Thule Vital 3L Hydration Pack - Review

Apr 17, 2018 at 11:24
by Richard Cunningham  
Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L


Thule's Vital 3L hydration pack is a newcomer to the sport. Yeah, I know that packs are out and frame-mount water bottles are in, but it is doubtful that every rider has forgotten why mountain bikers abandoned bottles in favor of hydration packs so many years ago. If you use a hydration pack, or plan on purchasing one, Thule's Vital 3L is one of the best compact hydration packs I have used to date. It's designed to keep the weight low where the hips support the load. Its mesh Y-back design is hyper-ventilated, and its three roomy cargo compartments let you organize both small and bulky items in its stretchy belly. The topper for this pack may be its "Retrakt" magnetic strip that automatically docks the drink hose.
Vital 3LS Hydration Pack:

• Designed for one to three-hour rides
• Low center of gravity design
• Retrakt magnetic drink-hose retainer
• Three-liter storage capacity
• Massively ventilated mesh construction
• 1.7-liter hydration bladder
• Weight: 450 grams 90.99 pounds)
• Black or blue
• MSRP: $89.95 USD
• Contact: Thule

The Vital 3L's hydration bladder holds 1.7 liters (the equivalent of two jumbo-sized water bottles) and packs up to 3 liters of total storage. The outer is a water resistant, coated rip-stop fabric, and the bottom is heavyweight Cordura nylon. One external zipper gives access to three internal compartments: a full-length forward pocket, a mesh zip pocket, and the inner hydration bladder compartment, which is constructed to stretch, so you can stash a wind-breaker where it won't prevent you from easily accessing small items.

Like most packs, the Vital 3L's interior features a key-clip and a sleeve to secure a small air pump, but it doesn't go crazy with organizer pockets and elastic loops. It's got everything you need, and nothing you don't. MSRP is $89.95, including the bladder, and if you need more space and fluid capacity, Thule makes the Vital pack in larger, six or eight liter sizes.


Features and Performance

Hands-free hose return: One of the stand-out features of Thule's new pack is the "ReTrakt" magnetic strip - a sleeve that automatically guides the drink tube snugly against the shoulder strap. unlike the more common magnetic dock, which requires the rider to return the hose back to point, Thule's solution allows the user to abandon the hose and get back to business. It always returns and it never flops around.

Helmet-style hip belt: Texas-sized waist-belts with a large, central buckles are a necessity for hip-pack comfort, but for the most part, they function as under-wire belly-bras. Thule chose a narrow waist belt that buckles in the center. Helmet-like triangles at each side of the belt allow the waistband to be angled comfortably to suit different body types, and the belt is tensioned from the sides, which turned out to be handier than I expected. The result is that the belt sat comfortably in the same location as the waistband of my shorts, and eliminated any sense of constriction.
Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
The entire back-panel of the Vital 3L pack is elastic mesh fabric, so it conforms to your shape and ventilates well.

Lots of mesh: The entire back panel, including the wide hip-belt pockets, is made from an open mesh material. There is no barrier layer between the mesh and the contents of the pack, which seemed odd at first inspection, but proved to be wonderfully comfortable in action. As a plus, you can see the water level in the hydration bladder without removing it from the pack. The Y-back design keeps the pack and its bulk so low on the back that it feels more like a hip pack in operation, but without the excess tension on the waist-belt. Because most of the air flow occurs around the upper back, Thule's design feels much cooler - almost as if it isn't there.

Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
Large mesh pocket keeps smaller items visible.
Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
Contoured shoulder straps were a key comfort feature.

Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
Helmet-style waist-belt adjustment and wide hip pads.

Minimalist shoulder straps: Curved and padded shoulder straps leave the chest area unconfined and open to the wind. The shoulder straps have plastic sliders on them to keep excess webbing from flapping in the breeze, and the pack's sternum strap slots into one of three vertical adjustment loops.

Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
Hydrapack's high-flow bite valve is a selling point for the pack.
Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
The 1.7-liter bladder has an internal baffle to slim its profile.


Technical Report

The cut and fit of this pack are the best I've experienced on the trail. Loaded up with water and the basic essentials, it was easy to forget that I was wearing a pack of any sort. It stayed put while jumping and there was no sensation of bouncing or jostling while descending chunky lines. I normally like a number of organizing pockets inside my pack, but the compact size of the Vital 3L plays well with its single zip pocket. I'd like a separate pocket for my phone, but it works. Nothing seems to rattle around in there, so I'm okay with that.

Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L

Thule's choice of a Hydrapack bladder and drinking system tops off this forward-thinking pack design. Its easy-open, sliding seal and ample flowing bite-valve eliminate the fuss-factor that is endemic to some drinking systems. I am a fan of the Vital 3L's 1.7-liter capacity, but out of curiosity, I wonder why Thule chose a bladder that so closely matches the capacity of two large bottles (1.5 liters), when they could have earned serious bragging rites by bumping up to a two-liter bag?

Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
Thule's ReTrakt magnetic hose retainer and Hydrapack high-flow bite valve.
Thule Vital Hydration Pack 3L
The 1.7-liter bladder has an internal baffle to slim its profile.

Visually, Thule's Vital 3L pack compares to the Henty Hydration pack that I also reviewed this year, but looks can be deceiving. Both have well-ventilated mesh backs and comfortable shoulder straps, but the Henty is a high-volume, work-duty hip pack that is stabilized by shoulder straps, and designed for longer rides and heavier loads. Thule's 3L is a feather-weight pack, crafted to carry only the essentials that a rider may need for one to three-hour rides.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesJob one of a hydration pack is to encourage drinking and Thule's ultra-comfortable Vital 3L pack, with its high-flow bite valve and magnetic stowing system does just that. Drinking on the fly is intuitive, so you'll reach for it often and ride stronger. If you hate hydration packs, but need the extra storage space and utility of one, this may be the best alternative to bike-mount bottles and cargo bibs. If you are a fan of hydration packs, Thule's Vital 3L sets a new benchmark for comfort and wearability.RC








115 Comments

  • + 82
 Which side of gun control debate is Thule on? I need to know before I vote with my dollars.
  • + 105
 Gezus. Waki do you have some kind of PB alert and spring out of bed and hit the keyboard when it goes off?
  • - 30
flag fecalmaster (Apr 24, 2018 at 5:46) (Below Threshold)
 Hey nice looking douche bag you got there!
  • + 9
 I don't mind the guns but no water bottle mount?
  • + 25
 @Yahh: He's a bot now. An eTroll with comment assist.
  • + 8
 Exacty. Thats enough water, wheres the gun mount?
  • + 17
 @scary1: Pole Machine is so long you can fit AR-15 inside the front triangle.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: hahahaha.
  • + 3
 Guns are illegal where I'm from Frown . I usually use a longbow as handlebar and keep the arrows in my backpack. If a villain appears from the bushes, I put on my tights, a hat with a feather, take a striking pose. If he's not impressed, I place an apple on his head and shoot it. Still not impressed? I'll do verbal violence too. Yeah, you wouldn't have thought I can do that, but I can. "You very unfriendly person, if you don't step aside or I'll say a nasty word!" That'll teach them. My backpack manufacturer, owned by a publisher of dictionary, will be quick to declare that they don't endorse nasty words.

Don't worry, I'll usually behave (and not wear tights). But when I need to protect my family, I'll be ready.
  • + 7
 @vinay: In US it seems they are concerned about potential villians everywhere, which is understandable. In Sweden or Poland we are worried mostly about a genuine super villain gangster Vladimir. We don’t fancy carrying IBMs to the groceries though... would be nice to live in Switzerland. Nobody will ever touch that country. Maybe that’s why their army knoves have wine bottle openers. Men are not men if they haven’t opened a bottle of Bordeaux under fire!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Pretty sure the enemy would rather be hit by a bullet than have their "cork" pulled out with one of these. There is a good reason no one attacks them.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Dood, crossbow FTW!!!
  • + 2
 @kosmoHR: Yeah, but chances of accidents with a longbow are slim. If kids find it, they're not likely to cause much harm. Guns, cars with automatic transmission, dumb it down enough and toddlers can make it work.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: dude!! on fire today!
  • + 1
 This “Gun debate” is actually about hydration packs versus fanny packs/water bottle cages. Camelback stands on hydration pack side - being large manufacturers of them (Visita Products aside). Whic Side are you on?

Clearly Thule has taken sides on hydration pack. I’m split: I dig the fanny and bottle cage for short rides. Hydration pack for long rides which allows me to stow 9MM or MAC10 to deal with pedestrian trail crowed control and/or E-Bikers.

