverage of standards in mind. Swapping rings on or before a ride is more of a bonus that we wouldn't expect many people to try. It is an option though.
  • 29 2
 @OneUpComponents: Exactly (and you should know, haha). This just seems like a better-designed update to traditional spider interfaces, especially because it uses standard bolts. So long as it's equally durable, the product is of value to all riders, not just those who change rings often; RC just focused on that application because it's a possibility that follows naturally. This is just like Campagnolo's quick release, come to think of it - the wheels don't have to be removed all that often, but most cyclists are still willing to pay the minor weight penalty for the sake of convenience. I have a feeling one wouldn't even pay a weight penalty for this. Your product seems to bring a lot more to the table than Wolf Tooth's CAMO system, for example; I'm still not sure how that one improves on a traditional spider.
  • 10 5
 Err Dingle speed
  • 35 1
 Yes it is similar to a spider/ring combo but a offers some real advantages over a more traditional setup. You can access the bolts from the front or back. The bolts do not need to be removed (just loosened) so it's simpler, cleaner and will work with a bash guide. It also fits rings all the way down to 28T oval.

Here's an instagram of a prototype about halfway along the project before we recognized the need to be able to access the bolts from the front. www.instagram.com/p/BIOVJA5htA7

Here also is a video better illustrating the swap - www.pinkbike.com/video/466933
  • 7 6
 @OneUpComponents: I like the idea...call me intrigued. I do worry about the stress put on the bolted areas during a ride.
  • 46 1
 @Longtravel: The ring drives directly on the carrier on an area quite large compared with a standard BCD mount ring. The bolt does not actually carry any of the pedalling load just holds the parts together and acts as an anti-rotation feature to keep the ring from being able to backpedal out of position.
  • 15 4
 There's kids born after 1991 who have never run a front range expander.
  • 2 8
flag KiwiXC (Mar 8, 2017 at 1:48) (Below Threshold)
 re-read the article!
  • 18 5
 I like the idea.
Riding somewhere with super steep climbs, drop down to a 30t. Riding somewhere where you need the top end speed, use a 36t. Or even carry both on 1 ride, swap as / if you need to.
I like to change tyres depending on where I'm riding, why not have similar options with your gearing?
For people who have a single bike for all riding, have easily changeable features to cover more riding can only be a good thing.
  • 1 4
 not plan for now. We are currently at version 12. the industries
  • 4 37
flag dangerwank (Mar 8, 2017 at 3:41) (Below Threshold)
 predictable. your comment looks like a session. get F'd @StackingItSince1991 @felimocl @Pedro404
  • 23 8
 Haha so many inventions on the market right now just to compensate for 2x drivetrains... Narrow wide rings, quick change rings, 50T sprockets... I have 2x with an mrp dual guide and my chain has never come off, deraileurs aren't flawless, but it works well for the really steep climbs I have around my area and is great all round.
  • 15 13
 @ctd07: My 1x setup has a flawless mech, no chain guide and my chain has never come off on it either. So . . . what again is your point? .
  • 21 4
 @ryanbpoquette: I ride & race a Shimano 2x10 with an SLX Shadow+ rear derailleur. Trail, park, enduro. I don't drop chains, just saying.
  • 28 39
flag justanotherusername (Mar 8, 2017 at 4:59) (Below Threshold)
 This is one of the most hilariously pointless things I have ever seen produced yet - Lets takes spiderless rings and put the spider back on them. Are we mental?

Who in their right mind takes rings in their bag to change them during a ride? I mean seriously, a few of you here are saying you would (including Waki who seems to get excited over anything one-up for some unknown reason) but how often?

Its a simple case of wanting to copy WT or similar and having to add something 'innovative' so that it looks like a novel idea.

The likelihood is that it allows One Up to more easily manage production - its easier to make rings in one bolt pattern and a load of different spiders than all of the combinations of offset and mounting types.

The bike industry is its own enemy, rather than working together to develop a standard chainring mount lets all develop our own and while we are at it lets make it 'quick change'.

Another problem with this is what do you do when your chain is very worn and you spend most time on one of the rings, when you fit the other it will just not work very well - stretched chains on new NW chainrings = noise, poor performance and a ring that wears very quickly.
  • 12 4
 Or you could grow up before posting next time
  • 7 1
 @Bluefire: I can even store different chain rings in my Fanny Pack, then I'm ready for Everest-thing.
  • 3 0
 It would be better to offer some sort of credit when you return your used chainring for recycling. Direct mount rings still lighter
  • 5 10
flag justanotherusername (Mar 8, 2017 at 5:51) (Below Threshold)
 @enrico650: The material used in a spiderless ring costs less than $3.00 in the USA, less in its country of manufacture.

Recycling value is probably around $0.05, high cu alloys dont recycle well either.
  • 11 3
 This seems like it will creak like crazy anywhere that it's wet.
  • 21 3
 @ctd07: No hate for 2x as I thought it was like a godsend switching over from 3x. That being said, a lot of the new developments in frame kinematics were in large part thanks to the elimination of the front derailleur.

