Pirelli Launches Scorpion Tire Range

Mar 1, 2019 at 3:12
by Richard Cunningham  
Pirelli Scorpion tire

Pirelli's history with cycling dates back to the Tour de France's golden era. Somewhere in the 1980s, however, the famous Italian manufacturer left cycling to focus upon motorsports. Pirelli recently returned to the sport, initially with their P-Zero road tires, followed by an e-bike offering, but did little to raise the needle for mountain biking until the announcement today, that their racing tire division has developed a range of high performance tires based upon technologies derived from their successful Scorpion motocross program.

Pirelli claims 70 world titles - reportedly, the greatest number among all tire makers - working with pro teams from KTM, Honda Yamaha, Suzuki, Husaberg and Cagiva. That's an admiral pedigree, but success on the motocross track does not always translate to a winning mountain bike tire. What we can say for sure, however, is that Pirelli's intimate knowledge of molding, and compounding rubber, in addition to the knowledge gained through successful campaigns in almost all forms of racing is a fantastic starting point from which to launch a competitive mountain bike range.

Pirelli Scorpion tire
One color-coded letter signifies each of the four options: Red "H" for hard conditions, Yellow "M" for mixed, Blue "S" for soft, and a Green "R" for rear-specific.

Meet Pirelli's Scorpion Mountain Bike Range

Pirelli did a humongous amount of research before pushing the go button on their Scorpion tire development. Reportedly, they learned that mountain bike categories were all over the map, and that there was a large disparity between the marketing spew that tire makers used to define the purpose and performance of their tire designs and the levels of understanding that even the best riders assimilated on those same subjects. Pirelli decided that simplicity and clarity was essential to their program, so here's how it breaks down:

Four tires: The Scorpion range is comprised of four models, each designed for a specific task. All share the Scorpion name followed by a color-coded letter a red "H" for hard conditions, a yellow "M" for mixed conditions, a blue "S" for soft conditions, and a green "R" for rear-specific.

One Basic Compound: "SmartGRIP" is the name, which refers to Pirelli's discovery of a rubber compound that retains its wet weather grip, while delivering dry-condition tenacity and tear resistance. SmartGRIP is the overarching compound, which is then slightly modified to better suit the performance envelope and knob height of each of the four tire designs. Here's what Pirelli has to say about it:

"As was the case for the SmartNET Silica, which solved the tradeoff between rolling resistance and wet grip on the PZero Velo road tires, so is the SmartGRIP Compound, which in the Scorpion MTB closes the gap between tear resistance and wet grip. In the off-road application, the knobs of the tires profile are mechanically stressed in a much higher way than those of any road tire. The grip properties, therefore, must always be guaranteed, without compromising the rubber’s resistance to tearing.

With an incomparable expertise acquired in the formulation of compounds in over 110 years of competition at the highest levels, Pirelli has solved this critical point, thanks to the new SmartGRIP compound. At the same time, the engineers also customized the properties of the compound, from the static ones (hardness and breaking strength) to the dynamic ones (damping and dynamic stiffness) for each model and size."
- Pirelli press release

Three widths: Scorpion tires were designed for wider rims from the beginning. Well, sort of. Pirelli suggests that the 2.2 inch width offerings are paired with 25-millimeter inner width rims, and states that its 2.4 and 2.6-inch casings are intended to be paired with rims beginning at 30 millimeters inner width. Pirelli supports 29 and 27.5 inch wheels (sorry, no 26), but does not offer all three casing widths in both wheel sizes. Reportedly, each size offering and model are engineered differently for specific performance goals. For instance, the Scorpion H is available in all three options for 29 inch wheels, but only in the 2.4 and 2.6 inch options for 27.5. presumably because the higher volume casings allow smaller wheels to roll faster over choppy terrain.

Pirelli Scorpion tire
Pirelli Scorpion tire
Pirelli will offer a conventional "Lite" casing (left) and a double reinforced casing with sidewall protection for all four models.


