Welcome to the 2019 North American Handmade Bicycle Show

Mar 17, 2019 at 0:52
by Richard Cunningham  
NAHBS 2019 Allegro Coffee
The party starts before you step into the Sacramento Convention center. Allegro Coffee was dishing out free Joe from their impeccably restored 1951 Flxible bus.

The North American Handmade Bicycle Show travels to Sacramento, California, this year. It's the show's 15th anniversary, and boasts the largest turnout of exhibitors on record. The vibe is upbeat and there are a number of new faces in the aisles, some of whom are sure to raise the bar for the two dozen mind-blowers who consistently sweep the NAHBS award ceremonies.

Some joke that NAHBS is an acronym for the North American Hardtail Builders Show. True that... but dual-suspension machines seem to be sprouting everywhere between the bumper crop of gravel-grinders and mountain hardtails that have dominated the expo for three years running. But who cares? NAHBS is cycling debauchery at its highest expression.

NAHBS 2019 Allegro Coffee
The chassis and drivetrain have been modernized.
NAHBS 2019 Allegro Coffee
Here, you're going to need this: Many thanks to bus baristas, Stephen and Susann Paige.



NAHBS 2019 English Cycles
English Cycles' single-sided single speed is impressive.

NAHBS 2019 English Cycles
NAHBS 2019 English Cycles

NAHBS 2019 English Cycles
The disc brakes and belt drive remain in place when the wheels are removed.
NAHBS 2019 English Cycles
One-sided chainstay brace reflects the impeccable construction of the frame.

NAHBS 2019 English
English Cycles' Adventure bike hides a few secrets. The rear stays bolt onto the frame and can be removed for shipping to far-away places.

NAHBS 2019 English
The hinge is there because the stem is part of the fork.
NAHBS 2019 English
Unclamp the steerer tube and it slides out so the bike packs even smaller.
NAHBS 2019 English
The girder fork design also functions as a rack for tents and sleeping bags.



NAHBS 2019 Crane Bell
Crane Bell Company of Osaka, Japan: Few could resist ringing every one on display. I was told that the world's best bicycle bells still come from Japan. The tradition began when bells were recovered from old telephones during the post-war recovery, and then re-purposed for cycling.

NAHBS 2019 Pauls
One of the most collectible mountain bike components. Paul components had a museum on display of vintage brakes and accessories they manufactured during the purple parts era. The Rastafarian anodized Paul derailleur marks the apogee of the garage CNC revolution

NAHBS 2019 wolf tooth
Remember when Wolf Tooth only made through-axles, chainrings and dropper levers? The revolution is not dead!



NAHBS 2019 Steve Potts
Master Titanium builder Steve Potts consulted with designer John Castellano to make a disc brake gravel grinder fork.

NAHBS 2019 Steve Potts
NAHBS 2019 Steve Potts

NAHBS 2019 Steve Potts
The rail transfers brake torque.



NAHBS 2019 Risse Racing
Kevin Risse has been making air-sprung bypass shocks since forever, but he brought something completely different to NAHBS this year.

NAHBS 2019 Risse Racing
CNC machining assures accurate frame alignment.
NAHBS 2019 Risse Racing
There is no welding. Everything is bonded, bolted, or threaded together.
NAHBS 2019 Risse Racing
The head tube area reveals the threaded bond area where the tubes attach

NAHBS 2019 Risse Racing
Closeup look at the Risse bypass-type damper. No word on the geometry, but the bike has clearly been ridden hard. Risse says he will be producing and selling "some" in the near future.



NAHBS 2019 Tashi Dennis
Meet collector Tashi Dennis. The man who has generously furnished us with images and information for PB's "That Was a Bike" series.

NAHBS 2019 efficient velo tools
Efficient Velo Tools: The Vice Grip pliers are welded to a split collar, which grabs the threads at the workplace and simplifies headset and bearing installations.
NAHBS 2019 efficient velo tools
Squeeze the handle and the EVT wheel-dish gauge resets while the tool is in place. Brett Fleming's tools may not look fancy, but they are built smart.