OneUp and Wolftooth were fringe companies until Sram XD came out. Trickle down innovation at its finest. It's also a great way to recognize game changers vs forced obsolescence. Dropper posts, 1x drivetrains, tubeless wheels, direct order bikes; these all allowed for small companies to develop into major players and spurred some serious competition.
  • 4 2
 @Racer951: Its more of personal commitment ,accountability and peace of mind, knowing that you are doing something to eliminate waste.
Still Direct mount stills a better option.
  • 11 1
 @iian: i'm not sure switching rings will work that well. Going from a 30 to a 36 will require additional chain links in order to shift properly.
  • 6 8
 @enrico650: drop it to recycling when you are done with it yourself, will save the carbon trail and resources posting it back so they can do exactly the same thing.
  • 12 2
 @OneUpComponents: It's a NEW option. Thanks for giving it. I think it's a pretty wonderful idea to be honest, and once my front rings wear, or I feel the need to change size, this is the route I will most certainly go. While I likely won't switch mid ride, switching before a ride is completely something I would entertain now that I don;t have to remove a crank completely.
  • 20 0
 @Racer951: Thanks for the input. I always respect your insight in these comment sections.

The direct user benefits are:
- lower replacement cost
- better user serviceability

The indirect benefits are:
- It allows your LBS (or you) to have stock (or quick access to stock) of any standard, offset, size and ovality their customer needs.
- quick change
  • 24 0
 @OneUpComponents: You can add - the ability to quickly steal your friends chainring
  • 30 4
 If anyone on our group ride stops to change a chain ring, we're leaving their ass behind.
  • 4 9
flag jrocksdh (Mar 8, 2017 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 Do it if u like noisy bikes and dropped chains.
  • 1 7
flag jrocksdh (Mar 8, 2017 at 8:19) (Below Threshold)
 @ctd07: noise and weight.
  • 2 2
 @ctd07: and many bikes are designed for 1x
  • 6 1
 @OneUpComponents: are you developing a similar system for single rear cogs for singlespeed? It would be awesome to be able to change out cogs without the need of a chainwhip and freehub tool.
  • 6 2
 @ctd07: Agreed. 2x is awesome for steep ups and steep downs, especially running heavy tires. Dropped chains are really rare too, but you do occasionally have to make sure the front derailleur is properly adjusted... no biggie. 2x fo lyfe, super gear range.
  • 3 0
 @OneUpComponents: So when I first read RC's comments about no creaking/durability issues in 3 months of riding, I was pretty skeptical, given that he looks like he's (a) not very heavy and (b) has enough finesse to be pretty light on his feet. I had to give up simple spacers to move my chainring in a bit on my Shimano crank because I (being heavy and definitely not light on my feet) managed to warp the chain ring. Looking at the pictures, the interface doesn't really seem all that much bigger than you'd get with a standard BCD mount - can you elaborate a bit on this (and on how you tested that in real life)?
  • 3 1
 Pure genious! Even if you switch the chain position with your hands it would be much faster than taking off the chainring!!!!!
  • 8 2
 Right, by adding 2 chain rings, we also add a front mech and a left shifter which adds more weight, makes it less intuitive while riding trails that are unknown to the rider and more possible mechanical issues to occur. umm, no thanks. If you want a 2x system go for it, they still offer 3x, and 2x systems so if they update the 1x system with a switch like system for the front chainring then I'm all for it.
  • 6 0
 Looks like a solid product from OneUp. Really slick connection. Looks very light.
  • 2 4
 That would never work....
  • 6 5
 @LiquidSpin: 1x is great, I embrace it, but 2x was pretty intuitive, and how many front mech issues have you seen? In all my years of riding, never saw an on trail front me he issue. Seen plenty of rear mech issues though.
  • 3 0
 @OneUpComponents: @OneUpComponents: It was mentioned in one of the comments that this assembly could possibly noisy/squeaky during use. Could you please comment on that? I am intrigued by this product and I think it has it's merits. As someone who enjoys a quite ride I am curious about that. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @McNubbin: Front mech issue as in derailleur getting bent to shit or breaking, like you see with rear mechs? True, that's really rare, those things are damn sturdy. Front mech issues as in newbies not shifting far enough in advance and having to get off, or chain drop (or worse, chain sucked/stuck)? Tons. When you go on group rides with kids, you'd be surprised how much time you spend teaching them how to rescue their chain from that nasty spot between the granny ring and the bottom bracket.

Like any skill, if you practice enough, 2x can become really intuitive. When I got back into riding after 15 year hiatus in 2010, I didn't have much of a problem with my 3x, then 2x. But after I tried a buddy's 1x, I still converted to ghetto 1x for the simplicity of it.
  • 1 2
 @McNubbin: dropped chains and noise.
Anyways, most missn the point here.
Are u gna ride ur one bike quiver killer at a lift assist, shuttle, jump area with a 2x?
  • 8 0
 @cky78: A year into rideable samples and we haven't heard a peep.
  • 2 1
 @Klainmeister: couldnt you just do this with the chain ring?
  • 1 0
 @Nicksand5: In theory yes, but it would require more chain length for similar ratio changes.
  • 2 0
 @McNubbin: McNubbin, you can't put your own personal life experience as the be all for whether or not people have front mech issues.

I've personally had front mech issues. For example the metal chain line guide bent inward just enough that the chain would rub up against it and start rattling when it was in the biggest front cog.

Again, Just because you've never experienced it doesn't mean it doesn't happen. That's just one con about having a 2 or 3x system.

