Review: Fidlock's Bottle Twist Uses Magnets to Hold Your Water Bottle

Aug 3, 2018 at 16:36
by Richard Cunningham  
Fidlock Bottle Twist magnetic latch


Fidlock's most popular product is its magnetic buckle system. I have been using a Leatt DBX helmet with a Fidlock chin-strap buckle and can report that it is a better solution than the industry-standard bayonet clasp in all respects. Fidlock's "Bottle Twist" water bottle system cleverly applies their magnetic latching concept to make it easier and more intuitive to remove and replace a frame-mounted water bottle.

Two magnetic studs that protrude from a simple frame-mount engage matching slots in a pod that is attached to the full-size 0.6-liter Fidlock water bottle. One clockwise twist releases the bottle, and when returning it to station, you only need to get the latch
Bottle Twist Details

• Twist-action bottle release
• Neodymium magnets automatically secure bottle
• Double-security latching system
• 600 ML volume
• Works in confined spaces
• 48 grams without bottle
• Includes "Gravity" security strap
• MSRP: $34.95 USD
• Contact: Fidlock
close enough to the frame mount, where the powerful neodymium magnets take over and pull it into place. Fidlock's system incorporates a simple mechanical latch that further-secures the bottle against an accidental release.

Fidlock Bottle Twist magnetic latch
Fidlock Bottle Twist magnetic latch
Powerful magnets draw the two halves of the Fidlock mount together. A second pair of mechanical latches (shown in red on the right) prevent lost bottles.


The twist action requires no forward movement, so the bottle can be released and replaced in cramped quarters that would be troublesome for a conventional bottle-and-cage arrangement. The locking mechanism works for right or left-handed riders, and Fidlock sells mounting bosses and bottles separately, so riders can buy spares or add frame mounts to other bikes in their stables.

Fidlock's Bottle Twist system has been upgraded with a "Gravity Kit" which is a slim, screw-on strap that encircles the bottle and better secures it to the latch. Sans bottle, the latch and frame-mount weigh 48 grams. The Bottle Twist system includes a bottle, (latching system and gravity strap attached), frame-mount and hardware for MSRP $34.99 USD, and you can get bottles in clear or charcoal colors

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Features and Performance

Fidlock's German-engineered solution to the longstanding slide-in cage is a little over the top, but most riders will forgive that after a few rides. Installation is simple: and there's no fumbling with an Allen key inside of a springy bottle cage. Bottle Twist will function perfectly as long as there is room to squeeze it somewhere in the front triangle. But wait! Unlike a slip-in cage, Fidlock's magnetic hybrid latching system works up-side down or sideways - basically, anywhere you need to put a bottle, Fidlock's magnetic frame mount will hold it securely.

"Yeah right," I thought. While there is no arguing the superiority of Bottle Twist's ease of operation and self-guided return feature, what were the odds that the magnetic latching device could keep a full bottle in place after jumping to flat or descending a high-speed rock garden? Fidlock's latch aced a month of all-mountain rides without a single premature bottle ejection. Okay then. I scheduled a couple of shuttles down a local trail with a number of rock features and high-speed sections that are historic water bottle harvesting zones. Full-gas, full-bottle, two runs, top to bottom with no issues. I don't give it a thought anymore. It works great - every time.

Issues

Performance wise, I have nothing but good things to report about Fidlock's take on the ultimate water bottle mount. I have used the less-expensive and lighter-weight Fabric system (it simply uses two pegs that slip into latching slots molded into the bottle) with much success, but the Fabric interface still requires a degree of fussing to line up the bottle with the pegs - a task that is exacerbated by terrain. Wave the bottle close to Fidlock's powerful magnets, and it gets sucked out of your grasp and onto the pegs - boom!

Fidlock Bottle Twist magnetic latch
Fidlock's twist-off feature and magnetic return are golden on the trail. The Gravity strap, however, looks like an afterthought.
Fabric Cageless 600ml water bottle
Fabric's simpler post-type mounts are better looking on the bike, but are much less secure and harder to manage.


