Opinion: Why Have Bike Makers Ignored this Grassroots Fix?

Oct 5, 2018 at 13:17
by Richard Cunningham  
DH World Champs bikes 2018
Adam Brayton's custom-painted Scott Gambler probably didn't look this pretty after the World Championships were over. Imagine how beat up it would look after a season at the bike park.


Why does it take so long for corporate bike brands to address popular grassroots trends? Wide bars, short stems, dropper posts, one-by drivetrains, chain guides, 29ers, wide rims, tubeless systems… the list of user-generated improvements that were widely adopted years before mainstream bike and component makers committed to production goes on... Rather than answer that question, I’ll give you another yet-to-be-addressed grassroots example that has been ‘trending’ for over a decade.

How many riders wrap their bikes to protect their frame finishes from gouging and scratches? Yeah, a lot, and the practice isn’t limited to fastidious dentists who can’t live with the sight of a scratched up Hightower perched on the back of their recently detailed BMW X6 M.

I took a straw poll while I was skulking around the Whistler bike park that suggested that as many as one in four riders had wrapped their frames. A little more poking around revealed that a large number of bike brands and shops religiously wrap their demo and rental fleets as well.

You don’t have to search far for a compelling reason to protect a frame. Pinkbike’s Buy/Sell pages are filled with close-up images of minor frame blemishes, posted by sellers to assure potential buyers that their bikes look close to new.
0 BIKE FRAME WRAP PROTECTION
Many riders protect their frames with off-the-shelf products originally designed for helicopter rotors. Pre-cut options, like this one from Shack Wrap, make the task easier and look more professional.

Moab’s Poison Spider bike shop rents a fleet of elite-level trail bikes. Mechanic Chad Guyer says that they wrap every frame with a clear product used to protect helicopters. When the tape comes off, Guyer states that, with the exception of a few deeper gouges which are unavoidable, the frames look new. When Poison Spider sells their rentals, the value added, he says, is upwards of $200 USD.

Let’s recap here: A mountain bike costs a lot of money, and it lives in an environment where it will be continually scratched and scuffed. Paint, anodizing, and plating have historically failed to resist that abrasion. Wrapping a frame with a tough, clear adhesive product protects the finish, keeps the bike looking newer longer, and adds a busload of resale value. And, the concept is both valued and accepted worldwide by a large number of enthusiasts. Buoyed by all those positives, you’d think that bike makers would jump on that and integrate protective wrap as standard equipment on mountain bikes.

But… they don’t.

invisiFRAME proetection kit being applied
Ride Wrap frame protection
Applying a layer of adhesive material to the complicated shapes of a mountain bike frame requires some skill and clever cutting. Invisiwrap (left) offers pre-cut full-frame wrap kits for the more adventurous garage mechanic. Or, you can pay to have it done by a pro, like Whistler BC's Ride Wrap (right).

I breached this subject with a handful of marketing types from well-respected bike brands and all I heard were excuses: “We believe that our chainstay cushions and down tube bash guards provide adequate protection.” “It would add weight.” “Bikes are already expensive, that would just raise the MSRP.” “Frame wraps would detract from the finish.” Plausible? Maybe. Pathetic? Absolutely. The smoking gun was that when asked if they wrapped their personal bikes, the answer from five out of six was, “yes.”

bigquotesIntegrating graphics with clear protective wraps on the top tube and down tube, as well as high-wear areas like the rear stays, should not be a daunting task for bike designers.

Combining frame graphics with a protective wrap is neither new nor experimental. Keith Bontrager’s 1990’s-era hardtails featured thick, wrap-around vinyl stickers that integrated his logo graphic into frame protection for the vulnerable top and down tubes.

Off-road motorcycles and cars have long abandoned paint in favor of protective (and replaceable) wrap graphics in high-scuff zones. To their credit, some brands ship their bikes with an assortment of clear protection tape that range from a handful of dots and squares to ward off cable rub, to more comprehensive kits (like the ones Specialized ships with its bikes), which include some tube-length protection. Yeti includes pre-cut wrap kits that are specific to each frame and size.
Bontrager Race lite
Bontrager's 1990's-era Race Lite combined a wrap-around vinyl sticker with frame graphics to protect the top and down tubes.

Customers, however are still saddled with a task of applying the stuff. No problem taping up small areas, but wrapping the top and down tubes without adding fingerprints and air bubbles to your graphics can be a scary commitment for a first-timer who has just shelled out eight grand for a stunning new bike.

I'm not suggesting that bike makers cover their frames tip to toe with plastic tape. I do think it's high time that bike makers came to terms with the fact that paint doesn't hold up well in the mountain bike environment and offer us a pro-version of the longer-lasting alternative that riders have collectively developed in their absence. Integrating graphics with clear protective wraps on the top tube and down tube, as well as high-wear areas like the rear stays, should not be a daunting task for bike designers. And, applying that treatment at the factory would ensure a professional aesthetic on the showroom floor. Bikes would look better, and customers could refresh the graphics when they didn't. The only real question left is, “Why aren’t we already there?"


351 Comments

  • + 285
 my 2 cents. They want you to keep buying their shit. plain and simple
  • + 121
 Yup. The quicker your bike looks shit, the quicker you'll buy a new one.
  • + 163
 @glasvagas: I like my bike looking a bit beaten up. It gives them character.
  • - 29
flag shacky (Oct 12, 2018 at 1:41) (Below Threshold)
 Exactly that man! Nail on the head!

Shack wrap:
www.shackwrap.co.uk
Www.facebook.com/shack.wrap
  • + 38
 this article is weird - the default assumption that wear and scratches to paint is bad. I don’t think that many people are so anal that they need their bike to look box fresh. It’s good therefor to have the choice if you want it. Should I also helicopter tape my tyres so they are kept factory fresh?
  • + 59
 Cost, Weight, Obsolescence by design... 7k and no pedals?
  • + 17
 @Mojo348: The carbon frame riders are a bit touchy about scratches and dents. I can tell you that.
  • - 10
flag ebikeandre (Oct 12, 2018 at 2:36) (Below Threshold)
 Used Shack Wrap on lots of my bikes now. best stuff by far.
  • + 30
 @Mojo348: 100% agree, just ride your bike, nothing is going to be perfect forever. Actually enjoy when a bike gets past the 2-3 month mark, the newness has gone, you can just get on and enjoy riding it, what are a few scratches going to do anyway ?
  • + 24
 @Bungalow-bikes: I've always thought the no pedals thing is weird. Grips, tire choice, handlebar sweep/width, saddle - those are all personal preference that someone spending a bunch of coin on a bike has. And pedals are the thing that gets left out?
  • + 53
 The main reason for protecting the paint given in this article is resale value, and resale is not something that bike manufacturers want.
  • + 11
 @Mojo348: with carbon frames the thicker protective tapes like Shelter tape also provide the necessary additional impact protection.
  • + 5
 @vectorforces: IMO if your spending over 2k there should be a stock Clipped or Flat option (most bikes come in at least 2 colour options) so what if there not exactly what your use to. Your absolutely right its no different to saddle, bars & grips! even if i took them off straight away it would be nice to have them for the emergency spares box!
  • + 42
 I believe the lack of pedals thing is to work around the law: complete bikes should have front reflector, rear reflector, pedal reflector and bell. By not including cheap pedals that you'll likely swap anyway the bike isn't complete and it's the purchasers responsibility to comply not the reseller.
  • + 4
 @Mojo348: IMO the need isn't to keep the bike looking fresh for the current owner. It for resale value as the next owner will take money off for each little ding and scratch they can find. My life revolves around resale value. haha
  • + 1
 @Slabrung: kudos, you made the best realistic comment all morning
  • - 1
 @ebikeandre: shack wrap or invisiframe for most frame coverage and durability?
  • + 3
 @Mojo348: man I just want my bike to tell a story, my wife and I moved to this island and we brought mountain biking with us, have been opening trails and many people here saw a mountain biker for the fist time ever. Can you imagine me telling this story and the bike I used for it looking mint? now that would be weird !!!
  • + 3
 scared up stickered up.
  • + 6
 @cky78: Yup! I could care less about scratches in my paint, but the person who buys my frame won't be willing to pay as much for it.
  • + 0
 @Slabrung: higher resale value would support higher original purchase price? Old to new churn rate is another point.
  • + 20
 @Slabrung: Actually the manufacturers would want the resale to be as high as possible. That way when a customer is deciding between new and used they are more likely to buy new if they aren't saving that much when buying used. It also means that a customer is better able to sell a one-year-old bike and buy a new one when they aren't taking as much of a financial hit.
  • + 1
 @Mojo348: Its those 3k frames one bad scratch and you cant sell it . Lots of folks have to sell that baby to get another one . and those prices are not going to stop rising . not to mention on carbon any deep scratch could = dead frame . Personally I would rather not wrap weight, hassle and so on. But i kinda have to.
  • + 6
 @coffeemakesroll: so the real problem is carbon and people trying to flog them...

I wonder how many people wrap their metal frames?
  • + 5
 Soon to be available in the Accessories section as an add-on item. Available at the low low cost of 249.00 with simple do it yourself instructions!! Don't forget a spare set!
  • + 0
 @cky78: What is IMO
  • + 8
 Its not true of all manufacturers! There are tonnes that are looking to improve the value and longevity you get out of your ride. We are already working with Commencal Canada offering this option, so not all is lost! As an add-on to do yourself with the most comprehensive kit available, or as fully installed. We are launching our full line later this month.
  • - 6
flag duzzi (Oct 12, 2018 at 10:10) (Below Threshold)
 @Mojo348: I agree. Must be the stupidest suggestion I ever heard on Pink Bike: Cover your bike in plastic. What net? Suggesting to spray them with latex?
  • + 7
 @Mojo348: Agreed. I think the #1 issue that wrapping protects from is stone chips, but bikes are for the most part (where "wrappable" and excluding beloved steel frames) are not going to corrode from minor blemishes to the paint or finish, it's purely cosmetic. Based on the wrap on my car however, the plastic itself inevitably get's fuzzy and looks terrible at the edges, which on a bike would be even worse (closer to the eye and dirtier).

