Pinkbike Poll: Can Today's Mid-Travel Trail Bike Be Significantly Improved?

Jun 24, 2016 at 14:43
by Richard Cunningham  
Wicklow Ireland. Photo by Matt Wragg.


Today's dual-suspension trail bikes pedal, climb, corner, and descend so well that it is hard to imagine that they can get much better. Hop on any reputable brand's 130 to 160-millimeter-travel trail bike and you can expect all of those things and more. Shimano and SRAM may argue about the nuances of gearing spread or whether one or two chainrings is the future of the derailleur transmission, but both shift every time you push the levers without fail. Same goes for disc brakes, and while there are devout fans from both camps who would scream otherwise, Fox's and RockShox's suspension performance has reached parity. Dave Weagle's anti-squat wizardry has been matched by alternative kinematics to the point where it is a religious, not a scientific discussion and everyone has figured out aluminum and carbon. Until a stronger, lighter and more durable material appears, or a new form of motion control replaces hydraulic damping, it is doubtful that Brand A's design team is going to come up with anything better than Brand B's can. So, today's poll question is:



Can today's mid-travel trailbike be improved significantly?






286 Comments

  • + 529
 Improve the prices
  • + 167
 I'm not pointing the finger at any brands but they end in "ecialized" and "eti"
  • + 101
 @bridgermurray: dont forget "rek"
  • + 41
 and "anta ruz" and "iner" and "rek" and "annondale" and .... point is there will always be someone that wants lower prices
  • + 63
 @rrsport: And what's wrong with that? That's how a product cycle typically goes. Once it's perfect, they start realizing ways they can make it cheaper. Then they're able to sell more of the project and still generate a profit. The bike industry is so effed up though, that
A) they think they have a perfect product when they don't AND,
B) instead of figuring out how to make it cheaper, they just make up bullsh!t standards while increasing the price!!
  • + 42
 @skelldify: YT looks to have a good formula for keeping prices down.
  • + 56
 I totally agree. But its funny you take a brand like giant and they tick boxes as far as performance, weight and price but they're looked on as being a cheap alternative by many and not as good as the more expensive brands. We as human beings are constantly sucked into the " if it costs more it must be better" scenario. Not just with bikes but many other manufactured products. Ironically with giant they manufacturer frames for alot of the other brands too.
  • - 43
flag Hunterchek (Jun 24, 2016 at 20:30) (Below Threshold)
 Typical people need to understand that if you want the best, you have to pay for the best.
  • + 17
 @slowrider73: and Giant is the largest bicycle manufacturer in the world.
  • + 5
 @Hunterchek Unless you buy direct, or off season.
Kona, Giant, commencial, and Yt all keep some dialed bikes under the 2k-4k range.
You can't get Eleven-six/Fox and XTR-Di2 in that same range, simply because the cost of the components alone cost's that much! 1.2k+1k+2.3k
Manufacturers have, and will continue with the path of lowest resistance in bringing price down, and that is to sell direct and kit cheap. It is a lot easier then to upgrade kits until you reach a "Top Level" usually in tiers of 2-5 different bikes. (Process, Process DL, Supreme Process) (Jeffsy AL, Jeffsy AL Comp, Jeffsy CF comp, Jeffsy CF pro) (Meta Origin,Meta essential,Meta ride,Meta Race,Meta World cup)
  • + 72
 Strong, light, cheap.....pick two
  • + 34
 When I purchased my Yeti, I thought it was going to come with Jarred Graves AND an actual Yeti. I mean, the bike is great, but for the price, I probably could have actually bought Jarred Graves for a few days
  • - 30
flag dtiskevics (Jun 24, 2016 at 23:28) (Below Threshold)
 I've ridden China carbon and I've ridden ENVE, lower prices come with baggage. There's always a cheaper option but there's a reason the word "cheap" is a synonym for "crappy". Good mountain bikes aren't cheap and cheap mountain bikes aren't good. If you think lower priced items preform just as good or just as safely as the good stuff, you either don't know what you are talking about or you're just a troll spewing the popular grievances to get attention. Shut up and ride your damn bike.
  • - 2
 @Myfianceemademedoit: until it goes wrong and you have to ship it back to YT as your local bike store won't touch it.
  • + 1
 @slowrider73: The problem with YT and other manufacturer direct companies is that it takes away so much business and other personal contact that you would find at any LBS
  • - 8
flag bonkywonky (Jun 25, 2016 at 0:32) (Below Threshold)
 @Hunterchek: ever heard of YT or Commencal, coming from the depths of socialist Europe?
  • + 12
 @dtiskevics: care to explain to me then why YT Capras and Tues get great reviews?
  • + 4
 @Myfianceemademedoit: they don't pay logistics to a central warehouse and they don't pay any retailers. By direct online ordering they reduce costs.
  • + 12
 @slowrider73: agreed! Look, for example, at this year's Giant Trance Advanced 1. $5000. Imagine how much it can fetch if there were some other brand's name on it.
  • + 6
 @Waldon83: I don't think he would let you ride him though Blank Stare
  • + 5
 @CapedBaldy: i know! Giant US have the anthem sx on sale at 4200 with carbon frame and wheels, xo drive, guide rs, revelations and it comes in at 11.2kg!! Sheeeeeet!
  • + 2
 anyon will be in US soon =
  • + 7
 Last year's Reign 1 was a steal, at least in Slovenia (3200 € when paid in cash). This year it's getting worse (something like 3800 € for a worse wheelset and cassette), but it's still better than Trek's similar bike for 5000 € (MSRP, there are usually large discounts in play when you actually buy it, but that's a whole another story as to why must everything be bought with a huge discount to get a 'normal' price, instead of setting right MSRPs and selling at those prices).

As for Kona, they're just as expensive as Trek in Europe. Even Commencal's bikes are usually slightly expensive, at least compared to YT for example.

I think my next bike (the one replacing the 2015 Reign) is going to cost 5000 € and will be aluminium. Yay...
  • + 0
 @ad15: exactly, and for those worried about service after the sale, I wouldn't complain about paying a premium from their LBS.
  • + 1
 @Stahlhaus: yes, that's the "formula".
  • + 9
 @Myfianceemademedoit: Its not like a LBS souly survives off if selling bikes. They survive off of mechanical issues. You breaking shit, and him repairing it. If they complain about you giving them money, then tough shit Lbs.
  • + 2
 Since when are there such good bikes? Since the average person is willing to pay 4000$+ for a bicycle. So the prices helped improving the engineering quality.
  • + 3
 @ad15: local bike shops ship back to the manufacturers too. Warranty from the local shop is a pain in the ass too.
  • + 3
 @Myfianceemademedoit: except for when you look at the YT website and see that if you order now, a majority of the bikes won't be shipping until mid August. .
  • - 2
 @Myfianceemademedoit: Yeah if you dont mind f*cking over small local bike shops
  • + 16
 @chillrider199: you miss my point, why should a store process a warranty for a bike brand that sells direct to customers... they don't..