Reinforcement options: Different levels of protection are offered. Lite casings are not reinforced to minimize weight, extra layers are offered on the sidewalls, and a more heavily reinforced sidewal in addition to double ply casings are also an option. Smaller 2.2 inch casings are generally 120 tpi material, while the larger and more aggressive options are made with 60tpi material.

Single-compound tread: Rather than layer rubber with different durometers to obtain the right balance of durability and grip, Pirelli spent the time to dial in one compound that is optimized for each Scorpion model. The thinking was that the tire will perform consistently as the tread wears down. We've seen tearing and uneven wear between layers on many tires lately, so this may be a welcome innovation.

Interlaced tread: Certainly not new, but it works for motocross racing. Pirelli's designers tie in groups of tread blocks with raised stripes of tread rubber to tune the stiffness of the tire where needed and allow the blocks to flex independently where further reinforcement may hinder grip.
Pirelli Scorpion tire
Interlaced tread: bands of rubber connect tread blocks to enhance grip.

"By basing the new tires’ design on the consistency of each terrain, Pirelli engineers also had to take into account many other variables: from the rider’s riding style to the most recent developments in terms of profiles and rim sizes. Therefore, in the new Scorpion MTB, the construction technology is not the same for all tire sizes: each size earned benefits from a dedicated development." - Pirelli press release

Hard terrain Scorpion

Scorpion Hard Terrain

Sizes: 29" wheel - 2.2, 2.4 & 2.6" and 2.2 & 2.4" Lite; 27.5" wheel - 2.4, & 2.6"
Price: €49.90 to €52.90 ($69.99 to 79.99 USD)
Weight: 650g to 795g
Rim widths: 2.2" x 25mm, 2.4 thru 2.6 x 30mm (inner width)
Casing options: 120tpi Lite casing for 2.2 and 2.4" and 120tpi casing with120tpi sidewall layers for 2.4 and 2.6"
Scorpion H
Pirelli Scorpion tire

Scorpion mixed terrain


Scorpion Mixed Terrain

Sizes: 29" wheel - 2.2, 2.4 & 2.6" and 2.2 & 2.4" Lite; 27.5" wheel - 2.4 & 2.6"
Price: €49.90 to €52.90 ($69.99 to 79.99 USD)
Weight: 695g to 850g
Rim widths: 2.2" x 25mm, 2.4 thru 2.6 x 30mm (inner width)
Casing options: 120tpi Lite casing for 2.2" and 2.4" Lite with 120tpi sidewall layer; and 60tpi casing with120tpi sidewall layers for 2.4 and 2.6"

Scorpion Mixed Terrain
Pirelli Scorpion tire

Pirelli Scorpion tire


Scorpion Soft Terrain

Sizes: 29" wheel - 2.2, 2.4 & 2.6" and 2.2 & 2.4" Lite; 27.5" wheel - 2.4 & 2.6"
Price: €49.90 to €52.90 ($69.99 to 79.99 USD)
Weight: 695g to 855g
Rim widths: 2.2" x 25mm, 2.4 thru 2.6 x 30mm (inner width)
Casing options: 120tpi Lite casing for 2.2" and 2.4" Lite with 120tpi sidewall layer; and 60tpi casing with120tpi sidewall layers for 2.4 and 2.6"

Scorpion Soft Terrain
Pirelli Scorpion tire

Scorpion R


Scorpion Rear-Specific

Sizes: 29" wheel - 2.2, 2.4 & 2.6" - 27.5" wheel - 2.4 & 2.6"
Price: €49.90 to €52.90 ($69.99 to 79.99 USD)
Weight: 740g to 855g
Rim widths: 2.2" x 25mm, 2.4 thru 2.6 x 30mm (inner width)
Casing options: 120tpi casing with 120tpi sidewall layer for 2.2" and 60tpi casing with120tpi sidewall layers for 2.4 and 2.6"

Scorpion R
Pirelli Scorpion tire


Our Thoughts

We'll have to ride Pirelli's new Scorpion tires to discover first hand if their claims match the performance of what appears to be a well designed tire range. The tread patterns look familiar enough, and that's a good thing. Tire design has been converging for some time. Specialized and Bontrager have enjoyed much success with tread patterns similar to the Scorpion H and M, while Schwalbe and Maxxis have been winning consistently using patterns similar to the R and S models.

