Pinkbike Poll: Would You Rather Be Over-Biked or Under-Biked?

Dec 20, 2019 at 11:31
by Richard Cunningham  
2020 Specialized Enduro
Specialized Enduro S-Works 2020: Whistler is one zone where you can make the most of a capable 170mm bike.


Not too long ago, bikes from the likes of Geometron or Pole were so far off the grid that they wouldn't make the long lists of mainstream riders looking for a new bike. Fast forward to the present and their lanky profiles almost seem ordinary. Long reaches, lots of wheel travel, steep seat tube angles, and sub 65-degree head angles are accepted as the new norm and, along with those changes, riders are gravitating towards riding areas that offer more aggressive options. Or are they?

"For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction:" Newton's third law can also be applied to emotional impulse. Every major trend creates pushback and we can see this happening with the rise in popularity of "downcountry" bikes; lighter weight, shorter-travel machines that may incorporate the attributes of their brutish all-mountain/enduro brothers, but are both visually and mechanically down-scaled to more sensible and versatile bandwidths.

Pole Machine review
Armed with a pro-rider's skills, you could ride the Pole Machine or Pivot's Mach 4 SL trail bike almost anywhere. The Pole's fun zone, however, lies between death-defying steep and eye-watering fast. The Pivot's bandwidth of enjoyable terrain is a bit further down the technical scale, but encompasses a much broader range.


Diminishing returns: If you do the math, riders with better skill sets and more capable bikes spend proportionately more time climbing than they do descending. That's right. It's reasonable to assume that riders who choose less capable machines, or those who have more average skill sets could be enjoying those same downhill trails to a greater degree than the top guns do. Arguing further, it's a foregone conclusion that easier, blue-line trails are more challenging and fun aboard a downscaled machine - regardless of skill levels.

Big descents with shuttle access or easy climbing trails - the meat and potatoes of enduro class bikes - are rare fare for most riders, so it's safe to assume that many of us are overbiked for the routes we ride most often. No doubt, the reverse is also true. A large number of mountain bikers clung their old-school steeds while the basic trail bike was transforming into a whole new animal. Even a lateral move to a similar-travel machine would be a leap in both capability and enjoyment for them. So, today's poll is: Are you over biked or under biked? Which direction would you lean towards for your next purchase?

Are you over- or under-biked? What direction will you go for your next purchase?




401 Comments

  • 296 11
 I like to be "underbiked"... When you ride faster than your buddies you can rub it in...and when they drop you on a descent you have an excuse.
  • 140 7
 Singlespeed hardtail: The ultimate "give your buddies shit when you beat them, but have an excuse for messing up anything (and I mean anything) during a ride" machine.
  • 7 8
 @MTBrent: i love mine Smile
  • 40 7
 And it works exactly that same the other way. Overbike = Smoke cem on the descents and have a reason\excuse to get stronger on the climbs.

Difference is that if you overbike you can usually just get stronger to make up for it, but if you underbike you have to get way better technically _and_ also get strong enough to manage the techniques in order to make up for the underbiking.
  • 43 0
 @just6979: but totally backfires if you get dropped on a descent. no survivors from that roasting haha
  • 29 3
 @just6979: underbiking usually makes you a better bike handler for that exact reason. It pays to have Both of you can afford it
  • 9 0
 @MTBrent: Unless you have any (and I mean ANY) mechanical issues on the ride. Then you can expect to catch flak from your 12 speed, dual suspension buddies for years afterwards.
  • 17 18
 E-DH Bike with a motorcycle battery. Always fastest up or down hill and can outlast them all.
  • 2 0
 @dynamatt: And if you can only afford one?
  • 35 0
 @just6979: You run what ya brung and still have a good time!
  • 14 4
 @just6979: Overbike, it will do everything
  • 3 0
 @dynamatt: That's what I said...
  • 2 0
 @MTBrent: bleeeehhhhh for those looking not to have funnnnn
  • 19 4
 I ski with my heels locked, and ride a 150/160 29er.

Both allow for burlier lines. And climb well.

If you ride stuff with big consequences, ride a big bike.
  • 15 1
 One word - quiver.
  • 1 0
 Damn, you made it seem like the ego-centric choice. Frown

Well, I guess it is. I like it cause I don't have to go fast to feel a challenge, which helps cause I don't work too hard at building/maintaining fitness. I just worry that it's less likely to cover for my mistakes.
  • 5 0
 @brentkratz: Exactly. If you can, you choose the perfect weapon for the job.
  • 46 63
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 3, 2020 at 14:11) (Below Threshold)
 @gooutsidetoday: thank you. Exactly. The real truth about riding pretentious hardtails. They don’t make you a better rider, you just want to tell this BS to people, but you are a sleezy sandbagger/ loser with excuse.
  • 6 2
 @peleton7: free the heel free the mind
  • 31 1
 @WAKIdesigns: It's always fascinating to hear how adverse you are to hard tail mtb's. If you take away the "better rider part", would you be comfortable with saying that a hard tail can offer more entertainment value on certain types of terrain?

Trying to quantify if a bike "makes" you a better rider or not, or trying to convince someone of that, is a fools errand. But in the years since I've picked up a hard tail again after over a decade of only suspension bikes, I know this is fact: It's allowed me to focus and improve on aspects of my riding that were much more muted or covered up by riding full suspension. That increased awareness, and attention to those details, definitely translates to my performance on each of my bikes.
  • 2 0
 @MTBrent: Amen to that!
  • 15 5
 @WAKIdesigns: Disagree. Hard tail on flats will teach you how to ride proper! I have a riding mate that if i put him on a hard tail with flats, he'd crash in about 100 meters.
  • 5 1
 @mammal: +1, and especially if you ride one on flats! That will teach you ride, or show you what you've been doing wrong...
  • 22 47
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 3, 2020 at 14:38) (Below Threshold)
 @mybaben: oh what a lesson! Hardtail+flats in the woods = captain slow
  • 15 0
 @WAKIdesigns: NOT one person said it was fastest. It will teach you to ride. Then when you jump on a good full sus rig, you will fly!
  • 5 0
 @MTBrent: single speed rigid is better especially if you smoke your mates on the downs (it's a given you're going to smoke them on the ups).
  • 1 1
 Lock the heel solve the problem. Like every discipline of alpine skiing has. And ski jumping is Nordic.
  • 4 0
 @rebeltom707: any telemarker worth their salt will admit that locked heels make it easier, which begs teh question: are we riding less bike because we're trying to make easy trails harder or because we're afraid to ride harder trails? And yeah, I can tele, like a boss.
  • 6 0
 @MTBrent: personally i think anything more than a penny farthing on trails not EWS is being overbiked
  • 1 0
 Love my nomad, but do have a good time trying to keep up on the hardtail aswell!
  • 2 0
 Did I just read the words "lifting shoes"?
  • 22 1
 We all know WAKI doesn't ride. Why even try to argue with the guy?
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I didn't argue that point
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: yeah just refited my olds 26" wheels and forks on a ht ns bikes frame and I'm as exited as anxious to ride it cause I know I have to relearn to ride a ht = may crash at the first berm Wink
  • 14 1
 @mammal: there’s absolutely no debate that hardtails make you a better rider. Waki’s just trying to compensate because he can’t ride one. Wink
  • 2 1
 @just6979:

I followed your logic until I watched yoann barelli cleaning double blacks on a city hybrid.
  • 1 0
 big time
  • 15 20
flag Hundin (Jan 3, 2020 at 18:11) (Below Threshold)
 @mammal: waki is the biggest loser on pinkbike , I wouldn't even read what he has to say lol such a joke.
  • 15 17
 @Hundin: Take a look at WAKOFFdesigns posted videos if you really want to have a good laugh. He's a f*ckboy with a keyboard. Has the style of a commuter and the physique of a middle aged woman.
  • 1 0
 @vjunior21: until u can't...
  • 13 11
 @Almazing: Two thinks Waki has never done: ride or have sex.
  • 7 2
 @professionalamateur: lmao, his first vid is of him riding a hardtail with flat pedals. Dude just played himself.
  • 1 0
 Roadie on dirty merch. Goes well
  • 2 0
 @mammal: try rigid then. HT still let's you plow with the front, you have nowhere to hide on a rigid bike.
  • 6 2
 @WAKIdesigns: oh what a lesson! WAKI in comments = mighty stupid
  • 7 15
flag professionalamateur (Jan 3, 2020 at 23:54) (Below Threshold)
 @getrad24-7: He's a bitch boy. Look at his stupid drawings. He has a pedal design with an off center axle. The guy's a mouth breather.
  • 1 0
 this man speaks the truth! @just6979:
  • 1 0
 @MTBrent: I ride a fully rigid SS 29er at my local trail center, the only ride that makes the trails fully engaging. I also have a 150/140mm 29er, that except for a few trails in driving distance, that require lots of climbing for runs ranging from 2.5-15 minutes, it’s too much bike for everything else. My next build is going to be an aggressive 120-100mm FS with an SS drivetrain.
  • 3 0
 @phdotd: SS rigid = mtb nirvana
  • 13 2
 @professionalamateur: you must feel really insecure about yourself to feel offended by waki's comments. That being said, since 80% of your comments are about waki and since you created a grindr profile of him I'm thinking you have a big crush on him.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I do remember that, you stated otherwise,
each bike got it's flavor.
  • 7 0
 Simply "biked" is fine for me
  • 2 20
flag professionalamateur (Jan 4, 2020 at 8:22) (Below Threshold)
 @zede: calm down pussy.
  • 2 0
 @dynamatt: how does underbiking make you a better bike handler?
  • 3 0
 @beast-from-the-east: it’s what everyone else has been saying about a hard tail as far as finding smoother lines and the other side is it’s typically a more playful bike so you end up being more creative, spending more time pumping/ jumping things you wouldn’t normally and also when things get chunky or sketchy you learn to manipulate the bike to make the lap smoother. At least my time being underbiked has produced those traits for myself. Now that I’m overbiked, i still ride with those attributes and it’s made me faster and more confident
  • 7 0
 @dynamatt: Plus your sphincter gets pretty strong from the fear. A bonus as we age.
  • 5 3
 @zede: I disagree with 98% of what Waki says, but he sure makes the comment section interesting. Keep on keeping on, Waki. You can hate on my SS hardtail all you want. It doesn't offend me.
  • 2 0
 @dynamatt: Ideally you need both to appreciate both. If you only ever ride one or the other you only get good on that particular bike. I see it as cross training.

