Review: Liteville 301 MK15 Enduro

Aug 21, 2020 at 9:39
by Richard Cunningham  



What happens when the mountain bike industry runs out of fireworks? Liteville’s 301 MK 15 Enduro may answer that question.

As the smoke clears from two decades of tumultuous innovation and contentious new standards, it becomes apparent that most of us are over it. Pick a bike, any bike, single-pivot, six-bar, faux-bar – they all pedal well, weigh about 30 pounds and descend wonderfully. Components have attained similar parity, and if there were a super geek waiting in the wings with a stupendous suspension patent or a truly revolutionary drivetrain, we would have heard about it by now. With plates this full, you’d be excused if one more helping of industry superlatives made you want to puke.
301 MK 15 Enduro Details

• Wheel size: 29", 27.5" or mixed
• Travel: 160mm rear / 160mm front
• Aluminum frame
• Proportional geometry between sizes
• 64.5-degree head angle
• Price as shown: EUR 6,820 (approx. $6,339 USD)
• Frame only: EUR 2,480
• Colors: Black anodize/natural
• Weight: 29.2 lb /13.28kg (size medium, actual)
Liteville

So, where do we go from here? If history repeats, then the next chapter will be more about fine-tuning and improvement, less about dazzling innovation. After 20 years of processed sugar, however, it’s not going to be easy for the sport to transition to a stable diet. The persistent evolution of Liteville’s 301 provides a roadmap. It demonstrates that a compilation of improvements can shine as brightly as flashy rocket science, and suggests that smaller, more deliberate steps can take us to a higher place. Let’s have a look at their latest version, the Mark 15 Enduro.

bigquotesSpontaneity, like gapping rock gardens, doubling up natural features and committing to steep drops is encouraged by its can-do calmness. RC

Liteville MK15 review
Rather than bending the seat tube to provide tire clearance at full compression, it's moved forward. The pivot bolt at its base secures the 301's integrated dropper post.

Construction and Features

What's new? We reviewed Liteville's 301 MK 14 two years ago and our review bike, the MK 15, looks like an identical twin at a glance. So, what's new? For starters, its aluminum frame uses a new, stronger alloy that Liteville is reluctant to divulge. The only hint may be in the welding, which has transitioned from merely excellent to outstanding - some of the best I've seen in my life. Liteville says the size medium frame weighs only 2760 grams without a shock, which meets or beats the claims of many carbon rivals in the 160-millimeter-travel arena.

The swingarm has been reconfigured to provide more chain clearance, and there are two positions for the rear swingarm pivot that allow owners to run either a 29 or a 27.5-inch wheel without significantly affecting the bottom bracket height or frame angles. That means you can configure the 301 with mixed wheel sizes or, using a Syntace "Level Link" headset spacer, switch to 27.5-inch on both ends (More about that later).

Geometry has changed as well, with a longer reach, a longer wheelbase, a slacker head tube angle and a steeper seat tube angle. The chainstay length has been lengthened slightly too, about six millimeters, depending upon the frame size. (Liteville alters the chainstays to correspond to each of the 301's five size offerings.)

Great news, skip to the riding impressions

Liteville MK15 review
Liteville switched to a new aluminum alloy and an improved welding technique that looks stunning. Cable routing is even cleaner than before.
Liteville MK15 review
Two locations for the Horst-Link dropout pivot allow the use of either 29 or 27.5-inch wheels without upsetting the geometry.

Which features carry over? Liteville's list of stand-out features is long. Some have been available as aftermarket upgrades, like needle bearings for the shock bushings and adjustable-angle headset cups. The 301 also shares its offset rear triangle and dishless rear wheel concept with Cannondale, and it's rare, but a handful of bike makers also alter the frame geometry and chainstay lengths for each frame size to ensure consistent handling and climbing performance.

Liteville MK15 review
Sealed needle bearings, located at all three shock pivots.
Liteville MK15 review
Integrated derailleur bash guard and Type-3 break-away hanger.

Liteville MK15 review
Lubrication port for its integrated Eightpins dropper post.
Liteville MK15 review
Spare hanger bolt stashed in the swingarm yoke.

Liteville's engineers also account for a number of firsts. They were the first bike maker to adapt their frame design for an integrated dropper post, with the award winning Eightpins design. Its X-12 axle uses tapered collets to cinch the axle in tension and torsion, and the 301's Type-3 derailleur hanger, with its breakaway bolt, offers a much stiffer, better shifting alternative that also protects the derailleur more effectively.

The deeper you look, the more you'll discover: the spare hanger bolt in the swingarm yoke; the Allen/Torx wrench that stowes into the rear axle fits almost every screw on the bike; the oil port on the seat collar which lubricates the dropper post; its virtually invisible cable and hose routing; the cable access/storage door under the downtube; and perhaps you'll notice that every piece of its titanium, aluminum and stainless steel hardware is designed specifically for its application, and accompanied by a torque specification. The list goes on, but the message is that, by themselves, few of these enhancements would generate much fanfare. Together, however, they make the 301 an impressive machine.

Liteville MK15 review
Allen/Torx tool that clips inside the X-12 rear axle.
Liteville MK15 review
Widely spaced swingarm bearings. Cables and hoses, completely internal.

size medium geometry


Geometry & Sizing

Both 29 and 2.75-inch wheel sizes are offered for size medium, large and X-large builds. Size smalls are configured for 27.5 inch only, while XXL builds are only offered with 29 inch wheels. As mentioned, frame geometry is corrected between size offerings and wheel diameters.

For example: chainstay length begins at 422 millimeters for size small and grows to 435 millimeters for 27.5" bikes, while the size medium 29" wheel option (there is no size-small 29") begins at 438 and grows to 450 millimeters for XX-large frames. Depending upon wheel choice, reach begins at 425 and grows steadily to 508 millimeters. Liteville increased the trail for both wheel sizes with shortened offsets: 37 millimeters for 27.5 and either 42 or 44 millimeters for 29 inch wheels, depending upon Fox or RockShox options.

Offset seat tube: The 301's straight seat tube is moved forward to clear 2.5 inch tires when the rear suspension is fully compressed. The illusion is that the 301 has an impossibly short top tube, but such is not the case.

The seat clamp is offset 24 millimeters to the rear to compensate, which aligns the rider with the correct seat angle, plus or minus a half degree, at any extension height. The offset post would not be possible without the additional stiffness of the Eightpins' oversized, 33-millimeter diameter stanchion tube.