Yeah alright I’m kidding on the above nonsense. I don’t think Thule has any association with gun, ammo or accessory manufacturing. Visita Sports should spin off their outdoor products companies instead of facing a continued boycott - plus guns and ammo aren’t profitable anymore Remington failed chapter 11; who’s buying 5k rifle when they can get a sick carbon bike?
  • + 1
 @prodicker: Thule, a Swedish brand and gun control, I guess I was joking, but anyways, tell me when IKEA starts selling arms Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Truth in at least 49 states with a title 1 ATF Tax Stamp for your SBR length barrel, but still definitely illegal in California! Razz
  • + 12
 Only a 1.7l bladder, and a 90.99Lb weight? I'll take 3 Smile

Shouldn't a 3l hydration pack actually come with a 3l hydration pack?

$90USD LoL
  • + 15
 3L storage, measured like pretty much every backpack or piece of luggage, and how Osprey and Camelbak do it too.
  • + 1
 I always think the same thing re: 3L bags. The larger size ones hold a little more water at 2.5L.
www.thule.com/en-us/us/bike-accessories/hydration-packs/thule-vital-6l-_-3203640
  • + 0
 @seanondemand: I do dual duty with my Eberlestock 'Just 1' backpack and it's Mossad approved 3l hydration reservoir. They list the storage capacity of the bag separate from the liquid capacity of the bladder. Most I've seen are like this.

The title here implies that the pack has a 3l bladder.

I would like to downsize the pack while maintaining the ability to still carry 3l of fluids. As a bonus, I can stuff a gel ice pack in with my bladder in the current pack, so whatever I put in there stays cold/fresh. Any suggestions for a suitable replacement?
  • + 2
 @zwieblekopf: I also notice that. My 3l hydration bag is closer to 2.5/2.75 litres.
  • + 12
 It'll go nicely with my fishnet stockings.
  • - 13
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 24, 2018 at 1:24) (Below Threshold)
 Alright! Would you fancy some PM sex?
  • + 9
 @WAKIdesigns: PM as in Post Mortum? Siiiiiicccckkkkk!
  • - 2
 @badpotato: private message you pervert. Never done it? It's cool.
  • + 8
 Great to see alternatives to the main players like camelbak and evoc. I like the feeling of freedom, not wearing a back pack gives you.......but I also do big all day epics in the Alps where non backpack riding ain't an option.
  • + 18
 i take backpack even for 1h flat ride, i cannot imagine myself using water bottle
  • + 5
 Dakine makes good alternatives too. just sayin
  • + 4
 @pcmxa: thanks but i know how to do it, i just really dont like it also hydration packs are way more convenient
  • - 1
 @Asmodai: then try to do it. It gives a different scent and taste of plastic than a bladder. More plastic, less fungae.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns:
i already tried i dont like it and i prefer backpack
  • + 3
 @Asmodai: I wear a backpack on every ride, but I carry water bottles in it; am I weird? Snacks, tools, parts, water, jacket, phone, and sunglasses in the pack for peace of mind. I've grown accustomed to the thought of having back protection at all times too, with my evoc pack. I honestly don't notice it once I start mobbin downhill.
  • + 0
 @Asmodai: I wouldn't even bring water if it were a 1 hour ride, sounds like unnecessary weight
  • + 1
 @cdmbmw: i go through at least 1l during that time i just need a lot of water
  • + 4
 Whilst internal baffles might make your bladder more compact (waits for jokes...) they make cleaning a PITA. I'm just gonna put it out there - is there really no more hygienic solution?
  • + 9
 Cleaning the bag that holds water with . . . . Water? Have a camelbak. Have used it on and off for 5 years now. Always emptied it when I'm finished with it and stored the empty bladder in the fridge. Never had to wash it out. Ever.
  • + 1
 I'm curious too. I've got two hydrapak bladders. One for EVOC (which is basically a straight bladder), the other for Ergon (where the bladder goes low, hip height). They recommend to turn the bladder inside out for cleaning, which isn't going to work with the one for Thule. The more hygienic solution would be to use another bladder in the pack. It is going to close the ventilation channel in the middle though, so that's a disadvantage. Personally I prefer Ergon. Also because of the back protection.
  • + 5
 I’ve had a camelbak mule for about 4 years with zero cleaning. Never even dump the water out until I fill up again. No problems yet. I only use filtered water in it.
  • + 3
 I like using an electrolyte tab in my drinks on a big day out in hot weather, hence the frustration. Like you guys I now just stick to water, but even still cleaning it every once in a while is a chore...
  • + 14
 I have used my camelback for about 7yrs now, I just rinse it with mouthwash a couple times a season. Works great and you get a minty flavour for the first time after rinsing.
  • + 3
 @habsfan2: that’s actually a really clever idea, definitely will be trying that.
  • + 1
 @habsfan2: Ha! Would give that a go. I've only used water in my bladders and just rinse em' never washed them properly (don't tell anyone)
  • + 1
 @dh1stan: dang and it’s cootie free??
  • + 3
 @slimboyjim: keep the electrolyte tab in your water bottle and water in your pack.
  • + 2
 @dh1stan: Ever heard of people using electrolyte tablets or powder mixes? It helps certain people from suffering muscle cramps. There are a lot of athletes who suffer from certain deficiencies in their bodies so they need a little more to help out when they extert their bodies.