NAHBS 2019 Shimano
Shimano says that they have finally got their bike-fit dyno up and running. It measures incremental changes in your power output that are directly related to changes your position on the bike and the pedals.

Shimano Dyno
Got the right crank length? Shimano's dyno can demonstrate in real time. if those 165mm crank arms are robbing your power.
NAHBS 2019 Shimano
Timing belts ensure accurate and repeatable measurements. The database includes most popular bike models and can suggest the right fit.



Isen WorkShop
Fade paint schemes were popular at NAHBS this year. Isen Workshop's frames were among the most stunning examples.

Isen WorkShop
Isen WorkShop



NAHBS 2019
Sometimes, fashion prevails over function.

NAHBS 2019
Not the optimum place for a pro build. Some exhibitors received their custom component kits on opening day.

NAHBS 2019 Sea Sucker
PB's Mike Levy reviewed the Sea Sucker bike rack on his right-hand-drive, powder blue Mini Cooper. Sea Sucker showed up at NAHBS with its twin sister.



NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
Hope Industries proudly displayed one of their new front sections, right from the mold.

NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
Inserts transfer loads from the fork and form a more precise fit for headset bearings.
NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
Shock mount tabs; The inside of the frame is nearly as smooth as the outside.

NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
The seat stay yoke is machined from a single piece of aluminum.

NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
An unfinished caliper....
NAHBS 2019 Hope Industries
...And a brake lever blade in the making.



NAHBS 2019 DT Swiss
Another look at the DT Swiss F 535 fork. Travel ranges from 130 through 160mm.
NAHBS 2019 DT Swiss
Aluminum caps cover the air valve and damping adjustment dials...
NAHBS 2019 DT Swiss
...And the Allen key to remove the caps is hidden in the front axle handle.



NAHBS 2019 Della Santa
Greg Lemond rose to fame riding bikes made by Roland Della Santa. This one was in the Campagnolo booth.
NAHBS 2019 Della Santa
Della Santa's stylish chainstays are mimicked by modern builders.
NAHBS 2019 Della Santa
Try shifting these while racing down a mountain pass.



NAHBS 2019 Carrer Bikes
Carrer Bikes was founded by craftsmen from Italy and inspired by shipwrights.



NAHBS 2019 Calfee Bamboo bike
Craig Calfee, the champion of bamboo bike frames, was honored by NAHBS this year and many of his creations were on display, including this, the mother of all bamboo bicycles.

NAHBS 2019 Calfee Bamboo bike
His method has been widely copied, but few builders have the skills to make a reliable fork.
NAHBS 2019 Calfee Bamboo bike
The joints are sanded smooth, exposing to pattern of fibers.
NAHBS 2019 Calfee Bamboo bike
Calfee has improved his technique to minimize the metal bits.

NAHBS 2019 Calfee Bamboo bike
Calfee originally used technical fibers like carbon or fiberglass, but moved on to natural fibers like hemp in an epoxy matrix to join his tubes.








96 Comments

  • + 106
 That bamboo thing is straight out of Aliens
  • + 12
 @mikelevy bring on a test video !
  • + 31
 @RedBurn: first huck-to-flat test please...
  • + 9
 Kill me
  • + 8
 I bet it wood be good to try though
  • + 15
 That bamboo bike is what they ride home after being voted off Survivor.
  • + 8
 Aliens ?? More like the Flintstones.Big Grin
  • + 16
 @RedBurn: I've nearly ordered one a few times. Building/riding one would make a great video.
  • + 16
 @sewer-rat: It's nice to see that Calfee's branching out.
  • + 6
 I immediately thought of Alien too. A Giger-ish bike if there ever was one.
  • + 1
 It doesn't need water mount
  • + 5
 Why’s everyone so bamboozled?
  • + 2
 @TheSmilingDentist: first thing I thought of was H.R. Giger.
  • + 5
 @Pynchonite: I think he's panda-ring to the tree huggers with that bike.
  • + 2
 It didn’t come straight out of aliens- it got caught in a blender storm before landing on earth
  • + 1
 Looks flexy...but in a good way.
  • + 39
 Only 2 pictures of the Pubesmobile? For shame
  • + 8
 Indeed dissapointing. First ride review, please
  • + 5
 And only one frame.