If you can only have one bike it is a different story - then you should get a bike that suits the majority of what you ride.

I ride both my bikes (SS rigid 29 and 160/140 29) a similar amount and learn from each.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: i agree 100% i said having both is ideal further up. But if you’re going to have one bike like i currently do do what you said. Whatever fits your location or style of riding.
  • 1 1
 @JohanG: yall are harsh. He's got a kid. Jealous of his artistic skill mabey?
  • 3 0
 Nothing like an egotistical maniac: just ride what you have fun on: completely pointless article aimed at being divisive
  • 1 0
 @MTBrent: like saying big ck ? or get her off with small one.
  • 2 0
 Next poll: “would you rather have not enough food or enough food?”
  • 1 0
 An E-Bike will make you faster...
  • 1 0
 @brentkratz: One word "E-Bike"
  • 2 3
 I'm actually mostly with @wakidesigns on this one. Ride what you enjoy, but hardtails don't make you a better rider. I ride one, and it has taught me to make stupidly complex line choices, pedal like a hack, and pucker up when things get rough.

Don't get me wrong, it's fun to feel like you're about to die sometimes and it's awesome for riding with slower people, or on meh trails, but over-biking is the way to go if you want to become a improve skills that matter on real trails.
  • 1 0
 @gibspaulding: By "hard tails don't make you a better rider", I think what you meant to say, "my hard tail didn't make me a better rider".
  • 1 0
 @brentkratz: response word: money
  • 1 0
 @devo88: Indeed! Run what ya brung!!
  • 142 4
 Overbiked makes up for me being underskilled
  • 35 1
 I resemble this remark
  • 2 0
 @kiddlivid: I second that!
  • 2 1
 Touché Lol
  • 24 53
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 3, 2020 at 14:13) (Below Threshold)
 Being overbiked is a responsibility. You have to go fast. Or you are an overbiked loser. Being underbiked is a form of cowardry.
  • 27 2
 @WAKIdesigns: More like an excuse. Like tele skiing. As in......you guys had to wait for me at the bottom of the run for 15 minutes, but (when I wasn't falling on my face) my turns had SOUL!!!!

You guys had to wait for me at the bottom of the descent, and I'm all bloody and beat up, AND I walked all the cool parts of the trail, but when I was riding (gripped with terror) I did it with SOUL on my rigid/hardtail/no dropper anachronism.
  • 9 35
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 3, 2020 at 14:26) (Below Threshold)
 @peleton7: like I got a belt and lifting shoes, I have to step up and lift some weight to not look like a fool. Or I can do some rather uninspiring exercises for gymnastics. But I may as well do crossfit or better: yoga. Suddenly I have no standards to live up to. Please clap, please respect my membership in mediocrity club
  • 3 1
 @peleton7: go check out Alta and see if the that tele skiing generalization still rings true. Some proper shredders there.
  • 16 0
 Being "overbiked" (whatever that means anyway) is aspirational... You know your bike can handle it, it's just up to you f'ing send it!
  • 8 2
 @rebeltorn707: skied Little Cottonwood last weekend. Saw no tele tourers-Dynafits work better.

In bounds-sure there are people with 1000+ days on skis that tele because they’re bored of the alpine turn, but they’re outliers, and still lock it down when they want to throw down.

So.....tele bindings don’t work as well to tour on, and don’t offer as much control. And most people I see freeheeling it kinda aren’t that good. Just sayin’.
  • 3 0
 @peleton7: awesome comment...
  • 2 5
 Seems more like a @WAKIdesigns comment.
  • 1 1
 Thank you. For it's for people like you that we get Friday fails.
  • 3 0
 In an ideal world I would like to buy a bike , ride it to the max of it capabilities then buy a new one . Nowadays an enduro bike can do any type of riding so if your a one bike person go bigger then your covered !
  • 3 1
 @peleton7:
Yeah, you obviously havent seen many people tele then.
I love generalizations from people that have no general idea of what they are talking about.
  • 2 0
 @enis: you know it was purely a way to crowbar in "still lock it down when they want to throw down". He should also have thrown in "the only good tele is a guitar" for niche hate points.
  • 2 0
 @BenPea:
I know, right.
Always good to make people feel bad just so you can show off some amazing verbal skills.

@Peleton7, are you saying that because I havent looked them down in 25 years that I dont throw down? Nice.
Odds are I can tele backwards faster than you've ever been fowards.
  • 8 16
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 4, 2020 at 13:36) (Below Threshold)
 I own two hardtails, a DJ and XC 29er, including my commuter - three. Time and time again you people are proving my point that hardtail owners are the biggest entitled whiny bitchy drama queens in all mountain biking world. Triggertails. You would not be so easily triggered if there was any water in your arguments. Hardtail is a Bike. A bike is a bike but you are not after a particular bike, You are seeking justification for your pathetic ascethism, for your silly sacrifice, that you dress up in a completely misinformed and misenderstood bulltshit, a myth, that riding a hardtail makes someone a better rider. It doesn’t. GMBN said it, MBR said it, Dirt said it. Cheers. I thoroughly enjoyed pissing off the distinguished gentlemen of league of hardfails. Steel is real.
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: so is that definitive?
  • 3 1
 @enis: I ski..... a lot. Go to Revelstoke or Golden BC and try to buy a tele setup, or find anyone on one. It’s anachronistic-cool for people with hundreds of days on alpine bindings but technically inferior, both from an engineering and biomechanics perspective.

If you ski well, and tele, good on you. But like underbiking, tele skiing is more often used as an excuse for sucking than a way to change up the turns.

So.....if you’re dropping 10-20 footers and skiing steep couloirs WITHOUT paramarking-keep getting some. Just know you’d get more on a Dynafit setup.
  • 1 2
 @WAKIdesigns: who can afford a full squish that’s specced halfway decent anyway? Drop the same money on a hardtail and get a bike that will last longer with little maintenance
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: truth hurts both ways
  • 1 0
 @peleton7:
What was it they used to say.....Randonee, French for can't tele
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: BMX=the original HT
  • 1 0
 @peleton7: Flippin' A, spot-on in every respect. All the fun of lunges, to boot.
  • 2 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 5, 2020 at 2:49) (Below Threshold)
 @Chonky13: yes. If anybody deserves credit for riding “hard” bikes it is BMXers.
@mkotowski1 - I am a bottom feeder. I never buy completes and most of my components are bought second hand. I even scavenge my buddies workshop for some stuff. I own one FS bike but spend most time on my DJ and soon on XC hardtail. If any bike improves my riding on FS it is the DJ. Riding dirt jumps, pumptracks, BMX tracks is what Actually lifts riding skill. And a DJ bike maximizes benefits from riding there.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: @peleton7

Hey, so there is no disrespect meant to either of you two. What I cant get my head around is how you can make judgement calls on a sport you're not proficient at.
Im sure you ski a lot and Im sure youre quite good (no sarcasm intended). I just dont get along with people lumping everyone into a basket based purely on the equipment i use.

For the record, i dont ski much...probably 3-4 hrs twice a week and once or twice on blues on weekends with my 3 and 5 year old kids.

Yes, I would agree its a dying technique/method and proper resort only tele sucks for touring. I dont tour. To be honest i hate the lack of specificity of downhillable touring skis (alpine or tele).

Also, im probably overbiked. I ride a slash everyday I chose to MTB.
  • 1 0
 @enis: they also say Telemark is Norwegian for falls down every turn.

The point is to have fun sliding downhill. If you do that on one plank or 2, heels locked or not, if you’re safe and having a good time you’re doing it right.

Same for riding a rigid bike-are you having a good time? Good on you.

However, if the goal is skills progression as measured by how demanding the terrain ridden/skied is, you’ll progress further, faster and safer on better, more modern gear.

So....go get some face shots.
  • 3 0
 @peleton7: I refuse to believe monoskiers are having a good time. Those are the MFers you need to be attacking.
  • 1 0
 That was me today. I hit a big high speed double for the first time and the miniDH saved me.
  • 1 0
 @mkotowski1: my mega 275 was 2 grand. That's 15 rental days. This way I am comfortable when I go to the park.
  • 56 0
 Just biked is good
  • 2 0
 Yes.
  • 4 0
 Critically biked.
  • 27 0
 Yep. This poll reads a bit like “so are you guys buying all this downcountry stuff we’re putting out there or do we need to change wheelsize again?”...