I am not accusing Pirelli of knocking off someone else's tire designs. After 110 years of racing development, however, they've no-doubt learned that winning designs are built upon the foundations of previous success. The devil is in the details - especially with rubber compounds and vulcanizing presses. Pirelli, with over 1000 engineers and chemists working on their competition tires, have got those bases covered. I hope the Scorpion range delivers, but more interesting to me is the possibility that a new player in the mountain bike tire game may break the industry's monotony monopoly and start innovating solutions to sidewall tears and other nagging issues that our sport's leading tire brands have chosen to ignore for generations past. We shall see. Scorpion tires will start shipping this month.

Find out more about Pirelli Scorpion tires here.


146 Comments

  • + 129
 i think scorpion isn't a good name for anything related to a sport where the worst way of crashing is also called scorpion.
  • + 165
 In a similar vein I always thought the brand name 'Hope' was also quite a poor choice for a company which makes brakes.
  • + 4
 I am also picturing a scorpion pincturing the tire....definitely wish the would have used the Pirelli brand name instead with some F-1 sounding tire model names.
  • + 7
 On the other hand, the Hutchinson Scorpion ( first gen) was a legendary tire.
Might run into branding issues though.
  • + 2
 Exactly what I was thinking
  • + 2
 @Slimeo: How do you rate S&M bikes? (sandm.com)
  • + 3
 @Slimeo: I never thought of this, but now I love it.
  • + 6
 It's also just a cheesy name.
  • + 4
 They've been using this name for suv/off road line up forever. Also road bike tires are named after car tires p-zero and so on. If anything it's in house consistency.
  • + 3
 @DarrellW: You know it comes from their names right? Greg “Scott” Swingrover and Chris “Mad Dog” Moeller. Yes, double meaning, but it is from their names. I actually lived across the street from one of these guys when I was a kid and well before they took off. Used to give me stickers and let me ride his little kicker ramp. Was stoked when I started to work in a bike shop at the age of 20 that his brand had taken off and become a big company. Anyhow, Friday Facts. haha
  • + 1
 @Slimeo: Hope named after the mill (Hope Mill) where they first located. The mill in turn named after a Derbyshire village.
Presumably people don't think it's called Hope due to some twee attempt at a random representative name.

It's a bit different to randomly picking Scorpion to describe your tyres.
  • + 4
 Still waiting for Hoosier to enter the fray.
  • + 4
 Fuji Bikes' in-house line of "Oval" wheels is not great either.
  • + 4
 @metalvelo: i bought a S&M dirt bike from them in maybe 1998. came in a box with shredded and crumpled up porn mags as packing material.
  • + 2
 along with Blur optics...
  • + 1
 Meh, the mx range has always been called scorpion
  • + 1
 @jamiep: Did you know that there was a porn vid filmed at the S&M warehouse roughly 15yrs ago? Great moment in bmx history.
  • + 1
 Scorpion is SUV tyre Smile in automotive worldSmile
  • + 1
 @Slimeo: you haven't seen me ride....all i need is hope.
  • + 72
 I'm disappointed they didn't use the F1 branding:

Hypersoft - Pink
Ultrasoft - Purple
Supersoft - Red
Soft - Yellow
Medium - White
Hard - Ice Blue
Superhard - Orange
Intermediate - Green
Wet - Blue
  • + 24
 I'm just happy to know a complete list and that i can search pinkbike for it in the future.
  • + 7
 Oh yes please... Give me hypersoft PZeroes. The Pinker the better.
  • + 7
 @gotohe11carolina: I'm not sure if I would like to change my tires every 100 km to prevent them from exploding...
  • + 6
 @Extremmist: if memory serves it was the medium compound that they had so much trouble with, said the teams weren't running enough pressure. I guess the pirelli engineers hadn't heard about the wonders of Huck Norris or Enve's magical pool noodles in the rims at that time.
  • + 1
 That would have been so sick!!!
  • + 1
 @gotohe11carolina: PHRASING!!!!
  • + 1
 @usedbikestuff: Alas they're no longer using it! This year each race will have soft medium and hard from the 5 compounds C1 to C5 they have homolgated.
  • + 6
 @fish-monkey: you know your F1 tires!