If you walk in to any of the bike shops here with a YT, canyon or any other mail order brand, with a warranty issue, you'll very politely get quoted a price to fix it, when you then say that it's warranty and should be replaced FOC, you'll then very politely (or not) get told to get in touch with the brand direct and send it back to them..

Then begins the wait for new parts etc as well as the cost of shipping potentially your entire bike back to the manufacturer...

I'm not saying thats bad, but you can't have it all, Mail order brands offer exceptional value with their builds, the down side is when things go wrong,
  • + 0
 @Myfianceemademedoit: ohh someone understood what i meant.. funny getting neg propped for a factual piece of information...
  • + 4
 @warehouse: yes they do, but a lot of stores, esp ones that have good relationships and a level of trust with the brand, can do the whole process by emailing pictures of the issue, the warranty manager can then authorise replacement from stock to get the customer back on his/ her bike faster, then replace the shops stock in the post..
  • + 1
 @mikeyb76: keith was so right with that
  • + 2
 @ad15: Warrenty is a completely different matter. I was just saying the general maintenance and servicing is what a shop survives off of. If the person manages to break the rear triangle, it is their job to get the new one. Then the shop puts it together. But I do understand. It is a bitch when you don't deal the bikes.
  • + 11
 It is crazy that companies like Specialized take a $300 China frame and mark it up 1000% - Same with SC - frames used to be built in USA, now made in China with huge mark-up. Why are we paying more for a bike than a used Toyota 4x4? We are part of the blame succumbing to all the lame new standards - increase your rear end by 6mm and you get BOOST!!!!!
And direct sales may help with the intitial sting of purchasing a new bike but it will bite you in the ass when shit breaks and none of your friends know how to rebuild a fork. Locally owned bike shops are vital for our culture - without them we are forced to go to Big Box stores with guys that dont know shit about riding, or wait for parts to get shipped to you.
  • + 1
 @CapedBaldy: Just bought a new one for my wife. Too much bike for a beginner but it was on sale for $3800 which is a steal for that much bike.
  • + 0
 Yes they could make it a 26er
  • + 4
 @chillrider199: can anyone explain to me why I would need a shop to handle my warranty? It's just as easy to deal directly with the manufacturer as with a shop. At least that's been my experience that past two frame warranties. Not to mention that I bought one of these frame at an LBS only to move cities, so it made no difference compared to ordering online.
  • + 9
 @mikeyb76: 99% of relevant bikes are made in either china or taiwan. I would much rather have a bike made by people who knows their shit. Actually, the best carbon frame factory is in China, and they build the very best frames on the market. Evil, Santa CC, Cervelo etc...
  • + 1
 @beast-from-the-east: Okay look. If you order the part and the bike shop puts it on, then dandy. But if you make the bikeshop do it. Then its kinda stupid. People do that. Believe it or not. And Im talking warrenty part. You didnt read my last comment correctly. Yes there is a typo.
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: what would you have done with him if you had him? Do you think he'll be surprised when he finds out you feel this way about him?
  • + 3
 IF YOU PAY MSRP YOU ARE DOING IT WRONG
  • + 1
 @somismtb: If you are paying MSRP you are either buying a frame or buying through a shop...
  • + 5
 @JBSDesigns: I agree that the China frames are great - but don't agree with the companies marking them up so much - the difference between USA vs China production is the USA frames used to be more expensive to make due to labor, insurance, workmanscomp, and other factors in the USA that leach money from companies. Now the frames are cheaper to produce and these companies aren't passing the savings to us - they are padding their bottom line---bullshit!!!!
  • + 10
 @mikeyb76: I'm still bitter about the day I got 3 Santa Cruz bikes. ..3 of the same models... I just happened to open the first one with the box up side down. BOOM, plain as day was a sticker on the BB shell saying "Made in China".....wait, what?
When did this happen?
Did I miss the memo?
Why am I still paying the "Made in USA" prices.
I felt cheated....
The main reason I picked up SC as a brand was cause they were made in USA...
  • + 4
 I think I am fine with prices... If you can't afford something then buy used stuff. Unless you are into owning 5 bikes. IMHO, since MTB became a popular sport and trails are getting overcrowded, bikes should be at least 50% more expensive. This like those 30 year olds complaining on prices of houses and loans - you are not supposed to have a house when you are 30. What else do you want cheap? Sport cars? So that you can have a Lambo as your 3rd car and drive to Laguna Seca or Nurburgring every friday evening? Luxuries must cost money, it's good for you! I remember very well, the 80s when my aunt brought a banana from Germany and I went crazy. A year later she bought a can of Fanta. Me and my cousins were collecting cans, it was so rare to drink soda in Poland. You can't even imagine how it was to see a Mars bar through the shop window at Pevex, where you needed go have US dollars (which were hard to get) which then were exchange for coupons if the authority allowed you. When I started riding bikes I was a student, I could save 3$ per week. That's why I was buying patches because I couldn't afford a fkng tube.

So sorry, I cannot appreciate moaning on prices of high end bicycles, especially since SLX level bikes are incredible these days.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: men ... you must be a men who don't care about others. Don't know how you can say that in 2016.... 30 yo boys and girls or students, can't ride good bike because they aren't older to spend lot of money ? Selfish ....
Remember but race is for young guns Wink
  • + 1
 @mikeyb76: MTBs will have gotten better when we can rephrase the old mantra to "strong, light, cheap; pick four"
  • - 2
 @MisterJones: quite on the contrary. So you wanting toys for nothing is a sign of altruism? And I am selfish for saying that people making bikes should be paid fairly for making them? You are saying this, because you have no clue how little money there is in bike industry. So no everything lower would make a sweat shop. Companies like ENVE, charging gajillions for a simple product can be counted on fingers of one hand.

Why don't you want 100$ gokarts made by Ferrari so that kids can ride the best if one they they would like to maybe become F1 drivers?

What kind of sick justice are you after?
  • + 3
 Yes, please stop changing frame designs and get the prices under control. Thanks!
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: I bought my sb66 as a demo from my LBS. Easy way to save coin and you can trust the bike has been cared for.
  • + 2
 So here in Austria 20% are taxes -> Buy a bike for say 5000€ -> State gets 1000€. Don't forget!
  • + 1
 @Mooka: i feel for the moroccans, 80% import duty....
  • + 2
 @Mooka: oh no! So you mean that this TAX thing, that it is the state taking my hard earned money? That's why my salary is 30% short each month! I thought it was the underwear gnomes again!