The downside of both the Fabric and Fidlock systems is that you'll be committed to their particular bottles. If either brand stops production, you're back to square one with frame mounts that have no use (Fidlock's could double as refrigerator magnets). Fidlock's bottle is made well, it seals tightly and doesn't leak when the bike is laying in the back of your vehicle and it's dishwasher safe - without the magnetic latch - so hand washing it is the reality.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesMost riders will judge Fidlock's twist-action magnetic water bottle mount as a significant improvement over the century-old slide-in bottle design. I used it on two bikes, one with limited clearance, and it was always a pleasure to operate. Aesthetically, Fidlock's system is better looking, and the lack of friction on the bottle keeps it like new. Great solution for any water bottle user - especially for frames with impaired bottle clearance.RC







126 Comments

  • + 78
 When can we have a bladder in the down tube and a straw sticking out of the stem cap. It'z the future I tellz you.
  • + 18
 On triathlon bikes: www.giant-bicycles.com/global/showcase/trinity-advanced-pro

"its unique AeroVault system includes an integrated front hydration unit, top tube storage box and downtube water bottle that, together, actually improve the bike’s aero performance on the road"

Combined with SWAT; sooooooooooooooo enduro!
  • + 10
 The tube sticking out of the stem cap doesn't have to be for liquids...
  • - 34
flag teocalli (Aug 9, 2018 at 7:29) (Below Threshold)
 Straws are no longer permitted in the crazy Liberal alternatively reality so sorry...
  • + 22
 @JohSch: Next step is a urine purifier and you can just keep pissing and drinking.
  • + 18
 @teocalli: www.fws.gov/refuges/features/OceansOfTrash.html

Getting rid of straws seems like a tiny step forwards.
  • - 11
flag teocalli (Aug 9, 2018 at 8:02) (Below Threshold)
 @JaredHarzan: You would think so but it isn't, firstly 90% of the plastic in the ocean originates from Asia so having towns in the USA eliminate straws is dumb. Second straws are the wrong focus, need to go after the big pieces that are still prevalent everywhere. But in today's world any critique such as mine is labeled anti-humanity so there you go...sorry for the rant
  • + 3
 @teocalli: People are avoiding important conversations for dumb reasons, not sure it will go well.
  • + 23
 @teocalli: Is there any harm in eliminating straws from your life? Do you need a straw to drink your beverage of choice? Eliminating plastics use one step at a time is a good idea and leading by example works better than trying to tell the third world to stop doing it when we cant. IMHO.

And just because the US and Europe are better at putting things in a landfill instead of the ocean doesnt make the net effect any better.
  • + 2
 LogicFeelings
  • + 6
 @teocalli: Like your mountain bike, as long as it isn't your primary source of transportation, straws are a luxury. You really, really don't NEED straws. If you want one, buy one to carry with you. The only way to stop plastic pollution if to stop producing plastic. Our sport is inherently not that environmentally friendly, but I will try to pick up the slack anywhere I can.
  • + 3
 @paulskibum: I don't use straws at all I am just pointing out the fallacy with the latest feel good idea, totally want the plastics reduced in the oceans
  • + 2
 @bicyclelifestyle: they are selling reusable straws wrapped in a plastic package. We stopped using paper bags to save trees and started using plastic bags, now we are buying paper bags to stop using plastic bags.
  • - 4
flag Dangerous-Dan (Aug 9, 2018 at 11:54) (Below Threshold)
 @paulskibum:
actually there are people who DO need straws. Maybe they will just serve me in a sippy cup?

teocalli's point is that the straw ban is something to make people feel good without actually doing anything to solve a problem. Sort of like "recycling", where some large percentage of the material goes into the landfill.

Much of the plastic is discarded or lost fishing gear. Maybe there should be a ban on "filet o' fish" sandwiches? Or maybe we should hope that enough of the crap gets dumped into the oceans that it is worth harvesting.
  • + 1
 @paulskibum: I'm no expert and not saying it's perfect, but putting garbage in a single managed locations seems better than widely distributing it across an ecosystem. Also, sea turtles don't choke on garbage buried in landfills.
  • + 0
 @Dangerous-Dan:
People who 'need' straws.
Paraplegics.
People who don't:
Everyone else (this includes children)

Yes lots of plastic is used in Asia (where we outsource the majority of manufacturing and half of the world's population lives there), but there are more plastic bag bans/legislation in Asia than North America.
  • + 0
 @paulskibum: When he says a straw he really means a re-usable tube. Haven't you seen what the triathletes use? Similar to a tube used in a Camelbak drinking system.
  • + 1
 @deserat: You slightly missed my point - yes water based disposal of garbage is short sighted and horrifically destructive and should be stopped.

But at some point landfill is going to become an issue as available spots fill up, pollutants leach into the water source etc - we should be doing all we can to reduce waste and recycle so ditching plastic straws is a good step - I try to recycle as much as I can and generally only have a small bin full of unrecycleable stuff each week but I worry the recycling I put out doesnt always get back into use due to errors in sorting and cleaning by either myself or my neighbours.