Again, if anyone wants a 1x or 2x then they have the option. Just don't rag on people who prefer a 1x set up. Especially when manufacturers try to improve upon it.
  • 1 0
 @iian: riding around with two and tools defeats the weight saving premise of 1x setups???
  • 2 1
 @nojzilla: yup did a dingle speed on my single speed honzo and it's awesome. No tools required.
  • 1 0
 @iian: I see, the 36/30 oval ring is coming...
  • 6 2
 @OneUpComponents: Pinkbike seems to have completely missed the point of your innovation. Why would anyone think it was about switching rings during a ride..? I use OneUp's Traction ring, and anything that makes it easier and cheaper to change a worn ring is a winner in my book!
  • 2 0
 Thanks for bursting my "mtb innovation excitement" bubble
  • 1 2
 so now we can shed some weight (dropper post) if we are stopping to change rings and have time for that, we may as well adjust our seats at the same time lol. does the interface wear as quickly as your chainring teeth? what happens when it wears out and your chainring falls off? is there a provided one up stem pillow for your face?
  • 2 1
 @OneUpComponents: any info on the chainline for their respective spiders? Much appreciated.
  • 1 0
 @mgolder: living in the UK riding in slop and up small hillocks, 1 by makes perfect sense
  • 1 0
 Anyone worried aboot creaking, just use Ti prep an pay attention to torque settings
  • 2 0
 @ctd07: except when you descent at speed over a chattery steep long rockgarden into a tight berm, go to pedal out of it, and realise your chain is riding your missus....i mean bottom bracket.
  • 3 0
 @OneUpComponents: Beyond elite racers how often do you imagine people actually change their chainring for any reason other than it is worn out. Its a clever solution but Im not sure what the problem is its trying to fix.
  • 4 0
 @dangerwank: calm the f*ck down Canada.
  • 2 0
 i got 3 chainrings :p
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: Using the Switch spider, would chainline remain the same as if using a Cinch or Sram Direct Mount?
  • 1 0
 Thing is, I can't see anyone wanting to change from 30 to 32. Two teeth, hardly noticeable. So let's say anyone that's gonna use this is going to take full advantage of the Benifits an swap out from 30 to 36.. Even 30 to 34 they're gonna need to swap for a longer chain too.........
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Or add a tensioner - but either way it is lot more complicated than just changing the chain ring.
  • 3 0
 @nojzilla: you guys love to hate eh?

For anyone with one bike who ride both trail and lift assist, can use this. Changing from 30 or 32 to 34 or 36 in 2 mins on lift days, yeah, I'd do that. No issue for me to swap a chain in 30 seconds. And chains are cheap.
  • 3 1
 @OneUpComponents: but each chainring is still roughly $40 so why is this any more economical than any other company that offers a cinch chainring for the same price or cheaper
  • 2 0
 @snowboarderboy: i've bought nice driect mount chainrings as low as $20 American. That's not the point however. I think the point here is ease of use.
  • 1 0
 @mgolder: What about the chain alignment? even with a tighter cassette cog grouping and a thinner chain alignment is going to be felt thru the crank when you apply force. I bet a straighter chain is an easier chain to turn slightly no matter what the thickness is. And for many many dollars cheaper . I'm not saying this is a bad idea but its not like it is a critical difference over a triple or double chainring setup. I continue to win and place top three in my age group in xc races on my triple setup and 27.5 (dated) wheels
  • 1 0
 @StackingItSince1991: you mean like a deraileur?........
Deraileurs are allready being stretched to thier limits with modern wide range cassettes, I doubt they'd take up the chain growth
  • 1 0
 @FLATLlNE: when I read the part about using two master links I lost my shit! I could see this being standard on heavier-duty enduro bikes like a nomad or a process, etc.
  • 1 0
 @FLATLlNE: but is this an easier than a cinch? - I mean at least then I have an excuse to grease my cranks every so often
  • 43 1
 A simple solution to the 1x lack of range is to use a 2x crank set and leave the 22 tooth granny on. If your legs fade or the trail goes vertical - just manually swap the chain to the 22 and ride away from your buddies on their 34x42 arrangements! Then again i am still on 1x10 and using an old 2x crank so its an easy option. Not so much if you have the latest bling.
  • 49 0
 'they see me roll'n, they push'n'
  • 4 2
 This is definitely an option, but keep in mind that there's more difference in weight between a spiderless 1x & a 2x than just the paltry 22g of a granny ring. the spider area has to be reinforced quite a bit to handle both the 104 & 64 mounting tabs. most of the weight savings in going to a spiderless ring is in crank design, not the granny ring itself.

Also, lets not pretend we don't care about looks a least a little bit, & spiderless rings are nicer looking.
  • 1 0
 Yup. Probably the same weight, and way less hassle.
  • 3 0
 chainline
  • 1 0
 I run this on my current bike, works very well if you're like me and enjoy taking a break at the top of a long climb. Granted I also just slapped a bash and narrow wide onto an old 3x set so keeping it simple...
  • 1 1
 This is exactly what i do on my fatbike. I have a small section of chain to add when swapping back to the 32t in the fall/summer/spring.
  • 4 0
 @groghunter: Just sayin', some of us truly don't care how our crank rings look.
  • 3 1
 Make sure to stop by weeny hut Jr at the end of the climb though
  • 8 0
 @groghunter: but there is also the additional weight of that dinner plate you're putting on the back to be able to pedal uphills. 2x lets you go run a lighter normal sized cassette in the back.

If I have to choose where I want the weight, low at the BB is better than out at the rear wheel.
  • 3 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Just bought a fatbike with 2x10 gearing, first upgrade is going 1x11, holy shit it's much more clunky with a front derailleur, and the step up in gearing is huuuuge, with awful shifting at the front.

I really don't care too much about the weight savings or any of that bullshit, I just want a simpler more reliable system that works.

I do want this though, makes it easier to swap between a 32 or 28 ring for summer/winter, just have to keep a chain @ right length laying around.
  • 4 1
 @Losvar: then you don't have a very good FD. I never had an issue with a single one.

I also don't think you really understand your gearing. Tight spacing is exactly what you give up with a 1x set up.

Don't get me wrong- I run 1x now, but this is a solution to a problem that never existed.

Think about what you just said so you're going to add in unworn chain links into a worn chain.