Thy'Tk,MaManeeyyy! (and gave 30% of it to the immigrants)
  • + 2
 @PedalShopLLC: At the time SC were still made in the USA (before the move to carbon, I'm guessing), weren't pretty much ALL the boutique-y brands made in USA? SC, Pivot, Turner, Intense, ... Why single out Santa Cruz as being uniquely made in USA? They never were unique in that regard.
  • + 1
 commecal, online bikes are discounted so a world cup enduro bike is 4999
  • + 2
 @PedalShopLLC: its been a long time since SC was made in usa. around 2007 ish? could be that things have moved around but back then it was a huGe company that makes a magically similar design. there was an article about them shopping the facilities in asia, when they found the larGe company they were obviosly the only way to go, no other manufacturer was even close to the quality and technical capabilities of the larGe company
  • + 1
 @MtbSince84: yup...been selling SC dating back, way back....I think as far back as 1997...It was Dean,Titus, Ellsworth and Santa Cruz for my go to Made in USA brands... it was just a real bummer to see that Made In ROC sticker on the bike when, at the time, there was zero mention of the change from my SC sales rep. Where they're made from, personally, I don't care too much as long as the quality is good.
  • + 2
 I think Waki is not completely wrong. Race is for young guns but they race so that rusty guns can buy. I'm rusty now when I finally gather enough to buy a decent used one. Its a free market, we can bar anyone from selling expensive or buy expensive. In the west, you'll probably get kicked out of the door if you pay peanuts but China is a unique country where u pay peanuts and get peanuts. If they ran out of peanuts, you'll get peas in your container instead. So it takes effort and experience to make sure they don't get peas. So the next time you get peas when you pay with an arm, try and find out out if the importer was paying peanuts for it.
  • + 1
 @AlexS1: LOL --- what a great analogy
  • + 1
 @somismtb: That's all I can think reading this stuff. I ride specialized because it's the cheapest for me. LBC hooks you up if you buy their shit.
  • + 1
 @bridgermurray: yeti bikes pricing are fully comparable to other top drawer brands like Santa Cruz. If you want the best you have to pay. I did. My Yeti is worth every penny.
  • + 1
 @Hunterchek: correct. A whole lot of whining here.
  • + 1
 @bluechair84: Yes!!
  • + 123
 New hub standards!!! Only way to improve the bicycle!!!! (Also maybe some new BB standards, headtube standards and why not throw in a new seat-post standard just for good measure)
  • + 47
 Yeeeessss. The world needs new standards.
  • + 5
 Been asking this for years. When is bike industry going to wake up and listen to the people? Seems to me that these guys do not even want to make money, especially SRAM, they do not care at all, they want us to keep riding the same bikes forever.
  • + 12
 BSA30 headsets! RIP pressfit!
  • + 8
 Let's just make a new wheel size too. Call it the complete package!
  • - 1
 @passwordpinkbike: Sram gave us clutch derailleurs, some of the best brakes..ever, and 1x drivetrains...they're usually ahead of the curve
  • + 7
 @Jhou: Im calling the new standard: 28.00978364826483in wheels.

That being said, they will (of course) be plus sized. However, were gonna have to wait for another two months for the plus sized versions. Because why create only one standard when you could create two?
  • + 6
 And then bring back the old outdated standards to really spark innovation.
  • + 5
 @tjtrotter12345: my sram clutch derailleur + nw drops its chain every ride. my zee never did once. Sram's stuff usually comes out first, but a certain other brand perfects the products.
  • + 7
 @tjtrotter12345: I thought Shimano was first with clutch mechs, 1x drivetrains were the first drivetrains ever and as for brakes, everyone has a different favourite. Hope brakes seem to receive most love but still not by everyone. Then again as being ahead of that curve you mentioned, not all curves are good either.
  • + 26
 a new pedal thread! this standard is around since forever, that can't be! you need more stiffness between pedals and cranks to prevent knee injuries. for improved carbon cranks maybe even no thread at all, press fit pedals are the future.
  • + 7
 How many times do these things have to change before we can stop calling them standards?
  • + 2
 @passwordpinkbike:
SRAM has a MUCH better record of reading the market and making stuff that the public wants. 1X transmission being the latest example.
  • + 3
 @i-ride-things:

If that's the case, you've almost definitely set it up wrong. Nobody else is having that problem.
  • + 7
 Listening to people gripe about standards is so fucking boring.
  • + 2
 Until the latest Standards become standard they should keep trying new standards, only by standardizing these standards can new standards be developed and become the new standard.
  • + 1
 @jzPV: you don't need pedals if you have Boost!
  • + 1
 @passwordpinkbike: I have not bought any components with the new standards. I was able too get the new wide internal width carbon rims in 26 from China for about 1/2 the cost of the new Carbon rims we see on this web page.
Vote with your wallet.
  • + 1
 @jzPV: That's perfect. And if you ever need to take your pedals off to transport your bike you just need a handy vice or press. And it's a perfect indicator that your cranks are past their best when the press fit pedal axle starts to work its way out of the crank. That really would be the bicycle industry looking after us all!! Smile
  • + 2
 @ermoldaker: pressfit pedals, YES!!! Why is that not a thing, pressfit BB's worked SOOOOO well, lets pressfit everything!!!
  • + 2
 @ermoldaker: That's nonsense. You can just put the pedal in the fridge and heat the crank, push them together and wait for them to return to the ambient temperature and voila, fixed. When you want to take the pedals out again, just wait for the industry to develop a way to freeze the pedal axle and heat the crank simultaneously.



In the updated version of the user manual they recommend to remove the pedal from the fridge before you insert it into the crank.
  • + 60
 8 inches of travel solves everything
  • + 17
 That is what she said yesterday.
  • + 21
 ooooo shots fired pew pew pew
  • + 1
 haha
  • + 1
 Speed solves everything. It's just that in the end trees always win...
  • + 2
 @cbj2012: I can't believe no one has written 'that's what your mum said' yet
  • + 50
 I don't care. The better poll is: Can Today's Mid-Aged Trail Bike Rider Be Significantly Improved?

I will always be the weak link on my bike at my age and skill level. There isn't a bike out there that I'll ever out ride so I'll try just about anything and keep the bike that's already paid for.
  • + 6
 Riding bikes gets better every year. The tech just slightly outpaces getting older. I usually ride my bikes into the ground. I would prefer to get a new bike every two years +/-
  • + 14
 @EricHarger: I like the thrill of chasing a good deal on something a year or two old, especially if it's NOS. If someone could race a model 2 years ago I'm sure it's plenty good enough for me to tool around on for another 5.
  • + 43
 Seriously?! You Dare ask that??! Let's start with stronger, lighter, and/or cheaper. Then we can get more technical: no more press fit bottom brackets, more real standards and fewer bullsh!t standards, tougher lighter tires, longer service intervals on forks and shocks, not machining parts so that there's 0.5mm of clearance and when it hit a bump funny parts get destroyed... Come on guys, anyone who thinks current bikes are perfect hasn't ridden one long enough to find the little quirks.
  • + 7
 Tolerances can be made tighter easily but, that increases costs significantly
  • + 11
 Still though, everything you just mentioned are improvements on current technology. Think of all the innovations in the last 5-10 years... dropper posts, clutch & 1x drive trains, brakes that work, tubeless tires, carbon fiber that doesn't crack, internal routing, electronic drivetrain, suspension, and seat post, countless suspension designs!