Honestly I'd embrace some kind of a compound chart. Better than 27.5x2.5 3C/EXO/DUAL/SINGLE/TR/DD/MAXX GRIP/MAXX TERRA/SuperTacky/WT. Try explaining that one to your mom.
  • + 1
 Bit behind the times mate, C1 C2 C3 C4 or C5 now.
  • + 2
 @gotohe11carolina: well, look at it this way. The race distance is normally slightly more than 300 km. There's one mandatory pit stop. That means that no compound needs to last longer than that.
  • + 28
 I can't believe the complaints here. No one has ridden these yet but you all have plenty of bad things to say. You are all whiney little bitches, seriously get a fringen life and go ride your bikes.
  • + 29
 ...so you just followed suit? Your just whining about whining.
  • + 23
 50 shades of XC tyre...
  • + 3
 Yea I was thinking there's nothing too aggressive there. If your heaviest 29x2.6 is 855g the durability has to be a big question mark. But the prices are great, they might make great trail tires for the average rider on terrain that isn't too rocky but you still want a light, wide tire. I was thinking Maxxis Rekon the whole time I looked through these pictures above, but these are definitely less expensive.
  • + 13
 Racer X now sponsored by Pirelli! (Sponsorship kit includes black sharpie and a pair of Minions).
  • + 12
 There's a Wind of Change in the MTB tyre market.
  • + 2
 I see what you did there
  • + 1
 And power is nothing without control!
  • + 1
 Most tyres buzz, these whistle.
  • + 1
 That deserves more pun props
  • + 9
 Profit margins are so much now for MTB tires that Pirelli could no longer sit on the sidelines. Car/truck tire for ~$175 CAD or bicycle tire for ~$75 CAD?

The tread looks a lot like Schwalbe to me. Nice job there Pirelli!
  • + 8
 Where are you finding bike tires for $75 cad? last i checked a set of minions ran you close to $250cad
  • + 9
 There are tyres that are equivalents for 75$ truck tyre, they are called Kenda and you find them on 300$ bikes in Walmart. Sorry to break the party though, Gwinny is on them now so they will go up in price.
  • - 4
flag endurogan (Mar 1, 2019 at 7:09) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: firstly I would like to point out tYres dont exist and secondly I've tried Kendas aswell as others and can’t find anything for BC riding that compares to a minion other than E13 tires that wear out after 5 rides
  • + 5
 @endurogan: Last time I checked onlines like Chain Reaction, Merlin, etc... Basically every tire was priced @ $75. WT and DD styles etc. being a bit more. Plus & fat tires were in the $125++ range. I wasn't factoring taxes/shipping.

My LBS has tires starting @ $95 IIRC.

I'm convinced there is price fixing happening in the cycling world ATM. The EU should look into it. They seem to be the only ones who keep an eye on that sort of thing for consumers.
  • + 12
 @endurogan: @endurogan: Ugh, can't believe i'm doing this - his point is that if you want shit tires they are there. They're Kendas @ $75. If you want good tires they're there - they aren't $75 (like you said).
If you want $175 tires on your truck and you're using it for more than fetching the groceries or driving to work in the city from your suburban dwelling, you're probably going to have a bad time.

And you're wrong about the spelling of tyres. When people learn another language they learn English, not bastardised 'American' English which basically operates on the premise that let's make it simpler because Americans aren't smart enough to understand that U can belong in words where you don't hear it.