It's also unfair to say it adds "a boatload of resale"; this may be true for a commercial operation that wraps an entire fleet and sells it every year, but your average 5-yr-old bike is going to look a little beat up regardless if it was wrapped, plus can you imagine trying to peel off all that plastic after it's been gouged and shredded by years of hard riding and weather?
  • + 1
 @rossburton: This is what I've always thought as well. Not sure where I originally heard it though, or if it's truely "the law"...
  • + 1
 @vectorforces: If they made the bike rideable, then they would be liable? lawyers ruin everything lol. No but I always thought it was more of a flat/clip question...
  • + 1
 @vectorforces: like the pedal is the most likely thing to be changed out
  • + 2
 @onek5: "In my opinion"
  • + 4
 So @shacky get immediate down votes for pushing products. Instantly creates interest 'cause everyone wants to see why.

More people end up viewing his links.

Anti advertising, haha!
  • + 1
 @RideWrap: what is the material/brand RideWrap uses on frames?
  • - 5
flag thenotoriousmic (Oct 12, 2018 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 can someone explain why carbon bikes even exist in the first place other than to make more money for bike companies?

There’s no advantage to using carbon for the vast majority of riders and a lot of disadvantages. Costs more, isn’t as tough, poor resale value and if you scratch it nobody’s going to buy it and for what? What are the advantages? Nominal at best?
  • + 1
 @Mojo348: might have been mostly true before plastic frames started dominating the ranks
  • + 2
 @Slabrung: I disagree. Manufactures love high resale values. If used bikes were cheaper, everyone would just buy used bikes. If a used bike is only a little cheaper than a brand new one, people are more likely to just go for the new one. Also, the more money someone makes on a used sale, the more they're probably going to spend on a new bike.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: yeah mate - my way too.


thenotoriousmic (10 hours ago)
scared up stickered up.
  • + 1
 @duzzi: No spray with Teflon and wash with simple green.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: I doubt many. i powder coated bikes for years none of my customers had problems actually quite difficult to get off for a new color.
  • + 2
 Invisiframe on all my bikes. I only have 1 MTB at a time and need good resale value to pay for the next. Invisiframe keeps the frame looking like new (actually) apart from a few deeper scratches near the BB. £70 well spent for this reason alone, but on top of that the frame looks like new the whole time! I add heli-tape to the really high wear areas around the BB/DT but the scuff guards on the new Santa Cruz Bronson are pretty decent.
  • + 1
 @onek5: IMO= In My Opinion
  • + 0
 Not at all. I have a major graphics company and i can tell you for dealing with this subjects everyday that full kits don't make a bit of sense. Only customers that think more about the bike that riding buy them.

You know why manufacturers don't support these kind of products? Adhesivity power, Sticking on top of scratchs, weak paintjobs, and things like that Wink Almost every day we deal with paint that came off with protection films.

Also i can tell you that there isn't yet any GOOD film that you can wrap with and that fully protects a bike. They usually just protect for little paint chips or little scratches. So a 100€ wrap kit won't solve a damn thing. The only films that really withstand that kind of use, have way too many adhesivity power to stik on top of a paint.
  • + 1
 @onek5: in my opinion
  • + 1
 @rossburton: clever! Never heard this answer before but it makes perfect sense and saves us from removing the bell and reflectors afterwards!
  • + 1
 @jOrGemRNh: Wow you've got some sweeping statements there - Well, funny how I've done 3 frames in a row, each one swapping at least one or two sections and finding the frame as new underneath with the film ruined. You just heat it up and pull it off. If the paint is coming with it, you have an awful bike. Full kits make a lot of sense for those wanting to protect their bikes from scratched and paint chips and tar etc. They're barely noticeable and keep the bike in top nick for resale.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: just like me wearing protection on the bits that have received damage in the past. If you are never going to sell it. Who cares.
  • + 0
 @choppertank3e: because you spent a lot of money on your bike and want it to still look good 3 years later?
  • + 0
 @OrangeGoblin: Mate, try to do that on a weak paint or a film that was sticked on top of a paint damage. Have you contacted any brand to check why they don't sell that from factory? Well, i have...Some brands even demand us to have an log with all the mods and films we stick in a certain serial number frame to avoid warranty problems. It's simply uncertain.

Don't you want to tell that to a costumer that came last week with a mondraker with a 2mm deep scratch in the rear shock link? Tell them that a full kit will make his bike invincible lol You know what will make his bike almost invincible? A proper care of it!

I didn't told protection films didn't make sense. I sell them ok? They make sense. Now, a full protection kit doesn't make sense. It simply doesn't. Why covering the headset area in a hidden cable frame? Why covering areas like the interior of the front triangle except in the bottle cage area or a roof rack hold spot? Why the complete interior of a rear chainstay? You can protect it in the tyre are in case it rubs, but besides that, why? Well, because pussies think that will cover any case of damage and brands profit from that.

This is like insurance mate, you aren't selling protection, you are selling a feeling of protection. Do you know how many pvc and pu tapes i've tested, in various thickness and to get to this conclusion? Tens if not hundreds. Do you want to see how a top of line pu self healing tape with 300microns holds in a pro gravity rider? I'll tell you, sometimes, one race.
  • + 1
 @onek5: in my opinion
  • + 1
 @onek5: it’s the same thing 2 billion other people have, yet everyone thinks their own is so-o-o-o special and unique, particularly if their brain is hopelessly infected with socialmediaitus.
  • + 1
 @jOrGemRNh: I was just responding to you.... "So a 100€ wrap kit won't solve a damn thing".

You then just said:
"I didn't told protection films didn't make sense. I sell them ok? They make sense. Now, a full protection kit doesn't make sense. It simply doesn't."

...I'm not really sure what your point is, respectfully.

My full kit protects my frame from superficial damage that it otherwise receive without it. Thats why I buy it. It does exactly the job I want it for. Therefore it DOES make sense. It has also lasted 3 years, with me only swapping the DT because it was starting to tear (After 2 years).

I've had/sold frames that didn't have it, and I've had/sold them that did. The ones that have it always look better.

Maybe just say that you don't THINK they make sense (for whatever reason) and call it an OPINION, because there are many people who use it with success and are pleased. Your opinion does not supersede their experience. :-)
  • + 1
 @OrangeGoblin: hey, not a problem at all mate. A community need respect for others opinion to fully work. I find this topic weird as it looks like a infomercial for what i see in the photos and in the guys answering and that makes me a bit sick.

Well, returning to the point. A full kit is obviously a plus. No question about it. However, with my experience, i found that the plus that it offers isn't good enough to worth 60€ difference. (Some months from now, the trend will me ceramic coatings, note it lol)

I think you missed my point a bit in that part of the buy/sell. Is way more significant the rider care for the bike than the bike tape. If you are a bit nuts like some of my customers, i can throw you a 500microns mx laminate and he will find a way to f*** it up lol. So we can't compare bikes from different owners.

Me thinking that they don't make sense is in fact an opinion, not a fact, but a opinion. A fact is that i'm a professional in the area, with some years of experience and trained, not a seller, because you're not seing me talking about my company here, so i'm talking straight and square. I install full kits and they get us money! However i do this because i love it, every single day, not to be rich, just to be happy, so, above all, i have a company to make people happy, and to help them get to the best cost effective and the best quality experience possible.
This is not a topic about materials kind sir, we work with the literal best you can find. I don't compromise in the material. But if i know that it is almost impossible that a customer gets a rock between the fork legs why instead of sticking a small cable rub patch to the front brake, why would by wrap the fork? If the customer asks me to, i will, i'm used to the weirds orders you can imagine.

(Not talking about a little detail that is the finish that a full kit gives to a bike, for example in a matte frame, where the kind of matte is almost impossible to match, so it looks like crap and it looks like you were patching the frame with left overs.)

(Btw you have to understand that these companies don't do anything special at all. they just buy a film, COPY/create some templates, cut it and apply it. that's why it began with invisiframe as they were the only ones that could make those full wrap templates and now there are billions of companies.) (And that's why i also find weird that they don't mention the first brand here but a canada based one) *cough* *cough*

For my customers, usually the customer that buys the best and that is super keen about details and finish, well, they don't like it, most of them don't even like protection tapes at all.
For my sponsored riders, they only use the minimum, easily exchangable to make it easier to swap stickers and damaged parts from race to race or heat to heat.
For the regular customer, i don't even recommend PU tapes, as a good quality pvc will do if he replace it every 2 years or so.

You have the freedom to buy what you want and everyone has that freedom, and you can feel super pleased with that investment! But if you ask me should i spend these extra 60/70€ just to get bigger protection films or buy for example a better helmet or a better part? Well, you know how my answer will be Smile

Cheers guys Wink
  • + 1
 @Bungalow-bikes: Chances are that they offer pedals that you and I don't want to ride.
Usually I already replace a stem and bar and other things, that then I have to sell off as "2nd hand - like new" for a dumping price.
I am happy to use the pedals from my old bike, what I also sell without pedals, and never had any complaints.
  • + 76
 Or heck. Don’t wrap it from factory but include it as part of the bike for those who want to wrap it. Manufacturers already have all the CAD drawings. It should be an easy thing. Or be a cheapskate and sell kits as accessories. Easy money. Apple sells screen protectors and cases and it’s a big add-on business in the store. This could be even a great revenue streams for local bike shops that carry your brand. I approve of this article and equally mystified.
  • + 6
 This seems like such a no brainer. I'd even settle for a paper template to use for cutting heli tape myself. I'd probably even pay for it. But to miss the easy money.. it's no wonder bikes prices are so jacked up.
  • + 2
 This is the absolute best idea.
  • + 2
 I'd pay a couple hundred for a frame protection kit in any bikes check out if they gave the option. Easy profit for any company and happy owners.
  • + 1
 Good point, but most of those cases are aftermarket. Thats what the oems are currently doing, letting you buy aftermarket frame protection from a dealer in the same way Apple has you buy an aftermarket case or protector from a dealer. You don't have a case, screen protector etc included with a iPhone from the factory just like you don't get additional frame protection from the factory.
  • + 1
 @michaeldorian
The apple cases are almost always aftermarket form a dealer not apple directly. Thats what the oems are currently doing, letting you buy aftermarket frame protection from a dealer in the same way Apple has you buy an aftermarket case or protector from a dealer. You don't have a case, screen protector etc included with a iPhone from the factory just like you don't get additional frame protection from the factory.
  • + 4
 I know all Yeti frames come with this included, pre-cut for all various tubes and linkages. Also Available from their web store to replace and refresh if they get torn up from use.
  • + 1
 nldesigns.eu/frame-decals
Not sure if these would count as protection but they are pretty cool
  • + 2
 We are already working with Commencal Canada on this exactly with hopefully more to come.