My point was reduce waste wherever it ends up.
  • + 12
 I've had three of the fabric bottles and all three of them have broken in the exact same spot.
The red latch area on the bottle...... hopeless. They should just make the bottle mould so it doesn't require extra plastic that breaks out of the mould like those stupid red pieces.

Granted, I've got a Yeti SB6c with the most heinous spot for a water bottle (will never buy another bike with a mount on the under side of the down tube - poor design)

The fidlock looks good, but I'm not spending any more money on water bottles that break.
  • + 2
 Lost my one of my 2 fidlocks first ride, mounted the other on on the road bike. My 2 Fabric's are still going strong.
  • + 2
 it is but theres a new camelbak bottle that has a little rubber cover for it. It. Changed. Everything.
  • + 5
 with all the latest advancements in frame material, industrial design, and suspension kinematics, i find it funny that one of bike designers' and product managers' main goals is now to fit a godam water bottle inside the frame. biopace, mega range, and 4piston xt brakes are cool again. I just cant wait for 26 to come back!
  • + 3
 I have both my Fabric bottles for a little over 2 years now. I always put them on the bike I ride most. They did not drop a single time and they are still working perfectly.

Would I ride Fabrics when racing? No, because can't put it back blindly and you'll waste a second.
Would I recommend it for recreational cyclists, riding anything from road to enduro? Yes!

The Fabric is cheaper than a normal bottle + (steel) cage, and it saves you 90g per bottle (/cage). For the price that's a huge weight saving + it looks good when mounted + your bike stays beautiful when you don't run (both) bottles.


I'd say the Fidlock is more for Strava warriors and racers, while the Fabric is more for people who ride their bike because they enjoy riding their bike (cheaper, lighter, better looking).
  • + 4
 I've seen quite a few Fabric (and other bottles) on thedide of Bike Park trails over the last few years. If the Fidlock is more secure then I might get one.
  • + 1
 depends on what you race too. I race enduros and have done with the fabric bottle for two years without a single problem. I never drink during a SS, only during liaisons, and while the fabric is definitely more fiddly to put back, it doesn’t bother me too much in those situations
  • + 2
 @cuban-b: I didn't realize that 26 ever left...
  • + 1
 +1 for this guy right here ^
  • + 8
 Yum...luke warm water splashed with grit on the spout.

I'm still in love with going full gas or poking around with a Camelbak bite valve in my mouth and knowing I didn't leave a tool at the house that will get me out of the woods.
Plus my keys are in my pack, I can chuck knee pads and/or a jacket in it if it's too hot or my knee acts up.

Camelbak Mule is still exactly all I need. Still don't get hip packs & water bottle mounts & stash compartments & strapping crap to my frame to get slathered in goo.

I've yet to tell the difference between a 30 minute ride and 3 hour ride when it comes to getting in a ride.

Camelbak, helmet, riding kit, bike. All these other solutions just make you chase your tail.
  • + 1
 @bizutch I'm with you. The only time I use a water bottle is if I don't think the 3 liters in my Camelbak will be enough.
  • + 1
 @rjm94566: the only thing I've changed is now I leave my Camelbak and kitt in a duffel all the time & added a 40oz metal insulated Camelbak water bottle to my arsenal.
I can toss the fuel in the car with that ice cold jug of water, leave it in thur parking lot at work all day, turn get to the trail, chuck the cold water in my Camelbak& go. Icy water makes about ride epic.
  • + 8
 But can we we get a magnetic water bottle to hold another water bottle? No? I'm out.
  • + 6
 i want insulated bottles. till then, i won't be switching.
  • + 3
 I am old enough that I remember every 5 to 10 years someone tries to reinvent the water bottle/cage system. In 1995 it was a system where there was what can only be described as a male protrusion bolted to the frame and a female end molded into the bottle. While these new versions are much nicer - its the age old problem of bottle compatibility. When I am soloing the 4, 6, 8, 12 and/or 24 hours of FILL IN LOCATION or doing the Nimby 50 this becomes an issue. I am an overweight middle aged man that sweats like a fat pig on a hot day - I do not see the Zefal 1L magnum bottles working with these systems.....