Genderless sizing: Many years as a custom frame builder suggest that there are at least as many men with short torsos and long arms and legs as there are women with long torsos and short appendages.
Liteville MK15 review
The Eightpins' saddle clamp is offset 24 millimeters to the rear to compensate for the seat tube location. The integrated design offers 15 to 25 millimeters more stroke, compared to clamp-on types.

Liteville doesn’t take sides, choosing instead to lower the 301’s stand-over height and stack as far as possible. This allows individuals with different body types to choose the reach they need across two, sometimes three size offerings to achieve the right fit. Liteville's no-fuss sizing is further enhanced by the integrated dropper post which affords the lowest possible drop and the maximum allowable stroke for any rider's leg length.

We've illustrated the differences between the size medium bike in this review. Follow this link for a complete breakdown of all sizes and options.


Liteville MK15 review
RockShox's Deluxe Select+ inline shock felt firm enough in the mid-stroke to discourage the use of its low-speed compression lever.

Suspension Design

Few men can watch the 301's top tube linkage cycle through its stroke for the first time without wincing. To my knowledge, no testicle has been harmed by the Four-Pivot design, but the jokes persist. The fact that Liteville has borne the brunt of that humor and stubbornly adhered to the 301's top-tube-mounted linkage suggests that the benefits of this design are compelling enough to shrug off the sarcasm.
Liteville MK15 review

Liteville 301 MK15 suspension
Liteville's "Four Pivot" linkage directs suspension forces to locations where the frame naturally opposes them.

The 301's Horst-Link four-bar rear suspension may have fallen out of favor ten years ago, but it never stopped working well. The fact that we're seeing a number of bike makers return to this simple system is proof of that. Liteville's "Four Pivot" linkage is configured to feed suspension loads into the frame, and to oppose the natural direction of forces the top tube and seat tube are subjected to. The link puts compression forces into the top tube, while the shock's trunnion mount is located to oppose bending forces where the rider's weight on the seat post is trying to rotate upper end of the seat tube.

Linkage plates are also made to soften the progressivity of the suspension for smaller frame sizes and, if you really wanted to get experimental, you could switch to the 130-millimeter travel "Trail" rockers. With two air volume spacers in its Deluxe shock, the 160-millimeter suspension feels progressive, with just enough anti-squat to maintain efficient pedaling without robbing its small-bump sensitivity. Overall, the feel of the new MK 15 is firmer and more aggressive than its predecessor.

As mentioned, Liteville converts all three of the trunnion-shock's pivots from plain bushings to needle bearings. They've figured out an effective sealing system for them as well, which has been an Achilles heel for needle bearings in the past. High-speed video footage of suspension shows that
Liteville MK15 review
The Horst-Link dropout disconnects the rear axle path from the arc of the swingarm. Liteville's attention to frame stiffness is evident here.
there is a substantial lag between the moment the wheel sees an impact and when the shock begins to move in response. Needle bearings shorten that response time by reducing start-up friction common to bushings - and I can attest that after one or two years of abuse, the suspension response will feel just as smooth.

Specifications
Release Date 2019
Price $6339
Travel 160mm
Rear Shock RockShox Deluxe Select+
Fork RockShox Lyrik Select+ 160mm, Offset 42mm 29˝
Headset Syntace Variospin 0-degree
Cassette SRAM Eagle XO1
Crankarms SRAM XO1
Chainguide Syntace SCS Evo6 integrated
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB threaded
Pedals NA
Rear Derailleur SRAM Eagle XO1
Chain SRAM Eagle GX
Front Derailleur NA
Shifter Pods SRAM Eagle XO1
Handlebar Syntace
Stem Syntace Megaforce3 40mm
Grips Syntace screw-on
Brakes SRAM G2 RSC 200/180mm
Wheelset Syntace C33i Straight Carbon Evo6
Hubs Syntace
Spokes 28 straight-pull
Rim Syntace C33i carbon
Tires Maxxis DHF 2.5"/DHRII 2.4" Evo
Seat SQlab 611 Ergowave
Seatpost Eightpins integrated

Liteville MK15 review

Liteville MK15 review
Syntace hubs use RockShox's oversized flange system to boost lateral stiffness.. It works.






Test Bike Setup

Beginning with air pressure in the tires (24psi rear and 22psi front), I ended up with 72psi in the Lyrik fork, which indicated about 20-percent sag. I found the best ride using the Charger damper's low-speed compression dialed four clicks in from open and the rebound dial set nine clicks out from full slow. I checked my shock pressure relying upon Liteville's DynaLevel sag meter, I pressurized the shock to line up the dots, which resulted in 30 percent sag, which felt too soft in the parking lot test, but proved best on the trail.

I'm not a huge fan of Syntace's Vector handlebar bend, but I decided to leave the bar in place and give it another shot. The width was 780 millimeters, ten millimeters wider than I like, but paired with the 40-millimeter stem, it seemed to work well.

If you haven't used the Eightpins integrated post yet, you're missing a treat. To set the saddle at your maximum pedaling height, compress the post to your preferred height, twist to unlock the under-saddle dial, then twist the dial back to "lock." I ended up with 165 millimeters of useable drop, which is 15 more than I usually get on any other medium sized bike using a clamp-on dropper post.

Trailside photo shoot of Mavic wheels turns into an easter egg hunt for pawls and springs when the freehub pops off unexpectedly.
RC
Location: San Diego, California, USA
Age: 66
Height: 5'7" / 180cm
Inseam: 32" / 84cm
Weight: 157 lbs / 72.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Status: Semi retired

Test conditions ran the gamut of a rare wet fall and winter in Southern California, to the treacherously dry, rutted and slippery terrain that we are more used to riding year round.

Liteville MK15 review


Climbing

Those who have ridden any number of well designed Horst-Link suspended bikes will recognize the 301's feel at the pedals. Unlike the sharp, instant acceleration you expect riding a trail bikes like the Pivot Switchblade or an Ibis Ripmo, the 301 responds with a slightly softer push of acceleration that at first, and feels a bit sluggish by comparison. Don't be fooled, however, because more often than not, you'll be motoring uphill a gear higher than you imagined. The Liteville gets at it when you need to hammer up a pitch out of the saddle too. Pedaling efficiency is there in spades, but it never feels sharp nor inspiring.