We agree that this should be an accessory, as its a wear-product meant to take the beating and then be replaced over time.

We recently took a 2year old wrap off the bike (which was still looking great) and the frame was immaculate.
  • + 2
 Specialized MTBs actually come with pretty decently-sized clear vinyl protection stickers.
  • + 1
 Yeti does this. Size and model specific frame protector kits shipped with every bike and frame.
  • + 1
 @RideWrap: Sweet. I just ordered a META TR 29er - do you guys have a kit for that?
  • + 1
 @RideWrap: On the other hand, I took some help tape off a frame I had and the logos under it came with it.
  • + 1
 No, it isn't a good idea at all. You know why? Because like apple, they will charge you 50€ for a f***ing 2€ case.
I know brands that are selling stickers at 125$ to the customer, that in the best vinyl you can have that is like way way better than they sell, should be sold at 25~30€ max as they cost like 2€ to be made.

Let everyone do what they do best, like guys at @RideWrap , that know what they are doing and sell products at a fair price.
  • + 1
 Yes but they cannot even put the strips they provide now in the parts box without folding them in such a way that they a rippled and un-usable now!
  • + 1
 It is possible. Also a good quality material folds without a problem. When you see graphic companies sending products in rigid cardboards or those air envelopes, well, the material usually is shit lol If you work with good quality materials, you can stretch it, step on it, throw it in the garbage and still use it lol
  • + 56
 I still can't get my head around why bike still don't have as standard complete rear triangle chainslap protection. Even bikes that do have it there always that 'missed spot' that is back to raw.
  • + 58
 I always wrap my "ladies bike" in latex. Its only good for one ride but its cheap. A little chainslap is actually fun. And when the wrap does break and goes back to raw, well, that aint so bad either but it can be dangerous if you get the timing wrong or riding an unknown trail that looks sketchy.
  • - 3
 That "blank" spot in protection is to keep bike as narrow as possible in the area your heel passes the rear chain stay.
  • - 6
flag Muckal (Oct 12, 2018 at 7:52) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: i figure you are not talking about bikes?
  • + 52
 Wrapping products is labour intensive and it isn’t easy to achieve the same perceived durability as paint - yes, paint chips and scratches but that’s the customer’s fault. But if a wrap comes unstuck at the seams or bubbles then it’s a warranty issue. And not only do bikes travel through the tropics in shipping containers that can get very hot, people transport them in their cars. Leave a bike inside a parked car on a hot sunny day and the temperature can reach almost 75C or 175F - that’s what car interior materials have to be rated for. If you want a wrap to stay stuck at that temperature it can’t be self-adhesive, it needs to be glued down with moisture curing polyurethane glue, and a machine to apply that to wrap material will cost in excess of £100k.
  • + 7
 This is exactly what I was thinking while reading the article. Being able to consistently apply this stuff is very specifically skilled labor, and probably doesn't have the same repeatably as most of their assembly processes. It would lead to warranty problems. And yes, shipping containers can get up to 80C in the sun. I did some research on bushing-shrinkage when I worked for Rocky Mountain. Rental bikes that get stored in the vans in Utah, and the bushings would just reduce in size and not fit any more. Imagine the dealer receiving a bike they need to sell for $8000 that has skin-peel on every surface.
  • + 1
 I was wondering if just applying a thin layer of moisture curing polyurethane over the whole frame would be cheaper/easier for manufacturers once set up for it. Decent protection or not tough enough?
  • + 3
 @ecologist: I think for customers to be satisfied throughout the life of the bike, it needs to be something that can be easily peeled off if you want to reapply after damage. Also, polyurethane definitely loves to peel if it's scratched or nicked.
  • + 0
 You've obviously never seen videos of helmet graphic applicators. It is a mastered skill and the workers knock them out in seconds. Same thing could be achieved with heli tape.
  • + 11
 @Poulsbojohnny: you've obviously never seen videos of a team of hamsters playing a team of gerbils in aussie rules football.
  • + 3
 My new enduro took 6.5hrs to invisiframe, I'm not even that incompetent either. Hooray for X wing frames with absolutely no simple surfaces. Worth it though.
  • + 0
 All these point are BS. first off if bike companies can find people skilled enough to lay carbon for frames they can find people to put on stickers. Second tons of cars have 3m tape on them and it holds up to being outside 24/7. Cars deal with more extreme environments and temps changes than any bike will see.
  • + 1
 @mammal: yeah. I've only used on porous materials where it is quite amazing stuff. I still want to see it tried.
  • + 1
 @nismo325: Those cars don't get tomahawked down rock and root covered trails on a daily/ weekly basis! Or leant against stone walls by renters with no concept of what the bike might be worth and that paint and stanchion coatings and pointy rock don't play well together!!
  • + 41
 "Bikes cost too much"

"I want my bike manufacturer to do more and more shit to it before i buy it"

"Bikes cost too much"

Repeat ad-infinitum.
  • + 10
 don't forget to mix in a few comments where you comment on the price compared to your previous bike, ignoring 5 years of inflation and exchange rate shifts.
  • + 25
 I thought the paint was there for protection of the frame. If bikes will come wrapped out of the factory, the people will want to protect the wrap too and start adding a second wrap layer when they get their new bike. I only protect against cable rub and chainslap. If I care more about the paint, I will have less careless fun on my bike.
  • + 9
 One other way to protect paint is to not put it on a bicycle. Leave it raw, nothing to worry about Smile .
  • + 3
 @IntoTheEverflow hahahah, I can totaly see that happening.

"For Sale: Stumpjumper 29 2018, mint condition barely used"

Oh man, you should drop at lest 200$ for those scratches on factory wrap.

@vinay: no paint, only wraps.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: Yeah, though I probably would apply some UV blocking paint. You know, just to protect my expensive wrap.
  • + 1
 @vinay: U.V. damage to carbon. Have you ever had a raw ALU frame? Smudges and oxidation have to be polished or cleaned regularly without clear coat.
  • + 1
 @choppertank3e: What happens if you don't do that? The oxidation is the protective layer of the aluminium. Anodization is basically an oxide layer too, isn't it?

I haven't ever had a raw aluminium frame. My first mtb frame was aluminium powdercoated, all frames I had after that were steel (the current one is powdercoated again). But I see no issues on the aluminium components I have where the anodization has worn off (pedals, bars, cranks, seatpost etc.) It is where two aluminium components rub and the oxide layers continues to get worn off (acting as an abrasive) where you start seeing issues (fretting corrosion, which is why people would use assembly grease).

If I'd get another full suspension frame though, chances are I'd go for the Alutech ICB2.0 (one of the coolest and most sensible frames to me for just general riding) which is being offered in raw (for 100 euro less). I suppose they trust it enough to sell it like that. Yeah maybe not for people who are too worried about smudges and the dull oxide layer (as opposed to the anodized finish which has paint in the pores) but I shouldn't worry about durability of this version vs their anodized versions, should I?

That is, just looking at other bikes. I currently don't plan to get a full suspension bike anytime soon.
  • + 24
 I prefer the 'lived in look' but then, I'm not buying a bike to sell in 6 weeks when the latest wheel size/standard/trend comes out
scratched the paint? that's why the gods invented... stickers
  • + 6
 Give me a beaten up bike anyday. At least its got some character.

This nsmb.com/articles/if-it-isnt-carbon-are-you-still-mountain-biker springs to mind...

And when it gets too bad you send it off to get repainted.
  • + 3
 And likewise, if i get a discount on a used bike because it has a few scratches on the frame then better for me as well.
  • - 2
 Wraps can provide further benefits than stickers... Self-healing film means scratches disappear, higher quality finish than many OEM paint finishes, low-surface energy menas that less dirt sticks to your bike, and more.
  • + 19
 There's quite a few reasons why manufacturers don't wrap frames from the factory but I'll give you a few:
- Shipping containers that exceed temperatures of 60*c during transport cause material deformation and defects.
- Paint off-gassing causing a reaction with material adhered to it.
- Long term effects of glue interacting with paint, leading to possible warranty scenarios.
- Discoloration of the wrap material overtime as it gets sun-affected

The list goes on.

I applaud companies like RideWrap offering a high-end solution to protecting frames. We have staff in our office that have gotten their personal bikes wrapped and they look great. However, due to a myriad of known and unknown issues with adhering copious amounts of 3M or off-branded protective tape to bicycle frames, we're happy to let RideWrap provide this particular service.
  • + 2
 @kperras and time costs..... typically takes me an hour to cut and wrap one of my frames....even if you could get that down to 10 mins for a smooth operating factory will require, a time management process to be created, and £££££ lost to labouring for 10 mins per bike for 1000's of bike frames....... never mind the cost of said heli tape for 1000s of frames
  • + 9
 Most of these issues have been addressed in the auto wrap industry. If we were talking 15 years ago I would agree work you, but the technology is so much better than it used to be. Yellowing, texturing issues, residue, reaction with paint, high tempature peel(a car sitting out in the hot sun can get incredibly hot), and even embodied VOC off-gassing aren't much of an issue. In fact, if you've ever been to a car show you've probably seen cars that have spent their entire lives completely wrapped in protective film, and it is almost entirely invisible, and is actually employed to "investment-quality" supercars off-the-lot more often than not. Those rich old guys are not going to put something on their paint that is going to harm it, because that would jeopardize their whole investment. So I don't think the issues you mentioned are really there reasons for companies not doing it.
  • + 3
 My car isn't wrapped.

> shrugs <
  • + 2
 @Compasteedee: agreed, these issues have been dealt with by 3M and other quality clear film manufacturers. In a previous job I did a bunch of aging and weathering testing on different products and most were excellent.

The bike industry is using it as an excuse because they haven’t made it a priority to do some R&D.

