Terrene Chunk 2.6" Tire - Review

Apr 29, 2018 at 22:49
by Richard Cunningham  
Turrene Chunk Tough 27.5 x 2.6 tire


Terrene (say "Tear-ane") is a rider-owned startup tire brand that promises no-nonsense marketing, realistic pricing and top-performing designs. The subject of this review is their latest addition, the very aggressive Chunk Tough, 27.5 x 2.6-inch knobby. The Chunk was released last year in a conventional 2.3-inch casing and its 2.6-inch monster brother comes into the market mid 2018.

Billed as a technical trail/enduro tire, the 2.6" Chunk is available in a "Light" or a "Tough" casing. Both casings are single-ply, but the Light casing is a more flexible,120 threads per inch, while the Tough casing is 60 TPI for better abrasion resistance. The major
Terrene Chunk Tough Details
• AM/enduro, front/rear
• Dual-compound tread compound (51a/62a)
• Directional tread pattern
• Available with Light 120 TPI or Tough 60 TPI reinforced casings
• Sizes: 27.5x2.3 / 27.5x2.6 / 27.5x3.0 / 29x2.3 / 29x2.6
• MSRP: $70 USD
• Contact: Terrene Tires
difference in the Tough version, however, is three panels of cut-resistant nylon fabric inserted in the sidewalls and under the tread, and rubber-cushioned bead seats.

Turrene Chunk Tough 27.5 x 2.6 tire

Turrene Chunk 27.5 x 2.6 tire
Turrene Chunk Tough 27.5 x 2.6 tire
Massive L-shaped edging blocks, paired with well defined rows of staggered center blocks are the defining attributes of today's most dominant DH and enduro tires.

All Terrene tires are tubeless ready and use dual-compound tread rubber - softer on the edging blocks for cornering bite, and with harder rubber on the crown tread for longer wear. Chunk tires use 51a durometer rubber on the edges and 62a in the center, which is a good balance between a super-grippy, short-lived 42a gravity racing tire and a longer wearing, all-purpose 60a single-compound option. Weight for the 2.3 is stated at 960 grams for the Tough and 830 for the Light versions, and our Tough 2.6 tires came in at 1140 grams each. Terrene keeps its pricing simple: $70 USD for either option in 27.5-inch.

Terrene Chunk tire


Features and Performance

Setup: Terrene's website says that its tires are no-problems, tubeless ready, but I had some difficulty getting the Chunk tires aired up to rims that I had successfully mounted Schwalbe tires to with zero issues (32mm Syntace and 28mm Diamondback rims). The 28-millimeter inner-width Diamondback Blanchard hoops fell to the left of Terrene's suggested 30 to 40-millimeter inner-width rim measurements. Typically, stiffer casings (like Terrene's Tough tires have) mount up more easily, because the beads naturally spread apart.

After a few unsuccessful attempts, using an air compressor and a number of tubeless hacks, I wiped the Stan's NoTubes Race fluid from my shop floor, hosed out the tires, and installed tubes to seat the beads and, hopefully, coax the tires into submission.

After gently unseating one side of the tire beads and removing the tubes, one tire inflated without a hitch. The second took a little squeezing before it inflated. The fight wasn't over, however, as small amounts of fluid continued to weep from the bead seats throughout the first ride, and I needed to top off the pressure occasionally for two or three days. Not off to a great start.
Terrene Chunk tire

Pressures and rolling resistance: Larger volume casings require lower pressure to achieve similar casing stiffness as smaller volume tires. I run 2.6-inch tires with 22psi in the rear and 20psi up front (1.52/1.38 BAR). Those pressures gave the Chunk tires a good deal of cornering support without stealing the suppleness and grip needed to climb or descend the steep granite faces of my home trails. At those pressures, the Chunks measured 2.49 inches (63.25mm) at their widest point - about the same as a 2.35-inch Schwalbe Magic Mary on similar rims (Note: Chunks and Marys measured the same width on 28 and 32mm IW rims).