Not everyone uses just water while they ride.
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: Against muscle cramps, wouldn't these people just need more magnesium in their diet (vegetables, chocolate etc) instead of tabs in their water, or wouldn't that be sufficient? I don't add anything to my water either, but then again I don't call myself an athlete.
  • + 0
 @slimboyjim, exactly. Bladder is the last resort for me. Only in case of longer rides at higher temperatures. Hate the initial taste of plastic filament when the bladder is new, like chewing sterile hospital gloves, that later slowly but surely changes into a mix of plastic and algae. Cleaning them is a btch. That’s why Evoc is the only one I accept (from 3 ones I tried) because the opening is big enough to put the whole hand inside and clean it with mild detergent and a cloth. It’s still a btch of work, even filling it means spilling water everywhere.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yep. Those folding water bottles work a charm in the backpack. Downside is you can't use it on the go but I take enough breaks to not be bothered about it. I even put one on my back pocket for normal rides paired with one in the frame. 10 canadian pesos
  • + 1
 @dh1stan: yep, i just refill mine and put it in the fridge for next time.
  • + 3
 @vinay: I'll take all help I can get against cramps and fatigue when its 105-110°F, especially when I'm not at my fittest. That said, I'm starting to prefer electrolyte pills over adding stuff to my water
  • + 1
 @showmethemountains: hydration has little to do with fitness... hydrate. Riding under-hydrated for longer period of time is genuinely horrible, bad for performance, bad for muscles, bad for joints and it even lowers the amount of cerebral fluid, which means increased head injuries. I am personally commenting on Northern and Central Europe climate, mainly afternoon 1-2h rides. Longer rides in California, Southern Europe? heh, no way without a back pack. I used 3 litres of water when climbing 2000 vertical meters in Italy at 32-35C. Came to the place we were staying at thirsty as a dog.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: right, I'm talking about electrolytes not water. Eating meals with plenty of electrolytes isn't enough to be safe when it can be 37-43C outside, so I supplement before and during rides. Lots of good options for adding to water but I'm starting to prefer separate pills instead, so I can keep the bottles and bladders clean. I don't know the details of the physiology behind it, but I have seen that I definitely fare worse without electrolytes when I'm not as in shape or not used to the heat
  • + 1
 @showmethemountains: ah yeah, sorry, sure! If I go for an all day ride I put a tablet with electrolites into the water bottle in the frame while water in the backpack stays clean. Most water bottles are easy to clean from tablets which cannot be said about bladders
  • + 3
 @vinay: Magnesium is only one piece of the whole and is not as simple as just getting enough magnesium in your diet. Sodium is also very important as well. Sure one could get this through their diet if they change up their diets. However, many people don't want to do that so they will eat the foods they like which may include the nutrients just not enough of it and supplement the rest through other means. Also, sometimes people just don't have the time. For example you get a phone call from a friend unexpectedly, "DUDE let's RIDE!" I don't think the person would reply back "Sure, let me eat then let it digest properly and then let's go" It would be nicer to just hit the trail with hydration and a snack bar most of the time.

Not everyone is deficient and still they drink electrolytes during their training especially in the wamer/hotter seasons. Water is great but water with electrolytes can help battle against muscle fatigue. No you don't need it but for many the choice is to add it in their water. Most of the these electrolyte tablets and powders have some sort of sugar added for sweetness which is why many have to wash their pouches every so often.