Bike industry - spend more time on stuff like this and less time on useless things like super-boost!
  • + 0
 Thank @kperras !
  • - 1
 @Compasteedee: Some of those idiots spend more on the protective film then getting the whole car resprayed would ever cost.
  • + 1
 - No they don't. Heat is actually good for them below 90~100ºC.
- Thats because they use cheap PVC instead of expensive PU Smile
- That's usually paint defect.
- Thats because they use cheap PVC instead of expensive PU Smile
  • + 17
 I'm gonna take a really far out guess here and say.....money. It costs money and time to wrap a frame, and the manufacturers wouldn't be able to make that cost back by charging more for the bike, like they would with say, a dropper instead of a standard seat post.
  • + 8
 They could make it an option, loads of bike companies let you customise the bike and it's components to no end, yet they don't offer wrap as an option. Seems like as a £100-150 option it would be a good margin option too.

I think it's more about turnover, they don't want their old bikes kept in pristine condition because the first buyer has less incentive to sell it and buy a new one, and the used buyer is a potential customer they lost. It's in their interest that bikes don't look factory fresh for years and years.
  • + 7
 Brands are adding quite a bit in the way of downtube and chainstay protectors, but this is honestly an accessory business. They spend ungodly amounts of time on design and to slap on layers of protective film makes their design departments cringe. If you want your bike to look clean and pretty long-term, that's mainly your responsibility to uphold. And there are tons of options out there to do it.
  • + 18
 Or just stop caring. A lot of BMX riders just get on with their lives and ride their bikes, scratches, skuffs and all.
  • + 7
 Because their frames cost at most 400€. When someone is trying to resell a bike for thousands of euros, then paint scratches matter.
  • - 1
 @ka-brap: "When someone is trying to resell a bike for thousands of euros, then paint scratches matter." - Then maybe these people can't really afford the sport and should think of doing something cheaper, or maybe spending less on their bikes. MTB, as a sport, is inherently hard on the equipment. You will crash, you will damage parts, if you ACTUALLY RIDE the bikes and not just polish them and keep them in showroom condition. I've seen scores of people who freak out over their bikes because of a scratch, or a crash. Does it then become about bragging rights on how much they've spent, or is it still about riding...?
  • + 10
 @muyguapa: the point is that if we’re supposed to be having as much fun as bmx riders then maybe our consumable bikes shouldn’t cost thousands of euro. We need the emphasis to swing back to what we’re doing with the bike rather than what the bike costs.
The notion that people who can’t afford it should find another sport is wrong on so many levels and is the absolute opposite direction the sport should be going down. It is elitist horse shit.
  • + 0
 @ka-brap: I have a pretentious boutique bike and couldn't really give a flying damn. The last buyer I want to deal with is one who is particular about scratches. The idea alone of "barely scratched" in the description to get few more bucks for your used bike is just asking yourself for trouble. I have sold too many bikes in my life to deal with a*sholes who can't manage their inner whiny bitch that makes them worry about such details. If they don't like it, bugger off. Someone will buy it, I just won't get it sold NOW. I'll have to wait a few weeks.
  • + 0
 @iqbal-achieve: Seriously? IF we're supposed to be having as much fun?? Are you being serious, I really can't tell... And there is nothing elitist about saying if a person is bitching about the cost of a bike, then maybe they shouldn't be spending that amount, or moving onto something else that they can afford, it's being pragmatic about the situation. I can't afford a new bike, or the latest and "greatest", so I don't. I'm still on a 2014 Rune, with a smattering of parts from even before then.
  • + 3
 @muyguapa: I think maybe I misunderstood you. My bad. Have a nice day.
  • + 2
 They also ride metal bikes and aren't obsessed about weight. (I'm talking about street & dirt jumpers, not racers.)
  • + 14
 Been doing this for years with clearbrite auto hood protectant from pepboys at $20 a 6inxhx20ft roll, $15 harbor freight heat gun and their free coupon scissors. NOT A DENTIST!
  • + 2
 What is this: "6inxhx20ft"?
  • + 11
 @ssteve: 6 inch x 20 ft... or 15,2 cm x 6,1 m
  • + 6
 I think the two main reasons for protecting a frame are 1 resale value and 2 aesthetics. I totally get protecting for resale but if you don't really plan on buying another bike soon who cares. Are the same people who have mint bikes after a years worth of ownership (that aren't planning on selling soon) the same people who drive a perfectly clean jeep with no scratches and armour-all tires? Scratches and scuffs remind you of all the fun you've had. Yes that first scratch, dent, or ding is heartbreaking but when you stop worrying about scratching it you can focus more on riding. It is after all a mountain bike not a road bike.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 12, 2018 at 1:24) (Below Threshold)
 A scratched mountain bike - AW MY GHAWD! It's like buying an expensive leather sofa and then buying a hideous cover for it. Congratulations Genius! It means that you care about your belongings Sir, yes Sir! Daddy is proud of you.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: the best i ve personally seen, was a family putting the tv remote in some kind of platicbag/foil -i felt so dirty. I cant take care of my belongings so i tell myself thats this is part of being badass.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 12, 2018 at 2:31) (Below Threshold)
 @optimumnotmaximum: hahaha, yeah, the TV remote in a plastic bag. Once I came upon a dude with the first ever V10 carbon, just a few months after it got released. He put pieces of old tyres on the downtube to protect it. His bike weighed at least 18kg. For reals I just put tape around places cables rub and around the rear tyre. I don't judge anyone for taping their bike... just like I don't judge anyone for keeping their remote in a plastic bag. Listen, there is nothing prettier than a fat black scratch on a turqouise Yeti. There's some nihilistic joy to it for me. Like to the scratch on top tube of my Antidote made by brake lever. Ghrrrkhrrrrrrrr. Like the sentence from fight club after he beats the crap out of Jared Leto's face. I wanted to see how it is to destroy somethign that beatiful...
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: or after losing a tooth:"Hey, even the mona lisa is falling apart". Personally i do not like cablerubmarks and beat up chainstays. The rest i dont really care -except the one time my wife dopped a dumbbell on my bike. I feel no joy messing my things up, though.
  • + 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: drop a dumb bell on your bike? Is she an angry crossfitter? Big Grin
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: it was an "accident" and it was my dumbbell. best thing she did not even notice she hit the bike with it and could not understand why i was so mad.i put a sticker over the huge dent in the toptube. it was in 2011 bike long sold all good.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: my bike's look exceptional beaten if we talk about the paint and I only tape palaces where the cable rubs. I am really proud they look like someone is riding, pampering is for the other guys haha..
  • + 1
 Go to any automotive protection shop and just ask for some scraps. The strips left over after they are done with a car are a good size for bikes, and they let you take it for free. REALLY NOT A DENTIST.
  • + 14
 It's like having a girlfriend and never having sex with her.... Leaving her a virgin for the next boyfriend! We should enjoy our bikes... and girlfriends! Smile
  • + 5
 (or Boyfriends! )
  • + 5
 Its not that.
Im a student and my frame was myw dream frame for a long time- if it has many paint chips Im gonna be sad.
I bought 2metres of 3M tape and fully wrapped my frame so that it shines for years to come Smile
  • + 0
 I suppose there is something to say for looking after your toys.... but I do hate the high end shiny plastic bikes covered in Invisiframe and not hammered. Bikes are meant to be thrashed! Wink
  • + 6
 I find the wrap looks pretty crappy especially compared to new paint. looses all the deep wet shine.

and a good application is rare.

Yeah it'll make the bike look better in 2 years and help with resale but it's like one of those black car bra's
You make YOUR bike look crappier in order for someone ELSE to enjoy

It only really protects against small scratches but a buffing wheel and polishing compound can get rid of 99% of these

I've done chainstays or next cranks where I have a lot of heel rub but
otherwise I'll polish out my little trail mistakes.
  • + 4
 Or go the Orange route with powder coated frames? My 8 year old Five still looks great. I bought a Tues and a Myst recently (not both for me!) and both had quite a lot of wrap on crucial places, so clearly the manufacturers can apply it at the factory. I still put more on as neither had any on the top tube or on the outside of the chain stays to cover heel rub.
  • + 4
 "Adam Brayton's custom-painted Scott Gambler probably didn't look this pretty after the World Championships were over. Imagine how beat up it would look after a season at the bike park."

Well guess what, I doubt a man whose riding videos go best with Slayer, actually cares... the only question is should you? And if you want to give me a lesson about exposure of composites or metals to water or UV rays, then well... you probably need more Slayer
  • + 3
 The "probably" and "imagine" bits bother me. If they want to make a point the show what the bike looked like after the Worlds. And wait for a season at the bike park and show what it looks like by then. Show it, we'll watch it, scale it to our type and frequency of riding and judge for ourselves whether it is worth the hassle. As it is now, they'd come across more professional not attempting to make a half-assed speculation like this.
  • + 6
 I heard Brayton rides like that because he actually listens to James Blunt
  • + 1
 @G-A-R-Y: I have to try that... I'll also download some vlogs of vegan and paleo youtube superstars.
  • + 2
 @G-A-R-Y:
You're Beau-ti-full
You're Beau-ti-full
You're Beau-ti-full
It's true
  • + 3
 wraps look awful once the dirt migrates underneath. Id rather enjoy seeing the finish of my bike without a plastic layer in front of it, encrusted with dirt and lose resale value, You're just keeping the bike nice for someone else and missing out on how it looks yourself. I'd also rather buy a used frame that shows the use it's had than a wrapped frame which looks new but has actually been hammered.
  • + 3
 I always buy frame only, I own a Yeti SB4.5, and I make less than 40k a year. I've never understood the person who bags on someone for taking care of their shit. I invisiframe my bike every time; its amazing stuff and its saved my frame from many crashes. My Yeti came with a sheet of frame wrap but it was thin garbage compared to invisiframe.
  • + 5
 Because it can easily be done aftermarket.

Is this A- an advertorial for "Invisiwrap".
or B - another bullshit bit of market research.
  • + 3
 Having been on Pinkbike before, I can tell you this article implies that there is a bike manufacturer around that will sell her 2019 bikes/frames with a protective wrap or at least will offer you this factory option. Once they have released their press release (or maybe a preceding or pending PB article/review) they can revert to this research proving that there is finally a "rider owned" bike company (who even owns a bike company and doesn't actually ride just a little bit?) that listens to the customers and gives you this option on their frames.