Yea sounds like a great idea. Also, if you only switch with the seasons- seriously you need this to save you 5 minutes twice a year?
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: Or you don't have much experience with FD problems. You do know that even road cyclists run chain catchers if they're racing a stage with a lot of shifts on the front?

Also, if you have certain brands of cranks, you want to loosen the crank/spindle interface as infrequently as possible(ethirteen I'M LOOKING AT YOU.) If I was running one of those cranks, i'd happily run this system for a twice a year change to avoid the known problems with crank arms never staying tight on certain interfaces.
  • 1 0
 You'd want to use a 3x so the "main" chainring is in the middle. 2x would give you a terrible chain angle.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: why would you buy those cranks?
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: A lot of people don't know how much a problem it is, until they buy the things, & others might get them as stock on a new bike. at the end of the day, every crank/spindle interface is a similar press fit, just shaped differently, so it's better for any crank to not be breaking it loose all the time. It's just that some brands' interface is hardier than others.
  • 1 0
 That's what one of the guys in my group does. He rides a niner that doesn't have the ability to run a front mech. He still needs a granny hear since he's pushing 300lbs. He's not fast but he climbs like a freaking Billy goat!!!
  • 1 0
 err... double post
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I would swap chain with the ring, that's pretty much a given, I meant I would keep one at hand for when I do.
  • 33 0
 LOL.... @Bike industry LOL....

2012: 1x
Get rid of front derailer! NW rings, don't need a chain guide like in your 1x10 setups!
And looks better!

2013: DM
Direct Mount Rings! Save some weight!
And looks better!

2014: Chainguides
Add a chainguide to your NW ring for extra safety! And makes your ring go faster!
And looks better!

2015: Non-round rings!
We just invented the OVAL rings! Scientifically the best and only possible OVAL shape that works! Did I mention University studies?!?!
And looks better!

2016: We go to 12!
With 50 pie plate!!! Range!!!
And looks better!

2017: Spider! Convert you DM cranks to a spider! You can change the chainring faster and reduce cost!
And looks better!

2018: 1x12 range is limited!!! Let's add a secondary DM ring in the front! Manually move the chain from the small to the large! RANGE!!
And looks better!

2019: Mechanical shifter!
Get rid of your chain guide and stop greasing your hand while on the trail (to change front ring)! Push a button and the ring will change A-U-T-O-M-A-T-I-C-A-L-L-Y!!!!!!
And looks better!

2020: Improved chainline and extra power!!!
1x12 and 2x12 limits are the impossible chainline! Are you tired of premature wear on your components?!!
With two rings on the front you can have the same RANGE with a 9 speed cassette!! Lighter as well!!!
  • 3 0
 can't upvote this enough Smile
  • 6 0
 Well said man. Also, I just noticed how close 2020 is, damn.
  • 38 5
 What's wrong with a good old fashioned push when the hill gets to big?
  • 24 0
 Shhh dont be British you'll spoil it Razz
  • 15 0
 It's also the perfect time for a smoke and a beerWink
  • 17 0
 @warehouse: or a schmoke and a pancake!
  • 15 0
 Pipe and a crepe
  • 16 0
 Blintz and a bong?
  • 5 0
 schlong and a strudel
  • 2 0
 Hump and a bump?
  • 19 0
 the ease of being able to take down a bear if need be "throwing chainrings"
  • 17 0
 I run a 36-tooth narrow-wide ring on the outer, and a 32-tooth narrow-wide ring on the inner of my 2x crank. No derailleur. Probably looks ghetto AF. Laugh away.
  • 3 0
 Stupidly simple and nothing short of Genius! I tip my hat to you Sir.
  • 25 11
 I absolutely love the idea. If I go to a lift/shuttle access place I can have two chainrings that are super easy to change. 36t for DH and 32t if I fancy some leg powered climbing.

Thank you one up! Having two bikes in one has never been easier!

You guys are awesome. You are not just another company doing N/W chainrings and large cassette sprockets living off of "SRAMs innovation". Truly innovative stuff
  • 19 4
 BANANAS. Its my pleasure, NAY, my honour, NAY! my god given right to own and be forced to use my table vice and 3 proprietary crank and ring removal tools when and if I should want to spend a nice portion of my afternoon swapping rings. This is flagrant and offensive and assumptive reallocation of MY TIME and how I choose to spend it. The assumption that I have the space in my hip bag for a WHOLE 4MM ALLEN WRENCH when I'm out galavanting on my trail rocket is an overstep and could seriously take away from my ability to carry my chain whip, cassette tool and extra large rear cog -which is my chosen method of adjusting my gear range on trail- Those SRAMbas-tards already over stepped when they stripped down the hallowed process of direct mount ring change to only making me carry a 1kg 10mm, a torx wrench and gauze for my perpetually skinned knuckles... the nerve! To think of committing to the ritual only to a 4mm (who even owns one??) and the time it takes my riding mate to rip a slash in the bushes is nothing short of S-rambunctious. BANANAS
  • 6 4
 @dangerwank: I am not sure what you mean but this is the kind of feelings I get about my stupid Hope crankset...
  • 4 2
 Original SRAM XX1 rings already were very easy and fast to replace. Ok, you had to unscrew 4 bolts (w/o nuts). So maybe it took you 2 minutes. Obviously wasn't appreciated very much
  • 5 0
 Direct mount rings have some big advantages over BCD spider setups and they made a lot of sense when there was only one offset and a few competing mounting standards. Now with 5 major DM standards, 3-4 more standards in the wings and up to 4 ring offsets (dish) the proliferation of Direct mount rings has reached an unsustainable level. This is felt hardest at your LBS where having the ring you need in-stock is increasing difficult and increasing costly.