How much more could they actually innovate and not just improve on?? Not much!
  • + 5
 @tjtrotter12345: Dropper posts are about the only innovation in the last 10 years. Most of the other improvements you mentioned are window dressing at best. Internal cable routing. PLEASE.
  • + 1
 @tjtrotter12345: As someone who has been around a while... bullshit. I have yet to see a dropper post that functions better than my decade-old gravity dropper. Shimano has been making kickass brakes for 15 years. Sturdy chainguides have been replaced with finnicky clutch RD/NW. UST is 15 years old and still the best tubeless standard. IDGAF about internal routing, CF, and suspension designs; some work and some don't, same as always. Geo has changed markedly, and the really shit/dumb stuff is gone, that is all.
  • + 1
 I think there is still a lot of room for improvement. Mid travel bikes are being sold as "do it all" bikes but to my experience, most of them are limited to a very specific set of trails. Too small and you can't rough them up at all and if you go slightly bigger, you're overbiked for 80% of the trails out there.

From my experience, most trails can be ridden just fine on a 120mm XC bike, you could even argue on a hardtail. Then if you get into the harsher stuff, most 130-160mm won't be specced with the parts that makes sense for such terrain unless you're willing to go for the very best parts, which is unaffordable to most.

I feel there are way too many options that don't really have their place for the few real world scenarios.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: Agree anything over 140mm is a waste don't need it in the NW, I love my EPO hardtail. Advertisement and the industry dictates what the market will buy by telling everyone they need to go bigger.
  • + 1
 @thoe: I don't know how many people I've seen on a 140mm+ that refuse to hit any trail close to requiring a 140mm... but baring a few exceptions, most sub 140mm bikes are too XC race oriented for the average rider. I find there is a lot of room for improvement in bike geo/specs with the current travel numbers.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: It all comes down to the type of trails you ride
  • + 1
 @tjtrotter12345: Carbon fibre frames have a long way to go still as they are generally the wrong shape for the material. Specialized have started it with the current Demo but still it will go further. Bike designers are still making mock up frames in aluminium then making from carbon, yet the two materials behave TOTALLY differently. There will be a massive revolution in how a bike looks and performs soon I'm sure.
  • + 39
 26 inch wheels are the future.
  • - 4
flag nozes (Jun 24, 2016 at 21:59) (Below Threshold)
 And the past.
  • + 1
 watch out 157 super boost extreme might be coming.
  • + 27
 Honestly it's kind of silly to think that we'll ever reach a plateau...
  • + 8
 Why, of curiosity? I personally think it's really logical for us to plateau, and right about here seems like it's where the plateau is going to happen. Component quality, frame materials, frame geometry... It's all better than it ever has been, and to me it seems like we're reaching the limits of what we can create within those three realms.
  • + 13
 @LindLTaylor: Take a look at most things in the world. Technologies keep developing in every industry, so why should the mountain bike be any different?
  • + 17
 @wpplayer18: Look at Motocross bikes. They reached a plateau a while back. The biggest chance recently was the move from 2 stroke to 4 stroke. They reached an ideal wheelsize, tire size, travel size, fork type, geometry, etc a while back and not much difference between brands. This is what will happen with mtbbikes sooner or later.
  • + 1
 @wpplayer18: that's not the case. Just take a look at Moores law. There is no indefinite growth
  • + 6
 Who knows then? There always seem to be breakthroughs that people never would have imagined.
  • + 6
 I agree with @SintraFreeride, there's a lot of things that have plateaued and bikes probably will one day as well. That said, even if bikes plateau it wouldn't stop people from playing the shifting standards game to make a few extra bucks.
  • + 7
 Is it though? I think you could argue that its already happened.

There haven't been any major changes in the last decade. Suspension has been refined (both kinematics and damper tech), frames have moved towards increasing use of carbon, brakes and transmission have been refined, and wheel sizes have been tweaked. But those are all really just refinements on developments that happened a long time ago. The last really big thing that is entirely new is dropper posts.

I wonder if the next big thing will be electronic guts for a lot of things. Already exists for shifting. I suspect suspension is next. Wireless is probably right around the corner. The gearbox unicorn might finally materialize in the real world, as we get better at miniaturizing things. And...gulp....ebikes.

Right now, I think advancements are stagnant. Its all about subtle refinements. I wonder if the change to electronic stuff will lead to huge changes going forward.
  • + 5
 Reminds me of a quote I read by a Patent officer in the late 1800's saying that "everything that can be invented, has already been invented". Quote could have been made up, who knows. But it seems short sighted to think that there won't be significant innovations. I don't know what those innovations will be.. If I did, Id have a successful company and id be sitting on a beach somewhere. Not in my living room commenting on a pinkbike forum.
  • + 2
 @SintraFreeride: Good point. The Moto industry spent the 70s and 80 exploring a bunch of crackpot ideas, the 90s were when the homogenization of design started, now everything is pretty similar and the focus is on refinements and getting the setup perfect..
  • + 2
 As long as the military industrial complex is thriving new materials technologies will at least continue to evolve. Improvements in geometry drivetrain, and tires seem likely based upon what we've seen in the last 5 or 10 years alone.

Motorcycles are quite a bit different in regards to the drivetrain and the weight of the bike, is that a fair comparison?

Here is a scary proposition: Ebike evolution could get to the point where they look identical to regular bikes.

But its quite possible that stable civilization could peak before mountain bike technology does and that will be the end of it all.
  • + 1
 @Protour: It's already possible to hide motors and batteries making it nearly impossible to tell the difference.
  • + 21
 I hear that URT suspension design works so great. That plus “Two parallel Elastocell springs and a Fluid Logic Damper that provide more cushion and less bounce than other conventional bike shocks.” Maybe add that to the next few treks we'll have the ultimate trail bike!
  • + 8
 more cushion less pushin
  • + 21
 We could do with some XL and XXL sizing improvements. How about longer chainstays in the bigger sizes? Acceptable amounts of stack?
  • + 7
 Yes to longer stays on bigger sizes.
  • + 9
 @Mandell: Because for taller people even medium length chainstays can make it feel like the rear wheel is between your knees. I'm 6ft2 and my preference is for about 445mm chainstays to give me a more centered feel on the bike.
With short stays and long legs which can put your ass quite far rearward, when the bike starts to drift it can be a hell of a ride as the bulk of your mass is pushing that rear tyre around. I've currently got 430mm stays and I have to keep my ass further forward than I'd prefer to keep the weight distribution good for cornering/riding fast.
  • + 3
 Agreed. I know there's not many tall riders out there, so it's a tough sell to get companies to make larger bikes. But frig, i'm 6'5 and looking at the geo charts of a lot of the new release bikes...there are few bikes that I'd be comfortable on. Getting pretty ridiculous that I'd need a dropper post with 250mm of travel just to be able to pedal around with the saddle at a decent height with this trend of shrinking seat-tube lengths.
  • + 4
 Ditto on the small/xsmall end. NOT scaling stack and cs length with the rest of the bike just seems lazy... And I know this will never happen, but if they actually used skinnier tubes for the small and XS bikes, especially hardtails, that would be great. Cut down the same tubes that they use on the XL to XS and you have something rigid enough to support a 900lb midget whose bones are made of depleted uranium, or to rattle the teeth out of a 130lb short person's head.
  • + 1
 I think robot bikes is the future. 3d printed titanium tube junctions and carbon fiber tubes. They let you customize the bike off of measurements that they recommend based on your height and other body measurements
  • + 1
 @natemeyer: just saw a thing on GMBN about them! Great concept but right now I bet it's still cheaper to call a guy who can tig weld and have him make you a bespoke TI frame. End result would likely look a bit less goofy too. Not saying that all won't change of course, it usually does...
  • + 20
 4 years and still the same bike. 2x10, 142x12, reverb, 26", non tapered fork. I would like a new bike with new everything but mine still does the job thank you
  • + 0
 2x10..... 1x10 and you are there.
  • + 8
 I agree with u mate. For me, money is tight and how can I warrant switching to 27+ , boost hubs, press fit blah when I have a shed full of 26 tyres, spares to fit my current ride.