To answer the question, no I don't care one bit about such a layer of plastic covering my frame. I've got some patches where the chain and cables hit/rub, I may get something to protect the fork lowers and that's it. I don't care about resale value. I buy my bike to ride, not to sell. Whatever bike (component) I ever sold or gave away was simply because I felt it was still too good to not be used.

Like some good old jeans, I can actually appreciate some signs of wear. A couple of months ago I replaced my DMR hardtail frame which I've been riding for over ten years. Yeah there are quite some patches where the paint has worn off and which show some rust. I don't think it affects performance one bit. Same with my current brake levers (2006 Magura Louise). The anodizing has worn off a little of the levers and the paint of the lever body has chipped a bit. I think it is cool. Moreover, how am I ever going to properly cover these in plastic? And how would it increase resale value one bit?

Now even if above only goes for me, judging from any regular PB bike review or the pending comment section, total bike weight is a major deal for a huge number of your readers. More so than cosmetic damage. "... lbs for a carbon frame? Dude, ... has a (lower weight) one that kind of money." (Cue pitchforks)
  • + 8
 Yup, classic PB infomercial/field research. These opinion pieces are like their directed polls, nothing but product placement.
  • + 2
 @southoftheborder: Interesting to see which company it will be then. Especially when judging by the comment section most people go "Bugger off with your factory wrap. I'll get a high quality wrap when I really want one, or I'll get no wrap at all."

So now I'm interested to see the company that pops up in a few months and goes "Hey look, we've been listening. We'll sell you our new frames wrapped in plastic. Easy to wipe your fingerprints off the bike should you ever touch it."
  • + 2
 @vinay: Minor improvements with almost no added cost, since the wholesale price of the wrap in China and the extra human time to apply it are both negligible there. Yet this will be marketed as the ultimate "WE CARE FOR YOU, OUR BELOVED CUSTOMERS!!!" tagline.
  • + 9
 You guys put the tinfoil hats on for this article? That’s quite the stretch.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Seen this with the "11sp bad, 12sp good" article well before Eagle came out. And I think with a couple of other "innovations". But I'm interested in your view as well of course. Feel free to share.
  • + 2
 @vinay: I have to admit I thought exactly the same thing as you... Smells fishy
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: Just looked the article up by this very same author:

www.pinkbike.com/news/opinion-numerology-and-the-demise-of-eleven-speed.html

I was baffled, still am. This article here is pretty much on par.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: what are you thoughts on tinfoil bike wraps to match the hats?
  • + 2
 @southoftheborder: Well, in this case and seing some brands answering here, i would definately say that this is an infomercial, as for someone that works in this area like me, none of this makes sense. Selling 100€ kits for bikes is the most stupid thing ever.

I will beginning to take pictures to those customers that buy those kits and damage the bike in the 1cm that the bike isn't protected lol Please, protect the most obvious parts and ride the f*** out of your bike and stop being some little pussies.
  • + 4
 Pro-Tip = Go to any sign shop and ask for the roll of clear vinyl that just ran out and they are going to throw away. Not enough to cover a vinyl sign, but enough to do 3 bikes at least.
  • + 3
 This is an easy problem to fix. Go to any auto dealership, ask them for the useless end cuts of 3M clear they’ve got lying around. Cost is at most a few bucks. Since everyone on Pinkbike is a pro mechanic, strip your bike down to the frame and wrap away.

The more interesting question is why mountain bikers seem to believe that their 4 year old bike is worth 75% of its original MSRP. What world do people live in?!
  • + 2
 Richard, you should know better than anyone why things don't happen... For any company making bikes in any kind of somewhat large volume, changing things up like that isn't an easy task. There are a lot of cogs in that machine.. Like someone else mentioned, more cosmetic related warranty claims if that wrap isn't perfect.. And, yes, an even higher cost to the consumer... Much like laying up 400 pieces of carbon fiber takes time, so does wrapping a frame, especially if you want it to look good.. This is a case where with the current way things are going, let the customer decide is probably the best bet... But, if you are buying a bike and resale value is a top concern, you're in the wrong gig... Bikes depreciate worse than cars and electronics...
  • + 3
 Pinkbike has the contact info for every mountain bike brand’s marketing manager on the planet. Maybe instead of creating a forum for asinine conspiracy theories you play journalist and actually ask them.
  • + 1
 @shoemakereast: Actually, I did ask them first
  • + 2
 It seems as though I might be of the small percentage that likes to keep my bike looking fresh. I take pride in what I work hard for and I'm not afraid to use my things hard (trucks and bikes) but it enjoy looking at my shiny ride before it gets its next round of mud plus the added resale is a huge bonus. I've wrapped both alloy and carbon bikes and i do the same to high wear spots on my truck.
  • + 2
 You can get a roll of helicopter tape big enough to cover a whole frame for about $30. There is a little bit of a learning curve but once you get the hang of it you can wrap a bike in about 1 hour. Then at the end of the season I'll use a razor to cut out and replace sections of the tape that got jacked up from rock strikes.
Also if you really want your bike to stay looking like new, buy a black frame. The carbon showing from little rock chips won't be as obvious.
  • + 1
 Any chance you could tell me where you buy the stuff please?
  • + 2
 @Blackers: For high impact areas (under chainstays, under down tube) use Shelter Tape - it's super thick and absorbs some shock. www.effettomariposa.eu/en/products/shelter-off-road

For abrasion resistance use this 3M stuff. I think this is it: www.amazon.ca/Translucent-Helicopter-Frame-Protection-Protective/dp/B00S0I9TCE/ref=sr_1_1/136-9543048-0103235?ie=UTF8&qid=1539362937&sr=8-1&keywords=helicopter+tape+3m
  • + 1
 @alexsin: Champion, thanks for your help.
  • + 2
 Just because a bike park hikes the resale prices on their beat-to-shit (BUT PRETTY) rentals doesn't mean we should question the entire industry. Do car manufacturers wrap the cars you drive off the lot? no. A used bike is a used bike and most people will not pay a premium just because the frame is pretty.
  • + 2
 Pinkbike commenters and bike buyers will savage a company that ups the price of their bikes enough to justify frame wrap. It takes a lot of time and labor to apply frame wrap so it sticks well and doesn’t look like shite. My Evil took about 6 hours of cutting and cleaning, spraying and soaking, and applying tape. Sure, pre cut kits take the cutting time out but let’s estimate it takes two hours of labor to properly wrap a carbon frame. Will the already cratering pedal bike (non e-bike, pbike?) market support higher prices for factory-quality frame wrap? Doubtful. Could be a selling point for certain brands but wraps don’t come for free.
  • + 2
 Where's the resale argument? The only supporting info was a rental bike could get "up to $200" more for looking prettier? What if it was a $100 or $50? When does it stop being worth the time and effort? Hours fussing with vinyl only to get a scratch where the vinyl ended isn't worth $200 to me.
  • + 2
 Hey Richard,

I usually like your stories a lot but cannot follow your intention with this one.

You have seen the business from the other side yourself. So you should know why some trends cannot be followed that fast and easily. I would say that everyone who thinks that he would do it better should start his own brand or apply for a job in the business.

The other way round there is not one bicycle brand that would miss a critical trend which would give them a mayor competitive advantage. Their sales people will hear ideas and complaints from the shops and distributors every day. If they don't follow then that is for a reason.

Second thing I want to comment is your listing of 29ers as a trend coming from the riders. How do you think any rider would have handbuilt a 29er wheel or suspension frame or fork without the availability of rims and tires?

First of all Gary Fisher failed to promote the 29er idea some 20 years ago. The for the sole reason to boost sales a number of brands decided to push 29er wheels and provided some weak arguments which have mostly been falsified. Yeah and the same lot tried to persuade us that 650B was superiour to 26". And the pressfit, boost, ... you name it.

Have we really been asking for multiple through axle standards or steer tube diameters?

Most innovation is driven by sales goals and the resulting marketing campains.
I know lots of people who have ridden 1x12 and wholeheartly reject it.

So who is making innovation and why?

All the best
Stefan
  • + 1
 Partially agree. I don't think my 29er is necessarily faster than the 26er that it replaced but it's way more comfortable and because I can run carbon rigids without the wrist pain from smaller wheels it's much lighter too.
  • + 2
 I could not care less about scratches and scuffs on my bikes. Covering a frame in clear stuff looks like that plastic covered couch at your grannies house. I do apply tape for cable rub because that can eventually wear a groove and I don’t like that. And a chainstay guard to avoid that damage and noise. I tend to keep my bikes a while and old geometry and standard reduce resale way more than any scratches. Besides, when I sell I’m looking to get something out of my garage not make a profit. I’ve asked around and as the article states, a protected frame might add $200 to resale. Not worth it to me.
  • + 0
 That's ridiculous. I've had three bikes professionally wrapped and nobody noticed until I pointed it out. Major damage wrecked a panel but not the paint so I replaced those panels and everything looks good as new.
  • + 4
 @alexsin: cause people don't give a f*ck how your bike looks
  • + 1
 @LOLWTF: You do. You said that it looks like your grannies house.
  • + 1
 @alexsin: no I did. But what do I know, all my grandparents dried before I was born.
  • + 4
 base layer and paint to protect the frame, clear coat to protect the paint, helitape to protect them, let's just bubble wrap the whole thing too just in case XD
  • + 2
 I've fitted Invisframe to the last two bikes that I've bought, an Orange Five and Alpine 6, although neither was done for the potential resale value. It's purely down to trying to prolong the finish of the powder coat, as being a UK based rider, I know how the combination of wet, muddy conditions and dirty kit can soon take the shine off of a bike. That said, when I sold the Five earlier this year, the fact it was Invisiframed wasn't lost on the buyer. The bike has been ridden in all weathers, but was still in great condition.
  • + 3
 This article reminds me of people who bitch and moan that the government should fix all their issues and provide for their needs. just wrap your own bike peeps, then go ride it.
  • + 2
 It would be way too time consuming for mass produced frames. Getting the tape on without air bubbles isn't a quick job so it would add massively to the cost. Also, if manufacturers start speccing it out of the box that's going to harm the companies selling it aftermarket. Personally, I don't bother with it. I put patches on cable contact points if necessary. I don't need the whole frame to be kept in museum condition and also it's a waste of plastic.
  • + 2
 So a bike with no scratches fetches a $200 premium over bikes with scratches? You can drop $100 on a pre cut kit to protect you frame, spend 3+ hours cursing the world while trying to put it on right, and then peel it off when it’s time sell the bike so it looks new? No brainer, save your money and take a $200 (less when you add cost and time in) hit.
  • + 3
 Ride it like it's stolen and I treat it like a redheaded stepchild. Fukk your protective tape I'll take some lube and some clean rags. It's just a tool for fun not a freaking Bugatti.
  • + 3
 Give me an attractive raw finish option with the manufacturer graphics every damn day (alu or carbon). I would rather save on the weight, enviro impact of paint, and hassle of plastic wrapping the bike.
  • + 2
 "Applying a layer of adhesive material to the complicated shapes of a mountain bike frame requires some skill and clever cutting. Invisiwrap (left) offers pre-cut full-frame wrap kits for the more adventurous garage mechanic. Or, you can pay to have it done by a pro, like Whistler BC's Ride Wrap (right)".