2010 Tell them they need more carbon
2011 Tell them they need more travel
2012 Tell them they need it stiff, really f*cking stiff
2013 Tell them they need bigger wheels
2014 Tell them they need it longer and slacker
2015 Tell them they need massive tyres
2016 Tell them they need it longer-er and slacker-er
2017 Tell them they need an ebike
2018 Tell them they need bigger wheels again
2019 Tell them they need less travel

The latest bikes are all great but goddamn it would be nice if more than 1/3 of us were happy with our current setup! Don’t listen to the admen, your current rig is a beaut no doubt.
  • 41 1
 160/140 with modern aggressive numbers. Really happy with it for where and what I ride. However- the perfect geometry and travel can't be a universal thing as the best bike is going to match what you ride, how you ride it, and what things you enjoy the most IMO. I have friends who ride the same trails as me on on 170/160 rigs and others on 160/0.
  • 2 1
 What are you riding?
  • 21 0
 @roma258: i'm gonna say it's a Sentinel
  • 4 0
 @wowbagger: Been looking at a Devinci Troy so those numbers looked familiar
  • 13 0
 As someone with a sentinel I must say it is damn near perfection on a bike
  • 7 1
 @thook: Same for my Stumpy EVO
  • 12 1
 Ibis Ripmo, jack of all trades.
  • 5 15
flag JaredGulaga (Jan 3, 2020 at 12:57) (Below Threshold)
 Other than the FSR suspension platform which is the definition of trash. Glad they changed it for the new enduro. @Lev8r:
  • 2 0
 @thook: ditto. I know they're about to release a new version, but at 6' on a large, it's as close to perfection as I've found. 140/160mm 29 is a really, really nice sweet spot for Moab, park, and general all mountain hooliganism.
  • 1 0
 @Klainmeister: didn’t know about a new version, that should be cool. I’m still bummed I missed out on the blue 2018 colorway
  • 2 0
 I'm with you on 160/140 and modern geo trail bike. If it a well designed bike with good linkage then that should be enough for 90% of riding.
  • 1 0
 @roma258: you will not go wrong dude. tup
  • 2 0
 @JaredGulaga: uhhhhhh.
  • 2 0
 I'm on a new 2020 Banshee Titan 170/155. Feels slightly overbiked but I'd rather be that than underbiked. Previous was a 150/130 GG TP which always felt like I wanted more suspension when it got nasty.
  • 3 0
 I am right with you on my Pivot Mach 5.5: 160/140. I loved this bike in a comparison test ride and over a year later, I love it far more. Double black steep tech is my specialty and the headtube angle at 66.5 and 27.5 wheels are not very aggressive for this, but it's exactly the challenge I enjoy. The climb/descend performance range of the DW link has been an eye-opener for me. I may never switch to a different suspension type.
  • 4 0
 @PauRexs: That’s my situation too. Overbiked for many of my home trails in the SF Bay Area, but the bike really comes into its own on my several trips a year to BC, Utah, Arizona, etc. It’s a compromise that almost doesn’t feel like one.
  • 1 0
 160/140 Murmur does it for me too... and also a single speed rigid 29 to keep things real.
  • 2 1
 @wowbagger: Yep. Sentinel. Love it. I'd be happy to go Sentinel again... though would love to demo an Optic also and see how that rides.
  • 3 0
 @snl1200: ooh, that's a bingo!
  • 3 0
 @chasejj: please tell us all about the new banshee titan!!! I’m looking at the bike. There are no recent reviews on that bike. Build weight? Does it climb decent for what it’s made for? Give us the details!
  • 2 0
 @chasejj: seriously give us a review and pics specs and weight then try to sell the article to pinkbike lol. But a little info on it been waiting for reviews but there are none
  • 1 1
 @JaredGulaga: uhhh it’s still the same old Horst link Future Shock Rear design. Just a facelift.
  • 2 0
 @aharvey: Long and slack , very torsionally stiff frame. Fit for me is perfect. I'm on an XL (6-3)and came off a Large GG TP. Fit/finish is top notch. Ano black frame is so tasty-Just like my Burner v3.1.
Linkage and Kinematics are a plusher version of a DW ( I came from Turners for years) but with a steep 77d STA which with Loooong CS keeps you very centered IN the bike.
Climbs extremely well and is insanely fast downhill. I find myself having to grab brake way earlier on DH runs when I realize the speed is higher than it was on my GG, by quite a bit, and that is a fast bike. Rearward axle path helps this I'm pretty sure.
Mine was ordered with a Factory Kashima X2 instead of the Performance X2 as I really wanted the full adjustement ability of that shock. Weight with Fox 36 /170, CK-Nextie 38/32 CF wheels, X01 drive, RF Sixc and Time MX8, Fox Transfer, Shimano Saints is 33.9lbs with 2.5 DH2/DHF tires. Not super light and not super heavy. Fox 36 at 170 feels much better than at 150. Larger air spring volume, I guess. Stealth cables and line are pretty well thought out and quiet if you follow their detailed direction on install. Quietest bike I've ever ridden.
I bought the long dropouts to try with the shorter stock ones as well. I think I like the longer ones which adds about 8mm to CS length which is already long. I haven't been able to really ride it in terrain it deserves yet as it has been raining a bit here and snow in the mtns. So far I dig it.
  • 1 0
 @chasejj: awesome man sounds perfect for where I live 95% natural chunk I find the longer chainstay more stable. I am also 6-3 so now I know what size to get.

Thanks for the reply.
  • 1 0
 @chasejj: that sounds like a sick build. Very similar to what I was thinking, but I have a 160 fox 36 with a 52mm offset. I’m wondering how that might change the performance??? Certainly won’t be as slack and BB will drop slightly. Great to hear about that rearward axel path and not getting hung up on rocks. Very rocky here. Thanks for the nice review!
  • 1 0
 @aharvey: I changed my CSU to 44mm. I've got a cherry 51mm I'll sell if anyone wants it. Because of the mud around here lately I changed to Shorty tires. Wow. Those are some grippy tires and they shed mud very well. I even like them on the dry sections. Just seem to be a bit narrow compared to DHF/DH2 combo. They definitely rumble a bit on the hardpack but so what, that grip!
  • 21 0
 The poll is asking two questions but only one response can be given. Both questions can't be answered by the poll. And no, Pole is not the answer, you all saw the test results.
  • 4 0
 Can’t answer the poll as I am very decided: same travel but more aggressive geo, like I did with my last 5 bikes basically. I guess it highlights how slowly the industry evolved as when I buy a bike I just hope it would be more mm here and degrees there but it does not exist. Well now it does but Pole has little process issues it seems (beyond that test you mention) and will not only wait for a 160/160 version but mostly for them fixing their production bugs.
  • 14 4
 Welcome to Pinkbike's opinion placing pieces, also known as "polls". They are used to imprint the manufacturer's needs into the audience, disguising them as a false dichotomy.

Just look at the options on this "poll", the fourth one is the most picked one, and it literally says NOTHING about the preferences of the target audience.

Now go back to the previous "polls" and you'll find both a way of directing the audience's choice in the preceding text and a limited set of options on the actual poll, all of them aimed to steer the voter's pick. Then the voters would see the main trend and question if their actual setup/pick is good enough or if it is worth a change towards the main trend resulting from the poll.

Welcome to the fake news era.
  • 5 1
 @southoftheborder: mountain bikers are lemmings. They just follow the heard and this feels like the wording of a shepherd.
  • 3 1
 @southoftheborder:

We are for sale. Also, Captcha, ‘I’m not a Robot’, and ‘Choose the photos with a crosswalk/stop sign’, etc. has ZERO to do with our security or privacy. We are free training for AI.
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder:
This site is not founded on any kind of journalistic integrity. No credentials in the written language required either; just riders and former mechanics who happen to be in a position to influence a lot of people’s opinions. The goal of every article is to incite as much viewing/commenting as possible as a metric for advertisers. Everyone here including me is being duped into tapping away at our screens. Not saying you shouldn’t, just that one needs to know the big picture before wasting time on such ‘polls.’
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: Yup, that's my point exactly. Thanks for stating it so clearly.
  • 1 0
 Pole is always the answer. Their bikes are in a league above everyone elses.
  • 23 3
 Wanna get better? Ride just above your comfort zone. Wanna not get better? Do that “underbiked” and miss part of a season because you ate massive $h!t and got hurt.

A lot of enduro bikes climb really well, so unless you’re
A) racing XC
B) don’t take any risks/catch air/ride steep stuff when you ride
C) live someplace flat and lame (poor life choices)
then you’ll improve more riding a bigger bike. And you’ll jump off more stuff. And it’ll be rad!!!
  • 3 0
 Agreed. When I sold my little 26", full sus, XC rig and got a 27.5 160mm, AM bike, my skills increased dramatically.
  • 1 0
 This, every day of the week and twice on Wednesdays.
  • 1 0
 Yup.

Totally enjoyed the 130mm bike and it’s precision and pop until I missed the narrow window of error on a gap and there goes months of riding.
  • 1 0
 Friend following on enduro bike followed my trajectory to an inch and kept on rolling
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: c'est Mardi, l'ecole c'est fini?
  • 1 0
 I give tires/wheels more consideration than how much travel the bike has. They are so good nowadays with CushCore that a 130 29r can rip about as well as a 160 if the geo is good. That said, I will be riding 145/160 this year instead of 120/150. @RideGG Smash
  • 1 2
 @Chonky13: now imagine what a 160 bike with cushcore can achieve...
  • 1 0
 Agreed.

My wife just upgraded from a small '14 Trek Fuel EX to a medium '18 Remedy (she's right in between sizes). She's still a very new rider, and not really interested in riding the bike to it's full capabilities, but the switch has improved her riding dramatically. She's not just faster, safer, and more comfortable on technical trails, but she has visibly better posture on the bike. She rides much looser and less defensively than she did on the old Fuel with it's absolutely horrifying geometry.