Those that get these products and like them - congratulations. Just not for my personal preferences.
  • + 3
 I’m using it for couple of months now on my Santa Nomad. Have been riding Sun Peaks and Whistler for 10 days in July and bottle didn’t fall of not even once so I consider it to work. However I’m running it without the strap and at higher temperature the bottle seems to get so soft that the mount attached to the bottle comes a bit lose so I’m thinking of attaching the strap if only I could find itSmile Apparently strip is only a workaround and there is something more sophisticated in the pipe...

Except from that issue which didn’t really cause any troubles yet. Overall I really like it. Even at bike parks it is great to have a bottle especially right now were climate seem to go nuts.
  • + 2
 Why a bottle in a Bikepark? I have a bottle always at the top and bottom at the lift station.
Would drive me nuts loosing the bottle anywhere on the trail
  • + 1
 @NotNamed: this thing is the real shit. I use this mount on my FR and it works. I also have it because it is almost invisible without the bottle. You can clamp it on the car rack anywhere because of it. Also this is the only mount I can glue to my Bikes who haven't any screw's.
  • + 1
 Also, strap makes it hard to squeeze
  • + 1
 @Serpentras: Convinced me im buying this.....

GET THE STRAP
  • + 1
 Contact Fidlock for direction on getting the gravity kit (the strap). I'd recommend it for lift laps/whistler.
  • + 5
 Top tip - if you own a Mach 6 Carbon in medium the smaller one of these (450ml) is literally the only bottle that will fit in there with the float DPX2 shock (stock).
  • + 2
 This changes everything.
  • + 1
 My small Mach 6 doesn't even have cage mounts! Consider yourself lucky.
  • + 1
 @sloonz: Try the Uni-Base option. www.fidlock-bike.com
  • + 2
 I'm afraid I don't understand the function of the Gravity Strap. Is it required or not? Are the bottle and bottle-side hardware not firmly connected together on their own? If so, it doesn't just look like an afterthought, it sounds like one too - but all's well that ends well, I guess. It doesn't look too heinous.
  • + 4
 The gravity strap is an addition required only if the bottle is positioned under the down tube. It was an after market solution following reports of the bottle failing in those situations.
  • + 4
 Best system ever. Been using it for 6 months now. Way better than any normal cage because my bike fits on any bike rack with this system.
  • + 1
 “The locking mechanism works for right or left-handed riders“

Could you explain this? As far as I can tell there is only one style of latch available, which requires twisting the bottle to the right, which I can only envision using my right hand to do.

I’m right handed, but prefer to use my left to grab the bottle. That keeps my dominant hand on the bar for more control while I’m drinking.
  • + 0
 surely you would just turn it 180 degrees to enable either left or right hand removal?
  • + 2
 You can unscrew the mount on the bottle and turn it. Now you can use it with your left hand. Like I do ..
  • + 10
 Maybe it’s just too early in the day for me, but I fail to see how this would work. Wouldn’t the slots be in the same positions even after rotating it? Like how the letter “S” is the same if it is rotated 180 degrees?
  • - 2
 @lj17: think about it-if its installed one way it will enable it to be removed to the right (as an example) so rotate it 180 degrees and youll be taking it off to your....
  • + 4
 @hairy1976: but turning an “S” 180 degrees results in … another “S”
  • + 2
 @CapedBaldy: Totally agree. Simply rotating it by 180 degrees will mean that you still have to twist it clock-wise to remove.
I'm a lefty and stopped by the Fidlock stand at Seaotter. Pointed out to the guys at the stand that the bottle will be hard to operate with the left hand on frames with little room. Two of them teamed up and quite rudely insisted this wouldn't be a problem.

Thanks, but no thanks.
  • + 1
 Yes, the bottle must always rotate clockwise to release but of course both of your hands can rotate in a clockwise motion. I actually think left handed is easier cause the motion is more ergonomic.
  • + 1
 @rjp1: That’s a bummer to hear how they reacted when you asked about this.

It looks like a cool product and various reviews seem to conclude that it works well. It might not matter much to some, but I really want the bottle to exit the frame from the left. Fidlock, if you make a version that does this, I will give you money. But if you are only ever going to have one that rotates clockwise, I’ll never buy one. My side-loading traditional bottle cage works too well for me to consider changing my method/ergonomics.
  • + 1
 @lj17: It removes very easily on the left side of the frame. I'm not sure how else to word it...
  • + 1
 @Barafu: I usually grab the bottle while I am spinning along with the seat fully raised, so it is a bit of a reach, and I just grab near the top of the bottle. I don’t want to have to reach even further down to grab near the middle of the bottle.