Invisiwrap! or even Invisiframe is the original and best known frame protection company. The wording in this one paragraph is just really frustrating! In my humble opinion there is no one more "pro" at the design and fit of frame protection than Lee at Invisiframe and I'm sure the vast majority of bike shops in the U.K would agree and the 1000's of customers they have world wide.
  • + 2
 ‘Wide bars, short stems, dropper posts, one-by drivetrains, chain guides, 29ers, wide rims, tubeless systems… the list of user-generated improvements that were widely adopted years before mainstream bike and component makers committed to production goes on...’

Hmmm!? Guess Sam Hill (narrow bars, longish stem, 275 and narrow wheels, medium frame), Richie Rude (narrow bars, longish stem and medium frame) didn’t get the memo.

Some are improvements but many are preference.
  • + 2
 Sam Hill invented wide bars.
  • + 4
 @dubod22: I know how wide he runs his bars dude. But Sam pretty much revolutionised the way we run our bikes and even the style in which we ride. He was the guy that started asking for wider bars and lower stack heights. Without his influence we’d all be riding around on 680mm bars still. He is a true talent. He completed the memo before the memo was even a thing.
  • - 8
flag zyoungson (Oct 12, 2018 at 3:38) (Below Threshold)
 Most of those things came from the industry and were definitely not user generated. Also mtb tech has been known for a long time to be fast moving and constantly developing. the article (writer) is retarded.
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: lol i think you’re putting too much faith in the industry man. If we left it to them they’d just still be churning out the same old stuff making the easy money. Innovation is risky for mtb manufacturers. So much is fad or fashion and knowing what’ll stick and what will slide is often impossible because it doesn’t even always follow logic.
Every one of the things RC mentions came from the user, that’s why he used those examples. I’m not an RC fanboy but he knows his shit and he knows what he’s talking about here, to call him retarded is, I’m afraid, well you get my point I hope.
  • + 1
 @iqbal-achieve: "Without his influence we'd all be riding around on 680mm bars still."? No, we wouldn't. I was running Renthal crosser bars on a BMX stem for years before 'the Industry' caught up.
  • + 1
 @DarthDonkey: oh sorry I didn’t realise you were gonna be the man to lead us all into the future? Fair play to you. I was running some pretty wide bars and short stems too, as were a lot of U.K. riders but I wasn’t destroying the rest of the best riders in the world on a set up most of them had never seen.
  • + 2
 Truth is that bikes depreciate faster than cars, faster than high end smartphones, etc. If you want your bike to look pristine, wrap it. If you're trying to protect resale value... weak argument. If someone is shopping for a used bike, a wrapped frame might encourage the purchase of your bike over a similar non-wrapped option, but its not like its protecting the value of the finish/bike.
  • + 2
 Someone selling new bikes isn't too concerned about preserving the resale value of used bikes. Is that really hard to understand?

And for that matter, integrating frame wrap in the graphics would defeat the point. The point being you remove the wrap when it's time to sell, leaving the factory finish in tact - if the wrap was the factory finish, you'd just have to wrap that.
  • + 2
 What's the point in this article? Or course they won't all come pre protected! Why would someone buy a new bike, when after a few years, they can just buy new frame wraps and replace bearings/shock service at a massively lower cost to make it look and feel like new all over again? Thus stopping a rider from purchasing another bike or frame, thus reducing overall annual sales because more people will be hanging on to their bikes longer. And if this happens, bike manufacturers will then increase their prices even more to compensate.
Article already mentions that yeti come with wraps in box, but think at how expensive they are already, they've likely already factored this into their pricing as mentioned above.
  • + 2
 They'll just change BB standard, axle width, reach, wheel size, etc. to make you buy a new bike.
  • + 2
 Its is very simple - manufactures don't want their bikes to be sold on at high prices, they want them to be a raw bashed as possible so that the next person will look into buying a new bike rather than a used one. That is the reason why year upon year they change bolt sizes and the whole lot, to put people off fixing and buy new instead. It is all business strategies!
  • + 2
 IMO.. leave this to the aftermarket.

Not everyone is going to want to wrap their frame let alone pay an additional premium for factory wrapped frames.

That said if a manufacturer wanted to offer an optional “armoured” version of a frame for those who ride in rocky terrain that would be slick.
  • + 3
 They are that far behind other sectors anyhow, all that protection can be built into the top clear-coat if they just used the right product. But hey why bother when suckers just keep shelling out the cash...
  • + 1
 It's very hard to believe that they're still bikers that don't know that you buy car shield transparnent wrap to protect your frame. Other options is clear "plasti dip" - not such resistant but very easy to apply and actually give some basic protection.

Beware one thing though! Some car foils has extremely strong adhesive to the point when can ripp off paint job if not removed properly so be sure to check this before applaying it to your bike.
  • + 1
 Its the same with your SMART PHONE. Most people buy a rubber case for it right away. But the beauty of the real material is never revealed. You could ask why the designer had to make any effort in designing it in the first place.
  • + 1
 My enduro came with some parts of the frame wrapped, and more wrap included to pretty much cover the whole thing. The costs to apply the wrap is prolly high, so they don't do the whole thing, but at least they give you the stuff to do yourself, or the lbs can apply it...
  • + 1
 Scratches have a history, love my bikes when new but it´s impossible to keep it like that forever, you can be careful when transporting your bike or keeping it at home, but every scratch it gets riding has a background, I used to remember some epic rides or some bad crashes looking at my bike
  • + 1
 I do agree but I expect it's unrealistic for brands to adopt from a cost / resource POV and of course the associated costs passed onto the consumer.

I personally have my frames wrapped because I like to keep my bike look as good as possible for as long as possible. What really irks me is when manufactures apply little or no protection to bikes or even worse useless protection like chain stay guards that are clearly an inch too short.

I don't expect my frame to wrapped but I would like it to come with appropriate guards built in to the chain stay, a rock gaurd on the down tube and fork bumps (if it's a DH bike).
  • + 1
 And here I am, just buying vinyl from the local hardware store and wrapping my frame, be it colour, pattern or simply clear. Costs close to nothing, is a very clean job and you are done in an hour with the whole bike. Just wrap it yourself, it's not that hard of a job to do. Everyone cannot simply do everything in order to please the mots people possible, that would be madness! Then again, pre-cut vinyl to be shipped with a bike/frame would be a game changer! Ride on, cheers!
  • + 1
 Do us a favour. Go buy material, go design your template, install, show us pics of your work with a follow up maybe 2/3 months later. This should answer any questions you should have as to why it isn’t done. Material, tooling, design, and skill are all out of 99% of people’s world.
  • + 0
 Or just buy a premade kit from invisiframe. It's tricky to install yourself and do a really good job with no kinks or bubbles. rockwrap.ca or ridewrap do the whole thing for you for like $200.
  • + 2
 Effetto Mariposa Shelter Tape is the best stuff out there! Use a nickel to round the edges and a heat gun to get it to sit flush and it quite honestly saves frames. I can't recommend it enough!
  • + 1
 I've wrapped my last four bikes. If you live in Vancouver check out rockblock.ca or in Whistler, www.ridewrap.ca. Cost is around $200 for a frame. Both services are amazing. If you damage a panel you can get it replaced and if a spot becomes extra worn you can double up. It's great. It also makes your bike easier to sell - it isn't even necessary to take the stuff off since the buyer usually wants to keep it on.
  • + 1
 Thanks @alexsin !