Under-biking just teaches bad habits.
  • 20 0
 IIRC, Mark Weir did a million feet of climbing aboard a 26" AL Nomad years ago...
It is quite satisfying climbing with XC guys on a 30# Enduro bike...and waving goodbye at the top.
  • 4 1
 Here a server won 2 XC races in 2007 on a nomad, gravity dropper and 2.4 tires...
  • 6 0
 @PauRexs: I’d like it if XC required that sort of kit cos the courses demanded it. Eg XC race with Enduro level DHs. Proper mountain bike race that...
  • 8 1
 @aps62: haha one server did that as well. I organized a serie of 8 events back in 2004 to 2008 called ALLRIDE google it ( allride girona, allride odena...) We mixed a 30K XC loop with freeride stuff, mountain and urban. And the most distinctive thing we organized categories by bike weight groups instead of age, so you were competing on the same conditions not being punished for those extra grams...
Too much advanced to the times perhaps! Enduro category didn't even exist... and some hucking freeriders wanted to kill us after the exhausting loop on their 17kg monsters... haha
Still surprised no one copied us yet even encouraged many...
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie,MW rode a Santa Cruz VP-Free,not a Nomad.
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: But enduro existed already in the neighboring France. Plus there had been a few Maxi Avalanche in Andorra at that time I believe ? I entered one in 2010 but I believe it happened already in 2009 and possibly before.
That was a funny time where you could find riders with AM, Enduro, Freeride or full DH bikes on these races.
  • 2 0
 @EnduroManiac: Yes that´s right. I mean enduro as a label "word" it appeared about 2007 I guess... And yes first enduro event I would say it was Megavalanche Alpe d´Huez back in 98 perhaps?? Then the first continental european labeled ENduro race format was Avalanche Trophy Kielder UK back in 2008, where wait I won the prologue! Wink
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: The Mega dates back to 1995,but it was never a enduro race. It's a downhill marathon.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: Never seen them riding Downhill bikes... Have you race it and suffered the "200bps Marathon pedalings" of that race?
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: Just 7 times between 2001 and 2010. Giant ATX One DH,MSC Nozko and Trek Session were the bikes I used.
Of course the race is better suited for a enduro bike,but at the time I didn't have one,and it still is great fun on the DH bike.
As for labeling, it's the race organizer that always have called it a DH marathon.
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: the first enduro races were called rally dating back to the 90s. Then the name enduro was used around 00 or 01.
Megas were never enduro races but basically are run on similar terrain (+glacier!) with similar bikes which we already called enduro bikes in the 2000s in France.
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: A race format is not defined by the bike used. In the case of the megavalanche there are a handful of small uphill pedaling sections where an enduro bike certainly fare better. That doesn't make it an enduro races as there is no concept of multiple stages and untimed transition rides to start gates.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: niceee. They called DH Marathon cause DH was the reference by that time, and is actually what Enduro really is... so we could say Enduro is a sublabel of DH/Marathon... Neg prop me but is the true.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac: good to know! Piece of history some one should write down and report properly!...
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: Let´s say its way closer to Enduro than DH, cause if you get the overall time and the phisichal effort here you have... plus the riders and trainning it´s the same. The only difference is all at the same time... that by the way is way more appealing for a proper Live TV show that I am still waiting...
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: it’s actually been written in Pinkbike by Matt Wrag some years ago.
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: differences between DH Marathon vs Enduro:
- 1 run (2 times same course for the Maxi) with unlimited training vs several courses with limited (or no) training allowed (with large variations country by country but historically in France it was like this)
-mass start vs individual start

So they are different sports with lots of similarities (same kind of terrain, bike, training) but different rules.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac: It's a pitty in EWS they don't include any mass start stage.. it would be the Pinnacle...
Also how you call the discipline then into the events they do include booth or all 3 of it? Curiously all on the same kind of bike...
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: the real question is : do we really need to give a name or categorization to everything ?
  • 1 0
 @PauRexs: Mass start is another kind of sport for me and leaves too much room for uncertainty/unfairness at the start. And if you're not on the front line you have almost no chance to win.
If things would be limited to bike types then we should have rampage adding to the DH WC right? I admit it's a different scenario as we're having here a racing format and freestyle/ride event but it's just to put it in perspective. It's not the bike, it's the unified format. There are already enough variations within the enduro format (total length, stag length, transition lengths, shuttle/no shuttle, total elevation gain/loss, profile (flat and pedally vs steep vs flowy fast), no need to add anything I believe.
  • 1 0
 @opignonlibre: Good point. But if we didn't, no one would use the entertaining Downcountry "word".
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac: At least I think I would be super good for the sport that in 20min plus stages the start order should be with the CG from 1 to X leaving the gaps of the current CG. So finally you would have some stages really appealing for Live Coverage seeing visually the real state of the competition how it progresses... I am telling you we will evolve this way... There was a French enduro they allready did something similar...
  • 14 0
 I am over biked with a Scott Ransom. However the 120mm climb/pedal mode combined with its low weight makes an easy choice most days.
It pedals so well it’s hard to choose another bike for a given trail when the flick of switch gives you 170mm and back to 120 again.
  • 15 1
 My definition of "overbiked" is that for the trail I'm riding, the bike is faster than I am with a bit more travel and aggressive geo. I'd much rather pay the slight weight penalty to have a bit more margin for error for when I ride a bit past my skills, as opposed to riding on the razor's edge of a bike's capabilities just to save some weight. But I'm more of a mellow/have fun rider than a fast/competitive rider...
  • 6 0
 If you want your trailbike to be capable on the downs you need the same wheelset and tires anyway so weight is mostly the same and geometry often is more or less the same so the only thing you'll feel is a little less travel... I think an enduro isn't stupidly overbiked with 150-170mm as long as it's got a snappy and efficient rear end.
  • 1 0
 @jzPV: I like my Mega. I kinda wish I waited for the new reactor.
  • 2 0
 @fruitsd79: How long have you had your Mega? What wheel size? What are your thoughts on it? I'm looking at getting the 2020 275. Thanks,
  • 2 0
 ^ What he said.
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: I got the 275 comp when it was on a sale in June. I do miss out, the water bottle delete feature. But the adjustability of the suspension is enough for me. The guide T brakes are not great. I prefer shimano honestly. but the NX eagle has not let me down. I am not smooth or skilled and crash into things.

The shock doesn't lock out so I have pedal strikes on climbing tech, but it saves my unskilled ass when I ride the steep. I don't mind the less efficient climbs back up. We did a few laps on the flow jump line yesterday, I got squirrely. But that's because I was going 33% faster than on my hardtail. Being overbiked kept me from crashing. Overall I like the Mega. I rented a few bikes at spider mountain (RM altitude 50, and the Maiden) to get a feel for suspension before I bought. true DH was too much for me, I like to feel the trail. The Altitude was awesome. I would have bought it but I didn't want to spend the extra 750 or so dollars. The 275 mega really is a mini DH that can pedal. I've settled in at 30% sag 2 volume reducers in fork, 3 in the shock.

I live in a flat area so we have to pedal a lot to get to short down hill bursts. When we go to arkansas for shuttle laps it shines. I am not good at jumping, and I can clear doubles all of a sudden. I'm hitting drops I would have thought impossible before.

