XC Bike Checks from the La Bresse World Cup 2018

Aug 26, 2018 at 2:33
by Richard Cunningham  
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Are those DT Swiss XMC 1200 wheels in 30mm width? The current World Champion opts for a dropper seatpost.


Jolanda Neff's Prototype Kross

Jolanda Neff gets the royal treatment with a new Kross dual-suspension prototype, fitted with DT Swiss wheels and remote-control suspension. Her new bike has to be one of the most stunning XC machines in the pits at La Bresse - a race bike befitting of the woman who wears the rainbow jersey. Kross built this chassis a little burlier than their minimalist XC machines have been constructed - a growing theme among elite XC teams.

Neff is another athlete who will be riding the new Shimano XTR, which, at present, is only available to World Class athletes.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Jolanda Neff

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Super rigid rocker link drives a remote-lockout DT Swiss shock. The chain guide looks like a janky add-on.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
DT Swiss remote controlled "Gold Standard" OPM fork


La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
DT Swiss' dual-control lever operates both fork and shock.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Kross' unusual flex-stay dropout pivot above Shimano's 9100 XTR 12-speed transmission.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Another look at Shimano's bonded-aluminum XTR crankarm.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks



Lukas Fl ckiger s new Th mus Lightrider. The updated frame has improved rigidity and sheds weight.
Lukas Flückiger's all new Thömus Lightrider is decked out with the recently released Shimano XTR.


Lukas Flückiger's new Thömus Lightrider

Shimano has kept its new XTR M9100 close to its chest as it continues the soft release of what may be their most important component ensemble. Lukas Flückiger is one of the lucky ones who is riding the system on his all new Thömus Lightrider carbon dual-suspension race bike.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Remote-control Fox shock and Shimano's super-clean looking XTR one-by crankset (38T chainring).
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Minimal-looking carbon lever.
Shimano s new XTR derailleur 10-51 cassette and a 38T chainring.
Shimano's new XTR derailleur, cassette and silent-running freehub system.

Shimano s new M9100 XTR race brakes.
Shimano's new XTR race brakes.

Flückiger's new Thömus Lightrider falls in line with the inevitable switch to lightweight dual-suspension race bikes as the UCI continues to encourage XC course designers to build more technical World Cup venues.

A flipchip offers the possibility to alter the frame s geometry and bottom bracket height.
A flip-chip offers the possibility to alter the frame's geometry and bottom bracket height.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Clean cable routing throughout.
The frame is said to be substantially stiffer and sheds weight as well partly due to a minimalist clear coat.
The frame is said to be substantially stiffer and even its clear paint has been minimized to save weight.
Ultra light carbon seatpost clamp.
Smooth seat tube bracing and a feather-light carbon seatpost clamp.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Schwalbe Addix 'Speed' rubber compound on the back...
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
...And the blue-stripe, Speedgrip Addix rubber compound up front.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks



La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks


Ischard Frederic's KTM Scarp

KTM's signature orange logo and paint scheme is famous among motorcycle racers in all genres. Years back, KTM's bicycle brand became a separate entity, but one can still sense a bold connection with its motorsports cousin that extends deeper than the orange logo. This is Frenchman Ischard Frederic's KTM Scarp race bike.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Ischard Frederic

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Wrap-around carbon rocker link driving a remote-control Fox EVOL shock. The seatstays are pencil thin.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Flex-pivot dropouts and a SRAM Eagle transmission.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Handmade Andre Dugast tubular rear tire.



La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks


Anton Cooper's Trek Procaliber

Aridenton Cooper may be the last World Cup XC racer to embrace dual suspension, but if that is true, he's probably riding the most comfortable hardtail out there. His Procaliber seat tube/top tube junction is designed to float slightly, which creates a more comfortable ride. Cooper is famous for his deep-diving negative stem, which helps the diminutive crusher to achieve a better climbing position.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Anton Cooper

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
A ground-up view of Trek's "IsoSpeed Decoupler" seat tube/top tube junction.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
SRAM Level Ultimate brakes...
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Dat stem!
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
...And titanium hardware.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Top guide, just in case.



La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Cavalerie's Effigear sequential-shifting transmission is touted as the lightest in current production.

Cavalerie had an Anatrail gearbox trail bike, powered by a Gates Carbon Drive cog-belt in the pits. The French brand also owns Effigear - the manufacturer of the bike's nine-speed transmission. There is no chance that the aluminum framed, 140mm-travel 29er could be a competitive World Cup racer, but their presence at La Bresse suggests that Cavalerie may be testing the waters for an all out assault on the conventional derailleur in a venue where even a minor victory could cause a major shakeup. Effigear is claimed to be the lightest gearbox transmission currently in production.