'[...] but if I do end up going we can link up and then you can murder me.' --QBP
  • + 10
 All Glory To The Pubes!
  • + 12
 If anyone else was wondering what by-bass shocks are:
jalopnik.com/what-is-bypass-suspension-explainers-you-wont-get-bore-1712663740
  • + 2
 Also worth noting that the DT Swiss fork featured in this PB article features position sensitive dampening as opposed to the standard speed sensitive damping.
  • + 1
 @Bflutz625: DT Swiss is a cool company. Never tried any of their stuff. I think mountain bicycling is a lucrative market nowadays, lots of cool innovation, there's so much you can do. Look at things like the Motion France fork, amazing that came to market, and Fox's live valve. I love mountain biking.
  • + 1
 @IllestT why don't we get this by-pass thingy on DH shocks ? That'd be sick grip !
  • + 2
 @Balgaroth: there is becoming a push for these kinds of shocks especially in the coil form as you can have progressive damping to compensate for the linear coil.
  • + 1
 @Balgaroth: I recall don't know. It seems strange that Fox make bypass shocks, just not for mtb. Cost?

I wonder if this is how EXT Racing make their shocks have progressive damping?
  • + 11
 I can see that DT Swiss Air valve cover on the fork taking hold. That's a clean design
  • + 3
 Yeah thats a really nice touch.
  • + 9
 Please do tell how this rail "transfers brake torque" all the way up the fork past the main welding point.
Let's just call it a cool detail without a particular function.
  • + 6
 The particular function would be somewhere to cable tie your brake hose to.
  • + 3
 Yeah, that seems like a bit of a stretch. Though it does look like it would stiffen the left fork leg somewhat, in a for/aft direction, no? Some have complained about light weight forks auto-steering when they twist under braking loads, so maybe that is actually what they wanted to achieve rather than an actual torque arm.
  • + 1
 A tab that’s only the length of the caliper will cause the fork blade to flex backwards/upwards. A longer arm on the end of the tab will reduce this flex. Whether extending the tab the full length of the blade has additional function is debatable.
  • + 2
 These are custom forks, not off the shelf. They are built according to the rider weight. Having an extra long rail means the tubing used on the left leg can be lighter.
Lighter tubing, better handling, more comfortable.

Can’t believe some random jack is second guessing Steve Potts - you probably don’t even know who he is.
  • + 0
 @RedRedRe: Oh, you're too sweet)

Stiffness and handling might really benefit, as already mentioned by the more to-the-point gentlemen above.

As for "transfers brake torque", doesn't look like it. My guess will be an incorrectly worded caption, but you can surely take offence on behalf of Steve for no reason Smile
  • + 1
 @sergeyeremin: yeah, you definitely know better a lot about cycling.
  • + 0
 @RedRedRe: Never claimed to, especially "better a lot" – that sound like something out of my reach.

I would love to hear how it "transfers brake torque" past the main weld along that slender arm – so far you've talked about everything but the only issue I mentioned in my original comment.
  • + 8
 The all natural home grown bamboo/hemp fiber bike also uses CBD oil for chain lube. I love it.
  • + 7
 Is it just me or did ISEN blatantly steal their paint jobs from an old Klein...
  • + 8
 didn't know HR Giger made bikes?
  • + 2
 Well things didn't go as planned for Big Chap.
  • + 2
 @AlexS1: didn't know "it" had a name, and never would have guessed it's so "formal"??? Smile
  • + 8
 That English Cycles' single-sided bike is gorgeous Drool
  • + 14
 its allright
  • + 1
 a righty?
  • + 0
 Do you have to remove the brake caliper to remove the front wheel axially or would you just pull out the axle to remove the wheel? Just curious.
  • + 3
 @vinay: Rob English custom machined the hubs and spindles so that the front and rear wheels are interchangeable since the rotors and freewheel are attached to the bike separately of the wheels. you can find some photos on his website here:
www.englishcycles.com/custombikes/garys-project-right-5
  • + 1
 Lefty's do it right, but Righty's do it better!
  • + 7
 That Risse Lassen has been around since the early 2000's... at least 2001.
  • + 4
 "Risse says he will be producing and selling "some" in the near future."