I won't lie, after the tubeless-ready wrestling match, I was secretly hoping that the Chunk tires would roll slowly and corner without conviction so I could write a little revenge into my review. Truth be told, however, the big, blocky tread rolls quite nicely over hardpack and paved surfaces. A little worse than a Maxxis DHR and a little better than a Schwalbe Magic Mary. Like most gravity-oriented tires, if you get out of the saddle and lay into the pedals, the rear tread blocks grind audibly against hard surfaces and rolling resistance increases. On the trail, though, the tire rolls as well as the better knobbies in its class, and the tread pokes through the dust and detritus to find grip where many tires would be wasting a small portion of each pedal stroke on wheel spin. In short, outside of the fact that they weighed 1140 grams, Chunk tires were much more efficient - everywhere - than I anticipated.

Cornering and braking: Aside from a few water crossings and slippery wet boulders, I can't speak to the Chunk's wet-condition performance. It found sufficient grip in those fleeting moments to assure me that I needn't worry about it. Most of my riding took place on fast-paced dry trails over surfaces ranging from hard clay, to deep sand, bare rock and rolling gravel. Edgy tires like Schwalbe's Magic Mary and Maxxis Minions work well here, especially a Mary up front, because you often need a front tire that can grip well under hard braking on loose soil. Terrene's most aggressive trail tire puts on a good show in all those conditions, with an unexpectedly seamless transition to the edging blocks while leaning into a corner, and both the front and rear tires track a tight line without much drifting. Chunks will drift, but grudgingly so.

Chunk tires carry a lot of speed, but they don't accelerate with much authority out of the turns like lighter-weight hard-pack specialists with shorter crown treads do. And, that's okay, because it only takes one look to understand that these beasts are designed to dig and grip, not to dance and dodge their way down the trail. The benefit of their tall center blocks is also reaped when you need to squeeze the brakes hard down a sketchy drop. The heavy tread gets the job done in a hurry and those reinforced edging blocks can hang on an off-camber for what seems like eternity.

Overall impressions: Like a Schwalbe Magic Mary, Terrene's Chunk is more tire than most of us will need for fast-paced trail riding. The edging tread is its strength, but unless you are racing DH or enduro - or ride every trail as if you were, its aggressive crown tread and DH tire weight are unnecessary baggage.

I have about 50 miles on them in rocky terrain with no abrasion or cuts. So far, Chunk's durability rates well, and if I continue to be impressed by their cornering and braking grip, I'll probably keep one on the front, but switch the rear to a faster-rolling tire like the Schwalbe Rock Razor or Maxxis Aggressor. I'm hoping that the Chunks will be easier to mount on another brand of rim. If not, that's a concern.
Terrene Chunk tire
Bring a tube, because you may not be able to re-inflate your Chunks with a CO2 device if one goes flat and a bead unseats.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesTerrene's not quite 2.6-inch-wide Chunk fills the bill for riders who want to maximize cornering grip and braking in sketchy soil - especially as a front tire. It should be an affordable gravity option for mid-summer when bike park trails are beat up, because it can find grip when popular dry-condition tires begin searching. That said, you have to push the Chunk hard to get the most out of it, so its 1140-gram weight and aggressive tread may be excessive for the needs of many all-mountain riders.RC






149 Comments

  • + 145
 All I know about Terrene tires is they are the number one choice in my area of middle age cheapskate fat bikers. They want the absolute cheapest tire possible with the second priority being that it doesn’t cost a lot of money. Performance is probably nine or ten on on list of priorities.

They spend hours talking about where you can order bootleg gorilla tape online to save 45 cents, talk your ear off about how fat bikes are best year round and complain that the Novatec hub that came on their 700$ fat bike broke after putting 2300 miles on it.

Those guys think Terrene’s are awesome. Me, I’ll stick with a Maxxis.
  • + 50
 savage
  • + 50
 So, um, where do I pick up that Ape Tape?
  • + 11
 Year round fatbikers blow my mind. They just ride so bad and for most trails good tires offer lots of grip without ruining your life on climbs & jumps.
  • + 15
 I logged in only to reply to your comment. That was an epic rant, worthy of many upvotes. I hate listening to that sh*t too. I fatbike, and I am happy to store it for the 7 months of the year I can ride my trail bike. I also realize that mountain biking is a "pay to play" sport. Going cheap on things like tires only cheats the experience...
  • + 1
 I just lol’d at my desk, awesome.
  • + 15
 Had Maxxis offered a studded fatbike tire I'd have considered it. Ended up with the Terrene Wazia 4.6 studded "light" version. Weights were close to claimed and performance has been pretty great. They mounted easily. They were not very cheap.