La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
An aluminum chassis powered by a Fox EVOL reservoir shock is the first hint that this Cavalerie is not World Cup XC material.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Formula 35 fork and 29-inch wheels.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Gates Carbon Drive belts run silently, do not stretch, and never need lubrication.
La Bresse XC World Cup bike checks
Formula Cura brakes





65 Comments

  • + 29
 @richardcunnigham, it shouldn’t be too surprising that Trek has a pivotless rear triangle on their XC hardtail!
  • + 13
 How about a full side view of the Cavalerie?
  • - 41
flag viatch (Aug 26, 2018 at 13:05) (Below Threshold)
 its called google
  • + 8
 Belt drives are cool but I would caution taking one to multi-stage events UNLESS you have a spare. I was at BC BikeRace this year and at the 1st aid station a belt drive rider had broken his belt. The Shimano crew on hand did not have a belt and loaned this rider an entire bike. Yes, cool to have but in reality, not many people have a spare lying around.
  • + 10
 Lightest gearbox on the market? Hope this is the start of a momuntus shift from the (let's face it, really old design) traditional cassette, Mech set-up.
  • + 9
 How did I know I'd see Anton Cooper's hardtail for the fourth time this year?
  • + 8
 Still waiting for Kross to come out with the name Kayden.
  • + 23
 Not me, I'm hoping for the name Chris.
  • + 3
 @tonestar: To ride that bike, you'll have to wear you pants backwards!
  • + 2
 @zonoskar: This kids are too young to remember what is like to miss the bus.
  • + 7
 "Clean cable routing" that is 100% likely to earn the ire of the mechanic who has to work on it.
  • + 3
 With stems pointed down like that and headtubes this short these days, I wonder how long it takes before they develop a direct mount stem for XC that mounts to the (lower) crown. Yes you still need something to clamp the forks above the headset (and something to protect the rider from it) but that's it. It would cancel some of the loads introduced into the headset and it would be a good reason to introduce another new standard. Win-win for everyone!
  • + 2
 Yes Cavalerie/Effiegear kick both Sram and Shimano right in their asses and prove to all of us what they already know. Done right we can have a drive train that lasts more than a season. Maybe Shimano will finally show us what their planetary Alfine tech can really do.
  • + 5
 go at the norcopit to get some info on the new revolver fs they are riding
  • + 4
 I am surprised not to see bikes with the frm dropper, that thing is like 240 grams, perfect for xc.
  • + 5
 Excuse my ignorance but what is the frm dropper post , 240 grams sounds insane light.
  • + 3
 295 actually... FRM OBI1. I have seen it at cape epic a couple of years ago the first time.
  • + 3
 @RedRedRe: Big thanks, will check that out as I've been looking for something sub 400 grams for my xc .
  • + 1
 Surprised Anton is using centre lock rotors. I'm sure I'd read in the past that he ran a 6 bolt rotor with 3 or 4 bolts so that if he bent it mid-race he'd be able to quickly get it off.....
  • + 3
 How many others are still riding xc hardtails?? Gotta love em on the climbs!
  • + 3
 Who is 'Aridenton' Cooper? Any relation to 'Anton "where did my bike go?" Cooper'?
  • + 3
 Sram drive trains are like a ford truck with a four speed. Shimano is like shifting a Bimmer or an Audi.
  • + 2
 My 1500cc six cylinder 100HP motorcycle uses a gates belt for a timing belt it’s solid takes serious abuse. After two years it’s still looks new in the Honda.
  • + 4
 Those numbers make me sad. Gold wing? SUV?
  • + 2
 Rock shox should reclaim their gold fork heritage, it's been a long while since the Mag 21 SL.
  • + 1
 Rs color was yellor or gray. Marzocchi red, green or gold. Manitou red. This is what i remeber from the early days. Shimano blue. Suntour red.
  • + 2
 Special demand: bike check of Gerhard Kerschbaumer's Torpado!
  • + 2
 The stem is the last piece of pluming pipe on the bike! So wrong.
  • + 2
 the smaller your xc, the lighter it is
  • + 0
 Why the fugly bend in the toptube though. It's a trend that won't die, apparently...
  • + 1
 That makes the front triangle stronger and standover height lower. The “trend” is to have it straight so people like you will buy the bikes.
  • + 1
 @RedRedRe: The front end doesn't need to be stronger and the standover height will be even lower without the bend. Together with the bend in the downtube, it just looks like the bike hit a tree full-on at 40 Kph.
  • + 1
 @zonoskar: mmm... from your comment I am not sure if you understand how the front triangle works or be able to draw basic lines.
  • + 2
 @RedRedRe: I can say the same thing about you. How do you not see if you draw a line from where the toptube meets the seattube to the headtube, without the hump in the toptube, that the standover height will be lower? Here, I've even drawn this basic line for you www.pinkbike.com/photo/16286617
  • + 1
 @zonoskar: @RedRedRe: ... "or be able to draw basic lines" zono kinda got you there lol
  • + 1
 Neat meat
  • + 1
 Those bloody stems!!
  • + 1
 Neat
  • + 4
 Seat
  • + 1
 Beat
  • + 2
 Cleat
  • + 2
 Peat
  • + 2
 Leatt
  • - 6
flag rabocse (Aug 26, 2018 at 14:39) (Below Threshold)
 tit
  • + 5
 Sheet
  • + 4
 Yeet
  • + 3
 Skeet
  • + 1
 fleet
  • + 1
 Fleet
  • + 1
 pleat
  • + 2
 @lehott: Cheat
  • + 1
 oh sheat
  • - 1
 "The chain guide looks like a janky add-on." dick comment
  • + 1
 Interesting. What you see as a duck comment strikes me as a factual observation...
  • - 2
 If it lasts more than one race, it’s oveebuilt.
  • + 23
 Your Mom is overbuilt.
  • - 2
 Beat cleat meat...ok too far
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