Eh neighbour?
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Kendas non OE tires aren't that bad. I agree with the feeling that their tires are about to see an increase in price.
  • + 2
 @nouseforaname: I see now i thought he was trying to say kendas are equivalent to minions, my bad. As far as the spelling of tires I just felt like being a dick because, its Waki he dishes enough out he can take some.
  • + 4
 Exactly! A corporation constantly looking for new revenue found a market where people pay $80 for a rubber product that uses 10% of the material in your average $150 car tire. No brainer.
  • + 1
 @endurogan: you aimed a missile at Sweden and it hit Buckingham Palace... Waki is pissing himself.
  • + 6
 @endurogan: ''tYres don't exist''. Yes they do, to people who spell the word the way it was intended to be.
  • + 2
 @m1dg3t: Kenda non OE tyres are not that bad

*if you use them where you don't need much cornering grip. Like a DJ bike or race BMX.
  • - 1
 @0gravity: Eh, the cost of a tire isn't determined simply by the quantity of material used. You're looking at higher prices relative to car tires, since they're still paying for R&D, and Pirelli's production numbers will be lower than those of their standard passenger car tires. For example, Pirelli's P Zero Corsa tires cost $400 each, and you need 4 per vehicle ($1600). Their bike tires are $60, and you need 2 per bike ($120). On your bike, you're paying 7.5% of what you would pay to outfit your car with (hopefully) the same quality tire.
  • + 4
 They got a glimpse at 45Nrth or Maxxis profit margin statements and started bicycle tire manufacturing the next day, if this doesn't tell us the stuff is overpriced, nothing does. A set of 4.6 45Nrth Wrathchild studded is 320$ Canadian A PIECE! (damn good tires, the bastards) Scorpion studded FAT soon to come!
  • + 1
 Always chuckle when I think a LT265/75R16 AT tyre is ~$250 CDN. A 29x2.4 bike tyre is ~$100
  • + 0
 @spankthewan: Cognitive dissonance.
  • + 2
 @0gravity: You can get "a bicycle tyre" for 15$. That will be the equivalent of your average 150$ car tyre.
A 3C EXO maxxis is more comparable to a high end sports car tyre from a premium manufacturer. Suddenly the maxxis looks pretty cheap in comparison.
  • + 1
 @0gravity: but they'll sell way more for cars then bikes, so margins/costs are completely different. Just a thought, probably has good deal to do with it. You would think being on there scale would change it, but you don't go into business to not make money.
  • + 1
 Ah wouldnt say so. Your average $150CAD Tyre is more like a $20 CAD Mtb Tyre. Sure it will do the job getting groceries or commuting, but it's nothing you'd use on track. A set of minions is more like a premium sports tyre (Sport Cup 2 Michelins) which will run you approx. $800CAD a piece.
  • + 6
 I like the weight numbers on these but time/testing will tell if they hold up. If you can make a 29" 2.6 at 850g that holds up and doesn't wash out on semi dry conditions I will try a set.
  • + 2
 I am really sceptical about those tires because a good enduro tire for me is a much more chunky design and then the weight. I can't run tires for 27,5"x2,4" with less then 850g. If so I will have punctures all over the tire. I didn't get anY tire who weight less then this who are save to use.
  • + 1
 29 x 2.6 Butchers, which are admittedly a touch small depending on your rims, are about 940g. That’s not too far off the weight of the Pirellis, and I don’t have durability issues. I could see the Scorpions being ok.
  • + 2
 First thing I thought when I saw the weights - Can a company really make a mtb tire that will stand up to any enduro level abuse at those weights? If they can then I'd say they have a winner but I'm pretty skeptical these will last in any sort of severe terrain.
  • + 0
 Another site put them on a scale, the 2.2s where 30-50g over weight, the 2.4 they weighed was more than 100g over claimed.
  • + 4
 "We've seen tearing and uneven wear between layers on many tires lately, so this may be a welcome innovation."