I'm riding this solid nukeproof mega 26 till either:
I can't get bits for it anymore
It breaks
I run out of all my spares
It gets nicked

Then I will move on to whatever the new fashion is then ... 28.75??"
  • + 1
 @jamesdippy: Bahahahaha! 28.73 you idiot!!! Wink lol! We joke but in a year there WILL be a scientific study taken by specialised stating that is nearly 13% faster when ridden with steel toe capped glasses and for the general public is the best all round trail and commuter size and have patented it. With a grip that locks into place using Bluetooth. It'll all make sense in a year!!! @wakidesigns you know the score :-)
  • + 17
 Im noticing a resurgence in hardtails of late. As the dual sus trail bike has lept forward massively in the past 5 or so years weve learnt much about geometry and its these geometry advancements that are being passed on to hardtails making them more capable than ever. Also the 27.5+ movement has finding its way onto a rigid back end giving riders even more options. These 'sideways' movements are the way were headed. Gearbox, electonic, more/less travel, they're all possibilities! But, as weve always done as a scrutinizing mtb community, lets not stop differentiating between advancements and companies bandwagon hopping and making us waste our money.
  • + 13
 I'm 100% on board with the next wave of aggressive-geo 27.5+ "All Mountain" Hardtails or whatever badge the industry slaps on them.
  • + 3
 Yep completely agree. With a capable fork less is more!
  • + 9
 Great observation. Very true as well. Hardtails have probably Benefitted more from "Enduro" designs than any other non-Enduro bike. I don't even know if it has as much to do with get or if it is about outlook of those who do factory spec. Hardtails now come with short stem, wide bars, big tires, all the elements of fun! It is rad that the industry almost seems to be making allowances for fun...
  • - 1
 Fuck plus tires. 2000 Nokian gazzalondi is dead.
  • + 1
 @torero: spell check. GazzaloDDi
  • + 2
 @torero , nobody here gets impressed by a guy tossing insults at plus bikes. You did not become a hero by saying it. No, Rob Warner won't write to you that Red Bull CEO wants to see you after he saw your comment. You may as well tell us how many girls you banged last night.
  • + 1
 Not only hardtails have been getting better but there are not all that many trails that you cannot ride with one, especially since building trends tend to point toward flowy highways.

Even though I'm not in their pants 24/7, I feel most people are overbiked these days. I don't ride a hardtail because I like to travel and hit everything from XC to DH with the same bike but honestly, with a 27.5+ HT I'm pretty sure I could ride 80% of what I currently ride just fine.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: I hope you are right about being overbiked. Because I had those intellectual ideas in my head when I was selling a Nomad and buying Blur TRc. Now I'm happy with a surplus. I find it ironic for people to talk about getting smaller bikes while they keep big forks and big tyres from their 160 bikes. When I see Prod Privee Shan with 160 fork and minions, and hear morals about having too big bike, I'm not wondering whether this guy is a lunatic, there is no doubt about that, I am wondering if he has any awareness of the fact that he is Wink
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm that guy with a 160mm fork on DH tires but the fork sees its bottom regularly and anything short of 1000g tires will be gutted assuredly. A 120mm ish bike would be nice for me most of the time but I'd still have to put 2k$ into it to make it bombproof since the strength of what is specced with 120mm is comparable to a wet paper bag. So yes, I feel "midrange trail bikes" need significant improvement before they can be what they're sold as, at least for me. Meanwhile, my boat anchor on wheels makes the most sense.
  • + 1
 @PLC07: I'm happy to say that I tried the 120 segment before it got cool. There's nothing in it, unless you live in a place with smooth and not so fast trails. Which is fine. Then it becomes a slope style bike that rips XC courses. However since I sit on a bike that is an amazing pedaller at 32lbs and 160 travel, there is no way I will go back to the little bikes. When I feel I need increased feedback I put EXO Minions on my DJ hardtail... but on regular rides - let it plow.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: lunatic for having fun on a bike? Hmm...Outside of spouting morals, which is a self-serving thing to do, riding the bike that makes the rider smile more seems fairly sane to me. Thinking anyone knows what someone needs better than they do themselves might seem kind of crazy though...
  • + 1
 @VwHarman: i meant thatba lunatic would build a hardtail with 160 fork, big tyres AND speak about having a small bike. You took those two apart and then suggested I don't like people to have fun which would be funny Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: must've misread, my bad!
  • + 14
 Infinite travel with 0" bottom bracket height. Anything less is just typical bike company laziness.
  • + 5
 I would make it even lower, longer and slacker, so that the bikes feel more composed, stable and capable blablabla...
  • + 2
 @karoliusz: You forgot compliant.
  • + 13
 maybe not much handling wise, but price and durability could keep improving infinitely
  • + 9
 There are too many BB standards. Each standard tries to solve one problem but creates another. One standard might creak less but be less durable and vice versa. If frame tolerances are made better some of the BB standard issues can be fixed. I really get annoyed by having new standards when old ones work great especially if the new standards don't really fix anything. Also, dropper posts are still far from perfect.
  • + 7
 I echo those who suggest suspension components that go longer without the need for servicing. If you own a FS bike, you either need a second bike for the recurrent downtime, or you need back up shocks and forks to slap on during service time. I love that "Oooh, that's what I've been missing" feeling when new shocks and forks are dialed, but the reality is...with one or the other usually at less than 100% performance, we rarely ever get that without it being a brand new bike. It just seems like durability and alternate designs could improve on that.
  • + 8
 Dear bike industry
Why my car's tubeless tires don't need to be filled with god damned white snot.
Also f*ck you tubes.