You'll learn to appreciated that touch of softness when things get rough. The rear suspension tracks very well and it's not all in the bike's kinematics. Those shock-pivot needle bearings help maintain grip and keep the 301's tail end rolling up and over roots, rocks and other trail chatter that might impede the progress of lesser suspensions. Up front, the new steering geometry keeps the wheel from hunting, which also saves a little energy. Check your Strava times after attacking technical climbs, or simply enduring long sections of choppy, no-flow terrain and you might be surprised.

I'm a fan of the 75-degree seat angle too. It's steep enough to eliminate the saggy butt feel old-school bikes have while climbing and, unlike the steeper angled bikes I have ridden, I felt a little lower and better balanced aboard the 301 while cornering through sections that didn't warrant dropping the saddle.

Liteville MK15 review


Descending

Liteville bills this version of the 301 as an enduro bike, and on pedally courses with predominantly natural terrain this machine could be competitive. True enduro racing designs, however, have crossed the line of demarcation between a versatile trail bike and a downhill-specific racing platform. To keep a Santa Cruz Megatower fed requires large helpings of steepness, spiced with technical features. Remove that terrain from the equation and it can be a boring ride. The new 301 has the numbers and suspension travel to handle the amplitude of difficult descents, but it stops at the line.

Cornering: There's a lot of support in the rear suspension - much more than its predecessor - and its slacker steering angle has the same effect up front. The RockShox Lyrik fork's minimal offset blends perfectly with the 301's new steering geometry and, thanks to that firmer feel underfoot, it carries a lot of speed through the apex. Overcook an entry and the 301 slides with confidence until it finds grip, then continues on its merry way. It's something you don't think about, it just happens organically, which proves useful when attacking sandy bends or if the trail tightens up unexpectedly.

Technical terrain: The Liteville is happiest blazing natural terrain - narrower, rougher and less predictable trails that require agility and confidence from both rider and bike. The handling is calm enough to free your senses from what's going on directly below your wheels, so you can concentrate upon the trail features ahead. Spontaneity, like gapping rock gardens, doubling up natural features and committing to steep drops is encouraged by its can-do calmness. The fore/aft balance of the longer chassis bike is easy on the arms for those moments when you need to snatch the front wheel up and out of trouble, and braking dive (which was a minor issue with the previous 301) is virtually non existent aboard the MK15.

However satisfying as 310's improved suspension and geometry may be on fast-paced technical trails, it can't convey the omnipotence that purpose-built enduro bikes like the aforementioned Megatower are famous for.
Liteville MK15 review
bigquotesThe Liteville is happiest blazing natural terrain - narrower, rougher and less predictable trails that require agility and confidence from both rider and bike.

Skilled bike handlers could smash out double black bike park laps aboard the new 301 Enduro, while above average skills would suffice to replicate similar feats aboard the Megatower. That assessment came from pictured test rider Harold Preston, a familiar face in previous PB reviews, who stepped off of his Mega' to ride the 301 MK15. I agree. In exchange for its lightweight feel, more efficient pedaling and wider versatility, the MK15 requires more attention and skill to play in the enduro sandbox.

Liteville MK15 review


Instead, I would categorize Liteville's 301 MK15 Enduro as an exceptional long-travel trail bike. It's super stable ride height and firm pedaling kinematics mask its 160 millimeters of suspension travel until it's called upon - which makes a defendable argument against the "downcountry" trend. I mean, once you add wide tires, a decent shock and powerful brakes to a short-travel bike, it will probably weigh and pedal the same as the Liteville, so why not have the extra travel and capability in the bank when you need it? I was convinced after launching a step-down on a familiar trail only to discover diggers had built a transition where there once was none. I attribute my nose case survival to the 160mm Lyrik fork.

How does it compare?

Liteville MK15 review
Liteville 301 MK15 Enduro

Santa Cruz Megatower review
Santa Cruz Megatower

On paper, these two superbikes seem like an even comparison. They're both billed as enduro racers, Both have similar angles and travel, with 160-millimeters in the back. Each design comes in a myriad of size options and sprouts a busload of micro-engineered features.
Santa Cruz's Megatower features full carbon chassis. The Liteville is aluminum, tip to tip, but the weight of the 301 Enduro is more than a pound less. Liteville's in-line RockShox Deluxe Select+ damper falls short of the Santa Cruz, which features a more adjustable reservoir-type coil or air-sprung shock. (Liteville offers the Super Deluxe Select+ as an option.) Both suspension designs deliver a sturdy platform, but the 301 handily outperforms the Megatower in the pedaling and climbing department, while the Mega's kinematics favor big-hit plushness at the expense of a comparatively lackluster pedaling feel.

Both offer five sizes. Santa Cruz offers 29-inch wheels across the range and uses reversible chips which allow customers to fine tune the geometry and chainstay lengths to suit their physiques.
Santa Cruz Megatower review
Liteville's linkage directs suspension loads to key areas at the top of the frame. Santa Cruz does the same, only at the bottom, where the moving bits are showered with dirt. The 301's option stays cleaner.
Liteville customizes each frame size with suitable chainstay lengths, kinematics and angles and allows customers to buy up or down to match their body types. If you understand kinematics and like to fiddle with your bike, Santa Cruz's strategy may be best. But, I like Liteville's sizing option. All you need to do is get your reach right and their proportional geometry assures that you will be balanced over the bike and it will perform correctly.

In the speed department, the Megatower steamrolls the 301 Enduro. Pinkbike's reviewers agree that the Santa Cruz has no upper limit beyond the rider's courage. The Liteville can't make that claim, but it wins when the question turns to: "Which bike would you choose as an every-day rider?" The Megatower is happiest when it's going fast... really fast. And the only places where you'll never run out of downhill are drug addiction and hell. That limits the fun factor to lift-assist or the rare places where climbing trails are merciful and steep gravity trails are plentiful. The 301 MK15, however, can show you a good time on just about any trail and still hit the big stuff when the opportunity arises.

The takeaway from this matchup is: as wonderful as each of these machines are, both leave us hungry for just a little more. Wouldn't it be great if the Megatower was a couple of pounds lighter and pedaled well enough to enjoy natural trails that were "just" technically challenging? Wouldn't it be great if the 301 MK15 Enduro was more trustworthy at mach speeds? There are people working at both marquees who could make that happen.