The two-piece Switch system is the most efficient way to handle the expanding number of DM standards while still maintaining major advantages over BCD setups, lower replacement cost and unparalleled usability.
  • 3 2
 @OneUpComponents: Awesome stuff guys! Need one for my Hope crankset as soon as I get some cash back on my account... have you thought of making a chain piece to handle larger jumps in chain length for different chainrings? Like for someone that wants to take 32 and 36 on a trip to BC. 32 for Squamish and 36 for Whistler? i assume that would be like 2 chainlinks. All that considering someone changes their chain often enough so that stretch difference is minimal...

Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: 1up is totally sending you some rings!
  • 13 2
 Wait, super boost is a thing Eek
  • 7 2
 almost cried when i saw that, as the last thing we need is more "standards"
  • 5 0
 It's actually called "Super Boost +", if you can believe it :s It was Pivot Cycles' idea

www.bikerumor.com/2016/05/27/pivot-unveils-switchblade-long-travel-2927-mtb-introduces-super-boost-hub-spacing

It's basically a 12x157mm hub spacing (same as the existing and confusingly named 150mm downhill hub standard), but with wider flange spacing, like you get on a 148mm hub.
  • 1 0
 @Smevan: but i have a session with superboost then Cry


Except i did not need a new hub from my existing pro two evo 150, just got some adapters!
  • 8 0
 Hold up... so anyone who bought a spiderless chainring can now buy an aftermarket component which gives them the standard four bolt pattern back?

I must be missing something here!
  • 6 1
 ok, all downhill from here now!! (15 mins later...) thanks guys, for waiting for me to switch helmets, put the knee pads on, elbow pads, goggles on, gloves on, unlock suspensions, seatpost down, and switch chairings!!

hey... wait!! i forgot to swap my tires to dual ply ones!! levers, anyone??
  • 6 2
 This is great as it's something different and new but not completely stupid and expensive.. A bit like Wolftooths CAMO spider and chainrings but more refined and nicely done here. I like the idea of being able to change chainrings quicker and not having to take my cranks off everytime. That is the only problem with cinch or direct mount cranks and chainrings.
  • 5 1
 useful to me with rf sixc cinch dm. having to take the cranks of is a ball ache multi tooled job and not good for the life of them as the bolts and cinch ring are made of very soft light metal and plastic.(s#*t)
My regualr 32 for normal rides or drop to a 30 or 28 for a 6 hour lake district slog. think il add it to the wanted list
  • 4 0
 God damn it, i was considering an idea similar to this recently to allow me to switch out between my 30t and a 34/36t chainring for xc/enduro days and solid DH days. I can see the need for these on enduro bikes tbh. Swapping the chainring between climb and decent is a little bit overkill in comparison to having a 2x system i agree. But i can defiantly agree when it comes to setting your bike up pre ride for what sort of terrain and discipline your going to do. Trying to flat out spin a 30t on a DH course motorway section is a nightmare, sometimes i wonder if you could run faster.........
  • 2 0
 "Definitely"
  • 8 4
 I'm an engineer and can't leave my bike setup alone for more than a couple rides before tinkering with something to make it "better", but chainring size is most definitely a set-and-forget affair. There are a lot of things in this industry that induce a good eye-roll, but this one takes the cake for me.

However, I'm excited to read the comments on the first pic of an EWS rider with an extra chainring duct taped to their frame!
  • 2 0
 Seriously, with 11-s... I mean 12-speed(!), how many chain rings does anyone really need??
  • 6 0
 Why won't you mountain bike companies leave me alone? I have no money left!
Ok, ok, I'll take a 34 tooth please... But then I'm done! You hear me? Done!
  • 4 0
 This is a really good idea. Especially for XC riders who may see varying trail features throughout their season. Forget 2X, as it will never be as light and requires much more torque than a 1X set-up. Also, some riders may prefer an oval chain ring for steep/technical tracks, and a large, say 34t, round ring for other courses. As the author says, barring any rule issues with changing rings mid-race, this could be quite an advantage for endure racing.
  • 8 0
 am i the only one here who is wating for a remote chainring switch ?
  • 3 0
 I'm undecided on this. My local trails are fairly flat so 34t oval with an 11-36 is perfect, but then head over to wales and somewhere like cwmcarn and a 30 or 32t would be more suitable. But then head to bikepark wales and a 36t would be nice. But the key issue is chain length. I run a short cage mech which is perfect at current setup, adjusting chain length every time negates the convenience of an easy ring change. Have wide range cassettes made this unnecessary?
  • 1 0
 I hear you but chains are pretty cheap. You could have a chain for a 32t setup and another for a 36t. Straight swap seems easier than adding links when opening and closing a quick link by hand can be difficult at the best of times. Any tips welcomed.
  • 4 1
 "And, perhaps more important is that most rear suspension designs are tuned to react best when the rider is using the middle ranges of the cassette gears."