The rest is quite sorted, but really rubber guys, is this 1890?
  • + 10
 MOTHER FUCKING GEAR BOXES!!!!!
  • + 0
 Gearboxes makes sense in terms of maintenance. You service suspension / droppers once a year why shouldn't your transmission be the same. Plus there are so many other advantages to gearboxes.
  • + 0
 I had to scroll so far down but I was sure it had to be in there somewhere. Gearboxes yeah, didn't consider the mother f*cking flavor though. Actually I'd drop the gearbox nomenclature altogether. Just move the gearing into the main triangle and don't bother marketing it as something new. Even if you don't seal it we'll still enjoy some advantages over what we have now. It is there. Hayes, get your arse off that PeteSpeed patent. Give it away if you're not going to use it. Didn't Hayes just buy it from BeOne, apparently not willing to invest in it? And when this has become reality, it is time to fix the brakes and wheel bearings into the rear triangle so that the thru axle just spins and takes the hub shell along. Owning multiple rear wheels currently is just too expensive just because every rear wheel gets its own freewheel, bearings, brake rotor, wheel bearings and cassette (unless you bother swapping these out if you swap wheels). I think it works like that with the Millyard bike and it makes a lot of sense to me, but it is far from common.
  • + 9
 Wanna improve the trailbike? Start with the rider.
  • + 1
 Perfect! I always assumed any deficiencies riders have should be blamed on the bike. At least that is what I have done for the last 25 years whenever I have to push it up a hill.
  • + 6
 Dropper post that tilts the saddle and shifts it back for descend mode, moves it forward and levels the saddle off for climb mode. Just one way off the top of my head that they can be improved.
  • + 1
 Oh yeah, I don't use a dropper (I just leave the saddle low) but to me it still looks silly to have the saddle level when it it is down just as a compromise because it has to be level when the seatpost is up. I just don't think we should expect this from the dropper post manufacturers who limit themselves to these telescopic systems. You need a linkage to do what we want here and that's much easier if you'd integrate it with the frame right away. No doubt they're working on it but when they finally release something that works, everyone is going to say it is ugly. The seatpost manufacturers might release something that works, but we'll then be having to deal with another few years of unreliable dropper posts.
  • + 1
 Finally someone with an idea instead of dimwitted follow-everyone-else hate
  • + 2
 And while you are at it, how about corresponding riding gloves sold with the dropper post that will shock your hands every time you touch your seat to condition you to keep from pulling up on your dropper post and damaging it when it is in the descend position.
  • + 0
 @Protour: If that makes you happy...
  • + 1
 @Protour: nah, just make a post that won't get damaged by that.

And one that can drop on its own too, the awkward bum -drop move is annoying sometimes
  • + 4
 improve reliability, durability and longer service intervals of suspension and linkage! if you read the shock/fork manuals it's ridiculous how often they need to be serviced, and racers seem to do full rebuild almost each race day...
and skip carbon, should I be afraid to ride near sharp rocks on the mountain?
and increase environmental responsibility on production, take care of recycling of old components etc.
  • + 4
 Get em Down by 2/3 in weight using proper modern compounds and production. Which would make room for a heavier electronics system..which I turn should allow for full and active adjustability from road to dh level.

I include tyres in that, knobbles that expand under an electron charge etc. Slicks to dh at the push of a switch..ai controlled obviously. Lots of options, all held back by greedy companies making little little adjustments as slowly as possible.
  • + 6
 One thing that has improved recently imo is the inclusion of dropper posts on stock builds. You used to have to buy them separately which was sort of a pain.
  • + 3
 This article is spot on. For most of us our bikes are already far more capable than we will ever be. I have 2 mid-high end range bikes (4.5" and 6") and honestly when I'm out riding they just disappear. I don't notice them or think about them ever when I'm out riding, they just plain work. The only time I think about them is when I'm on the intertrons reading some PB component review and thinking "I NEED THAT".
  • + 3
 The next big innovation is coming in the form of custom frames, built for each individual - size, angles, intended use, wheel size based on rider size, parts that can be replaced for new standards/components, etc. That frame featured a few weeks back, with the carbon tubes and 3d printed bits, is a vision of the future.
  • + 3
 Cheaper! Reliability and a lot less maintenance. Imagine cranking on ur pedals as hard as u want without chain snapping? Suspension service easily done by the lamen. Even more reliable tubless setups. Electric suspension that makes all suspension bikes ultra efficient? Ik the price of these goodies r too much for u younger guys or some older guys but many of these companies u bash on here r same companies that made products that have improved our biking experience more than most could have imagined. Prices seem ridiculous but theyll come down and new innovations will take their place.
  • + 3
 The Next great cycling innovation won't come from any of the usual players, what advantage do any of them have to turn the industry on it's head?

The Bicycle Industry needs a Tesla to come in and mess shit up with some market disruption and new innovative product done on a scale no-one else thought possible.
  • + 2
 24" plus wheels! We desperately need these…we just are waiting for SRAM to tell us so! Oh and BOOST PLUS PLUS RC2 ENDURO RR CARBON GRIZZLY BEAR! Whatever that may be. It'll feel just like a coil!
Am I turning into @Protour?!?!?
  • + 0
 The bike industry can only plateau when the demo is taken off the market. It's really just a stain on frame design... or something like that
  • + 4
 absolutely, just go back to 26" wheels. Lighter, stronger, better acceleration and deceleration, less unsprung mass= improved suspension performance.
  • + 2
 Give it a couple more years. That is the marketing line they will take about the time that the vast majority of riders have switched to 27.5/29
  • + 0
 This will actually happen, All three wheel sizes have a purpose. Once everybody forgets about 26" it will make a resurgence exactly how you phrased it. I will be hilarious and embarrassing at the same time.
  • + 2
 There are many topics where the tech didn't make a leap forward for quite a while. Question is, where is it realistic to expect one? As long as there's no new material coming up, weight won't change drastically. Electronics could make a big change, mostly in suspension. If Fox is really on it, this could happen soon. Another field in which I see opportunities are tires / wheel systems. Maybe someone figures out how to make a decent, light dual chamber system or light tires that are still robust. Dropper posts are another thing which is stagnating without having to.
  • + 2
 Surprised that electronically controlled suspension wasn't mentioned. If anything on the near horizon can make riding more enjoyable it's not having to worry about suspension settings and whether or not you'll remember to unlock your shock and fork at the top of that long climb.
  • + 1
 I agree. We will hear a bunch of whining about this, but this will be the future. Fewer cables, and smart suspension. I'm looking forward to not listening to rattling cables, and not having to reach down to adjust my fork , then my shock. It'll be pretty sick when my suspension can firm up for me when I hit a punchy climb. I'm sure there will be some downsides to this, but let's face it, the first droppers weren't perfect, neither were the first forks, shocks, etc. It's coming.
  • + 1
 Yep. Knowing the bike industry it's going to be painful but eventually we'll have central computers on bikes that control suspension, dropper, and drivetrain.
  • + 2
 @grgsmith: That sounds absolutely awful...
  • + 1
 @Scotty7447: I think it has potential - imagine if your suspension could firm up or not based on how much power you are putting down and how rough the terrain is.