To each their own. I choose to use electrolytes because I know my body lacks certain minerals and nutrients even with a super healthy diet.
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: oh yeah, Just talk to a few pro riders, none of them pretends they are tough boys, they charge and refill all the time. Even on small rides. Perhaps a weekend warrior will be fine since he will recharge in 6 days time, but many just feel it’s normal that they bonk and then feel like sht for next few days. I know a few of those. Last year I rode almost 80kms, 1500-1700 vertical meters in +30 on DH tyres. Charging pre ride, Drinking, eating regularly, supplementing electrolites and microelemnts. Took me 11 hours until I bonked completely. That moment when you roll on slight descent and feel like wind stops you and water tastes sweet. Three weeks ago I forgot to take water and snacks, ride went from planned 2,5 to 3,5h in +10. Bonked on the last hill before home. Bam.
  • + 1
 @LiquidSpin: Alright then. So it probably aren't the electrolytes which mess up the bladder, but it is the sugar (as always). Isn't there some brand that simply doesn't add sugar? I wouldn't want that in my pack, but I wouldn't want that in my bottle either. Sure you can clean the bottle (as well as you can clean the bladder). But just as hard as it is to clean the hose and mouthpiece, it is to clean the mouthpiece/lid of a typical bottle. The only one I know I can disassemble is the (aftermarket) mouthpiece from Sigg. It is spring loaded and if you twist it a bit further, you can take it apart. But after a year or so, I couldn't clean it anymore either (and that was from just water). Sure bottles are cheaper, but hydration packs are modular. You can get a separate hose or a four-pack of Camelbak mouthpieces for not much. Alright, the bladder made for this Thule bag seems a bit of a pain. But the Hydrapak bladders I have for Evoc and Ergon can (are supposed to) be pulled inside out for cleaning. Try that with a bottle.
  • + 1
 @vinay: just put the bottle into the dishwasher at max 60 degrees...
  • + 2
 @vinay: Probably there aren`t because glucose helps sodium to enter the cells so it can be absorbed in the small intestine. It`s not the only way but sure is the most effective way to get sodium absorbed. Plus the benefit of having glucose as a fuel.
  • + 1
 @vichopepe: just wait for it, next trend in sports nutrition, sugar and carb free body builders... iI am still waiting for the fruktarian, protein free crossfitters though...
  • + 1
 Yes, there are a number of electrolyte products available without sugar. Besides various "salt tabs" and other pills, two in powder form that I remember are HEED Endurolytes Extreme powder and Gatorade Gatorlytes Endurance.

I'd been fine with a little bit of sugar if that helps absorption, but I've learned that I don't want to rely on a single source for both fuel and electrolytes. During a long race my stomach decided it wasn't ok with Cytomax anymore, but that was also the only source of electrolytes I had!. Late in the race on a climb both calves locked and I fell over.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Camelbak did have a product that was my "Go to" to get. It was called "Elixir". It was sugar free and tasted awesome *in my humble opinion" However, they no longer sell this product. Probably due to poor sales.

I never had to wash my pouch as frequently when I used Elixir.

Sugar is actually beneficial while doing any type cardio where you're exerting a lot of energy passed 20-30 minutes since it is quick fuel the body can convert quickly into energy. Which is why most of those electrolyte tablets and powders have added sugar of some sort. (not only for taste)

*FYI sugar is good but just don't over do it, then it has a lot of bad side effects.

I hear ya on the whole cleaning out the valve and hose unit. I have the cleaning kit but it's annoying to do but I only do it every so often. I've been pretty good about rinsing out my pouch after every ride.

There are sugar free versions out there but I have not tried them because I'd rather buy local then order online and unfortunately all of my local stores do not have a sugar free option Frown
  • + 1
 I use onestep, its a no-rinse sanitizer that is sold for homebrew beer making. Just soak the bladder, hose and bite-valve for 30 seconds and you're good to go.
  • + 1
 @vinay: check out “lyteshow” on amazon. Strictly electrolytes, no sugar to make your bag smell like fermented death.
  • + 1
 @cyrways: Thanks. If I ever need them, I'll look at these. I don't like to have sugars sneak into my water if I don't need them, so it is good to know there's an alternative. I think I'm currently fine with just water.
  • + 2
 @vinay: anyway, all of your ride are "only" 2 hours long and you don't even sit down, how could you manage a sip?
  • + 1
 @mollow: Obviously I can take a sip when I stop, but I can take a sip while riding too. Just can't really pedal with one hand off the handlebars (lack of skill, I know many people can, saw Rachel Atherton wave at the camera while pedaling away) but I can just coast for a short while, put the mouthpiece in my mouth and then continue pedaling again. If I'd ride with bottles, I would indeed not be able to drink, pedal and stand with my current skill level.
  • + 1
 @vinay. Where are you riding in 105-110°F heat and why?
  • + 2
 denture cleaning tablets... drop two into a full bladder and let stand overnight.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham: I've used them and the ones I get from REI. It typically only calls for 1 tablet in semi hot water over night. I'll first scrub and rince the pouch with mild soap, rinse and then use the tablets and it does the trick.
  • + 1
 @lightsgetdimmer: I am not, what makes you think I do?
  • + 1
 @lightsgetdimmer: That must be my posts you are referring too. Northern California valley. Thankfully not the average temp, but those kind of days can be common in the summer. If possible I ride at 5am to avoid the heat, or late to at-least avoid the strong sun. But that's not always possible and sometimes you just have to ride!
  • + 1
 @vinay: yeah, my bad. I meant to reply to showmethemountains
  • + 5
 Why is this so obvious?