We are beginning to ship our kits out with a full launch probably near the end of the month!
  • + 0
 @RideWrap: Awesome. Such a good service. Ideally shops should offer your service as an upgrade when they buy their bike (get a discount on a wrap when you buy it with your new bike).
  • + 0
 @alexsin: Many already do in the lower mainland! Soon to come to other parts of the world....
  • + 1
 I was glad the author mentions "marketing types". The MTB business has become what I hate most about the ski business, marketing types and used car salesman. The fact that they said "it would just add to the MSRP" is telling. Consider that that at list price the markup from the Mfr cost is 50%-80% and the average full suspension MTB now must be around $4000 new, I'd think adding this wrap would be a value-add over competition rather than a increase in MSRP. And they know there are a certain amount of people out there that can afford to, and will replace something just because it doesn't look new anymore.
  • + 1
 Truck manufacturers don't 'equip' their vehicles with any type of bed-liner(be it spray in or plastic) either, and they've been pretty-much a must-have for over 30 years.
Bike manufacturers largely protect the down-tube and stays, and that's what most people want.
I use helo tape on my shit, but don't fault the manufacturers for not doing it for me, and would rather do it myself than have to pay extra for it to come that way from the factory
  • + 1
 Actually, most truck manufacturers come w/ bedliners today. Even the base.
  • + 1
 a good Down-tube protector from the factory and thats about it. Anything else is just rider preference. No need for all of it. Maybe on cranks it would be nice. But if its just a wrap it shouldn't come from the manufacturer. People don't really know how to shut up and just ride your damn bike!
  • + 1
 my 2013 commencal looks like it did when i purchased it in early 2015 because i wrapped it with an invisiframe kit just like my other bikes before. I've met many riders that have said that they wrapped there bikes after the first crash and wished they done it as soon as they got the bike. especially when there carbon chips. many people say they like there bikes a bit worn looking but ive never seen anyone deliberately scratch up new bikes to look more how they like.....to each there own but i always assumed that if bikes look like new a few years on theres less incentive to sell it and buy new....that is assuming that your not a new standards chaser Smile
  • + 1
 Oh no, my downtube has shuttle wear. Also, manufacturers want people to buy NEW bikes, not your pristinely wrapped used one. That being said, I guess the person selling the wrapped bike is likely buying another brand new bike to wrap again...maybe it’s a wash. How I see it though, a bike is a tool. Ride it hard, maintain it well, and it’ll have a nice long life with you before it’s time to upgrade.
  • + 1
 I agree with the premise here. I’ve got old bikes thet are beat up. They look cool dirty but run better when you keep them clean. I’ve got a couple of newer bikes that look so awesome I did go to the trouble to wrap them... but it’s a royal pain in the ass, and I’m pretty meticulous with these things. I’d pay an extra $100 for the factory to wrap the most exposed areas properly... which would cost less than ordering the materials and taking 2 hours to do it yourself without as good of a result. While I’m not likely to re-sell my bike soon or cry about a scratch, it’s a great and super cheap way to protect the finish so the arguments against it make little sense.
  • + 1
 K9 bikes used to cover the mainframe in a super tuff Teflon based layer. Holds up and other obvious benefits. I wrap but only because no one has yet offered something better and more environmentally friendly. Something like Linex but less weighty. A few seasons back my first ride on a brand spanking new bike in Leogang in the rain... Lots of very abrasive mud....not the sticky goo from the UK... Bike looked like it had been used a full season after half a day. Even the anodized frame was showing silver patches. Wrapping a frame is not just about vanity, it actually does protect from real wear and tear.
  • + 1
 A really good industry of wrapping company's have sprung up to fill the void left by the manufacturers, they would kill that overnight if they did it. Plus it's a good earner for local bike shops and workshops. By the manufacturers not doing it it keeps other businesses in business.
  • + 1
 I agree completely that there should be a factory option of frame protection. As said elsewhere, even chain and downtube protection is still lacking with many manufacturers. But I also feel like why do we need to try so hard to protect these blinged out machines that, as RC says, are being used in quite an abrasive environment? I mean why spend £5k on something that needs £100 of clear tape to keep it looking bling?
I totally get all the arguments for resale, upon which I rely heavily but we shouldn’t have to be so concerned about keeping our bikes tidy so much as we should about ripping. It smacks of some roadieology to me and I don’t like that show shit.
Have we gone too far, making bikes that are too shmancy and now we’re all scared to ride em before we wrap them up in protection? Heaven forbid I crash and put a scratch in it and you can forget going out in the mud, no way my babies getting the grinding paste treatment.
Do I care more about protecting my investment than I do about hitting that rock garden? I mean the things worth 4 times more than my car and I wouldn’t take that rallying. Feels like it’s heading that way to me but then I’m perpetually skint.
  • + 2
 Mate, mtbers are just as bad as roadies. Half degrees here, weight savings there, 5mm offset conundrums, bar height, tyre compound. Mtbers make roadies look like James Dean devil may care types in comparison.
  • + 7
 @dubod22: it is as I’d feared then. We are defeated. Now...
Rat goes into exile after escaping an attempt on his life while the rest of 50:01 are scattered and many others succumbed to the power of the industry.
Kade must find him and complete his training if he is to do battle with Gee.
Who of course will later kill his industry master to save Kade in an act of redemption that leads to Gee being reunited with the spirit of Rat and Peaty in a terrible CGI scene.
  • + 1
 Recently had to wrap an entire fleet of rental and demo bikes for the whistler season. It's kind of fun for the first one or 2... but after you've done 20 or 30 bikes, templates really do become handy. And it really does protect the bikes. especially from foot wear and chain slap. If I can make a 3m frame template in less than an hour, and wrap a bike for around $40CAD, it should be cheap as chips for big bike makers.
  • + 1
 I bought a Cube recently and the downtube where you might get rocks flicked up from the front wheels and the chainstay were wrapped from the factory, they also included some clear stickers to apply where you might get cable rub.
  • + 1
 Which Cube did you buy? My 2017 Stereo 160 C:62 Race came without wrap and only the standard downtube and chainstay rubber.
  • + 1
 Been doing this for years with heli-tape and gorilla tape. If bike manufacturers were to do this at the factory it would make the MSRP go up. I take pride in wrapping my own frames. I know exactly how thick the wrap is (it’s not some cheap thin scotch tape that I could see the manufacturer applying to save money), and that I can cover the entire frame from headtube to rear axle. Not one area is missed!
  • + 1
 I definitely would have preferred my bike came with the 3m tape than having had to spend 4-5 hours creating my own templates at home and applying it myself. Those curved sections(which is like 90% of the surface area of a carbon frame) are damn hard to make the tape adhere.
  • + 1
 I wrapped my current frame before building it. Being a bare and perfectly clean frame made it pretty easy. However I did this to help protect against potential damage to the carbon. Where I live the terrain is consistently rocky so theres a constant barrage of flinging rocks and pebbles. The idea being that chipped paint and exposed carbon layers will lead to a problem earlier. I didnt do it for looks.
  • + 4
 The first thing we put on any new bike is a 3m wrap. Callum at ridewrap.ca is awesome.
  • + 1
 Thanks @OneUpComponents !

We aim to serve and have some really cool stuff in the pipeline to make our wraps even better!
  • + 0
 I can't recommend Inivisiframe enough. Shipped to Canada from the UK in 3 days and once you fit a few panels its pretty easy to get the hang of it. Frame taped my recent bike purchase in less than 2 hours. It looks fantastic and won't have to deal with paint chips that everyone complains about. I've heard RideWrap is also a great product, but you have to get your bike to Whistler in order to have it applied. And it's way more expensive.
  • + 1
 thanks @gbeaks33 !

Our webshop and diy kits launch at the end of this month! Give us a try next time, weve been working to reduce pieces, increase coverage, and make them easier to install. Smile
  • + 1
 @RideWrap: Awesome, good to know!
  • + 1
 Get a frame with a good, durable finish. Problem solved. Powdercoat works wonders, check out Orange bikes for instance. Hard anodising is another finish that keeps well. It's not rocket science people.
  • + 0
 Have you taken a close look, and I mean taken a close look st the fit and finish of some of these brand new 4000$ frames?

It’s down right horrendous.

I was looking at a brand new 5010 CC that seemed to have bypassed the step of sanding on the inside of the front triangle. Look at the seat tube/top tube junction on an Ibis and it looks like a glob of bondo. The paint quality on these new bikes is just not that good. It appears that they are cutting corners to save money on paint prep and paint quality. Personally I hate the look of running around with a condom on my frame but if you plan on selling your bike, you have to do it.
  • + 1
 I have only ever wrapped one bike. .It cracked and was replaced under warranty. My current bike isn't wrapped when it cracks and is warrantied I will likely sell off the brand new frame and buy something else.
  • + 0
 It would also be cool if companies sent a little bottle of touch up paint with each sale. Something liike a nail polish bottle that matched the color of your bike. That would really go a long way to your customers. Its the little things that really set a company apart from the rest.
  • + 0
 I've used invisiframe on my last two bikes and I wish I'd put it on the one before that (carbon trance SX). I got it on with minimal bubbles but not perfect. On my DH bike the area where it rests on the down tube has rubbed through and I'm not to happy with that but overall its good to protect the new frame. If there is a better product out there that someone uses let me know.
  • + 1
 Hey @brownstone , check out our Shuttle armor for your downtube.
  • + 1
 If we consume and produce less plastic, there will be less plastic pollution on Earth. Yeah MTBs use a bunch of non-reusable materials, but why add to a growing problem on Earth simply for aesthetics?
  • + 1
 Helicopter tape under the downtube, rubber wrap on the drive side chain/seat stay, electrical tape on the bridges and seat tube and cable rub spots.