But I agree we'll probably see some awful products before it's widely accepted. Electronic shifting is taking long enough to gain any popularity...
  • + 1
 @grgsmith: just my opinion, but electronic shifting seems like pure luxury while electronically controlled damping will drastically improve performance and ride quality.
  • + 1
 @grgsmith: Thought that's what Specialized BRAIN technology is doing without electronics?
  • + 1
 @P3N54: BRAIN senses bumps. It keeps the suspension firm, unless it senses a bump, in which case it will open up to absorb the bump. I've never ridden a brain bike, but the reviews often state that it takes too long to open. If I understand it correctly, there is a "weight" in the BRAIN. In the "nominal" position, the weight is keeping the valve closed. When the rear axle travels upward (you hit a bump), the the weight stays down (inertia), the opens the valve and allows the suspension to work. It's a good theory, and some people like the way it rides (I have no opinion, I've never ridden it).

Electronics would be capable of evaluating more variables (speed, power, incline, saddle position (up or down)) and could use this information to quickly decide what do to with the suspension. I'm not arguing for or against electronic suspension. Just trying to explain how this is different from BRAIN.
  • + 2
 -Brakes with floating calipers so the pads stay aligned as they wear (tech exists, need to miniaturize).
-Crank-based drivetrain ratchet system for shifts without pedaling and reduction of rear unsprung weight. Should be easy now with everyone 1x (been done, needs R&D).
-Bushed chain that does not requiring lubing (tech exists, needs a lightweight version).
-Forks that keep the stanchions lubed without having to flip the bike upside down (inverted?...eh. Better use of capillarity?).
  • + 2
 Properly engineered electronic dampers will be a game changer for a lot as it will alleviate the constraints put on designers to design pedalling platforms into there suspension designs therefore allowing them to design it for what it's meant to be for. Absorbing impacts and aiding traction.
  • + 2
 I think starting to design bikes for 26" tires, 24" tires, 27.5" tires, 29" tires or whatever and stop centering the bike industry around 1 tire size. Im not saying make bikes able to accept multiple sizes but instead keep designing bikes for different size tires.
  • + 1
 I still want to go fast and shred, but I don’t need to be a few grams lighter or have to have this year’s wheel size, drive train or dropper to so. It would be nice to see additional separation of the bicycle product lines that would offer lower priced equipment, yet still of high value, that is catered towards those of us that ride weekends and an occasional weeknight and let the rich and/or sponsored folks chase the high end race spec equipment. It is my observation the bicycle manufacturing industry is now emulating the computer hardware industry with a 3 year planned obsolescence model.
Remember, where you put your dollar is where you put your vote.
  • + 1
 This is why I'm looking for a deal on a year or two old demo or personal sale. Personal bikes often have some nice upgrades that you basically get for free at a discounted price. It's a bike not a car so if something breaks it's a parts upgrade opportunity. Just make sure the frame is good!
  • + 1
 I'd like to see something with at home suspension tuning, as in something to help riders set up their suspension beyond that of a weight chart and basically like what the world cup guys do. Obviously we don't need our bikes as dialed as WC racers, but there's a fair bit of performance to be gained from having things like suspension set up properly.
  • + 1
 The industry continues to cycle one minute you need 8" of travel the next you need 6" and so forth. I find I turn to my trusty hardtail. I jumped on the band wagon when 11 spd was introduced and went back to ten due to cost and how long it last.
  • + 1
 I think electronics are the devil on a bike... but electronics will allow a kind of kinamatic diversity that isn't able mechanicly. That being said it will also alow manufacturers to justify the continuation of such a high cost of "production". CHEAP BIKES FOR ALL!
  • + 4
 More proper shocked, 130mm ish, slacked out, burly pinner bikes! With small wheelz.
  • + 1
 How about the bike industry. How can the bike industry be improved? We talk about new standards, price, and suspension. But what is the whole picture. Im talking from design, to manufacturing, to marketing down to the consumer. Should the industry be geared to serve the needs of the consumer or should it be geared to just innovate.
  • + 2
 I see the potential for electronics - Shifting, suspension, dropper - What I would like to see is electrical filaments woven into the carbon of the frame. No cables or wires - just connection points.
  • + 1
 i thinks the bike of today are still disposable garbage. just look at the shape of modern bikes they could all be lighter and stronger but instead look like art.(eg hydro formed 6 series alum instead of a triangular 7 series design) most bearings are not suitable for the application (ie not angular contact). the chain is exposed causing massive wear. anyone who rides alot will tell you you still have to maintain your bike almost every time you ride it to prevent it breaking down.
  • + 1
 @Hunterchek: I fail to understand all the negative votes that Hunterchek got for this. Reality is such a bitch. Everybody wants something for nothing. Notice that he wrote "the best" not "adequate" or "ANYthing I can't afford" or "what my rich buddy has that I am jealous of".
  • + 4
 I have a two Konas A precept and a Honzo I think at this point I need to stop whining and just become a better rider
  • + 2
 If they really think bikes are perfect, they should build 1,000 at a time instead of say, 100, save huge on ordering components/raw materials/etc in bulk, then pass some of those savings on to consumers.
  • + 1
 Whats the cannondale in the title picture? Sexy!

Mr Duell in 1899 "everthing that can be invented.. has been invented" .. only fools think that. bike tech will never truly plateau.. because it doesnt exist in a vacuum. All technology is constantly evolving and the bike industry just borrows from other product developments. Marketing is the other driving factor.. the company has to make money to survive.. so once we reach a state of near perfection at a reasonable price they will try and sell us regression.. steel will be real again. Ss hardtails etc. And the world goes round..
  • + 3
 Best I could hope for is not much changing but we see a significant reduction in price to be able to afford all of these new awesome improvements that we already have
  • + 2
 I want an 8 inch travel enduro single pivot e-bike with a twist throttle and one of those bolt on plastic exhausts that make braaaaap noises
  • + 0
 Significantly, no.
I still think bikes got as good as they need to be about 5 years ago, now it's change for changes sake.
I'll be racing xc on a 26" steel hardtail in an hour or two and tomorrow I'll be racing enduro on a 26", 135mm qr nomad.
I've not noticed all the latest greatests getting faster.
  • + 2
 really, everyone saying "no"? Look at bikes from ten years ago. That's how we're going to be viewing today's bikes, 10 years from now.
  • + 3
 We could definitely use some more tire size options: 26.75", 28.25" - both with + size options ...
  • + 1
 This^^ plus a 13 (or 14) speed cassette and wider rear hubs
  • + 2
 And don't forget the'" 26.75-minus" : the revolution ! It's like a regular 26 rim where you can't mount your regular 26 tires.
You need specific ones ...
  • + 0
 Just small stuff:

Design the bikes to run with 40mm stems, so increase the reach by 1-2cm
Design the bikes to run 2.5 inch 29er tyres please, So drop that bb further
With all this boost and 1x drivetrains, how come almost no one has beaten the enduro's 430mm chain stay yet?
  • + 3
 this article basically explains why my next bike is going to be a transition. keep it simple. go ride your damn bike.
  • + 0
 I want adjustable geometry. I know it's been tried many times, but please keep trying it until we get it right. I want a higher BB, steeper head and seat angles while climbing, and the opposite for descending.

I want everything electronically controlled: shifter, shocks, dropper, and geometry too.