I changed the grips for meaty paws, and I am using saints flats with custom extra big pins (M4x12 pointed grub screws).
The sam hill grips were too hard and small diameter for me. I wear XL gloves. The brake pads it comes with wore quickly.
The wild enduro gum 2.4 tires grip loose rock very well but they are noticably more draggy than the DHF/Rekon i am used to. Fun fact, the 2.4 Michelins are only 2mm skinnier at the lugs than my 2.6 maxxis!
I bought an extra spare hanger just in case. It did not include a spare. haven't had to touch anything yet.
I'm 270 pounds with all the gear and five ten impacts. bike has not disappointed. I just wonder if the Reactor would be more fun. N+1
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79: Thanks mate, I really appreciate the feedback!
  • 16 0
 Underbiking is VERY in in 2020.
  • 3 0
 Completely agree. We have to ask of ourselves, how many of us have been persuaded in the last year to adopt a 'less travel better geometry approach' due to pinkbike articles selling the idea in flowery language!? I tried a Mondraker the other day and disliked the wheel flopping around on anything but the super step stuff. Nice reach though. My 26" hardtail has a fantastic head angle for me with 27.5" 160mm forks up front, but my dropper suffers from being used at such a slack angle... Yes my set up could be better but I'm gradually finding the sweet spot for myself. Not that the two Mike's aren't fun to read Beer
  • 2 0
 Haha f*ck 2020 then. Already dark times and now this?
  • 2 0
 So many YouTubers getting into hardtails. It's all the rage!!
  • 3 0
 @barefootdan: I've only ever owned a hardtail and I don't frequent this 'youtubers' establishment you speak of...
  • 2 2
 2020 is short for 200/200
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: the Chinese year of vision...
  • 1 3
 @landscapeben: or the Iranian Year of English Speaking Alpha Orangutangs
  • 14 0
 If you're wondering what it's like to be "underbiked" try only owning a full-rigid XC weapon in the PNW.
  • 9 1
 I’ll pass
  • 5 0
 ...and riding it with a full face helmet?
  • 13 0
 @jgainey: I'm not but I did race XC in a full face when I was very, very new to the sport. And I got a super cool nickname to boot!
  • 4 1
 umm, full-rigid can no longer be an "XC weapon" today (the current XC race tracks are too technical for rigid bikes - not that you can't ride them, you just won't get the podium)
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: I've got a handful of medals here that would say otherwise... I'm not USAC Cat 1 or anything but I'm pretty quick on it.
  • 2 0
 LOL! I've been there myself, and also seen it around me! Cheers from Oregon.
  • 2 0
 @jgainey: I fell and went boom on my face. I'd consider a full face to ride a beach cruiser after that.
  • 3 0
 @f00bar: in the rights hands fully rigid sure is and I know a few people who still whoop ass locally hahaha. It's always a treat seeing those guys ride
  • 1 0
 @f00bar: Except you are talking about world cups. Most Amateur XC courses, which are those most people will experience, are very tame in comparison.
  • 11 0
 Overbiked definitely helps for bigger riders. I pay the extra pund and a half penalty for putting a dual crown fork on my enduro bike for the front end stiffness. At 6'5 250 I can feel a Fox 36 flexing under me in technicalk sections at speed.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/18118621
  • 8 0
 That's a purdy bike, I'll give you that
  • 10 0
 I turned 60 this year. My skills and, especially, my courage, are not what they once were. However, being "over-biked" has me cruising trails that used to give me pause. Also, comfort is very important for me. I cut my teeth (in 1984!) on a fully rigid bike. I might re-acquire some skills by going back to one, but it would beat the hell out of me.
  • 8 0
 my 2c. Overbiked is aspirational - It's the idea that one day I will be good enough/fast enough to really conquer that terrain and im buying a bike incase i ever do get there.
That's an appealing thing to alot of people and theres nothing wrong with it; even if deep down we all know we're not all that likely to achieve our end goal. We just want to know it's won't be the fault of the equipment.
  • 7 0
 Living in a third world country, I can only afford to maintain/buy just ONE bike. Soni choose to be overbooked for my local trails, with the consequential reward of having enough bike to cope with the epic Alpine trips I like to take 4-5 times a year. Plus the extra weight and inertia works wonders in the meandering trails of the Pereyra Natural Reserve I ride weekly.
  • 2 0
 f*cking autocorrect, "Soni"="So I", "overbooked"="overbiked".
  • 8 1
 Judging bikes by amount of travel is simply lame, just realize that 140 and 160 bike differs by a f*ng 2cm of travel!. And thesis they all bikes are similar is a lie. There are bikes that are simply much better than others, but such knowledge would simply ruin bike media, so instead we have very balanced reviews, with lots of BS like "playful", "agile", "plenty capable". Add pro movies to this and you can market even mediocre bike as a great bike. The problem is that a pro can ride any bike. What matters is what an average Joe can do with it.
  • 7 0
 Being overbiked is a matter of safety: I enjoy the sport, love the descents but at the end of the day I have to get home in one piece: I have a family to feed and a job to look after. I’ve been underbiked before and have the scars to prove it. I can’t afford that kind of luxuries anymore
  • 4 0
 This narrative means that it's all about the bike.
  • 11 1
 Is there such a thing as over biked, more under cahoonaed..
  • 5 0
 Yep, if you're bored riding your dh bike on a gravel towpath, you're just not hucking off enough bridges
  • 2 1
 Under cojoned you should say. Cajones=drawers, as under your kitchen sink. Cojoned=balls.

*The moar you know*
  • 10 0
 Underbiked is just call Flat-country.
  • 6 0
 In the motorcycle world, a big superbike is pointless on the street, you'll never find a place to use all its power and full capability. You're just constantly holding it back, always weary of giving too much throttle for the conditions.

I think in the MTB world, it's not really as much of an issue. Sure a big slack enduro rig on a flat XC course is pointless. But assuming there's gravity involved, would having too much bike really make things worse? I'm not really sure. Is it more fun to ride a slow bike fast? Or do you have more fun knowing you have a bit of margin for error. As long as the bike pedals well and doesn't weight a ton...party on my dudes.
  • 6 0
 @roma258 as the moto saying goes- "It's more fun to ride a slow bike fast than a fast bike slow"
  • 1 0
 @pdxkid: exactly! all the comments overbiked/underbiked blah blah, that statement is fact.
  • 6 0
 "...it's a foregone conclusion that easier, blue-line trails are more challenging and fun aboard a downscaled machine..."

This is a dangerous outlook IMO. We should invest time in making our trails more challenging/fun, NOT dumb down our bikes in order to do so. Its sad to consider the idea of the recent technology explosion to have hit a ceiling and us just backing down from charging forward through even harder terrain.

"You rode down that?!" is something I want non-mtb people to keep saying lol.
  • 5 0
 Your not wrong, but this can be looked at from a number of different perspectives. New trails are popping up in my region, that are more along the lines of flow trails (accessible for most). If I take my hard tail on these types of trails while riding with my GF, or riding with someone who's less skilled it's a riot for both of us. Instead of "dumbing down trails" it can be as simple as "allowing more types of trails to be fun for the veteran rider".
  • 13 3
 Ride what you own
  • 6 1
 Sorry, I don't get what this article is all about. If you ride the bike you'd like to ride then you're not over- or underbiked. Sure others will always have their opinions but that's irrelevant. Sure if your goal is to travel a certain section fastest and/or safest there may be a more objective specification of what bike would suit you but other than that (which is the case for most of us outside racing) you just spec your bike for the amount of shits and giggles to be had.
  • 6 1
 Waaay too linear. It totally depends on the ride, mindset, riding group, and terrain.

Always prefer my DH bike doing whistler laps, as a long day of constant runs beats you down proper. I'll choose my 160/150 trail bike on my home Shore trails, if I'm feeling smashy, or riding with a group that will likely require it. But just as often, I'll grab the hard tail when I'm solo and feeling like picking the trail apart at my own chill pace, or if I'm riding with a group that has a lesser skill set.

Stupid polls...
  • 3 0
 Why is the trail bike not a choice for chill pace or riding with slower riders? What's the usual contrast between a trail bike and a hardtail? The trail bike is (slightly) less efficient (in rolling, smooth terrain)... so who TF cares about the speed/efficiency factor when you're just chilling and hanging with the n00bs?

And of course DH bike is always the choice for a full day of lift-access, but it you can't afford a 2nd bike... Then having the 1st bike be a 150ish trail bike means you can take it to lift-access and still smash out a good 80% as much riding without feeling like you got the shit totally kicked out of you.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: Regarding the hard tail, compensating for no rear suspension makes mellower trail or slower paces way more interesting. It's not really about efficiency, but about feedback from the trail. What would normally be a smoother, perhaps less interesting ride, becomes way more engaging as it requires more focus to pick up and pump the right spots. Mix in some occasional mayhem and excitement when you meet with a bit more tech, or pick up a bit more speed through sections.

What your referring to in your second point, is called compromise. Sure, if I couldn't afford 3 mtb's (4 actually including the pump track bike), then I'd compromise. But I'd way rather choose the right weapon from my quiver, to suit the given the trail/conditions/mindset/riding partners, wouldn't you (regardless of your opinions on hard tails)? Of course you would.

My split of time spent between TrailDually/HT/DH is probably 40%/40%/20%, because each one is better suited to different experiences.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I find it odd that people talk about more engaging when riding a HT. I'm just as engaged on a full mush, just going faster and not dinging as many rear rims.
  • 5 0
 For local home trails, underbiked is fun (but can lead to expensive repair bills...) but for big days in an unfamiliar bike park, overbiked gives that safety margin to take few risks. Which makes for much more fun. Great. I just argued for n+1 - sorry...
  • 5 0
 I ride my aggro hard tail and my enduro bike on the same trail. It makes the same old trail fun in different ways. I can ride an entire 2000 feet of drop without stopping, pushing as fast as I can, really stretching my DH endurance and pretend to be a racer on my enduro bike. On my hard tail I can test my cardio on the climb and then take my time on the way down, popping from side to side, trying to blast corners and look cool, all on the same trail. It doesn't have to be one or the other.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, if you've got the means, the correct answer is "Quiver".
  • 2 0
 @mammal: I have the means, but I don’t want to have to maintain multiple trail bikes, nor constantly agonize over which bike to bring.
  • 1 0
 @MtbSince84: I get what your saying, but to be honest, maintenance is spread evenly over all the bikes in the quiver because so is wear. And when you know what you prefer for the given situation, there's no agonizing, only deliberate choices.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: There’s a certain amount of “garage rot” whether you’re riding a bike or not. But I get it - it *would* be nice to have the perfect bike for each riding situation. OTOH, I like getting on the same bike each time, having it be completely familiar and working on my skills on that bike. To each their own!
  • 1 0
 @MtbSince84: my Nike bikes are always breaking down so its nice to have a spare
  • 5 0
 As someone who rode sketchy steeps/tech on a 71* HA back in the day, I couldn't give a shit about what anyone might say about riding "overbiked" these days. Suffering a little harder up keeps some of the beer from sticking.
  • 1 0
 I like the cut of your jib!
  • 7 0
 If overbiked means I'm clearing stuff I didn't think I would, then bring it every time.
  • 4 0
 To pedal long distances = underbiked
To shutle again and again = overbiked
For me If I only can choose one , it will be overbiking , I always going to suck on flats and uphills but the downhills always are going to be funnier and because of that I need a stronger bike and components that withstand a couple of years at least.
Underbiking requires over budget = over servicing and over replacing new components often or over faster
  • 3 0
 I have been underbiked from 2002 to 2018. I was riding a Balfa 2Step when I should have been on a BB7. Then a Devinci Frantik when I should have been riding a Wilson. Then I had a trail bike for lift-assisted riding when I should have been on an beefy All-Mountain or Enduro bike.