I can appreciate that you prefaced your rant with an honest declaration that you don't know much about Terrene tires... I guess I'm here to say that the yahoos who've provided you with your education on the subject may have led you astray.

Smile
  • + 14
 Riding bikes isn't a singular sport. There are lots of different ways to get out and have fun. Maybe someday after a few more surgeries you'll be an old fat biker, too.
  • + 10
 @High-Life: Amen to that.

Don't think there's any reason to shame people if their motive was to save money... this is a sport that is increasingly difficult to enter due to the associated costs up front (and ongoing, when we're talking hundreds of dollars for a new pair of tires).

The only thing I can sort of relate to with the original post above is people complaining about bargain basement parts when they fail.
  • + 6
 So...you're saying that you consider yourself a bit of an assguy?
  • + 13
 um ok...

the tire reviewed is a trail tire for $70 - pretty much in line with Maxxis.

that's like saying you like maxxis better than kenda trail tires because kenda dominates cheap OEM commuter tires.

You're totally entitled to like Maxxis better than any other brand (and I'd agree I'd trust Maxxis more just based on track record)

.....but your rant literally makes no f*cking sense at all.
  • + 13
 That's a bummer you're portraying this company and product through your experience of cost cutting folks who sound like hacks. Just cause a handful of fat biking chuckle heads run Terrene doesn't mean you've got to discount them as a whole. It's cool to see a small start up in the industry trying to put out a competitive quality product. Hope you felt good about shitting on them
  • + 3
 @aharvey: ? epic rant yes but it made no sense at all.
still can't wrap my head around why @wibblywobbly got *any* upvotes.
$70 on a tire isn't going cheap by any means.

There's kooky wingnuts on new santa cruz bikes with bar ends and slicks and kooky wingnuts on old trail bikes with brand new fox shox but 10 year old rubber all over my town... does it mean I dislike santa cruz and fox because some riders make questionable decisions on how to use their product?

So confused on how yall judging the brand and I wouldn't even run that tire (because it's too heavy and aggro for my riding style, not because i'm the bike fashion police)
  • - 5
flag eric32-20 (May 1, 2018 at 18:38) (Below Threshold)
 You, sir have won the Interwebs today. (Everyone please power down your laptops and cell phones)
+5 : )
  • + 1
 @headshok2002: Trust me, you better have those Terrene than some Maxxis on your fatbike! Wink They're supposed to bring something new to te table but for now, none of their fatbike tires are good on the snow! lol

And I am a DHF fanboy! Wink
  • + 3
 @dontcoast: I can't speak to everyone's opinion, but I upvoted the original post not because of its Truth, but because it was entertaining. Getting a laugh is the ultimate currency in the Pinkbike comment section.
  • + 1
 @kjjohnson: agreed it was pretty funny!