Liteville MK15 review
Syntace chainguide.
Liteville MK15 review
Eightpins integrated dropper post.

Technical Report

Integrated seatpost: I wish every bike in my stable had one of these. The Eightpins mechanism is ultra reliable, rigid and friction free. If you want the most drop (up to 223mm) for the least hassle, this is the one. It's action is unmatched when it's desirable to drop the saddle part way for pedally descents.

Syntace chainguide: Not a fan of this one. Before there were derailleur clutches and narrow-wide chainrings, Syntace's integrated guide was a great solution, but now it's rarely called upon and mostly makes noise. The one benefit I discovered was that if I shortened the chain to adapt to 27.5-inch wheels with the guide on the chain length was perfect for 29-inch wheels with the guide removed.


Liteville MK15 review
RockShox Lyrik Select+ fork, Syntace C33i Evo6 wheels
Liteville MK15 review
Derailleur guard works well. Bang through boulders without a care.

Syntace C33i Evo6 wheels: I destroyed two rear tires in the rocks, mounted to Syntace's 33mm inner-width carbon wheels without denting or cracking them. Still running straight too. I am also sold on the Evo6 concept - offsetting the rear axle six millimeters to center both the chain line and rear spoke flanges.

Mullet option: Liteville sent a 27.5" rear wheel for me to try. The difference was measurable - consistently, two seconds faster on a descent I often use for reviews. The advantage depends upon how many turns there are and how tightly they are spaced. When I factored in the entire ride, however, times were almost always shorter with the 29-inch wheel in the back, especially so in technical terrain. If your diet is heavy on flow trail, I'd suggest the mixed option. Otherwise, it corners nicely enough as a 29er and the ride is a little smoother.

Internal cable routing: This is the third Liteville I've reviewed and the only one to exhibit this. Landing to flat or smacking boulders at speed made an awful sound that gave the impression that something was falling apart. The source was eventually traced to internally routed cables flapping inside the thin-walled downtube. Foam rubber stuffed through the downtube hatch solved the issue.

Rear axle wrench: Syntace's Allen/Torx wrench snaps into the axle - much better is that it fits every piece of hardware on the frame, even the stem and water bottle bolts, and all of the bike's SRAM components.


Liteville MK15 review

Pros

+ Capable 160mm bike you can ride almost anywhere
+ Very efficient and lightweight for this class
Cons

- Enduro bike that won't win many EWS races
- Expensive, minimalist, German engineering may not impress your friends



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesWhat is the moral of this story? The industry has figured out the fundamentals. Soon, the focus of a new bike purchase will gravitate to finding the best match between riding style and machine. A dazzling descender may be the perfect choice for a rider who lives in Finale Ligure or Whistler, but that's not most of us. Unless you plan on racing, a bike like the Santa Cruz Megatower eliminates almost every reason to own a dual-crown downhill bike. Liteville's 301 Enduro erases the reasons for most of us to own a Megatower - and it'll make you question why you'd want a short-travel mountain bike as well.

Value will weigh more heavily in our purchases. Bike designs have stabilized, so we'll be keeping them longer. Once you've made the right choice, you're going to want it to be hassle free for a long time. Liteville's 301 MK15 Enduro shows us that getting it right is only the first step. The journey is then perfecting it. Therein lies the larger portion of the value equation. Recall the products you value most and it's likely that they are the ones you reach for most often, have steadfastly performed and have withstood the test of time.

I still have that first Liteville 301 MK10 we reviewed eight years ago. It's been my primary ride, a test-product mule, a loaner bike, and now I ride it occasionally as a reminder that I was an idiot to preach that 26-inch wheels were the better option for a mountain bike. Jokes aside, that Liteville still rides like new - no creaks, no wiggly pivots. It's a small marvel, and I have no doubt that the Mark 15 that is in my stable today will be busting out laps somewhere in the mountains long after I'm subjugated to driving around the supermarket in an electric mobility cart. 
RC








181 Comments

  • 180 1
 66 years old and still riding bikes, hell yeah!
  • 143 0
 Welcome back RC. Good to have you back.
  • 23 2
 and still comparing every bike to a Santa Cruz. For 20 years most of his reviews did. In MBA it was the Heckler, now its the Megatower
  • 28 0
 RC is back?!?!

I could read his reviews all day. As many of you it reminds me mba from the 90’s.

Welcome back RC - hope to see more from you in the future.
  • 23 0
 Guess who’s back
Back again
RC’s back
Tell a friend
  • 11 0
 My buddy Dennis is 76 and still charges hard www.pinkbike.com/photo/18058763
  • 3 0
 Not just riding bikes... shredding! Inspiring for sure
  • 12 0
 @meathooker: He's been saving up some good lines - "And the only places where you'll never run out of downhill are drug addiction and hell." YES.
  • 4 0
 RC not just riding... But shredding !!!
  • 1 0
 Imagine wanting a Liteville but not wanting a dropper post.
  • 1 0
 @60ndown: isn't there a video of that dude stuck in some serious mud going around now? Some older guy got into some crazy mud hole and he's rolling around trying to get out.
  • 1 0
 @sb666: that's not him in the pics....
  • 1 0
 @streetkvnt-kvlt: you can mount normal seatposts and droppers to (34.9 mm diameter or 31.6/30.9 with shim).
  • 1 0
 @MattyBoyR6:

That ‘old guy’ is Carl Fogarty.
  • 1 0
 @GregorFuk: the motorcycle racer? Noooooo. I'm just going to refuse to believe that. Nooo, really? Guess he was a better road racer than dirt.
  • 1 0
 @MattyBoyR6: The one and the same. Note the Ducati ebike.
  • 73 2
 I’m just here for the ball chopping and neuter comments. Show me what you got.
  • 10 23
flag baca262 (Aug 31, 2020 at 1:00) (Below Threshold)
 i wanted to say the same thing, wtf are they smoking in liteville? designing for looks i can understand but this is insane.
  • 89 0
 Unless you ride naked and habitually drape your sagging ballsack over the toptube I think you'll be fine.
  • 2 2
 @Trailsoup: there was a noob once, he missed the seat and landed with his jewels between the wheel and seatstays. he was dressed. had the luck that it was a crappy xc bike so it had qr dropouts.