Did they say that in 2019 or 2001?
  • + 1
 I hope Risse makes a comeback soon!
  • + 0
 Yes, but the front triangle was made out of chromoly, not carbon and cnc'd pieces. Not only that, but they also custom tune the suspension and geometry to your needs.
  • + 2
 Super cool to be checking out this article & see the bus from our coffee company making a show at the event! I followed the bus build and checked it out before it's maiden voyage, it is well done. The crew puts a bazillion miles on that thing so I don't know where they end up half the time, an interesting cross of hobby and profession seeing that here. Props to Allegro choosing such an excellent event!
  • + 1
 Is Allegro the Whole Foods or Safeway coffee brand?
  • + 2
 mini's " twin sister."
This one is concours condition.. no offense to Mike, I love all classic minis and hisbrightens my day every time I see or hear it...but these cars are probably 20 years and 30+k apart Wink

Anyone selling a 1999 Mini Cooper Sport5?
WANT!
  • + 1
 Buy stock in timing chain guides.
  • + 1
 If you think dentists would buy stuff like this you don't get mountain biking!

It's a PB highlight when the photos start coming out from this show.
Some crazy clever stuff from English and that one piece machined yoke - very nice. Does it count as handmade though? And what about the machined aluminium moulds needed for Hope's carbon layups ? Sorry being a pedant
  • + 5
 Best show of the year, congrats to all the builders!
  • + 1
 Certainly the most interesting show!
  • + 1
 Glad after a zillion decades Potts has learned some engineering. This is/was my type II fork that almost killed me a few years back. photos.app.goo.gl/PByNQzvJNV388vN5A
It buckled during a low speed brake. Glad I wasn't hauling somewhere sketchy.
Lucky me he fixed it with a longer truss - and charged me 100 bucks for a two tone paint job.
  • + 3
 rasta paul rear mech is a piece of art, unfortunately shifted like a pos. the good old purple ano days. english one sided bike is cool.
  • + 1
 I was amazed at the number of wood and bamboo bikes at the show. I was surprised that many of them have carbon or aluminum "core structures". My favorite bike of the show was a gravel ride from Mooro. It had the most beautiful paint job I've seen since Mountain Goat's customs. I also noted a lot frames also featured frame pump fittings. A featured that disappeared with CO2 cylinders, but I am glad to see are returning for road, gravel, and adventure bikes.
  • + 1
 A bit like interbike in the late 80s In a new way cool. Hey Hope put a layer of fibreglass in your headset bearing seats it'll stop the steel bearing sets corroding from touching the carbon.
  • + 1
 I've never heard of English Cycles but it's immediately obvious that it's an American company.