"it is doubtful that every rider has forgotten why mountain bikers abandoned bottles in favor of hydration packs so many years ago"
  • + 3
 I actually *would* prefer a pack, but I get so sick of cleaning the funk out of the bladder. Bottles are just easier. So these days, I still wear my pack, but it just has tools and food in it. . . And sometimes an extra bottle.
  • + 5
 Fun fact!

It's pronounced "tooooooola".

Not "Thuuuuuuuuueeeeeeeelllll".

I always wondered until recently asking a Thule rep.
  • + 1
 I like the way this looks compared to Camelbak and Osprey but I hate waste straps, I dont understand why nobody makes those those flaps removable. USWE packs look pretty good but the size of the straps are kind of ridiculous.
  • + 1
 Love my USWE! Had it for years now. Thing doesn't move on rides. It's tight and holds like 3 liters of water but I love
  • + 1
 Another one size fits some design like all Camelbak bags. Based on where that sternum strap sits on RC, it would be firmly pressed against my neck given my torso length. Looks like Ergon is still the only manufacturer that understands that riders come in multiple sizes. Ergon will get my money every time.
  • + 1
 It's adjustable - 3 positions available
  • + 1
 Very nice stuff. My sugestion for all hydration pack builders is offer a white option to keep water fresher more time. Black packs get hot faster than white. And it seems nobody play attention to this detail!!!
  • + 15
 Yeah, I wouldn't ever buy a white backpack, as soon as I unpack it it won't be white anymore.
Perhaps some kind of foil liner for the bladder itself?
  • + 8
 @Milko3D: I slip mine into insulated freezer bags and i still have Ice chunks at the end of a 6hour ride. Try it.
  • + 5
 I'm still confused why backpacks for MTB's aren't all waterproof. Just saying it would be really helpfull considering the "Nature" of our sport.
  • + 1
 @richierocket: Actually, I've spend about 8 years in the UK, drinking tea was never a problem Big Grin

This was more of an alternative suggestion to the white thing Jordi mentioned.
  • + 1
 @richierocket: not sure if I'm more impressed about the ice chunks or you being able to ride for 6 hours straight haha
  • + 1
 After I die dehydrated only for carry WATER on the bladder I never put water again... Just sport drinks like Gatorades, obviously back to home I go intro the shower with the bladder.
  • + 3
 the 80's called. they want their water bottles back.
  • + 1
 Wish it had a couple mesh elastic water bottle type pockets at the hip belt, easy access for bear spray and or energy packs and food on the go.
  • + 3
 the bladder appears to be the same that comes with the Osprey packs.
  • + 1
 Does it have water bottle boss attachments so I can screw it to the underside of my downtube?
  • + 1
 I'm already 10lbs overweight adding another 90.99 Lbs will be un-noticable.
  • - 1
 10lbs overweight? Sorry, you don’t qualify as handicapped enough to use an E-bike. Don’t ride one.
  • + 1
 no pics of it mounted to the bike? does it slide in and out of a cage okay?
  • + 1
 This is how backpacks for riding should be... with the weight low. Nothing new... The best ones are made by wingnut gear.
  • + 1
 Never saw those before, very nice!
  • + 1
 do mtbr's ever use runner's hydration vests?
  • + 1
 I urinate all over this hunk of detritus.
  • + 1
 Nice try, but still not as good a design as a Wingnut.
  • + 1
 Richard Cunningham, "DOING WHAT YOU WISH YOU WERE DOING". [TM]
  • + 1
 When 30seconds to sell a product isn't enough!
  • + 1
 I tend to have mold grow in the bitevalve more than the bladder...
  • + 1
 That, and I seem to always put a hole in the bite valve itself, then it leaks everywhere.

These days I use a standard Camelbak with an on/off valve.
  • + 1
 So.... would your body temp not warm up the water........?
  • + 0
 Yeah, it's a Thule and all, but that thing is fugly.
  • + 0
 But ... this pack has NO helmet mount ...
  • + 1
 Almost 91lbs eh?
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