stitches down there!
  • 43 0
 Considering the number of questions, why doesn't anyone do the experiment. Levy seems to be into "bro science" as he calls it. So yeah, who cares about pedaling efficiency if your genitals are at stake? I'd recommend the PB editors attach a dummy dick to their lycra and check the damage after a test ride. Start long and gradually make it shorter until you've reached a length that proves to be reasonably safe. Only then draw conclusions. Pro tip, don't start tooo long to avoid getting stuck in other moving components which may affect the test results. Also, attach the dummy with the Liteville rear mech breaker bolt. You need a release mechanism in case of a successful test.
  • 5 1
 I used to own one some 7 years ago. The number of ball chopping questions is a reason to not ride the bike in itself. (Altough no person EVER managed to achieve it).
I didn't like how the bike rides as well, but still.
And despite it's such a light bike, it was one of the most troublefree rigs I ever had.
  • 8 0
 we really need a video of the suspension movement
  • 2 0
 @gtill9000: Including rider? It takes proper rider error to be low in front of the saddle when the rear suspension bottoms out, I'd say. So far, I've only heard Taj mention a case of (him) getting stuck between rear wheel and seat tube. Which to me makes much more sense than getting caught in front of the saddle. That said, I can imagine having my knee too close to the top tube in a corner so when the suspension compresses, it might catch a strap of the kneepad. Not sure if that is possible, I never look in that direction under such conditions Wink .

Either way, the top tube does look high for me. Some other bikes have tall seatposts too, but the top tube could still be dropped a good bit. This seattube is 2.5" taller than I have on my hardtail (for my size) and it appears like the top tube would be raised a similar amount. I think it would definitely bother me, which is a bummer as for the rest the bike does look cool. They probably need these long seattubes because, unlike conventional dropper posts, a customer can't just slide the complete assembly up in case of a longer rider. And a low top tube with such steep seatstays would probably not look cool anyway.

So yeah, it may not even be that much the linkage I'd be worried about. But the whole concept of their dropper combined with the suspension linkage dictates a fairly high top tube, which takes the fun out of cornering the bike.
  • 3 1
 @Hill-Seeker: I don’t need a man-scaper
  • 9 0
 I usually have to subscribe to niche websites and search a very particularly worded query to get the same types of cock and ball torture porn that this bike makes as a side effect. I don't know if I'd be able to concentrate knowing what was going on at the shock linkage, or whether I'd put a gopro on just the link region and become a content maker for other degenerates like me.
  • 5 1
 Nutcracker 3.0
  • 1 0
 @vinay: That was funny!!
  • 1 0
 Ive had it almost happen. Its a good reminder to keep your weight forward.
  • 1 0
 @madmon: seems people think you're only kidding
  • 2 0
 @Trailsoup: Rockshox has the new Coxblox suspension. They will be fine.
  • 1 0
 @gtill9000: It seems like it attacks your balls at full compresion!
  • 1 0
 Catch that too tube and you’ll be two stone “lite-r”
  • 51 0
 I want to see the pic of the seat lowered at its max and the rear bottoming out to check the guillotine's clearance
  • 52 8
 I appreciate the engineering that went into the frame details but I can’t get over the ugly looks and the stigma of Litevilles only being ridden by old german dudes with clip-on full face helmets and sunglasses
  • 9 2
 You forgot that no one is fast on them and that most of them we see on lame hiking trails.
  • 18 1
 Quite simply the really cool quick young ambitious fun shredders ride the cheaper decent mass production stuff they can actually afford. The expensive stuff you can only afford once you're past your prime. Doesn't go for Liteville only.
  • 19 1
 @vinay: mostly true, but even then Liteville doesn't have a huge appeal to a lot of riders. The people I see riding them mostly look like the nerds from the mtb-news.de forum that drill holes in shimano brake valves, use Continental tires and get mad when someone doesn't use a calibrated scale to weigh his bike parts, aka the typical german internet engineer. Everyone else who can afford expensive bikes is on stuff like Santas or Spesh Enduros.
  • 13 1
 "clip-on full face helmets and sunglasses" loved it!
Aren't you forgetting about huge backpacks as well tho?
  • 14 0
 @Arierep: i recently saw someone on a liteville with a bottle in the frame, a second one strapped to the top tube via fidlock and a backpack with hydration bladder on the back. Gotta stay hydrated on the hometrails.
  • 37 0
 Isn't the fashion police a bit strict here? Some don't like goggles over half shell helmets, some are picky about "mismatching" components, there is always something. I've been wearing baggy clothing ever since the nineties and have seen the trend cycle a couple of times since then. Not even sure what it is now Wink . If people on Liteville bikes structurally would misbehave on their rides (overtaking moves, bad braking habits etc) we should indeed call the company and request corrective actions. But whatever their customers wear, how much water they carry on their rides, I couldn't care less. I actually have more appreciation for people who don't even try to fit in than those try to in a way that doesn't suit them.
  • 22 1
 @Upduro: They are pretty popular with the alpine bike-hikers, though. The kind of hardcore mountaineers who carry their bikes through snowfields to the summit and then ride down stuff most others wouldn't dare walking.
  • 10 0
 German MTB stereotypes are wild bro...
  • 6 0
 @Ttimer: This ! I do a fair amount of bike mountaineering, and this is a frame I‘m currently interested in purchasing. The higher bottom bracket does help a lot on low speed steps and drops.
  • 2 0
 Hey, that would be me then! No seriously, I owned a MK7 once and the suspension link looks super ugly on a XXL. That monstrous seat tower on the bigger frames, never ever again!
  • 3 0
 @vinay: eh, I'm just taking the piss a bit, no bad intentions. Liteville just seems a bit of a polarizing brand whose riders often fit square in a certain category that I feel is more prevalent in germany than elsewhere.
  • 4 0
 You forgot white Lycra Pantz and hard shell Pads
  • 2 0
 @roma258: Right?? I've never seen one while out riding in the USA. Show up with a Liteville here, people would blow their minds, German stereotypes notwithstanding.
  • 3 0
 @Upduro: Alright, get that. I live in The Netherlands and can't link any stereotypes to Liteville riders. I've got one neighbour who has a 301 and in the nearly five years I live here and know him well, I've just never managed to join him on a ride. He's cool, he's just busy. Being a doctor, he's probably even more busy now. There is some fairly lightweight stuff on the bike (Tune, Magura Marta etc) yet at the same time it isn't the latest fancy stuff. He's still rocking 26" wheels, he actually got a new 26" Syntace wheelset recently. I don't think he suits the German prototype.