just concerned some sharp mind might take it seriously.
  • + 2
 Are the bikes fat or the riders? Both?
  • + 1
 @mflynnwwc: Just Stirring that shitpot.. kuz this is comig from a guy running MAxxis Tires~~~ lmao
  • + 1
 All I know about Terrine is that I love bacon potato and cheese terrine. Oh wait you said Terrene...
  • + 38
 Richard - I think you need to check your information on this review, it is very incorrect. All of the specs that you list are from our 2.3 tire, not the 2.6 tire, including weight, rim widths, price, available sizes. I'm pretty disappointed something this factually erroneous made it to print, especially without even asking us for verification of these discrepancies.
  • + 10
 @RichardCunningham Someone doesn't appreciate your glowing review.
  • - 1
 @Terrene The photos sure show a 2.6" tire mounted up. So either you labeled your tire incorrectly or the inner width of the RC's wheel is throwing up your stated width.
  • + 31
 While I agree it is wrong of @RichardCunningham to not check the facts, lets get one thing straight... Richard has weighed your tough tire in a 27.5x2.6 to be 1140 grams. Your website states that the 27.5x3.0 tough version of this tire is 1040 grams and your 2.6 tough was weighed by RC at 1140 grams (N/A on your website). Are you telling me the 3.0 weighs less than the 2.6 because I find that hard to believe. If you want to talk about "erroneous", then how about you go put correct tire weights on you website or fix your manufacturing process instead of trying to pull the wool over customers' eyes.
  • + 5
 @Nathan6209: That would be the latter. Tire width is 2.6" on a 35mm rim. Recommended is 30-40mm.
  • + 1
 Do you actually represent the company? this profile was created today. Is this just a troll account posing as terrene?
  • + 4
 @terrenetires: i think RC gave the rec inside rim spec for your 2.3 in his write up, but that was his error. I think he got the rest right (weighed a 2.6 tough; mounted a 2.6 tough on 28mm inner width; rode that tire).
  • + 4
 @mikefromdownthestreet: if you start typing @terrene you will see it is under Tim Krueger the "founder" of Terrene.
  • + 16
 @BEEner: Actually, yes, our 2.6 weighs more than our 3.0 primarily because we feel the intended use of the 2.6 is for more aggressive riding, so it has more rubber content (taller lug height) and more protection than the 3.0. Our issue with the review was that RC was comparing the actual weight of the 2.6 to the stated weight of the 2.3, making it look misleading.
  • + 3
 Looks like article has been corrected now "Weight for the 2.3 is stated at 960 grams for the Tough and 830 for the Light versions, and our Tough 2.6 tires came in at 1140 grams each."
  • + 4
 @Terrene: the 27.5x3 Chunk Tough holds up just fine in CO front range rocks and great in nw AR sharp rocks and roots.

I used a 27.5x2.8 McFly out back with great success. Not as grippy as a Chunk but faster, as intended.

I have moved on to Maxxis tires this time around on my plus hardtail only because I wanted to try something different. I highly enjoyed Terrene tires and recommend them to anyone who asks me about them.

It's a shame people feel the need to berate a tire brand or others about a tire choice. While I agree that more needs to be done about your specs and website, it's still usable.

At least you didn't name your tire Ass guy
  • + 3
 @cdnrocki: Which is all well and good, but it's still a review written after only using the tire 50 miles with the wrong wheel/tire information rolling around in the reviewer's head. If anything correcting it just gives it enough credibility to be even more misleading.
  • + 9
 @Nathan6209: Checked the width of the tire on 28, 32 and 40mm IW rims with the same results.
  • + 3
 @RichardCunningham: Just as I would have expected.
  • + 2
 @RichardCunningham: Here is someone going the extra step to verify measurements.
  • + 39
 realistic pricing ≠ $70 USD
  • + 4
 Exactly what I thought
  • + 7
 Proper DH tire yes, mid weight am tire not a chance
  • + 4
 @Powderface: Just like every other tire on the market today.

More competitors means more competition which should mean lower prices, but people are stupid so we all pay.
  • + 8
 And 1140g certainly ≠ 960g...
  • + 5
 You can order tires from the German bike sites, delivery included for less than that. It’s actually the cheapest option.
  • + 11
 When your tires retail for more than Specialized tires, you're not there yet.
  • + 2
 @powderturns: good hint. What site
  • + 7
 @yzedf: you nailed it. Butchers in the GRID casing are tires for a similar application, but I just bought one and paid $55USD. Better, lighter, tough and they cost less. Honestly, I don't know why more people don't ride them.
  • + 4
 @MTBrent: The review was giving the weight for the 2.3 tire not the tire in the 2.6" size.
  • + 4
 @aharvey: More people don't ride Butchers because they simply are not as good as a Minion
  • + 1
 @H3RESQ: I wonder what Loic thinks of them...
  • + 1
 @H3RESQ: minion dhr2 are the only decent version.
  • + 1
 @m1dg3t: more competitors at $70 means $80 are in the wings, and that we won't likely see a similar tire for $60 from them.