Quite far from innovative. Continental has been doing that for 10 years and the older maxxis tires were also single compound.
  • + 1
 You beat me to it! I was also surprised to hear that a single compound is an innovation! I guess he could have seen that on CNN!
  • + 1
 Agreed, I mistakenly ordered a single compound Minion DHF for my 26" hardtail that has lasted longer than three 3C tires.
It admittedly does have less grip, though.
  • + 7
 Cant wait for the Pirelli MTB "NSFW" calender to come out.
  • + 6
 You are showing your age, as am I, when you first thought is screw the tires, are the calendars coming back.
  • + 4
 I'm trying to understand are there people, who really think that the wide range of tyres is a bad thing? I'm personally glad to have all the wide choice of casing, thread and rubber hardness to suit my terrain the most.
  • + 1
 They try to convince you to make more money, marketing often promote their weaknesses as a good thing for you.
  • + 1
 I wouldn't say a wide range of tires is a bad thing. I think a wide range of tires, all with the same name despite being very different isn't a great thing. I'll never complain about too many choices, but this is yet another brand's non-descriptive nomenclature we have to figure out. The prices they cite are a lot more reasonable than the big M and S, which I appreciate.
  • + 5
 It seems all nice on the paper or a computer screen with large tables full of different widths, diameters, casings and compounds until you try materialize a perfect rubber for you in your head and then go and try to get your hands on it. Because you will soon find out that your distributor is not importing the exact tire spec/combo you would like and you have to choose from what is actually available.
  • + 1
 @lp130i: come on, we have so many online stores in the EU, so you can basically stock on most interesting tyres when they are on sale. It's more of distributor problem, not manufacturer.
  • + 2
 "but more interesting to me is the possibility that a new player in the mountain bike tire game may break the industry's monotony monopoly and...." huh? Specialized, Maxxis, WTB, Onza, Michelin, Vittoria, Bontrager, Continental, Schwalbe, Vee, Vredestein, etc....yes quite a monopoly there. Come on Richard.
  • + 1
 These seem to be the first tires I've seen in while that compare to Schwalbe on the weight front, so at those prices I'd be down to try some. If there are options out there with comparable weight please, correct me, but I see a lot of aggressive tires from other brands coming in at like 100-200+ grams more than Schwalbe.
  • + 1
 Schwalbe Snakeskins are too light. Need to beef up 100-200 grams to be usable.
  • + 1
 When is the Ferrari F-1 bike dropping? you know, the fully electronic everything bike that just about does everything for you to get those KOM's on a set of Pirellis for at least $20,000.00.
  • + 2
 I will have my money ready when they make Pirellion DHR in 29x2.4, tough casing and soft compound, ThankYouVeryMuch. Oh and sprinkle it over with some skinwall..
  • + 1
 Think they could have been a little more innovative with the name. Almost every one of their car/truck tires are called scorpion somewhere in their name.
  • + 2
 If they perform anything like their mx and xc moto counterparts, they'll be fantastic.
  • + 2
 great tyres for rally driving. i cant wait to try them out, but id probably highside it trying to scando flick into a corner
  • + 3
 "A whip looks complete when the tires say Pirelli"
-A Tribe Called Quest
  • + 1
 Glad to hear they're thinking about tearing resistance. I'm sick of ripping side knobs off my DHFs and happy to try an alternative..
  • + 3
 What's the graining and degradation like with these tyres mid-race?
  • + 1
 You better dont go off-line into the pick-up with these..
  • + 2
 Hey Pirelli, while you're at it , why don't you become the first to give us the '' actual'' size of your tires.
  • + 1
 E13 & specialized have already been doing a good job at that. E13’s on larger rims actually measure larger than their specified width
  • + 2