The use of a stylised Union Flag in the logo rather than the flag of England. lol
  • + 2
 We’re one of 6 shops in the US that has the Shimano bike fitting system...it is hands down the best bike fitting system out there....
  • + 3
 That hardtail with the Fade paint scheme and flow wheels. My goodness!
  • + 2
 We have one of the shimano fit bikes in our shop. It's pretty amazing what you can do with it
  • + 1
 Blast from the way past...I had that Paul’s rear derailleur on my old fat chance YO eddy..one i wish I kept or at least had pics of.
  • + 2
 If you follow the English cycles history at the NAHBS - the builder is simply brilliant. I would love one day to own one.
  • + 2
 So somebody made an Ed Gein tribute bike in bamboo?
  • + 1
 Down tube shifters; right up there with chain stay mounted U-brakes and 1 1/4" headsetsSmile
  • + 2
 love the rusty nuts and bolts on the risse that bike will last forever!
  • + 2
 i can smell the beard oil from here
  • + 1
 Triton bikes titanium craftsmen switched to full carbon? Now that sounds interesting.
  • + 2
 this DT fork perfect for blacked out Nicolai
  • + 1
 Looks like the Mini Cooper is all the way from Australia, with its Queensland plates.
  • + 1
 I expected to see the Atherton's bike...handmade right!?
  • + 1
 535. Ouuuu i like that technology!!!!!
  • + 2
 That Ti Fork is stunning
  • + 1
 The Lefty was something, but the "Double Rigthy" is something else...
  • + 1
 English Cycles meet Cannondale onBIKE
  • + 1
 Love this event, bike freaks and all this shit !!!
  • + 1
 So is a complete hemp + epoksi fibers frame possible to make?
  • + 1
 Depending on how clamping interfaces are worked out. The way the typical dropout works isn't ideal as it would compress the fibres out of plane causing damage to the laminate. But when using some kind of Maxle type axle with an expanding wedge then that could work. Same with the brakes. How are you going to connect the caliper if you can't make thread? You'll need to use a nut to not call that part of the frame, then find a way to deal with the compressive load between caliper and nut. If you no longer rely on standard components though then yeah, I think it could be done. There have been all wooden bikes, paper/cardboard.
  • + 1
 @vinay: thanks for the reply, it is an interesting thought that hemp could replace for example carbon fibers, making frames more enviroment friendly... ????
  • + 2
 @Kanta: Yeah natural fibres like hemp, flax, bamboo etc can be used making the product more environmental friendly. But environmental friendly is a big subject. in this context, the good thing is that the growth of these fibres is relatively CO2 neutral (if you don't include the logistics, farming etc). The creation of carbon fibre takes a lot of energy, so that's a win. But once you impregnate it with a thermoset like epoxy, it is no longer organic waste and the only way to get rid of it is to burn it. Obviously that's the issue with most ways to make organic material more durable for construction. The win is that the growth is relatively CO2 neutral (you have actually temporarily fixed atmospheric CO2 in the product) but the loss is that it turns something that otherwise would be harmless organic waste into residual waste.
  • + 1
 Freakshow!
  • - 2
 the Isen paint scheme is stunning. the pubes bike needs to be burnt, then melted down, then buried
  • - 1
 epoxy matrix sounds like something from the Business BS Generator
  • + 0
 because most matrix materials are already epoxies?
  • + 1
 A composite is a "composition" of different materials on a macro scale. In many products we're looking at, it consists of fibres and something in between to keep them together which is being called the "matrix". This matrix could be the shit between the straw to make a roof, it could be the nylon between the short glass fibres in the housing of your powertool (does it say something like >PA6GF30 somewhere?), it could be the plasticy material (whatever it is) between the fibres of the duct tape and yes it could also be epoxy between carbon or bamboo fibres in a bike. So yeah matrix material could be epoxy but it is far from always the case.
  • + 1
 Your definition of composite is wrong.
  • + 1
 @VTwintips: Care to tell the class what it is then?
  • + 1
 @Deoratwo: given that there are macro and micro scale composites, but that anything on a bike is going to be micro-scale, we, at the very least, need to include the micro-scale stuff. One could say that in fact, we should only be talking about the micro-scale composites, considering that we are on the topic of bike frames, but I think that's a bit too far, as I don't want to fully discredit where vinay is coming from here (even though my last comment sort of did).

So .... rephrasing: MOST MICRO-SCALE matrix materials, for BIKE FRAMES are going to be epoxies. [-_____-]

Basically, for the sake of discussion, we aren't talking about the fact that the bike is made of bamboo and then some natural fiber sub-assembly and call the whole thing a composite of tube and rope. We are talking about the sub-assembly itself, which is a microscopic composite that mixes recently-alive-plant based fibers and long-deceased bacteria-based (petroleum-based) epoxy resins.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.069000
Mobile Version of Website