There is no incentive to make anything in MTB... easy on the wallet.
  • + 1
 @makripper: Loic doesn't pay for them...
  • + 1
 @jerryhazard: no but if he wanted, or Arron before him wanted, they could have had a better tire designed for them in 3 seconds.
  • + 19
 Installation shit show. If you can't get them on with a compressor and spend your next 3 rides returning latex to nature, there's a problem. Sure you did't use skimmed milk by accident?
  • + 7
 Split tube has never failed for me. A bit of rubber to rubber contact works wonders.
  • + 31
 @fartymarty: sure its less risky, but it just doesn’t feel the same......
  • + 2
 Ghetto tubeless is rock solid for me!
  • + 3
 Fwiw, I've used these tires and found the tubeless setup pretty normal/painless. If a compressor won't grab the bead, it might just take 30 seconds of massaging a bit more of the bead onto the bead-seat by hand. His experience is pretty common if you just throw a tire on a rim, and expect it to air up.
  • + 2
 @skylerd: I agree. Also used the Chunk (light add tough) and McFly tough. None of the tires gave me problems when mounted on i38, i45, or i50 rims widths.

They were all mounted by hand and with a standard bike pump. None of them took more than 30 sec to seat.

Now, his experience is real and it sucks. Some rims and tires are less compatible together than others, even if both are quality items. Just how it is sometimes.
  • + 15
 Ran the 29x2.3s tough version all last season and they worked great. Rode all over upper Midwest, as well as CO and WY with no issues. Mounted up with the compressor on the first try to flow s1rims. These are higher volume tires despite the review and were an awesome compliment to my carbon honzo although it is the largest tire you can fit on that frame. They wore well and cornering and braking traction was consistently there.
  • + 5
 I also ran the 29x2.3s all last year in CO, Moab and a little in the Midwest on my Rocky Mountain Element. They set up tubeless perfectly first try. I ran the light casing front and rear and even had a few days at Trestle and Telluride bike parks and was happy with the performance. I got another set this spring and they were a little harder to set up tubeless because of the dents in the rims from riding beyond the bikes intended purpose but once they were seated i haven't had any issues in the last 200 mi.
  • + 15
 you'll never tear me away from my minion DH-Fs!!!!
  • + 3
 me too. I rode over a big piece of shatterd glas today and nothing happend, I was so scared at that moment. dhf´s never dissapoint!
  • + 8
 @Dan278: I rode over a nail with Schwalbes, even without taking anti-anxiety meds!
  • + 3
 @PinkyScar: with or without knobs?
  • + 1
 @Dan278: The new Addix line is really ahead of the older compounds. Ive got over 125 miles on a pair in soft and ultra soft. Still have all the knobs. Before addix, I was not a fan, now though, much better.
  • + 9
 @RichardCunningham this review is a bit of a disaster... misquoting the tire weights... trying them on a rim that is outside their recommended range... only riding them in the dry...

Maybe scrap it and come back when you've got something more solid?
  • + 9
 fyi - do not read pb content to get complete and correct info, spelling or sentence structure. come to pb for the comments about incorrect info, spelling and sentence structure.
  • - 3
 @bikekrieg I wanted to compare them with similar width rims and similar tires on the same trails. The Chunks fit in with Magic Marys, worked fine on 28mm IW rims, and still weigh 1140g
  • + 4
 I have to agree. Given Richard’s knowledge and experience, I expect better. At a minimum testing them on rims that within the manufacture’s recommendation and aren’t known for being a pain to get mounted tubeless.
  • + 5
 Any chance of a Comparison with the lighter version.
I find a 800g+ tire tends to work and feel better for me especially if I add a huck norris and it weighs less overall. So any excuse not to go for a weapons grade dh casing is welcome.
  • + 0
 Agree - and I'll probably get downvoted for this but I've found a lighter tire with a tube sometimes rides better than a burlier tire tubeless, and I'd guess the weight is pretty comparable.
  • + 6
 @gtill9000: but you will be fixing flats on more occasions.
  • + 1
 @gtill9000: why not go same light tire tubeless? Feel?
  • + 5
 @gtill9000: Burly tires with burly tubes and burly air pressure FTW! I hate flats, but I love smashing through rock gardens so there's that.
  • + 1
 @jaydawg69 - that's true. @rexluthor - the lighter set up tubeless tires seem too flimsy. I have to run higher pressures (than the same tire with a tube) to keep them from rolling over in turns, which I hate. @Boardlife69 - you get an upvote from me.
  • + 1
 @gtill9000:
Rolling over in turns. How wide is your rim? For me it makes a huge difference. I used to have to run dh grade at high pressure for that and the usual pinch flats but don't on wider rims. I won't run any rim less than 27mm ever again. 30mm preferable
  • + 1
 @markg1150:

It happens even with wide rims. My Salsa Pony Rustler has 40mm wide rims. They were setup tubless with the stock 27.5 X 3.0 Nobby Nics; and I had problems rolling the rear over on itself unless I aired up to 30+ psi...35 worked best in bike park berms in my experience.

That rear Nobby Nic got retired last weekend in Bentonville thanks to a sharp rock in the sidewall. The Maxxis DHR-II that replaced it, has a much beefier sidewall; so I suspect I'll be able to back that down now.
  • + 2
 @mark1150 - I'm using 30mm internal width rims with 2.8 in the front and 2.6 in the back and have to run them at about 21/23 with tubes. Tubeless it needs to be more like 24/26, which is small difference but I often get funny looks when I say I have anything in the twenties. I have no idea how the 2 Mikes run 2.3s in the low 20s like they say they do. @SeaHag - The more bermy (and fast) the more pressure I need. But I've never needed 30+
  • + 0
 @gtill9000:

I'm kinda a special case. Not too many 275# riders take 6' drops, jump 20' table tops and attack downhills the way I try to. Razz

A friend of mine who also owns a Pony Rustler and weighs just 20 pounds less than I do, runs 10psi less than I do and claims he never has a problem...but he doesn't ride like I do.
  • + 7
 How can you review a tyre if they never got wet? Treads that chunky are surely for the wet?!
  • + 4
 50 miles is not a review of anything! I get that the tubeless experience sucked and that they are heavier than expected, but that doesn't mean you skimp on doing a real review. Unless 50 miles is what you do on all the stuff you ride...?
  • + 3
 Fifty miles is short for a tire review, so I included that info as a heads up. But, it's long enough to rate its performance and, in the rocks where I have been running them, enough to say, with surety, whether they will hold up to slashes and abrasion. If you shuttled 50 miles of DH trails, you'd have enough information to weigh in on your tires.
  • + 0
 @RichardCunningham: not unless I had ridden in hero dirt, blown out dusty, mixed wet and dry, and of course full on wet/rain. They have a lug pattern that looks good for my local spring conditions that ranges from damp to wet with lots of off camber roots and rocks. The conditions you described would be fine with a Butcher and Slaughter (DHF and SS) combo.
  • + 13
 I feel like I could get a very good sense of how a tire works in 5 x 10 mile rides. Or 2 x 25 mile rides. It's not like he called it a "long term review" or whatever.
  • + 7
 @RichardCunningham: rider-owned companies seem like a rare breed in MTB (unlike in skate, surf, snowboard industries where rider-owned is common). So it would be great to hear more about the people behind the company, rather than hear about a war of rulers and measuring tapes.
  • + 2
 @filmdrew: good luck. Anyone who is a small company that comes on here to defend their product gets ripped a new one,no matter what they say.
  • + 7
 That tubeless inflator attempt is never going to work! Too many flow restrictions for a fast enough hit to seat the beads.
  • + 16
 Seems more like a rookie attempt at tubeless set up than the tyres fault!
  • + 2
 @wilson12359: Exactly. Tubeless is considered old tech by now that ways on how to mount it easily should have been known already. Cant seat a tubeless tyre? how about reinstalling that tubeless tape so its flatter in the middle of the rim profile.
  • + 1
 @ugez: it sounds like the whole diameter is off, since it leaked at the bead also. When I encounter this, usually on rims that aren't tubeless to begin with: I add two laps of gorilla tape, to bring the diameter up. Then they fit snug and can be aired with a hand pump. Its extra weight, but worth it for reliability in my book.