I think that is a misleading statement. Changing gears on the cassette has a minimal effect on suspension performance.
Whereas changing front chainring size has a very noticeable effect on suspension.
  • 5 1
 How about a narrow-wider 2x chainset that you change by hand! Best of both worlds and no extra weight of shifters and cables! This is the future!! ...heck if you need 3 it can even be 3x!!
  • 4 0
 Ahh....the dirty finger shift....as dirty as it sounds...
  • 1 0
 Already doing that, plus it gives you double the gearing. Not a fan of the 1x for where I live.
  • 1 0
 Shimano has applied for a pattent for shiftable narrow/wide chainrings.They only shift in two of the four quadrants.
  • 1 0
 @SpillWay: or bloody... been there done that...
  • 5 0
 Truly ingenious way to solve a problem that was not existent few years back... Bike industry is starting to bite its own tail...
  • 3 0
 Seems like an elegant and well thought-out solution, so kudos to OneUp. But this does make me wonder of what the point of having dinner plate-sized cogs and $500 cassettes if you need to change out your chainring anyway? I thought the point of 1x was that you have enough range (or more) to replace your 2x/3x.
  • 7 0
 I can hear that thing creaking over the Internet...
  • 7 3
 I'll finaly be able to carry 2 chainring with me! 38t for downhill and 30t for climbing! And again, what is the advantage of 2x11?
  • 21 2
 And 2 chains too?
And how about 2 handlebars? One flat and narrow with horns for climbing and wide riser for downhill.
  • 3 0
 @pakleni: it's a good thing most of us got two wheels already... lol
  • 7 1
 Bring some extra chain for all 'yer favorite ring-sizes!!
  • 5 0
 Cool design! These guys are reinventing the wheel. Keep up the awesome work OneUp tup
  • 2 0
 This is a great idea. I keep playing with the gearing on my enduro bike for trail days, races and park days. I have a 30-36t spider I have to change painfully everytime I need to swap! Definitely will be looking into one of these in the future
  • 2 0
 Awesome idea, the only reason I prefer spider over DM is ability to swap chain ring without deattaching cracks; regularly I ride 32, however for shuttle lift days swap to 36, chasing length is easily adjusted via 4 links with lock
  • 3 0
 As a mechanic, designer, and rider, I fail to see how NOT having to remove your crank or any hardware to change a chain ring is a bad thing. It appears to be a solid design and if it performs as intended: well done, OneUp.
  • 2 0
 @OneUpComponents Just installed mine and looking forward to using it. We have multiple bikes in the family, multiple crankset types. Great to get the spiders for each then use whatever ring size we need to interchange between the bikes! I went with the 32t and 34t, primarily because my bike frame is wide at the chainstay and I was not sure if the 34t would fit. But the low cost was worth trying it out and being able to drop to the 32t if it did not fit was worth it.
  • 3 2
 Great engineering! But it really isn't that necessary, once the chainring is bolted on its rare that they are swapped out and even so, it's easy to do so with standard bolts. This, as good as the engineering is, is just another thing to worry about.
  • 4 0
 Its those small cogs and not using 4bolt directly. Sometimes it would require the whole crankarm or pedal to be removed. Not an issue for most 4 bolt spiders though.
  • 2 0
 Been struggling with my chainline on my Genius LT with with the RF Cinch Crank. Does anyone know if this thing could solve my problem? need to bring my chainline further inwards. Thanks guys!
  • 6 0
 I believe the OneUp 6mm offset will give you 49mm chainline which is slightly inboard of RF cinch rings. Assuming your Genius has 142mm rear spacing.
  • 1 0
 @banffowen: Yes, my Genius is still on 142mm. Right now i'm running an Absolute Black Oval Chainring which has 6mmoffset as well. RaceFace says their Chainrings have 6mm Offset too. So I think the only way to reduce the chainline is buying a normal RF Spider and put some spacers in between. or do you think there is another way? Thank you for your help!
  • 5 0
 @scott-dl: Absolute Black are telling fibs (and I'm stupid enough to have bought two of their rings). I bought their oval ring to set my Cinch to 49mm but it made no difference compared to RF NW DM. I've just got hold of a OneUp oval 30T (literally arrived on Friday just before this was out!!) and it definitely has a bigger offset on it than either the RF DM or the AbsoluteBlack I have on my desk. I can clearly see there is a difference... I can't accurately measure that it's 2mm more or not but it certainly looks like it will be. I reckon the OneUp will help and Absolute Black are telling fibs (I won't be buying AB rings anymore). OneUp from now on I think - if this one does fix my chain line.

The only issue I see with the Switch idea (which does appeal to me as I could swap -2T or -4T for winter then back the other way for summer) is that I'll lazily leave my Next SLs on far too long and they will seize up (self extracting nut is difficult to undo). Even after just 6 months since I last took them off they were really difficult to remove to swap rings. If I had a Swtich installed I'd only need to remove them to change BBs so I'd be mega lazy and cause myself problems later. Or when the pedal inserts come loose again... whichever is sooner. BB or inserts?!
  • 6 1
 And voila, your chain is instantly either too long or too short!
  • 1 0
 @OneUpComponents: this is cool, i like it. i generally only ride my 1x hardtail over a wide variety of tracks and terrain, but i find that i also hate running a fkn massive stupid dinner-plate trendy rear cassette and i know im not the only one (im currently running a 26 tooth front to a 11-32 6 speed rear...). Descendence Bikes will be using your components soon.
  • 4 0
 And I'm here still using my 3x9.. No problem, no hassles, just ride it and shut the f up
  • 1 0
 I wore out 3 chainrings over the last 2 years, and it wasn't that terrible to change out. But, if I can do it faster, than why not. I see no utility in changing rings mid-ride or even for different disciplines on the same bike. But if others do, that's cool.
I am blown away by the complexities of friggin' chainrings these days. A year ago, all I had to do was look at the number on the front of the ring. If I wanted to change from a 32T to a 30T, I just picked that one that said SRAM in the title so it worked with my cranks. I now have a RF cinch crank and the number of options are ridiculous. There are now boost and non-boost chainrings...but different companies determine if they are boost or not? Wolftooth and Absolute Black have gone rogue and decided that their non-boost rings are actually compatible with boost and should be used. Whereas OneUp and god knows who else are opposite. Take a look at the last 5 pages of the YT Jeffsy Owners forum here on PB. It's all about what chainrings are compatible or not. They can't make anything easy anymore.
  • 4 0
 Waiting for @OneUpComponents to offer a second rider to get my sorry ass up the hills.
  • 1 0
 This is super cool! I’d love to easily swap my chainrings. Also, with traditional direct mount rings, you throw away much more of your chainring than you actually need to. The arms dont wear…

The same thing should be done for brake discs. I don’t get why i always have to discard the entire thing?