I am now on a Devinci Spartan LTD (180/165mm) and I am not changing that setup! The long travel bikes are so good now, I don't see any reason to ride a short travel bike.
  • 3 0
 I guess I would count as "overbiked", i even run dual cushcore in my enduro and dh bikes. I love riding bikes but I have a fulltime job and other commitments, so why expose myself to more risk and harsher impacts? big bikes are easy on my body (I'm never sore from biking unless I crash), safer to navigate the trails i ride on, and still fun as hell.

I get the appeal of smaller bikes and ground feel/connectedness - I grew up skateboarding down gaps wearing super thin shoes because board feel was more important than heelbruises at the time. Now I like smashing a weekend of nonstop bikepark laps with the boys then sitting down on monday to work feeling fresh.

Its especially nice typing all day without being reminded of the braking ruts i was riding all weekend. Modern big bikes are just unreal.
  • 3 0
 Ive been both and I’d rather be overbiked any day of the week. Knowing that you are heading to a trail that will be muted a tad is way easier to cope with than heading to the bike park knowing your brother and buddies are going to trail you down a disgusting double black that will most likely end up with you looking like you just went through a cheese grater or being the annoying guy who backs down from a challenge. There’s always room for improvement when you’re on a DH sled. Climbing quickly and efficiently feels good, but descending like a bat out of hell is where the real gratification comes in.
  • 3 0
 Over bike for sure! All my current bikes are more capable than I am and after riding the best mountain bikes I could afford since 1980, I’m grateful that bikes are as capable as they are now. That said, I have plenty of options in my current stable to maximize the fun and keep my ass from getting into too much trouble - all without a battery in sight. Now get off my lawn !
  • 3 0
 Easy question for me to answer: I've got a 6 year old 130/120 27.5er. Underbiked AF. But what to get is a much harder question to answer, there are so many rad bikes out there now. Still waiting on the message from pinkbike that I won the GG Smash for Xmas! There must have been a problem with my email address. Pinkbike? Pinkbike?
  • 3 0
 In my opinion, there is one extremely important factor that is is omitted in this article and surprisingly even in the comments!! TYRES! Going from the lightest to DH casing make such A night and day difference on the same bike. It would be really interesting to ask how much uphill effort are you ready to sacrifice in exchange for the grip, damping and and protection of downhill casing tyres assuming you're gonna climb on the bike 100% of the ascents with no assistance. I wonder if somebody with a power metre ever tested XC vs DH tyres on the same climb same bike. I would assume it could be be something like twice the amount of energy to ascent the same climb.
  • 3 0
 For a guy like me, who can still ride pretty hard and somewhat fast, but is getting old so hitting the ground hurts a lot more that it used to; being overbiked is quite a luxury because if I make a mistake or choose a bad line etc the bike can help me out of a bad situation and possibly help avoid a crash.
  • 7 2
 Overbiked for safety factor. I'm a professional in the private sector and crash injuries could cost me a lot of money.
  • 2 0
 I bought a Mega TR 275 when they came out (4 or 5 years ago), fitted a -2 angle set, 160mm or 170mm fork and 26" wheels, it was a wee weapon, until today... RIP Mega TR275. Snapped the chainstays.
With that setup it had most of the modern numbers with the exception of the super steep seat angle and it loved to rip around the trails, wasnt the best climber but loved to attack a down, not like a Dh bike but like a slack trail bike.
  • 3 0
 A good big bike and a good hardtail and you're set. Just like the days before enduro. But better because the big bike can go up hills better and the hardtail can go down better.
  • 1 0
 And assuming this survey is about one bike quiver, I predict front-end geo's are reaching their maximum. And people will start going the other way and extending chainstay lengths to to eliminate front end wheel bob when climbing and to achieve more stability at speed. Early examples include S-works Stumpy EVO, Banshee, and Nuke Proof (w/ Sam's input). And then travel will just be determined on rider's ability, fitness, and terrain. As more travel can just bog somebody down when it's not needed and vice versa. With a 140/130mm bike being the new middle (w/ extended geo).
  • 2 0
 I think it is better to be slightly over-biked if riding more difficult technical downhill trails. Just a little extra is good because focus is on the downhills. However, if riding XC all the time, under-biked (lighter) is good because the focus is on the climbing.
  • 2 0
 Currently underbiked with 130/117 trail bike. I've reached the limits of the bike given my skillset (on the descents at least) and want something I can push a little harder going down. Next bike will be modern to aggressive geometry with 160mm -150mm front and 160mm-140mm rear, depending on the linkage/shock.
  • 2 0
 I've been riding an entry level XC Hardtail for about 2 years now, I even took it on some DH trails and it was fun but scary af. About 3 months ago I moved to a small town with lots of mountains to go to university. Ofc with those mountains there is a huge mtb community and a lot of super gnarly trails. I honestly have to say that I'm glad, I worked my ass of in a bike shop for a few months before going to university to get a bike, that most would consider overbiked (Fuji Auric LT 1.3 2020 with 170/160 mm travell). Even though I think my upgrade from a 700 Euro XC Hardtail to a 3700 Euro Super Enduro (got it for 2400 from the bike shop I worked in), could be considered a bit to abrupt, I wanted to get something, that I'll be able to ride for a long time on pretty much anything, because as a full time student, I don't have to much money to spend on shiny upgrade parts or even a completely new bike.
  • 2 0
 I would rather be a little over biked. That said one bike is just crazy talk here in B.C. Know you’re trails and have a few tools in the shed for whatever is going down that day.
N+1... always.
Pump Track/Jump Bike.
HT Trail Bike
160/145mm AM/Enduro Bike.
180mm-200mm Park Bike.
All local ride areas covered.
  • 2 0
 Can you check this cavity for me? ;p
  • 3 0
 @mybaben: I’m no dentist but I play one in B.C.
MTB... it’s a lifestyle not a hobby.
  • 1 0
 @shredb4dead: LOL. i'm just taking the piss out of you. Wink
  • 1 0
 HT trail bike is fairly redundant...I'd swap that with a 120mm 29er
  • 2 0
 Have an aggressive hardtail which I love and ride the most ( but my back doesn't) and a long travel 29.

Got a 125mm "new school" Rift Zone carbon on order. Not ready to give up the other bikes but hoping it will do the trick for all. I'm either over biked 90% of the time on the 29 or rattling out fillings on the HT where I ride the most.
  • 2 0
 I made the switch this fall from an alloy Process 153 to the new alloy Process 134 and for the terrain here in Oregon the smaller bike is revelation. It turns out riding the longer travel bike kinda sucked unless you were going really fast or riding really steep stuff it also had a coil shock and weighed 37lbs. The 134 is 4lbs lighter and the geo and suspension just works better everywhere but the ragged edge.
  • 5 0
 ah, the ünderbike

as Vital calls it
  • 5 0
 Can’t let the bike do all the riding for you
  • 3 0
 None of the above. My next bike will be a Guerilla Gravity with a second set of wheels and a seat stay tuning kit so I can always be goldilocks.
  • 1 0
 I just have 3 bikes. What's the problem? Kidding aside..if I had to keep only ONE bike it would be my 140/160 bike that has average geometry and is built up lightweight. It's not giving up a ton on the smooth/fast stuff, but is more fun everywhere else.
  • 4 0
 I don't believe in being over or underbiked. My bike and riding is non-binary and I decide what it is on each ride
  • 1 0
 I have a 160/160 Banshee Rune and it is one heck of a bike.
But I will say that this is too much bike for me.