It is funny actually, how the "very German" stereotype only applies to certain brands. Obviously not to "cool" mass production brands "YT, Canyon etc" but it doesn't seem to apply to all high end brands either (Raaw, Trickstuff, Nicolai). All brands with a lot of attention to detail. I'd almost put Raaw in the same category as Liteville (even though Liteville obviously has a longer history hence a bigger portfolio of little details).
  • 4 0
 @Upduro: never seen a more accurate description of the mtb-news.de forum Big Grin
well done sir!
  • 2 0
 @Upduro: what does drilling holes in brake valves supposedly do? I'm legit neugierig.
  • 5 0
 @Rodeodave: someone hypothesized that the wandering bite point on shimano brakes comes from one of the brake fluid holes being too small so the fluid can't flow back fast enough. He then assumed that if you drilled out the hole to make it larger and used an oil with a lower viscosity (the latter of which others have done before) you could get rid of the wandering brake point. I didn't follow the thread any further so no idea if it actually worked lol
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: hahaha you pretty much just described every old dude e-MTB'er in New Zealand.
  • 1 0
 @Upduro: Neues Wort gelernt, Schnüffelbohrung, lol
  • 52 8
 This looks so 2010.
  • 26 0
 "Get in the ball choppa..."
  • 3 0
 Underrated comment.
  • 20 1
 I only know a couple of riders who own Liteville bikes. But what the owners have in common, is that they absolutely swear by Liteville and refuse to buy anything else.

Liteville (Syntace) is also an industry leader when it comes to material science and aluminium construction. They somehow manage to build lighter, stiffer and stronger frames out of aluminium than what the competition does while using carbon.
  • 1 0
 Where are the frames welded?
  • 4 0
 @twozerosix: in Taiwan at a higher end facility.
I’ve ridden this bike before, as a mullet bike. I loved everything about it (240mm dropper post travel in the XL which was perfect for me). The bike handled great, etc. But I just don’t think it’s very good looking. And for that price that’s a big deal. But man, it pedaled well! I shocked myself with how much vertical uphold I rode vs my own bike...
  • 1 1
 I also had Syntace/ Liteville high on my list for quality parts....but after experience with 601 Mk4 complete bike I don't trust them anymore.....
In my experience their W33i wheels are useless for enduro and parks....also their ratchet mechanism fails (they have like 5th version of it now...).

They stand behind their products (give you new parts and so on...) but that is sometimes very slow process and countless mails and sometimes you have to call them by phone.
  • 14 0
 great read RC! These are cool bikes...but have you ever landed with your feet blown off and your private area on the toptube...would hate to have that happen on this. Also repaired one of these and they seem a bit flexy...but that was the mk13. the 8pins looks nice, although those x12 hangers are worthless. rather have it bend than break. but thats just my preference. My old norco aurum and sight had the x12 system and wasnt too fond
  • 3 0
 On my Sight I broke three rear mechs and only one of the bolts... It's a great idea in theory though.
  • 1 0
 @housem8d : "rather have it bend than break" --- why?
  • 6 0
 @FloImSchnee: because if it break your drivetrain has more chances of going into your wheel, also if its just bent you can usually finish the ride/ race
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: Understood.

On the other hand, if my hanger wasn't that sturdy, my derailleur probably wouldn't have looked like this after hitting a stone in a race... Wink
fstatic1.mtb-news.de/v3/23/2384/2384689-4qzeebd5pajc-img_4644_resize-original.jpg
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: either way, something is getting broken Frown ( easier to replace a derailleur. Maybe slx this time ;p
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: well, that's the great thing about Liteville's solution though: there already is a spare screw available. See pictures above.

And cheap to replace, other than those stupidly expensive 20-35 Euro hangers.
  • 1 0
 @korev: I had 601 Mk1, Mk3 and Mk4.....they are great bikes but on Mk3 my hanger screw break and also seatstay near bolt (and they didn't have any spare 601 Mk3 XL seatstays....).

Liteville new frames (301 Mk14, Mk15, 601 Mk4) are not build as good as in the past - they have serious quality control problems (if you just look at the bike at home they are still perfect, but for serious riding they need to solve some things....).
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: when I broke the bolt on my Norco I just untangled the chain and replaced the bolt with the spare one in the frame
  • 17 0
 5ft 7 doe snot equal 180cm...
  • 1 0
 The other 2 conversions are wrong too. Not by a lot, but still.
  • 5 0
 Perhaps he used to measure 180cm... But now measures 170cm... We all shrink as we get older after all Wink
  • 1 0
 @juanny: I’m shrinking as I’m getting older but still wanting a longer reach!
  • 15 1
 Great review! And thanks for the phrase: "And the only places where you'll never run out of downhill are drug addiction and hell." :-)
  • 15 1
 Does it come with a pair of kevlar underpants?
  • 2 0
 No just Warnug nut cracker.
  • 14 6
 Guys.... i have no idea how you come to the conclusion that something "down there" can get into the linkage. Not even if you ride nakid, guys.
I ride a 301 as my main sled since ages. And my bits are still complete and have never been in any peril.
  • 5 0
 Not even pants or big thighs?
  • 41 2
 Keepiru, why is your voice so high?
  • 5 3
 I dunno, I knew a guy who lost a teste and part of his dick in a bike crash, another guy who lost a ball, and plenty of dudes who have had "close calls" myself included. It has nothing to do with linkage, but acting like your gens aren't in constant peril is naive. I'm weary of all linkage and bottle cages and couldn't comfortably ride a bike with either on the top tube.
  • 17 0
 @RonSauce: Hell, you run with a wild crew!
  • 7 0
 @PB-J: haha, that anecdote does make it seem that way. I've spent alot of time in sports, most injuries you get amnesia about but you never forget the dude who caught his junk in his chainring.
  • 12 0
 RC is back!
  • 7 0
 It's a bit like Norco and Liteville came at the trail bike dimensions question from totally different directions - Norco ask how little travel can you have and Liteville ask how much. I'd like to see a comparison between this and the Optic, as I reckon that would make far more sense than vs the Megatower.
  • 9 2
 "The 301's Horst-Link four-bar rear suspension may have fallen out of favor ten years ago".... it did not fall out of favour, Spaz's patent on this pushed many brands away from using it.
  • 4 0
 So glad to see RC's happy face again!