Currently I grab the top of the bottle with my left hand and pull left and up. With the Fidlock, I would have to either pull the top of the bottle to the right to release it (using my left hand) and then bring the bottle back to the left and up to get it out of the frame. OR, reach even further down and grab near the middle of the bottle to twist it and lift. Both of those options are worse for me.
  • + 1
 @lj17: I hear ya - I have the same issue. I'm just saying I was surprised by it after actually using it. It only needs maybe 30-degrees of rotation. So it's true you wont be able to pull it out by the very tip top but it's surprisingly easy.
  • + 1
 @Barafu: Fair enough. If I run across someone on the trail with one, I might ask to give it a try. But otherwise I’ll be sticking with the traditional setup. Thanks for the info and insight.
  • + 3
 The Fabric does not hold when shredding the trail.. lost it.. The Fidlockis nice but the metalring was broken after two months..
  • + 1
 As much as I like my Fabric bottles when they work, I regularly lose a bottle (like every 2/3 months)... on my road bike (usually on rough descents, or bunny hops to avoid potholes). Can't imagine using them on a mountain bike.
  • - 14
flag fecalmaster (Aug 9, 2018 at 2:43) (Below Threshold)
 Water bottles,,, why would you add ??? sloshishing unbalanced weight to the center of your friggin bike. Roadies excluded.
  • + 1
 @SwintOrSlude: i had one witch was also lost on the road bike, seems to be a recurring problem
  • + 11
 @fecalmaster: Cause it's better than up high on your back?
  • - 6
flag fecalmaster (Aug 9, 2018 at 6:25) (Below Threshold)
 Listen I like women of all shapes and sizes. Sorry butt not interested in what your implying.
  • + 1
 These are great! My son and I are running 2 of these each on our Pole EVO150 bikes. A small one on the top tube due to very limited room. I had to make a small plate to make the bottle sit away from the rear shock but it looks okay and does th job. We run the larger bottle under the down tube. I was sceptical about the one underneath staying on the mount when hitting rocky terrain, but Im definitely impressed. We've given them a good testing but neither of us have lost a bottle. Well worth considering these whether you're limited for space or not, I think they look cleaner than cages.
  • + 1
 This fidlock is the first water bottle I've used in 3 years, got an evil calling and ride mostly downhill oriented stuff, this thing is legit, it's not coming off unless it gets hit and twisted during a crash. Quickly got to where I can take it off and put back on without looking and it has a reassuring snap when it locks back in. I like that it's hardly noticeable when riding without a bottle, no cage.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: Can you find length measurements for the 600 bottle and the smaller 450 bottle? They mention on the website that it'll "fit even the smallest frames", but without physical measurements, how would anybody be sure...?
  • + 2
 I really like the idea of a fidlock water bottle. Too bad there is no bottle mount on my Capra, but my old school Gary Fischer XC bike might benefit from this system Smile
  • + 2
 I put one on the top tube of my Capra right in front of the seat tube. Looks dumb as hell but better than carrying a pack for short rides.
  • + 1
 I glued the most mount to my frame. Perfect solution..
  • + 1
 What kind of glue did you use?ive got an evil wreckoning with no mounts????@Serpentras:
  • + 2
 Check out the Uni-Base strap on solution. www.fidlock-bike.com
  • + 2
 Why are we still using plastic bottles when we already have a built in bladder? A catheter is the future! Just add an inline filter and quick disconnect!
  • + 3
 Dirt and magnets doesn't go so well! People wanna get rid of plastic straws, but then buys plastic water bottles, hypos!
  • + 4
 I misread "self latching" as "self launching"
  • + 1
 Birzman BottleCleat, same idea without the magnet, works perfect, less expensive, less weight (if that´s important to you)
www.birzman.com/products_2.php?uID=10&cID=37&Key=224
  • + 1
 Pretty sure fox live product development team is sh!tting a brick right now. A magnetic water bottle right next to a shock computer to instantaneously change suspension settings... what could possibly go wrong??
  • + 2
 The Monkii V Cage is a good alternative to the Fidlock & Fabtic systems. £18/$23, 36g, works with any bottle and 100% secure in my experience.
  • + 0
 Isnt the main point of a bottle to be able to pull it out and put it back in while you are riding?