Chips can be prevented. Crash damage is an inherent risk.
  • + 2
 Clear Gorilla tape is $7 a roll. Not as thick as the Heli tape but about 1/4 the cost and works for cable rub and rock hits just fine. Easy to work with also.
  • + 1
 my 2 cents - the one thing the industrie needs to fix is internal cable routing. why do only a few manufacturers get their had around how to produce frames where this s*** actually works like it is supposed to?
  • + 1
 how good a bike looks does heavily affect peoples views of it......if you disagree then why were suspension fork shock boots removed cos they were much better at stopping scratch damage and ingress of s#it than without them.
  • + 0
 As usual, RC is proving how out of touch he is. What a random thing to request from bike makers. When manufacturers are finally making light, strong, cheap bikes, have settled all the standards, all the parts line up like they're supposed to, and they don't creak for a month after being ridden through a puddle, maybe then we can start talking about protecting our precious paint jobs.
  • + 1
 Settled what standards? Seems to me there's a new standard hub width or wheel size or bottom bracket standard or chain guard mounting every few months. And I like to see innovation, but it's going too far. What need is there for a 148mm hub width when we've had 150mm for 20 years? It's just greedy moghuls trying to make our possesions (that we paid thousands of pounds sterling for!) obsolete so we have to buy new (may they be cursed with a terminal case of boils).
  • + 0
 Personally I think it's not just down to manufacturers to offer this as a possible add-on, more so it's down to your local LBS, those of us that still support them, to educate the customer on the benefits of a specifically cut kit { www.invisiframe.co.uk} for your chosen ride, £70 for the kit and then the hourly rate for the shops competent mechanic to apply it, my local shop, www.bikescene.co.uk usually applies a dozen per week, be it at the time of purchase or retro fit, personally when I sold my Mojo HD3 I removed the kit, after 26 hard months it looked brand new, it's now on my new HD4, it's a no brainer for me.
  • + 1
 I got that wrap on my last bike, the funny part is the occasional comment about a crack in my frame which is just the seam between two pieces. I applied it myself it wasn’t too bad for a first time next time would probably be even easier.
  • + 1
 I always send my bikes to Shackwrap to protect their nice paint jobs, if they had some tacky stick on graphics and logos, I’d probably choose a different bike with a real professional finish and get it wrapped properly
  • + 1
 There is an simple solution to figure it out. Using a spray foil/film designed to protect car wheels, paint protection, ect., U can also protect your bike and enjoy many color variants Wink
  • + 2
 Don't YETI Bikes come with protective foil for certain places of the bike? Granted, the foil does not look as thick and sturdy as Invisframe for example.
  • + 1
 never ever cover any bike, do not care, ride the shit out of the bike donate, buy the new one;
alu bikes look badass with scratches and marks of riding, typically removing paint will make look bike more badass
  • + 1
 Yeti includes a sheet of pre-cut/shaped clear protective vinyl with all their frames. The buyer can choose to use it or not. I’m pretty sure they aren’t the only ones either.
  • + 1
 YT as well I believe.
  • + 1
 @general-lee: My YT didn't come with anything like that, but maybe this year they've added it?
  • + 1
 Nukeproof comes with touch up paint and rub stickers
  • + 1
 IMO wraps tend to look shittier than a scratched up frame, especially once it starts to see wear, and some products can't ever be removed because the adhesive damages the finish underneath.
  • + 1
 Frames coming wrapped seems like it could definitely benefit a lot of consumers. I like the idea, and though I can see some downsides, I think wrapping the high-wear areas ought to be wrapped.
  • + 3
 Ride it till it's raw and it'll buff right out. A little pati a never hurt no one
  • + 2
 I think it comes down to warranty. Can you imagine the number of complaints about peeling tape etc. They just wouldn't be able to keep up.
  • + 0
 Shack Wrap offers the best service in my opinion. Used him a few times for my different bikes. drop off in the morning and collect later that day. the bike looks exactly the same and is worth more when you come to sell it after a couple of years.
  • + 1
 Yeti has a kit you can buy. Specialized ship the new stumpjumper with a Kit. Granted, it's not for the full bike but the main areas can be protected.
  • + 3
 Wake up sheeple! Big Frame Wrap controls the entire bike industry!
  • + 2
 hahaha
  • + 1
 Wow can’t believe how many people actually care how the paint looks. Ride your bike dudes! Crash...jump..hell even lay it on its side. It’s a mountain bike!
  • + 2
 Surely the answer is to have a paint which is durable enough to negate the requirement for any form of adhesive protection
  • + 1
 As soon as I ordered my Pivot Mach 6 I ordered a set of InvisiFrame for the bike. I take my bike to the bike park so it needs all the protection it can get.
  • + 1
 I believe there is a typo below the nomad and HB160 frame - The kits pictured are produced by invisiFRAME and not invisiwrap... invisiframe.co.uk
  • + 2
 Wrapping my bike to protect the paint is pretty much the only thing i was never ever concerned about.
  • + 1
 Well, there goes my brilliant start up plan of operating a wrap shop using nothing but HD shipping tape, and charging $500.00 a pop for each frame. Dang.....
  • + 2
 Banshee uses hard anodising to avoid minor scratches. That really is some tough stuff. Only works with aluminium though.
  • + 1
 I bought a second hand banshee frame a few days ago and I admit it look really good for a frame that I presume was ridden hard. But then I don't really care and only wrap some old tube around the chainstay to quiet any hit by the chain.
  • + 1
 @opignonlibre: that’s exactly what I did.
  • + 1
 I swear my 2014 aluminium Specialized Enduro came with a frame wrap on the downtube. I still replaced it with one from invisishield though.
  • + 1
 Do away with the paint altogether and ride a raw frame. Takes a lot of stress out of attaching your bike to racks and day-to-day riding.
  • + 2
 Invisframe- That is all. www.invisiframe.co.uk one of the best products about.
  • + 0
 The timing of this article cracks me up. I just started a bike wrap service in Bentonville, AR. I'm currently charging $95 to cover a bike in all key areas with a high quality self-healing film.
  • + 0
 i do have industrial glue here and there, but in general i like my bikes with scars from ride, not a dust from the garage... I do agree for crack'y, carbon protection is a must....that's y i never rode carbon...
  • + 1
 bike manufacturers don’t need to make and sell every last bit on the bike.

also, frame wrap on some and not others would make it tough to compare weights between bikes.
  • + 1
 My 2012 Scott genius LT is raw aluminum apart from a painted logo at the down tube and printed torque specs where applicable. 6 years on it still looks great....
  • + 1
 Odd Pinkbike chose to use a Capra for the heli tape example pic. My 2017 Raw Carbon Capra actually did come heli taped from new.
  • + 1
 specialized stumpjumper already has a tape on the downtube and theres no reason they shouldnt be able to coat other major parts of the bike.
  • + 1
 If I’m shopping for a used high end bike online and it isn’t wrapped then I just assume that the previous owner didn’t maintain it at all.
  • + 1
 Personally I feel like wrapping your bike with tape (whether it be graphic or clear) is part of the personal customization process.
  • + 1
 What's this helicopter clear vinyl ? Sounds interesting. I use motorbike shop thick clear vinyl, it's a bit of work to cut the forms but not impossible.
  • + 1
 I had my '15 Giant Reign with a kit of vinyl stickers in stock. But it's more for preventing scratches form cable routing I guess.
  • + 1
 All those scuff marks were and still will be the glorious moment to me! I love it!
  • + 1
 Love my Raw Aluminum Knolly Fugitive for this reason. Just F’n ride and I don’t worry about scratches!
  • + 2
 Ha, just got a new bike that is raw aluminum.
  • + 2
 same here! 3M clear protective film...
  • + 1
 Can I get mine pre sand blasted? Then it would look so cool on the lounge room wall. No trip to Emergency required!
  • + 1
 I'm going to start selling wrap-wrap so all you pansies can protect the finish of your bike-wrap.
  • + 1
 Simple solution; have your frame coated with Rhino Lining, it only adds a kilo or two...
  • + 1
 Because they’re too busy chasing their tails coming up with dumb shit to think about smart shit.
  • + 1
 I'm way too crash-prone to worry about tape. Don't bake that silliness into the price of my bike please.
  • + 1
 It would be an improvement if every bike comes with enough chain--and seatstayprotection. Even that isn't standard
  • + 1
 It's mtb, let them get beaten, they look better, cut the crap guys,
Anyway who enjoys a bloodless mma fight right?
  • + 1
 Cause Mt.Bikes and parts are way overpriced and the manufacturers know it laughing all the way to the banks!
  • + 1
 Because people who design mtb bikes are usually slow as shit or don't ride off road at all
  • + 1
 if my paint looks mint for ages, how can I justify the sick custom respray at 10-15 yrs or so of use?
  • + 2
 Bahaha 29ers? I see what you did there.
  • + 2
 I just got a bike with no paint on problem solved
  • + 1
 that and do away with rear international standard mount, just have pm to pm for the rear just like it is front.
  • + 1
 I use basic winter insulation tape (Frost King) on a few areas - works just fine.
  • + 2
 You guys think way too highly of the people in bike industry.
  • + 1
 I don't bother with it, a scratch or 2 is no big deal to me and makes little difference come selling time.
  • + 2
 Been making my own protective frame decals for 20 years
  • + 0
 Powdercoat! Lasts a good few years (longer than helitape), then powdercoat again. Maybe in a differnet colour.

Good have saved a lot of wasted time there!
  • + 1
 Excellent point RC. Especially when 5 out of 6 said they wrapped said frames!!
  • + 1
 Ya and shops like Poison spyder in Moab charge you for a frame replacement if you put a scratch in it.
  • + 2
 Welcome to the mcdonalization of mtb
  • + 1
 Orange will re-spray a frame for not much more than the cost of a frame wrap...
  • + 1
 MTBs get scratched. Get over it.
  • + 1
 CrankSkins.com did it first Wrap your crank...and everything else
  • + 1
 Don't headline stuff like clickbate please.
  • + 1
 YT comes all cleared tape btw so not ALL bike manufacturers are cheap
  • + 1
 Great idea and a great article.
  • + 1
 Hit up that UPLAND STOKE for your protection! BOOOOOOY!!!!
  • + 1
 Buy steel...problem solved.
  • + 2
 Hockey tape
  • + 2
 3M tape
  • + 1
 Prediction: 2020 clear protective dynotags will be the new black
  • + 1
 wrap it before you tap it!
  • + 1
 Bonty Race Lites (with their custom short offset) were the bomb!
  • + 2
 broach the subject.
  • + 1
 I hear LINEX carbon frames works best!
  • + 1
 Why don't bike manufacturers utilize powder coating?
  • + 1
 Orange do!
  • + 1
 Why dont bike manufacturers utilize powder coating?
  • + 1
 lots do already but it still chips.
  • + 1
 Clear plastidip but anyway.
  • + 1
 Have you done this? I’ve thought about it
  • + 1
 Can plug for ride wrap. Protection ninjas.
  • + 1
 i stopped reading at the line about dentists and ther bmw's.
  • + 1
 I kind of like my rough arse used look
  • + 1
 I've helicopter-taped my @ss to prevent aging/add resale value Wink
  • + 1
 I like that Propain Bikes are already doing this. 3
  • + 1
 Apparently dentists aren't cool.
  • + 1
 I found the solution to this problem years ago. Just buy quality products.
  • + 1
 Only internet mtb-ers care about wrapped frames
  • + 1
 Just make frames out of heli tape material.
  • + 1
 Just offer metal bikes in raw, clear anodized. That's the shizzle!
  • + 2
 "grassroots." Gtfo
  • - 1
 YT Bikes now come with some area's of the frame taped, downtime, rear chain stays etc.
  • + 1
 My Jeffsy came wrapped in all the high paint chip probability areas. The wrap on the chain stays started peeling off so I had to clean the adhesive off and reapply with helicopter tape.
  • + 1
 @vtracer: Yep I just checked my 2016 capra. Looks like they wrapped the left side seatstay, right side seatstay, and right chainstay. I wrapped the right side with and old tube as well, just to be safe.
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