This opens up options for more sophisticated arms, since you can keep them. Think carbon or whatever…
Same with the rings. Now you can run steel rings with less weight penalty!

Me like very much!
OneUp is oneupping it quite a few times already Smile Cool company!
  • 2 0
 I have my 1x10 34t, and an emergency/granny 24t inner, I just manually move the chain over if needed. No 2nd shifter no front derailleur.

Never needed anything more or less.
  • 5 0
 My front mech still changes faster
  • 2 1
 Wow, you can do the swap in 2 minutes! My XT FDR can do it in 2/10 of a second mid ride any time I want and it never misses. Hard to understand why people have such difficulty adjusting and operating a simple FDR. Its quite an insult to your intelligence if you think about it.

Every rider should be questioning the durability of the inter face. 3 months is nothing and the industry has a bad habit of not being able to duplicate prototype function and durability when going to mass production. Definitely a wait and see, wait until the third generation scenario.
  • 1 0
 I would love this for my gravel bike, to go from a 42 to a 38 in the fall for cross without removing my crank would be sick. I also see this for amature racing, i run a 32 on my xc bike, never had an issue climbing yet but would be cool for the steeper races put a 30t on as apprently its not as fast to pedal down hill...... bah.
  • 8 3
 Early April fools
  • 1 0
 Just attach two similar chainrings and hop the chain over manually no? (ok chainline, but thats always been an issue with 2x 3x.)

I guess the extra chain curve on 11 and 12 speed cassettes might be a bit much.
  • 1 0
 Do people really change their chainring that often? I like a 1x set up, but if my climbs are that demanding and my descents are that radical I won't be worrying too much about an extra shifter on bars.
  • 3 0
 One up stuff is great and they are great inovaters. Keep up the awesome work!
  • 1 0
 Between On-Up and Wolftooth plus Shimano and SRAM there are so many good options for any sort of of 1x you could want. it's come so far in the last few years. I for one am all for it.
  • 2 0
 Will it clear big flat pedals (Vaults, TMacs) when you remove the chainring from the spider whilst on the bike? The example in the review shows smallish xt clips.
  • 2 0
 Definitely the larger sizes (34-36). Below that depends on the pedal.
  • 1 0
 So why are the replacement rings so much cheaper than a standard 104mm chainring?Doesn't look like any less material was used and certainly more machining in the locking interface.
  • 2 0
 Streamlined manufacturing. With 5 direct mounting standards, 5 different tooth options and oval/round options they'd have to make and store 50 different rings.
But with this it's now 5 spiders and 10 rings.
  • 1 1
 @spudlord: It makes sense what your saying,but there is a 40% jump in price from these new rings to the standard bolt pattern rings.And don't get me started on the premiums people are paying for the expander cogs,with little to no more machine time or material costs and a price of 220% more than one of these new rings.It doesn't make any sense.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: it might not be manufacturing cost weigh dictates it, your bring out a new standard so you price it so people but it over current offerings.
We're still a very niche small market so through scale prices are going to be high. RnD ain't free.
  • 2 0
 I HATE removing my cranks. I change chainrings after I get a bit stronger in the season and for going to parks. Going to try an oval as well.
  • 1 0
 Does this mean you would have a slack chain when running a small toothed ring and a super stretched chain that barely makes it into the largest cassette ring when running a larger front ring?
  • 3 0
 It's going to be soooo ENDURO to switch your chainring for the transfer stage!
  • 1 0
 I like it! If its stiff and durable Switch should be very good option for persons who live (and ride) the lowlands and go mountains every few weeks.

Personally I use 32T for xc/backcountry and 28T for AM ride.
  • 4 0
 seems to be some really worked up nerds on here. chill out yo
  • 1 1
 Lots of typically narrow-minded opinions from the splintered mountain bike factions. No, this isn't going to appeal to all riders and I doubt that is OneUp's goal. I see it as a pretty cool, unique, and VERY convenient way to make rapid and easy changes for the varied terrain one might encounter. Nobody here is getting any younger, I know I'm not, and having the ability to do a quick tailoring which, by the way, DOES make a significant difference. I can see merits to this system within my own local network of highly varying terrain and tech. @OneUpComponents: You have my attention on te oval ring for my new Boost Frame 6Fattie.
  • 5 2
 As if this even a thing.......
  • 1 0
 The reason I liked direct mount rings is that the chain ring bolts can never go loose (doesn't happen often, but when it happens it happens on the worst moment).
  • 1 0
 You packing tools?
Yeah i wink back.
And a chainring!
Ill just slap it on for the climb.
And switch to my dh ring on the way down.Wink
  • 2 0
 i like the idea not for changing out gearing but for making replacing the chain ring super simple.
  • 2 1
 I like it, but why innovative?