I have tried the fabric cage and it is not easy to put it back in, besides it does not hold well the bottle.
This is just as bad.
  • + 2
 Love how it will pick up all the iron dust from rider in front and make those brown snow flakes around them
  • + 1
 Since a lot of frame manufacturers cant make a frame with bottle mounts & seems to be an on going problem with new bottle designs, What is going on?
  • + 2
 Someone should utilize the space inside the frame for water & connect camelbak hose.
  • + 3
 @mcozzy There is already this: www.pinkbike.com/news/eurobike-2018-an-air-pressurized-frame-for-an-adventure-bike.html

So it should be possible Big Grin I mean this would be enduro as f#ck Big Grin
  • + 2
 On triathlon bikes: www.giant-bicycles.com/global/showcase/trinity-advanced-pro

"its unique AeroVault system includes an integrated front hydration unit, top tube storage box and downtube water bottle that, together, actually improve the bike’s aero performance on the road"

Combined with SWAT; sooooooooooooooo enduro!
  • + 1
 @JohSch: This will be the holy grail of ENDURO!
  • + 1
 Have fidlock mount on two bikes and it works flawless. I do wash the bottle with the lash in the dishwasher and have had no issues - so far....
  • + 1
 if only they offered it as a standalone kit for universal bottles or even the big popular ones like camelbak and specialized and such.
  • + 2
 but than i couldn't use my baller ti king cage...
  • + 1
 They use mechanical locking, yeah, I saw that. But why would strong neodyms not be able to hold the bottle on its own?
  • + 1
 What we truly needed to know is if will survive after ride beers? I have lost many bottles in this way
  • + 2
 I don't understand why we make things more complicated.
  • + 1
 Because this is actually easier to use, especially when riding on trails.
  • + 2
 @ka-brap: donyoy have a stake it this? Again, unless you have some special need/fit issue, a bottle cage is simple and reliable.
  • + 2
 @ReformedRoadie: Nope, not at all affiliated with the cycling industry. I just see lots of people commenting on it who have not even used it.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: exactly what I was thinking.
  • + 1
 Thought this is what i need then saw you still need cage mounts, so its no good to me.
  • + 3
 Fidlock also have systems that can use other water bottles and an adaptors if you have no bottle cage mounts.
  • + 1
 They also make a universal mount that straps to your frame!

www.pinkbike.com/photo/16209947
  • + 2
 I have lost 3 Fabrics already ... time for change.
#lost&foundFABRIC
  • + 1
 I have that Fabric bottle on my Warden. Absolutely love it! Such a great idea
  • + 2
 use a side out bottlecage, thing done.
  • + 1
 Have you ever used any Fidlock-equipped closure system? You literally put the two pieces near each other and they snap securely into place. It's far easier than putting a bottle in a bottle cage. Side loading or traditional.
  • + 1
 @ka-brap: seriously, how hard is it to use a side loading bottle cage?
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: It's not hard on it's own, just that the Fidlock is easier and less prone to faffing about compared to a side loading cage.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: It feels kinda cool if you just hold the bottle close to the mount and it gets sucked into place. Its also super safe and you can mount it to your trail/dirthardtail without beeing decapitated by an angry mob at the dirtpark.
  • + 2
 @ReformedRoadie: You don't realize what a pain it is until you've used something better.
  • + 1
 Just rode the Whole Enchilada in Moab and I never had any issue, stayed put.
  • + 1
 New business idea for SRAM, TLD, Shimano, Raceface, Fox.
  • + 1
 The Fabric one is not ok with some frame + shock with piggyback
  • + 1
 Fidlock needs an insulated bottle option.
  • + 1
 "Water, fire, air and dirt - F*cking magnets, how do they work?"
  • + 1
 hope your internally routed steel cables stay out of the magnetic field
  • + 1
 FABRIC! But I'm sure this is nice too if you don't have a FABRIC.
  • + 1
 where to buy these in the us? i've been wanting one for ages.
  • + 1
 Jenson www.jensonusa.com
  • + 1
 I'd Hit That.
  • - 3
 Should not be too hard to get rid of proprietary systems: Screw in flat neodym magnets in frame mount, one broad velcro with flat neodyms sewn in around bottle, done. My bank account is ...
  • + 0
 That wont work.
  • + 5
 Once you hold any Fidlock mechanism in you hand, you will realize that it's actually not the magnets holding the two parts together but the clever mechanical connection that exists. Magnets simply help bring the two parts together.
  • + 1
 @simooo: tell me why?
  • + 1
 @Tamasz: Try it and find out for yourself.
  • + 1
 @MysticMCyclist: so you tried it already? Smile
  • + 1
 @Tamasz: have a look at the pictures again

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