I can ride it maybe 75% of it's capacity. And it has taken me a lot of gym hours to build the body strength to handle the bike as it was meant to be ridden.
If I could choose again I'd opt for less travel; more fun. It is fun going mach through roots and rocks, but the personal maintinence to do it is fairly high.
  • 2 0
 I have enough bikes to always chose one for being under-or overbiked.
Ok except for that 29er XXL DH rig that doesnt exist in my size. Or the ubiquitios gravelbike.
Life is too short Frown ...
  • 1 0
 Don't know how crazy tall you are but try the Supreme 29er... I'm 196 and it's the first dh bike I've ever owned that felt right.
  • 3 0
 Because your survey don't capture this possibility, my next purchase will have the same level of travel as my current bike but with more aggressive geo.
  • 1 0
 I'm currently on a 140/130 bike with fairly progressive geo from 2016 (Whyte T-130RS). I'd like a bit more bike with a bit more progressive geo - ideally something like the Ibis Ripmo (160/145) seems to check all the right boxes. Where I ride has a lot of rolling, rocky tech, but I also make frequent trips to CO and Bentonville where a slightly bigger bike would really shine.
  • 2 0
 I honestly don't know. Overbiking on easy trails means you can just take really dumb lines and send stuff really big. Underbiking on hard trails keeps you on your toes and makes you pick perfect lines. I think both are fun.
  • 1 0
 I’ve wondered how much a custom or hot suspension tune would allow you ride these shorter travel bikes harder. Seems it would be a sweet spot. I moved up to a longer travel bike because I kept struggling to handle the bigger hits without losing the smaller bump compliance on my mid travel bike.
  • 1 0
 Got an enduro bike 160/160 from 2015, maybe a bit less travel on a modern bike will translate to similar descent capabilities and way better climbing performances. Now I'm overbiked on normal trails and underbiked in the bike park...
  • 2 1
 Had bike with 170 front and rear and just proceeded to injure myself with it a bunch. Raced dh for years and never had any injuries as bad as I did "trail" riding an 170/170 bike. Have since sold it and found the balance with an aggressive 130/150 trail bike that can do everything but doesn't build as much stupid speed on trails not built for going fast. I'll save my pursuit of speed and big lines for the DH bike and trails and parks that warrant it.
  • 2 0
 Like this perspective. Like the days before enduro, a good DH bike and a hardtail and you'd be set. But now it's better because the big enduro bikes can go up hills effectively and the new hardtails rip.
  • 1 0
 I like having the right bike, but if it were a choice between a MegaTower or SB130 in my local and expanded area trails, I'd take the SB130. Underbiking is fun. Took my SB100 to Telluride bike park and surrounding trails and had a blast. Only real complaints I had were that the braking bumps were tiring. Being overbiked is fun if you have access to the terrain that the bigger bike shines in.
  • 2 0
 I would rather be over my bike rather than under it because if I was under it that would mean i'm on the ground and the bike is on top of me. My bike is heavy that would not feel good
  • 2 0
 Under biked with 130/120 yet still in top 5-10% on downhill parts of trails here in California. If you really want to get good, start with a hardtail and learn technical skills.
  • 1 0
 On flats! Wink
  • 1 0
 I’ve had a Pole Evolink 140 since 17’, just picked up a 2020 Trek Top Fuel. It really comes down to the terrain I’m riding but the new top fuel is crazy capable and and absolute blast. I’ve been on 160mm bikes since 2010 and consider myself an expert level rider. Nice to be able to pick which bike to ride depending on what I’m in the mood for, plow fest, or skitter over and around stuff. Either way I’m pinned and having fun in the woods ????????
  • 1 0
 Process 29, 160/153. Enough travel to get me out of trouble when I need it too, but short chainstays and a reasonable head tube angle to keep it lively when the terrain is mellow. I’ve found it to be a good balance between a bike that isn’t to much of a pig on my local trails but doesn’t hold me back at the bike park.
  • 1 0
 I was waaay underbiked when I first moved to the PNW. Had a bad crash as a result. Then I went the Nomad 3 route because I vowed never to be underbiked again. So then I was way over biked. And that was all fine and good while I built my skills and confidence, but as I got better I found that the monster truck was less fun on most trails. So then I went to an Evil Insurgent, which was a little more poppy/fun but still a bit of a monster truck and not the best climber. Then it was a 150/130mm 29er (SB130) and that seems to be the sweet spot. I almost never feel underbiked except on really rowdy stuff, but if I’m honest high-speed gnar is less than 10% of my riding day to day.
  • 1 0
 I was always underbiked growing up because of various reasons. So that's what I'm used to. That being said, it wasn't very awesome, because stuff would break, etcetera. It's hard to say, if my 10k bike broke I'd probably have a stroke.
  • 1 0
 2019 Giant Trance 29er Pro 0 with 115mm rear and 130mm front (weighs in at 27 pounds ready to ride). This has been an amazing all round trail bike that can punch above its class. For when a bit more is needed 2020 Santa Cruz Hightower. Both bikes are fast on climbs and reward aggressive line choices on the downs.
  • 1 0
 Under biked is fine if that bike can hold up to sever conditions. Not a huge fan of harsh bottoming out or holding back on trails. Absolutely hate broken frames and suspension. Hence I ride with my preferred 150-160 travel, don't have to hold back for fear of destroying my bike here in the PNW. Nothing lasts forever but nothing should break for years is what I hope.
  • 1 0
 this pole does not have any true meaning. I'm riding a v1 evil following with a fox 36 140mm. 120mm rear but could use more on demanding trails. I took it down flying Monkey without issue but skipped gaps and hucks. I'm going to over bike my next build. Hey Pinkbike, let's be real and get true statistics and opinions based on current setups and bikes. until then you're just teasing my saddle horn. Thanks for the pinker + purple balls = math. still hurting by your polls.
  • 1 0
 Yes, i am overbiked - and i love it!
180/180 -27.5 and it climbs everywhere i want it to.
It is fun, to have a bike you can challenge to YOUR limit. It soaks up nearly every mistake and so you have the chance to try again immediatly.
It works on my easy hometrails and it SHINES on big shuttle or lift days.
So... i can't find a reason to change anything!
  • 1 0
 I have a 29 170 Enduro rig (over biked) and a 29 Hardcore Ti HT (under biked for skill level and often terrain)

I do have fun on both but if you held a gun to my head n made me pick one it would be the big squish bike. Ive had a few accidents trying to ride the HT in the same way haha bouncy bits save my arse so often without me realising it.
  • 1 0
 I have more than one bike. Current mtb's are a 160/150 29er and a 160 forked HT. My wife noticed ages ago when I was on a more XC bike that I wasn't having as much fun on our "easier" rides. As soon as I went back to taking the big HT I sent everything in sight and she commented it was good to see I was having fun again. I ride my MTB to be a hooligan. The roadie is for fitness.
  • 1 0
 I am on a 2017 banshee Phantom 105 mm of travel but long and slack, and a Chromag Rootdown with 160mm fox 36. i prefer less travel but let the tires and geometry do their thing. All the trails at Bromont are smoother than they have ever been.
  • 1 0
 Maybe I'm a little overbiked. My main ride is a Turner RFX, 170mmFr, 160mmRr, but I love it. I do lots of big rides(high mileage) with lots of climbing and descending. I also ride my local bike parks(Snow Summit and SkyPark) The only time I really miss a smaller bike is when I do flatter, fast paced rides.
  • 1 0
 I have 2 bikes, so can be either underbiked (26'er HT w/ 90-130mm Talas), or biked (2015 153 Kona Process).
Both bring smiles, and have personalities. I do feel that the 153 compensates for any rider error, while the HT punishes you for the same. Different bikes make the same trail different, and honestly, if you have the space, there is no purpose in selling your old bike, as it will only get you a few hundred bucks, so makes a great loaner, 'bro, or alternate bike while the main ride is being serviced. As long as I have time to bike and mountains nearby, life is good!
  • 1 0
 This entirely depends on where you live and what terrain you ride. I have a Scott gambler and a specialized Enduro 170mm. Both top spec builds. I like to ride the gnarliest, steepest trails I can find with nice big drops and jumps. My gambler is for the park. Enduro for everything else. I wouldn't want any less travel.
  • 1 0
 There was no option for "same wheel travel, more aggressive geometry"