My wife has a M10 301, XS with 26 front, 24 back (!). She is extremely happy with it despite the very small wheels and gained more confidence in rough terrain than I have.

And I also have fun riding this as a dirt bike and when going crazy on the local flow trail. Which I only do after I adjusted sth on the bike for testing reasons. Of course. What did you think?
  • 4 0
 What has always worried me about Liteville designs is the danger it poses to your body at full compression to decompression. Like. What if you huck a massive drop and while you bottom out your weener blows out of your pants then for some reason takes a hard turn after said blow out and goes between the linkage and then the decompression chops your got dang weener clean off?! Idk about that shit.
  • 4 0
 Hey RC, we’ve missed you. Nice bike you have there. Could you please add a clip of huck to flat and one of squishy action. Thanks in advance.

Different topic, Where you at with ebikes? Just curious.
  • 1 0
 Check the Downtime podcast with RC. I think he nails it, for US trails at least.
  • 4 1
 I've been with my current employer for over 10 years now, and one particular very experience engineering colleague of ours retired at least 3 times (that I know of). We throw him a cake party when he retires, and he'll go travel around with his lovely wife for months, tired of all the traveling, and comes back to work to help us poor young inexperience engineers, retires again in a year, cake party, travels with lovely wife... and repeat. I think he's just doing it for the cake parties. Watch your cake budget Pinkbike!
  • 3 0
 Very interesting review RC. Great to see you’re still riding and writing.

This bike seems very similar to the Ibis HD3: a trail bike that can “enduro” versus an enduro bike that can “trail.”

The price may seem high, but it includes great component spec ( carbon wheels, Sq Labs seat, etc).


I am a fan of the bike.
  • 6 1
 I'd be really worried about snagging my shorts on the pivot arm on this bike.
  • 6 0
 but what if my schlooong gets stuck in that linkage?
  • 3 0
 yo shlooong ain't that looong...
  • 5 5
 @nsp234: i know but some retarded hillbillies asked that same question in the last liteville review some years ago. are you really that dumb in those parts of the woods? seems so when i see which carrot you have for president
  • 2 0
 I'm sure this sentiment:

"What happens when the mountain bike industry runs out of fireworks? Liteville’s 301 MK 15 Enduro may answer that question.

As the smoke clears from two decades of tumultuous innovation and contentious new standards, it becomes apparent that most of us are over it. Pick a bike, any bike, single-pivot, six-bar, faux-bar – they all pedal well, weigh about 30 pounds and descend wonderfully. Components have attained similar parity, and if there were a super geek waiting in the wings with a stupendous suspension patent or a truly revolutionary drivetrain, we would have heard about it by now."

... will hold up to the test of time as well as this thesis:

"The End of History and the Last Man (1992) is a book of political philosophy by American political scientist Francis Fukuyama which argues that with the ascendancy of Western liberal democracy—which occurred after the Cold War (1945–1991) and the dissolution of the Soviet Union (1991)—humanity has reached "not just ... the passing of a particular period of post-war history, but the end of history as such: That is, the end-point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.""
  • 3 0
 Seems like some velcro and some kydex/spandex/nylon would offer a simple piece of mind for the ball chopping scenario.