 I may stray but always seem to end up back on the Maxxis teet. God dam you Minions!
  • + 3
 Hutchinson's lawyer called.
  • + 2
 Hutchinson probably manufactured them, like they do with the Pirelli road tires.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: well you live and learn...
  • + 3
 @BenPea: The story goes that Pirelli supplies the proprietary rubber compounds, and Hutchinson makes them. Hutchinson is the only manufacturer of bike tires in France, so anything labeled "Made in France" is from them.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: ok, merci!
  • + 3
 Looking forward to the P-zero lineup.
  • + 1
 Me too. 399$ a piece.
  • + 1
 Are these actually made and engineered by Pirelli (who arencontrolled by ChemChina) or is this just a licensing of the name like those Goodyear tires?
  • + 1
 Interesting naming convention, I wonder what it suggests for future model development.
  • + 1
 If Pirelli doesn’t announce Richie Schley as their first sponsored rider there is something wrong with this world.
  • + 3
 No aggressive offerings.
  • + 2
 I wish the snow would clear up so I can ride...
  • + 1
 Hope they get some OEM European business because who is going to buy these?
  • + 1
 Reasonable priced tires from a major tire manufacturer - take note GDYR and Michelin
  • + 1
 Michelin also makes a single compound "Performance" series that costs the same or less as these Pirelli's.
  • + 2
 These wont work, none of them look like a maxxis dhf.
  • + 1
 Those look terrible. I wonder if they are making themselves or just using CST.
  • + 1
 These aint going to explode or rip away like in F1 asking for a friend .....
  • + 1
 I have to be honest, none of those designs look exactly inspiring. I really would not fancy any of those on my bike.
  • + 1
 The last Pirelli i used was a Phantom on the rear of my RD 350 LC around the same time man landed on the moon.
  • + 3
 Still gonna ride Maxxis.
  • + 1
 They are light weight because the tread is whimpy. Good for the popular flow trails would suck for gnar.
  • + 1
 So much for simplicity and clarity. How many different options can be made? Then go and call them all the same thing!
  • + 1
 I bought a set of Pirelli Scorpions last month and they were $1,100 fitted!
  • + 1
 I was always happy with my motorbike Pirellis. Will definitely consider these once available.
  • + 1
 pull off at Church's with Pirelli's skirtin gang signs out the window ya bish hopin all of em offend you ya bish
  • + 2
 I hope they last longer than their F1 tires
  • + 14
 So how long do Pirelli F1 tires last for you?
  • - 5
flag AD4M (Mar 1, 2019 at 6:59) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: Not sure, definetly better than your sense of humour that's for sure
  • + 1
 Forget the tyres, bring on the Pirelli MTB Calendar Girls !!
  • + 2
 cue 26'' whiners
  • + 2
 No 26" tyres or 26" tires either. Nothing to see here move along
  • - 3
 Se nao fazem questão de fazer esses pneus para rodas 26 com certeza vão perder mercado para os fabricantes que ainda se impor tao com o ciclistas que gosta desse tamanho de roda como eu , tenho uma GT fury 2016 e rodo com rodas 26 e acho a bike muito mais rápida e mais espertas em vista das 27.5 sem falar que ela fica mais baixa dando a sensação de mais controle e tração assim a bike fica bem mais prazerosa e facil pra evolir a manobras . #rodas29nemmorto.
  • + 1
 hairy knobs are a real drag
  • + 1
 Looks like another total XC BS tire.
  • + 1
 Pull off at Church's with Pirelli's skirtin'
  • + 1
 I had Pirelli P6000s on my first car. Good tyres but had a puncture once.
  • + 1
 P77s. Good grip and super progressive.
  • + 1
 All we need to know is how these compare to Minions...
  • + 1
 The only yellow M I want on my tires is the beginning of Maxxis
  • + 2
 PIRELLIS SKIRTIN'
  • + 0
 Looks promising, but 26x2.4 at least - THANKS... >.> #IDontDoOrEncourageApologies
  • + 2
 No 36ers? I’m out!
  • + 0
 Where is the skinwall option?
  • + 5
 Where are the side knobs?
  • + 0
 i'm out!!!! wwwaaaaaaahhhhhhh
  • - 2
 They look like schwalbe treads!
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