@RC have you ever tried adding laps of tape when you have a super loose fit like this? Its benefits outweigh the weight you add...
  • + 3
 @takeiteasyridehard: The tire was a pretty tight fit on the rim, I'd say in spec with the average tubeless ready tires out there.
  • + 3
 Exactly...pull out the presta valve core and use a blow gun. I've had dozens of tires that wouldn't inflate with the core in there.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: well, that does suck ...I'm sure you tried no priests core, and everything else. That sounds like a bastard of a tire to seal up then. Reminiscent of old racing ralphs
  • + 4
 Hit the tire with some ether! If ether can seat a 40+ inch truck tire it''ll surely seat a hard to mount bike tire. Don't use a lot though or it'll blow the beads right over the rim.
  • + 5
 soak it in a rag and take a big whiff then you won't care about mounting your tire
  • + 4
 Anyone else think its ridiculous that you can get car tires for the same price as bike tires? Yes, I understand the performance difference, but still!
  • + 0
 Economies of scale. Weight concerns. Comparing high-end with budget. Etc.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: ....millions of car tires, thousands of bike tires, gotcha.
  • + 3
 Racecar tires are much more expensive than pedestrian tires. Race-bike tires are much more expensive than pedestrian bike tires.

Compare that $100 bargain car tire to a $15 bargain bike tire (CST, Duro, Kenda, etc), it's more appropriate than comparing a race-ready bike tire to a shitty no-name car tire.
  • + 1
 @PinkStatus: Yup. Here's those economies of scale for you www.worldometers.info/bicycles
  • + 1
 @m1dg3t: That's a bit disingenuous. How many of those millions are leisure/commuter bikes ridden daily across Shanghai, Amsterdam and Manila (99.99%), and how many are proper mountain bikes ridden on terrain that requires a decent tyre (very few)? I also mentioned erroneously comparing budget against high-end and ending up with a meaningless result. There also seems to be more competition in the auto industry. I was bewildered by the number of brands available when I bought car tyres last month. I ended up spending 320 euro on 4 non-premium but decent tyres (hmmm, you have to buy at least 2). And I'm sure I can buy a mtb tyre for 5 euro on ebay that will last me about 1000m descending on local trails (a couple of evening rides) or 6 months of school runs. Don't know why I feel the need to argue this.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: Your logic is flawed. Your rationale is irrational. You could apply that same thinking to automobiles. I'm not going to argue.

Fact is: Cyclists get reamed.
  • + 1
 What GTScoob said. Yes, you can buy shitty car tires for less than top of the line mountain bike tires. But, have you ever priced tires for race cars or motorcycles?
Buying just two tires that are track worthy on a street motorcycle on sale on discount websites can easily be $350/pair, as an example.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: and those track tires last maybe a weekend if lucky...
  • + 2
 @m1dg3t: Ok man, at least one of us is right and that's good enough for me.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: you know the price of a decent road tire for all weather and has pinch flat resistance? Go on the shwalbe website and do some research. Those people you all grouped together use those bikes like vehicles. They don't want shit tires that make them late for work and get fired
  • + 1
 @makripper: If you're suggesting that anything like a significant proportion of those millions of people in Asia (for e.g.) can afford relatively high-tech Schwalbe road tyres and will choose them over whatever's being sold at their local market or mass retail store for a tenth of the price, you need to look outside the "richest 1% in the world" bubble.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: wow you need to travel!! You don't know what you are on about. Good luck with life
  • + 1
 @makripper: yep, Asia is the one continent I missed (apart from a stopover in KL). I'm really keen to see some figures on tyre sales among commuters there cos this still seems like a speculation contest. Annual wage in the Philippines is $5k a year. How much is a high-end commuter tyre? Is this a common household investment across the Eastern hemisphere? To the point where profit margins can be as high as those of car tyres? To be honest this isn't an argument I'm prepared to die for, but I'll keep my jury out for now.
  • + 2
 @RichardCunningham just a wee tip, but with particularly stubborn tubeless inflation attempts, try hanging the tyres on a hot radiator for 10 minutes first to make them super soft and malleable. Also valve core removal helps, but I suspect you knew that one
  • + 5
 A 35mm would fall in the middle of the 30-40mm suggested rim width, not the 28mm rim used.
  • + 1
 Never heard of this brand. Still pricey. Thanks for the conversion bar and mm. Never knew there could be too much grip in a tire for not competing. I like to ride same tire inthe frint of my enduro and dh bikes. Try to have something familiar
  • + 4
 I hope these tires are not as aggressive as the assguy.... I sincerely hope
  • + 4
 This review would have been much more useful if you had attempted tubeless setup on a more well-known rim as well.
  • + 8
 I've been using that rim for a number of tires without any issues, so it's legit.
  • + 5
 CST BFT. $26USD. That is all I will say.
  • + 3
 And who makes Maxxis tires? Oh yeah, CST...
I put a set of Rock Hawks on my old Kona last year. Rode them in the PNW and in the hard pack in Bend. Work a treat. Jury is out as to what I'll put on my YT when the stock Maxxis wear out.