I want a dropper that lowers without having to sit on it.

I want light-weight tires that are pliable at low speed, stiff at high speed, and are as durable as current DH tires.
  • + 3
 No more flats. You get that right, you own the world. No need for anything else.
  • - 1
 Imagine the next level for canyon's shapeshifter. The flip of a switch and your bike goes from a 140mm travel play bike to 200mm travel DH monster. As everything gets lighter this is becoming more possible. I'd also like to figure out a way to keep air inside my tire long term
  • + 3
 Gearbox please! Get rid of the ancient deralieur.
  • + 2
 110 mm travel, 62 degree head angle , 3 meter wheel base and 32"+ wheels with 180mm hubs. I can see it now Smile
  • + 3
 I don't know why I even answered. I'm still on a 26'er
  • + 2
 Well they could come with places to mount up a 24 oz water bottle. Might be a good start.
  • + 2
 Actually get real...weagles downduro is where we are heading. Break out the ol sleds boys!
  • + 1
 I think inverted forks still have room to replace regular forks and become the standard. They'll have to become cheaper first though.
  • + 2
 Design a dropper post that moves the seat slightly forward/&front down on the climbs and it would be a good improvement.
  • + 2
 Rims an tyres, in this age of tech. I still can't believe we're suffering punctures!!!
  • + 3
 Metric will revolutionise everything.. Said no one ever
  • + 1
 I would like to see advancements in anti bike theft and bike tracking. The rate these high dollar bikes are being stolen you would think advancements would be made.
  • + 2
 Ultramagnetic brakes and fly by wire steering.
  • + 2
 this pool is as significant as the latest: "should we leave the EU"? ...
  • + 0
 I think opinions became too general, but whatever, I think brands like Commencal and many others need to make seat tubes shorter to allow for dropper posts with more travel.
  • + 1
 Ok, neg props. We need taller seat tubes like road bikes!
  • + 1
 and also new cockpits. handlebar and stem integrated as one single carbon component!!!
  • - 2
 Yes:
* wider range 1x15 with a chain that won't break despite being that thin
* dropper posts that don't suck donkey d!ck
* even more powerful and better modulating brakes
* integrated storage inside frame
* tires/rim combos that don't pinch flat, ever
* lighter
* electronic shifting
* electronic automatic reactive shock tuning and lockout
* automated geometry changes as you climb or descend
* maybe gear boxes, maybe
* bearings that don't get crunchy in less than a season
* cheaper
* better shaped dropper levers or buttons
* gps tracked anti-theft built in
* integrated lighting
  • + 3
 Agreed on sucky droppers
  • + 1
 next big thing is nanotechnology carbon composite so expect the bike fairly lighter sub 11.5 kg enduro bikes
  • + 1
 Yes, they can be significantly improved. No, I don't think it'll happen any time soon. Gearbox.
  • + 1
 Its going to need radical changes in drivetrain, materials, suspension to make the bikes much better than they are now.
  • - 2
 The biggest chance left to do is obviously geometry wise. Slacker headangle 63-65º, steeper seatangles ~76-78º longer toptubes even on the smaller sizes with longer wheelbases, anything under 1200mm is just silly (even for XS frames).
Then, of course, a dropper post that goes down with out the rider needing to sit on the saddle would be AWESOME!
Also a type/tube/tubeless system which allows low tyre pressures without risk of burping nor flatting like the Procore system.
And for plus tyres to be both light as some are now but with sidewalls that won't tear easily (some sort of kevlar sidewall protection maybe).
Those are my thoughts anyway.
  • + 1
 There is always place for improvement. Evolution won't stop because you think you're close to perfection...
  • + 1
 More super boosted bikes.
  • + 1
 Carbon, aluminium OR STEEL (www.starlingcycles.com)
  • + 1
 cant wait to see what Canyon prices will be when they hit the states
  • + 0
 As with anything technologically based mountain bikes will continue to evolve until forever.
  • + 1
 Mind controlled gear switching and rocket boosters please :p
  • + 1
 Threaded headtubes just like threaded bottom brackets please.
  • + 1
 "Small geometry tweaks" Make a huge difference on the trail
  • + 1
 gearboxes.
  • + 0
 Yes, with a light, wide range, low loss, frame mounted gearbox.
  • + 1
 Pinkbike is full of morons.
  • + 0
 Yes, beat YT and make these high quality bikes even more affodable.
  • + 0
 Cables and wires will disappear soon
  • + 1
 get a new bike
  • + 0
 The bike need better tire's
  • + 0
 I think it's time for a new wheel size and bigger tires
  • + 1
 Ask a Dentist
  • + 0
 Bearing life needs work.
  • + 3
 Which ones? Hub, BB, frame, headset, pedal? Bearings are always going to be consumable items so I'd rather have easily replaced bearings (mostly with respect to headsets, bbs and hubs)
  • - 1
 Hell yes with a Waki Downduro conversion.
  • - 1
 Tame the trails and everyone can ride xc bikes for DH.
  • - 3
 Reliabilty needs to be improved. Yes I'm talking to you Sram, Shimano, Fox, Rockshox, KS, Renthal, Roval, and so on. Produce stuff that lasts more than 6 months please.
  • + 2
 Shimano, RS and renthal have all been pretty reliable for me ( apart from reverb but that seems a common industry wide issue with droppers).
  • - 3
 on my reign I have to remove air from the fork and add air to the shock to make it climb well then do the opposite for descending, much can be improved here!
  • + 2
 I pedal my reign up everything anyone else would without adjusting the suspension at all and it's not bad, it doesn't crush the climbs mind you but it wasn't designed for that. It's a 6" trail/park bike heavily slanted towards descending, the reigns not meant for crushing climbs. If you want to crush climbs you ought to find another bike. I personally love my reign, it really helps me scare those pesky hikers when I'm coming down the trail.
  • + 2
 @Scotty7447:Hahaha nice comment. I pedal my reign up stuff no one else can clean, I'm not looking for speed on the climb. One thing I did just notice today is a couple clicks of compression works just as good as adding air for the descent. I don't recommend scaring the hikers.
  • - 1
 no press fit bb's and lots of gussets
  • - 1
 I DON'T CARE! Oops already said that.
  • - 1
 Do our bikes really need bigger training wheels?
  • - 3
 Electronics bro, they're gonna change everything
  • - 2
 rohloff's for the masses
  • - 2
 A 160mm bike is an AM bike. A trail bike stops at 140mm.
  • - 1
 Nobody saying e-bikes?
  • - 1
 Betteridge's
  • + 0
 Betteridge's Law states the answer is 'No'. Which, in this case, is true. Define 'significantly', and assign it to any aspect and the answer will probably still be no. Significantly lighter? Significantly cheaper? Significantly faster? If we measured any of those things over time we would see no 'significant' improvement over the past few years. Incremental improvements from now on. The best thing you can do is train harder and smarter, and also earn more money.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel:

You're all Bike Nazis!

Godwin's.

IB4TL. Moderator, you can shut this thread down now.
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