Looks like a killer bike. I'd love to put my leg over one.
  • 7 1
 RC is back!!! Big Grin
  • 6 1
 I still feel so dumb for selling my LV. Best bikes Ive ever ridden.
  • 5 0
 So glad to see RC again. I hope I can be like him when I'm 66.
  • 5 0
 Not a bike you would want to slip pedals & ride the top tube on
  • 5 1
 Another prime example of brand refining the same bike would be Orange Bikes
  • 5 0
 I love the attention to detail of Liteville bikes, rad.
  • 2 0
 Loved the Mk8 and then the Mk11 which I ran mullet (26/650b), soon to be on the Mk15, can’t wait! Only question is what wheel size to go for?! This bike gives you all the options... so good.
  • 1 0
 I enjoyed the mullet version.
  • 1 0
 RC, Welcome back, bro! Wer'e both 66! As to the Liteville, that close up of the bottom bracket details, and the welds too, it bugs me that there is a transverse line, like a CRACK, at the top of one weld at the bottom of the seat tube. 'Prolly just a dog hair or something, but my eyes just can't help but zero in on it. Say it ain't so! Somebody!
  • 1 0
 So much yes for this review. I would probably never buy a Liteville based on looks alone, but I respect the company so much. Why is it that seemingly no other brand really pushes high end aluminium? 16kg "trail bikes" and you still don't know if they hold up to the abuse after some years, but the marketing video was so sick bro just send it. Lv/syntace just keep on perfecting good concepts, while still being innovative (first mullet? Pedalable 180mm bike? Integrated dropper?). And as seen in the comments right here, consumers apparently prefer having flashy components, latest and greatest new standards and sick edits than just well engineered and manufactured bikes.
  • 1 0
 Yes a review from RC ! Six pound frame. Same or lighter than carbon fiber. Beautiful welds. Makes carbon look like a marketing gimmick. My bike uses needle bearings at the pivots. I don't know if it's better than cartridge bearings but they work . So this is a trail bike verses a Hi tower which sounds like a Enduro race bike. I'm guessing your going to feel less fatigue with this bike after a long ride. In theory with 27.5 wheels you could get this bike down to about 28 pounds. The only thing I don't like is the lack of choice for a seat post. Tools attached to bike I like.
  • 2 1
 Seems like a great bike. I miss a nimble host link bike after owning a Meta 29 for a while. Especially on those awkward moments when 29 inch wheel hit my ass on a tricky techy move. Would happily ride a mullet.
  • 2 0
 The rest of the bike is o How others should be, like that straight.down.tube , love it but.so 90's and more sloping.tube please
  • 2 0
 Correction: The EightPins dropper NGS2 which is fitted to the Mk15 offers up to 258mm drop!!!!!! (not 223mm as stated above, that was the older NGS1) ;-)
  • 3 0
 RC review thanks got me excited for a well written tech read, old school rules.
  • 3 0
 I came for a video showing how the suspension works through its cycle. Sadly, I'm leaving empty-handed...
  • 2 0
 The review is very good, the bike is more a trail bike with travel than a race bike but so fun to ride !
You can watch it in action :
www.pinkbike.com/video/505197
  • 2 0
 @TransitionBikeCompany also use the Syntace X12 axle and you can get the tool as an upgrade... I have and can't recommend it enough
  • 1 1
 Nothing new here. 1990's Horst link? Aluminum? One front ring? Chain keeper? Dropper post? Silly, expensive/finicky cassette? Is this a joke? These delusional bikes solve no issues. If you don't agree with these "testers" then you are just S___ outa luck and "out of it".... Same ol same ol : There is not ONE thing that makes this bike stand out from any other bike. What sets this bike apart from all others is a special wrench to remove the wheel....really??????
  • 1 0
 I can see it being good for trail maintenance. Sharpen the edges of that rocker, and you can lop off branches as you're descending, along with any other fleshy bits that happen to be close....
  • 2 0
 Good to see another review from RC! Oh and stacks of dimes, stacks of dimmmmmmmmmmeeezzz
  • 4 1
 With that shock place, litevilles always looks like xc bikes to me
  • 4 1
 So, it's not a park bike. Nice.
  • 3 0
 RC still driving the bus, taking everyone to school. Chapeu!
  • 1 2
 I'm pretty sure that asking a big whack Megatower to speed like the Lightville (and visa versa) is akin to asking a pizza to be as healthy as a salad, marijuana to be a productive work enhancer, or Donald Trump to be as electable but with a socialist agenda. What you actually need in your life is both.
  • 3 0
 Glad to have you back, RC!
  • 3 0
 This is a bike review. Thanks RC, we missed you.
  • 2 2
 wieso fliegt ihr die Kiste erst in die USA, im Schwarzwald wäre der Test wohl sinnlos. Das Rad ist für Schlamm und Dreck gebaut und nicht für bisschen Staub, wo auch immer du bist...
  • 1 0
 As a mountain biker
I'd like the space between my genitals and the bike to vary when I huck to flat
So that I can visit A&E to get my rear shock removed from my anus.
  • 1 1
 “treacherously dry,” WTF! Why is California so expensive? Ahhh. Also great to see a review from RC. Gotta get those free bikes somehow????
  • 1 0
 RC is 5'7 and has 84 inseam? And I thought I have long legs with 5'9 and 83 Smile
  • 3 1
 so who want's to get their nuts torn off?
  • 3 0
 The original mullet O.G!
  • 1 0
 It was a great ride till I slipped a pedal and rode the top tube through the rough.
  • 2 0
 Great review! Love that dropper and frankly that is a solid bike as well.
  • 2 0
 Curious how it compares to Ripmo.
  • 1 0
 RC reviews - full of detail and pizzaz! The bike reminds me so much of my 2004 Slayer. Minimalistic and no fuss!
  • 2 1
 suspension this crazy definitely needs a huck to flat or at least a no air squish video
  • 1 1
 1. I think I'll stick to my processed sugar, thanks.
2. That linkage looks like it could neuter you.
3. Calling this a "Super Bike" seems like misuse of the term.
  • 1 0
 Love RC's reviews. Also think Liteville's bikes are neat. Such attention to detail. I also own a Megatower & love it.
  • 1 1
 the suspension design is based on the rider being on the seat while going through its travel... most of the riders weight would be down at the bottom bracket, no?
  • 1 1
 Expensive. Quirky. Foreign engineering. Weird looking. Sounds like something Levy would like. If only it had 30mm less travel
  • 4 3
 Well made frame but sooo unsexy.
  • 1 0
 Aren't you supposed to be retired?
  • 1 0
 Good to see your by-line again RC!
  • 1 0
 aka "the ball-chopper" : )
  • 1 0
 First mistake.. needle bearings..
  • 1 0
 oh so much buthurt from made in china boutiques rider
  • 1 0
 Brilliantly written. Thanks RC
  • 1 0
 Such a hefty price tag for such an ugly bike
  • 1 1
 Great report RC, you don't look a day over 50.... #sixtyisthenewforty
  • 1 0
 Waiting for 601 MK5...
  • 1 0
 They said me on mail that new 601 will be earliest in 2022, because other project are more important at the moment for them.....probably e-bikes...
But in my experience 601 Mk4 is the only 601 that really needs some changes in construction (bearings....)....
  • 1 1
 Those pics are from my home trails! shhh...mostly not legal
  • 1 0
 Very cool
  • 1 1
 Quite fitting that a LV is reviewed by the oldest staff member.
  • 2 0
 Wisdom comes with age.
  • 2 3
 Something like a Jeffsy would be a better comparison here.
  • 2 3
 So almost 7k€ for an aluminum frame with an X01 setup (GX chain)?
  • 11 0
 And still lighter and stiffer than most of the carbon frames. So what do you want pay for?
  • 11 2
 If the aluminium frame is just as strong and lighter than carbon, whats the issue? 7k might not even get you X01 when shopping at the likes of Yeti, Specialized or Pivot.
  • 6 8
 @Ttimer: with a bit of shopping around, you can get the high-end carbon (turq, cc etc.) with a X01 kit from any of the boutique brands for around 6k€, usually with a lifetime warranty on the frame.

Carbon is also a lot easier to repair, should you need to.
  • 17 2
 @f00bar: You realize that comparing one bike at MSRP with others at "deal"-pricing is not helpful, right?
  • 3 0
 It’s lighter than many similar carbon bikes, less fragile, comes with a 10yr transferable warranty, heck, even the bearings last for many years in these bikes... what’s not to like?! Money well spent.
  • 3 1
 @Ttimer: I'm comparing *real* prices that I can buy these bikes for - nobody carries Liteville so they never drop much in price - but that's not my problem
  • 1 0
 @f00bar: Please show me someone with the balls to ride a gravity focused carbon bike that has been repaired.
  • 1 0
 @choppertank3e: carbon can be made actually *stronger* than before - google carbon repairs. I would certainly have zero issues trusting a professionally repaired carbon frame - the better companies will give you a 5 year warranty on the repair.
  • 6 6
 ugly as ....
  • 6 1
 Your ...?
  • 1 0
 That's
  • 1 2
 $6,339
  • 3 0
 If it's 6800 Euro wouldn't it be more like 8000USD?
  • 1 1
 @panchosdad: Unfortunately, the Euro is now lower than the USD.
  • 1 1
 @RayDolor: buddy it's been that was since 2002
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