$70 is not competitive in pricing. When I read that, I was hopeful. Then I saw the price tag and it looks like any other overpriced tire out there right now. Fail.
  • + 0
 I've literally seen dozens of knobs ripped off of CST tires in only a few rides. They're a great option for a kid's Huffy, though!
  • + 1
 @ccollord: I don't know where you ride but I put two seasons on two sets (two different bikes) in the PNW and they looked fine. Basically the same as a wire bead 60a Minion from what I can tell.
  • + 1
 @RoboDuck:

Ride in high desert and rocky alpine conditions, my BFT 2.5s lasted a season. When they really started to wear, they very nearly fell apart. Also, they are/were only single ply - so not an apples to apples comparison to the Minions I like to run.

However, for the price - they were indeed worth it.
  • + 3
 Weight is stated at 960g but it came in at 1140? Holy moly, is that a typo??
  • + 7
 Yes,
2.3 = 960g
2.6 = 1140g
  • + 1
 @peterguns: Ahh I see the article is updated, thanks. Look at me paying attention. *pats self on back*
  • + 1
 What's realistic pricing? Seventy bucks for a tire? I think not. I'll stick to Specialized's GRID tires for reliability and high performance.
  • + 2
 70$??? Realistic???
Wtf?!
I prefer the classic minion or HR2 for 35€ in my country!
  • + 1
 While Maxxis tires are not my absolute favorite tires, they just seat so gosh darn well trailside that I don't run anything else.
  • + 2
 Terrene (say "Tear-ane")

Is that tear as in "I cried a tear" or as in "I will tear this paper"?

Important question...
  • + 1
 Actual word in the dictionary, pronounced like "Tureen"

Terrene
təˈrēn,ˈteˌrēn
adjective, archaic
: of or like earth; earthy.
: occurring on or inhabiting dry land.
: of the world; secular rather than spiritual.

en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/terrene
  • + 1
 50 miles is not long enough for a full review. But I do appreciate the honesty RC. Just ride them more before pushing something to press next time.
  • + 3
 ill get me some for bike park days.they look mean
  • + 1
 Curious on the bead setting. You have tape all over the rim trying to hold the tire in place. Did you try soapy water? That works very well.
  • + 2
 A Rider owned brand, no 26" option?
  • + 2
 26” tire??? Wait... No.
  • - 1
 I'm essentially an old and fat biker that could give a shit less about "attractive price points" for subpar gear and I'll stick with my tried and true Maxxis rotation - thank you.
  • + 1
 Looks like you've got a DB Release 3, me too! Any clearance issues with the 2.6 on the Pike or in the rear?
  • + 2
 Tire weights- the biggest lie in the bike biz
  • + 2
 Thanks for the free review
  • + 1
 I'd like to try a set because the only fires from them that I've seen had an incredibly stiff plastic like compound..
  • + 1
 Terrene....sounds like something to eat Big Grin
  • + 1
 I was excited until I saw the decimal point...
*sigh*
  • + 1
 Dhr 2's on 742 rims.....nuff said
  • + 1
 grid from specialized really are good , good enough to comment and mean it
  • + 2
 no 26" - no buy
  • - 3
 No 29 tires..??
  • + 1
 They make 29ers Planetx.co.uk have them in stock at £19.99, older versions though I think.
  • + 0
 They also make this in a 29 x 2.3 and a 29 x 2.6.
  • + 1
 @hypno-newt: I could only find the 29x2.3 on planet x. Hopefully the 29x2.6 will be back in stock as it is reasonably priced.
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