I love my Carbine, everything about it is perfect for me except that the seat tube is too far back when climbing. Straighten that sucker up to like 76-77 degrees from the 73.4 degrees that it currently is and perfecto, I jizz in my pants.
  • 1 0
 I thought I liked being underbiked until I rode Black Mtn in Pisgah! I knew there was a long gravel climb so I left my Enduro and took my Process 111. The gravel climb was indeed long, and the fact that I was solo made it even longer, but when I finally finished all the hike a bike stuff (thought I was finished a dozen times before I truly was) and pointed it down it beat me up pretty good (but I'm 53, so YMMV). I don't know how many roots and rocks are across the trail that have the earth cut out from under them, but it felt like a million little 2 foot drops. Glad I didn't take my hardtail!
  • 1 1
 As far as I go my bike far out shines my own skills, I realised that a couple of years ago when I jumped on a mates original stump jumper (no suspension at all) and and happy to admit 90% of my riding prowess is purely down to my full susser. It’s said often that modern bikes are amazing, but it’s not until you ride a bike from your youth (early 90’s) you realise how far they have come.
  • 1 0
 Fine with more wheel travel as long as the pedal bob stays at a minimum on the climbs (lockout or suspension kinematics, doesn't matter). Would rather a fun party mode than an easier climb.
  • 4 0
 I know being underbiked is fashionable, but I like my porridge just right.
  • 2 0
 Overbiking makes me feel even more unfit than I already am, it also gets me out of trouble when I run out of talent, which is fairly often.
  • 2 0
 Love my Evil Calling, short travel 27.5 with aggressive geo. Probably not the fastest bike on the planet (especially with me driving), but super super fun!
  • 3 0
 I am happy with 5 inches in the rear Mr Humphries, but use six inches in the front Mrs Slocombe, ooh ahh.
  • 2 0
 If I am under-biked have I not been over-biked and conversely if I am over-biked, does that not mean I have been under-biked at some point?
  • 2 0
 Um, no?
  • 2 0
 Only if you have not completed less than two rides
  • 1 0
 @MtbSince84: If one has been neither under-biked nor over-biked on their bike have they biked at all?
  • 1 1
 Buy a 140-150 bike and be untouchable
  • 2 0
 Simultaneously trying to create buzz for downcountry, while subliminally talking down on non ebikers who climb. All in a few short paragraphs.
  • 1 0
 For me the challenge is if I would go under biked (less travel) with aggressive geo but still ran a durable tire what am I saving with less travel. With close to equal tires the weight saving is minimal.
  • 1 0
 I would like to try more modern geometry with less travel;
I do like my current bike and it was ahead of the time with geometry, and still ride good, however something like Norco Optic / similar bike will be blast to ride
  • 2 0
 Actually my suspension travel is still great (160/160), but my geo is totally dated!! I want close to the same travel, but with the rad, modern geo!!
  • 4 0
 Overbike = Old Guy Insurance.
  • 5 0
 Underbike = New guy jock measuring manhood
  • 1 1
 jesus christ! stop being some god damned poor! just have 5 bikes like me! full Hoped out Chameleon XX1 Pivot Firebird AXS build Mondraker FpodiumDC Yeti SB130 LR with Push front and back S-works Demo it's really that simple!
  • 1 0
 I always thought that underbiking meant that you broke stuff all the time and over biking meant that you never broke anything and didn’t ride hard enough for what you bought.
  • 1 0
 Turn off Strava and enjoy the bike you ride. Stop being tricked by pinkbike advertisers that a different travel number will solve all of your problems. Spend that extra cash on bike trips!!!
  • 1 0
 I just bought a 29er hardtail with a 140mm fork and a sub 65 head angle...... where does that put me on the poll?
I selected less travel, but like Stevie Wonder said, nothin' from nothin' leaves nothin'.....
  • 3 0
 180/180 with a 64 head angle. doesn't get more aggressive than this for me
  • 2 0
 I'm at 160/140. I'd like a bit more in the rear with better fork/rear shock from what I have.
  • 3 0
 Whatever the industry tells me I need!!!
  • 2 0
 I'd like to continue having multiple bikes because that's what having a job is for.
  • 1 0
 What's it called when you smoke your full suss riding buddies on a downhill while riding your rigid frame SS that's older than dirt? BWAHAHAHAHHAH!
  • 5 0
 Arrogant, I think it's called arrogant. LOL JK. Seriously though, find some new riding buddies, yours suck...
  • 8 0
 fantasy?
  • 3 0
 Overbiked so I can race DH on my everyday trail bike.
  • 1 0
 140 air / 130 coil seems to be the sweet spot for me - plenty of geo numbers to play with on my rocky already so theyre at the peak of the curve.
  • 3 0
 Missing the option: same travel more aggressive geometry.
  • 1 1
 Overbiked and underbiked are what happens in a crash. Whatever bike I’m riding is the perfect bike for the situation. Unless I’m on a big bike and flat trail. Then it’s just training.
  • 2 0
 Looking forward to moving up to a 2020 Sight this year hopefully. Coming from 125 / 140.
  • 2 1
 Downcountry? It's a trail bike. Who came up with that rubbish. XC, Trail, All Mountain/Enduro and DH. It's all covered in those categories.
  • 1 0
 The year 1999 wants its question back. Vouilloz never one on a pig, and Hill suddenly got fast when that stupid SGS disappeared.
  • 2 0
 Anyone that says underbike just likes to climb and gets smoked on the descents.
  • 1 0
 Downtravel is going to be the word of 2020. The book Zen and the Art of using less travel will be released by PinkBike Press.
  • 1 0
 *Initial Reaction* "Over... What kind of questions is THAT?" >.> (I'd like to be prepared for anything - apart from that which needs a DH fork...)
  • 1 0
 Seems like all the short travel bikes ride like they have more travel and the long travel bikes pedal like they have less travel. So just pick whatever tickles your fancy.
  • 3 1
 On the west coast if you're overbiked it just means you're not riding hard enough trails Wink They're out there!
  • 3 0
 If your bike feels like "too much bike," go faster.
  • 2 0
 Less travel bikes have tendency to snap or does not forgive mistakes overshooting jumps or missing lines
  • 1 0
 or you could just move to a place with harder terrain so you don't have to buy a less capable bike to make your shitty trails more exciting.
  • 1 0
 Overbiked for sure-it’s the creative option-don’t have to stick the trail then...intentional re-route or not, ya still come out beaming!
  • 2 0
 That’s why I run a 180mm hardtail, moar travel, aggressive geo, climbs like a goat
  • 1 0
 I run a 170mm hardtail, mostly because, "f*ck it". And I think it looks cool. And the cost. Plus with a dropper post, it pretty much does everything OK. Like theoretically I could do all the riding disciplines poorly on it, even skate park, street trials, DH, Cross Country, Dirt jump, dual slalom if I was a good rider. Unfortunately I'm pretty out of shape, and old.
  • 2 0
 I want to see demographics on the votes. Age alone would be interesting. Main discipline would be good, too.
  • 1 0
 İ'm 16 and a amateur to this sport and im overbiking myself(180/170) because if i do anything wrong, the overbike tolerance saves me every time and i'm happy with that.
  • 1 0
 Thanks to all the butthurt in the comments I’m now aware of the international problem of people being forced at gun point to buy new bikes.
  • 1 0
 Does anybody else scroll through the endless sea of comments on PB just to find the @WAKIdesigns with the most down votes? They are usually pretty entertaining Smile
  • 1 0
 Took my new rigid 29er out yesterday for its maiden voyage. First time off road without a full suss in 10 years. Quite the life lesson. But i didn't die!
  • 1 0
 I like being overbiked, this way when my brain writes checks my body and skill can't cash my bike makes up the difference, (usually).
  • 2 0
 Canfield Balance = Perfect-biked
  • 2 0
 I'd like to keep roughly the same travel but with more aggressive geometry
  • 2 0
 I’ll just take a Norco Optic for everything I need
  • 2 0
 Nukeproof reactor 29 best for everything well per Sam Hill Smile
  • 1 2
 The pole is great if your selling bikes. It's a shame . There was a time when mountain bikes we're evolving. Those were fascinating times. SS , fully rigid or shit loads of travel. I have fun. It's a state of mind.
  • 2 1
 Long travel bikes that handle/pedal like short travel bikes are the future. Shocking, I know.
  • 2 1
 Over biked, under biked, blah blah blah. I have a bike and I ride it. Run what ya bring and have fun
  • 2 0
 I generally prefer to be "on" my bike.
  • 2 0
 I literally just got my first sus fork. So I’m always underbiked
  • 1 0
 I like to mash over everything, and I like a bike to make up for my limitations. Therefore, overbike me!
  • 2 0
 The year just began, this wins dumbest 2020 trolling question already!
  • 1 0
 PB should share these comments with bike designers to build a bike specifically for Trolls.
  • 1 0
 shortish travel 140/140,aggressive geo, aggressively steep st, and amazingly tuned suspension system
  • 2 0
 I’d rather be too many bikes
  • 1 0
 I’ll always be overbiked regardless..

As in. My bike is WAY more capable than me!

True for most of us eh?
  • 2 0
 I prefer to be over my bike than under it
  • 2 0
 i don’t need to change my perfect bike a 2019 pivot firebird
  • 1 0
 I ride a Rocky Mountain Altitude, my friend rides a Trek Marlin. We both have fun on the same trails.
  • 1 0
 Overbiked a bit, honestly. Better to have no one to blame but yourself for a bad result in a race or whatever.
  • 1 0
 Pole's front end just announced its parting ways with the rest of the bike.
  • 2 0
 It's VITAL to be underbiked! Wink
  • 2 0
 I'm not over- or under-biked, I'm just biked ????
  • 2 0
 just as long as it is "biked" it is perfect
  • 2 0
 Overbiked and a 140mm hardtail for everything else.
  • 3 0
 More bikes is the answer
  • 1 0
 Nah less bikes more trips
  • 2 0
 I still ride a 2001 Schwinn Straight 8.
  • 1 0
 I always think it's better to be overbiked & not use it than underbiked & need more !
  • 1 0
 Pivot Mach 5.5.....160f 140r, still plenty capable for almost anything short of the bike park, but climbs extremely well!
  • 1 0
 I ride a 2008 Bigfoot and a 2009 Big Hit. Anyone who thinks they "need" a modern bike is lacking either skills or balls
  • 1 0
 Hint: nobody needs any bike ever. But your cry for validation and admiration is noted.
  • 1 0
 But since you went there, why do you need two bikes?
  • 1 0
 My last freeride bike was a Santa Cruz Bullit from 2001 with a dual crown fork and an angle set to boot to bring the head angle to about 65 degrees. When doing bigger jumps, I have had way more oh-shit moments on it than on my enduro bike, which is way longer and slacker. Bike selection definitely matters if you do certain type of riding.
  • 1 0
 ditch the full sus get back on a metal HT and fall back in love with bike riding, nothing comes close.
  • 1 0
 140 out back, 150 up front seems to work fine for me. Happy on all day epics to DH runs
  • 1 0
 I’d rather be overbiked. Better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
  • 1 0
 Over bike or under bike that is the question. I just like to bike don’t care
  • 1 0
 Overbike for sure I run 210mm travel and a 61 degree head angle. I wouldn't go any less aggressive
  • 1 0
 Yea but which bike is better for "Down Country"!!!
  • 1 0
 I'm fine with what I have now as its less wheel travel, and modern Geo,
  • 1 1
 have gone from a reign and nomad to a norco torrent and having heaps more fun....
  • 1 0
 I ride alone; and walk the line, so.......
  • 1 0
 The new Hightower is pretty friggin capable!
  • 1 0
 Overbiked, always, 200+/200+ minimum, no matter if I have to climb 10km!
  • 1 0
 Both can be fun if you’re in the right headspace.
  • 1 0
 Sadly, I'm just olderbiked.
  • 1 0
 Is the cover thumbnail a Pole with a Fox 40?
  • 1 0
 170/160 with modern geometry. Love my Commencal Meta.
  • 1 0
 I chose the biggest bike that can still climb well. Ripmo
  • 1 0
 29er / 170mm
This seems to be what I want.????
  • 2 0
 n+1
  • 1 0
 Same/similar travel, more aggressive geometry.
  • 1 0
 Try vlogging while balancing on a unicycle....
  • 2 1
 +1 for underbike
  • 1 0
 Is that a real question?
  • 1 0
 Is this?
  • 1 0
 @lognar: What was the question?
  • 1 0
 @CentralVTMTB: What's happening?
  • 1 0
 Technical**
  • 1 0
 More bikes!

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