Wolftooth has this system running under the name Camo for a long time - even with oval steel chainrings.
  • 1 0
 it's cool... but there is nothing innovative... I used to race bmx 25 years ago and we had the same stuff, depending the track you ride...
  • 1 0
 I run 2x10 on my MTB beater. Front rings are 30 and 36t. Manual shift - can shift down with my foot ... shifting up requires hands.
  • 1 1
 A solution to a problem we don't have. I have never, ever had to remove my cranks and pedals to change a chainring, ever!!! If you do, you must be running like a little girly 30t!!
  • 1 0
 'girly 30t' or a direct mount chain ring... any of them. The product and article are not about 4 bolt rings.
  • 1 0
 Reckon it's a really good idea. Ability to swap between 30-32 tooth rings and an maybe an oval on 1x11 would be enough for me to buy it.
  • 2 1
 Going by the pictures, I was expecting a bad review of a snapped chainring....sadly not so
  • 2 1
 @OneUpComponents does the Cannondale interface on this also work with S-Works cranks?
  • 3 0
 The Cannondale and Sworks interfaces are different unfortunately.
  • 2 1
 @OneUpComponents: follow up question, is there going to be an S-Works interface?
  • 5 0
 @Zaff: We'll definitely make carriers where there is demand. The strength of this system is that a single carrier opens a rider up to our full line of ring options so less popular standards can more easily be serviced.
  • 3 8
flag justanotherusername (Mar 8, 2017 at 5:05) (Below Threshold)
 @OneUpComponents: No disrespect but realistically this is the only benefit to the system - That it makes it easier for you guys to manage production.

The issue is that they are also more expensive than your spiderless rings, probably heavier, probably less stiff and there are now 4 more bolts to come loose on the rider - brilliant.

There are no benefits to the owner in reality unless you genuinely think riders give any thought to the time it takes to change a chainring...

Your chainguide works very well by the way, great design.
  • 1 2
 @Zaff: wolf tooth makes Cannondale and specialized spiders for their CAMO system.
  • 1 0
 Now I can ride with a spare sprocket in my backpack and pretend I'm a ninja! How cool.
  • 6 3
 april fools?
  • 3 0
 that's a nice idea.
  • 2 1
 Great idea but I still like my old XX1 spider. I just flip the chainring to get double the life! 4 bolts, 2 minutes
  • 3 1
 I can do the same thing with all my 'old' 4 bolt cranks...
  • 1 0
 Exactly. I don't get it. Reintroducing old technology?
  • 1 1
 @oneupcomponents

You thinking of doing steel chainrings for this ? They're hard to beat for reliability and price. I don't care if they're heavier.
  • 2 0
 It's definitely on the radar.
  • 1 1
 Wolf tooth already has a similar system called CAMO, and they offer both stainless and aluminium options in round and elliptical. And they're US made which is nice too.
  • 1 0
 @Nobble:

Yeah, but their steel chainrings are $100
  • 1 0
 @UtahBikeMike: probably the cheapest chainring you will ever buy ,considering the life.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon:

Not really. My $14 steel sram chainrings look new after almost a thousand miles
  • 1 0
 @UtahBikeMike: $14/lbs. Its a helluva price. Ha!
  • 1 0
 @dontfeedthetrolls:

It's 110g for the 30t i have now. That's $3.22 per pound.
  • 2 1
 What happens when you nail a rock or a log with the chain ring? Will the chain ring come off?
  • 1 0
 Now make the spider so you can mount two chainrings, say 104 and 65 mm BCD's, and you would be on to something really good.
  • 1 0
 Just buy double wide chainring bolts and slap another ring on. No tools required. much faster
  • 2 0
 Great, simple, affordable product.
  • 1 2
 I think OneUp have some masterful products in their range - I use and recommend a few of them - but this just screams 'communism'. Good in theory Horrible in practice. Pointless if you ask me.
  • 1 0
 Oh joy. Something designed to piss off retail bike workers and shop mechanics. Just what the industry needed.
  • 1 0
 Kudos for the innovation, but it takes five minutes to swap a chainring on either my Race Face or SRAM direct mount cranks.
  • 2 0
 Why are you guys always trying to "one up" everyone?
  • 1 0
 I wish I saw this a week ago. My new e*13 ring is on the way. Unless anyone in Kelowna wants a 30t? Please??
  • 1 0
 Absolute kak, who changes out chainrings on a regular basis. Its one month too early
  • 1 0
 I see anyone saying..."brah... Hold on got swap out my chainring!" On the trail, they're getting punched.
  • 1 0
 I got a seat post that you must lower manually. Where's my innovation award?
  • 5 4
 Useless and more fragile.
  • 1 0
 yeah!!!
  • 2 1
 This is one of those rare game changer products. Very cool...
  • 2 0
 Not really
  • 2 0
 @fastback570: exact same words came out of my mouth before I saw your comment. Game changer??? Come on. That phrase has truly lost its intended meaning.
  • 1 0
 @Doomsdave: I stop and lower my seatpost manually. Does that mean I'm innovative too?
  • 1 1
 My wallet says no, hell no! This is not the current bike my standard, so I'm not buying on this.
  • 5 4
 Mediocre solution to a problem that does not exist.
  • 3 2
 100% agree. This has to be a joke. It's a little disappointing from a company who've otherwise released some stellar products.
  • 1 0
 Surely there isnt enough of this BS to go around.
  • 1 0
 It doesn't fit rf ride cranks?
  • 1 0
 Cause that looks stiff... kinda defeats the purpose of a DM setup.
  • 1 0
 So the industry ditched spiders to have a spider. Of course!
  • 3 2
 Why... Just Why?!
  • 3 3
 What about shimano xt crank??????
  • 2 2
 Seriously??
  • 2 2
 sram xx1 spiders years ago did this, nothing new there
  • 1 0
 looks a little sketch
  • 1 0
 Rubbish
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