RideWrap Releases Dealer Software for On-Site, On Demand Protection Kits

Jan 28, 2022 at 11:42
by RideWrap HQ  

Press Release: Ride Wrap

RideWrap is stoked to announce the launch of the first-of-its-kind software for the bike frame and fork protection industry.

Our Super Cutter software is an on-site, on-demand bike protection kit cutting solution for use in bike shops, PPF/tint shops, bike manufacturing facilities, sign shops, mobile bike service businesses, or any place that is looking to offer kit creation and install service to customers.

Super Cutter users gain access to our complete, constantly growing library of Tailored, Covered, and Essential protection kit patterns. Our patterns are carefully designed to suit all types of bicycle frames and forks including mountain bikes, e-bikes, fat bikes, road bikes, gravel bikes, commuters, and more.


In tandem with RideWrap Bicycle Protection Film , these two create a complete solution for businesses looking to grow their bicycle frame and fork protection offering.



What’s Included In The Super Cutter Program?

The Best Patterns
RideWrap’s design team leverages proprietary technology to deliver the best bike patterns. We changed the game with our design ethos, and now it's available on-demand.

The Fastest Growing And Most Complete Library
We have a dedicated team measuring bikes around the globe every single day creating the most complete and up-to-date library of models.

Less Faff
Our user interface and system is designed to be simple and efficient. We tested and developed our program in conjunction with protective film installers.

Support When You Need It
We have a dedicated team of real people ready to take your call 7 days a week. The software is developed in-house, so our team is able to react quickly.


How Does The Program Work?

The program is available to RideWrap Dealers. Not a dealer? Sign Up Here

1. Sign up for a Super Cutter account
Go to www.ridewrap.ca/super-cutter to learn more and register for your Super Cutter account

2. Order materials and credits
Submit your order for RideWrap film and Super Cutter Credits right in the system.

3. Order cutting equipment/verify your existing equipment is compatible.

3. Download and install the desktop app.

4. Start cutting kits on-site and on demand.


bigquotesSince we started shipping protection kits, we’ve always looked to support LBS and other businesses to grow their offerings and expand their businesses. Now with the Super Cutter, instead of having to wait for the shipping couriers, businesses are able to get their customers' bikes dialed in immediately, reducing ‘New Bike Day’ delays. As an added benefit, the number of shipments and resulting shipping carbon footprint is drastically reduced.Dan Seguin, Co-Founder & Director of Product Development






231 Comments

  • 116 9
 Such a cool idea. This will save on shipping/packaging/emissions etc

Love it!!!
  • 32 34
 Can't help but think that on-demand cutting leads to considerably more waste than a bulk cutting process. But then again, maybe that's offset by savings on packaging material and shipping?
  • 27 1
 @mi-bike: how so?

I imagine they nest the same. The shops only cut what they sell so there is nothing old, not used, and ultimately thrown away.
  • 16 1
 @mi-bike: Why would cutting on-demand make more waste than cutting pre-demand?

And yeah, so great for shops to not need to stock up and guess about frame popularity, etc. Or lose a sale due to a 1-week delay. Hoping this helps the LBS.
  • 33 11
 @bishopsmike: Bulk cutting should allow you to minimize gaps. I think that on-demand cutting must lead to more unused material - that will then need to be thrown away.
  • 18 3
 @mi-bike: I'm not understanding why a small roll of vinyl in a LBS's plotter/cutter would have bigger gaps than a larger roll back at Ride Wrap's HQ? It's all computer-designed, the cuts/gaps would likely be identical wherever you're doing the work.
  • 20 16
 yeah! and only an investment of 10-15,000 dollars! lol the ROI is going to be like 5000 bikes wrapped.
  • 7 0
 @mi-bike: nesting is nesting. There is potential for there to be more waste but I doubt in reality there will be any more than bulk cutting. I doubt ride wrap keeps stock of many kits precut. When you make an order with them, they would cut on demand. This just moves that process to a different location. I’m sure high volume dealerships will love the income this can generate for them.
  • 10 6
 @Afterschoolsports: ah, ok. If ridewrap already cut on demand then I agree there could be the same amount of waste. But (and sorry to be that guy), that's before all those proprietary cutters are manufactured in some distant land and shipped to LBS's around the country / world. Centralized manufacturing has its benefits.
  • 39 32
 Wrapping your bike is about the dumbest thing you can do, if you want to save the environment.
  • 2 1
 Maybe they can program it such that it creates generic patches from the residue and quit selling the aftermarket branded patches. I don't use RideWrap but I do use those smaller patches to protect the frame against cable rub. Nearly all bikes have cables and/or hoses so nearly all of them could do with some generic protection here and there, even if the owner wouldn't invest in the full wrap.

Other than that, it deserves a mention that this is a great reason for people to buy bikes at their lbs instead of over the internet. Unless the web dealers also offer this service of course. But the too-cheap ones who are only shifting boxes and don't have the room/people/skill to unpack them and apply such a wrap at least won't get a piece of the pie.
  • 12 5
 @IntoTheEverflow: This is the wisest comment so far. The main aim is obviously money not save the planet.
  • 11 11
 @IntoTheEverflow: I don't agree - bikes that look beat up lose their value, and may lead to someone buying a new bike. Bikes that look shiny and new get ridden, and less likely to be replaced. Would be easy enough to say new-looking bikes reduce landfill.
  • 14 4
 @IntoTheEverflow: to be fair, I think most people care more about their wallet than the environment. And rightly so....tough to do much good in the world if you're perpetually wondering how to pay the power bill.
  • 3 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: People probably don't wrap their bike in plastic for the environment. If that'd be the reason, people would use flax or hemp.
  • 2 10
flag conoat (Jan 31, 2022 at 6:54) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: yeah, sorry. was thinking more along the lines of a printer and cutter. if you're just cutting clear vinyl, it's cheaper. let's go with your £1200 figure for a second....

1200 for the cutter
undisclosed amount for the software from RW. let's assume it's a license fee and you pay per file printed. that would be the way a smart person would do it....so what is your guess? £10? £20? since full RW kits are around £85, I would put the fee from RW closer to 30-40 quid given that vinyl is super cheap.

so.....

£35 for the license to print a kit
£10 in vinyl

you sell the wrap for £85(gonna be tough to charge more than directly from RW)
you clear £40

just to pay for the machine, you have wrap 40 bikes. I know a very busy, very popular MTB shop in surrey that does a crap ton of sales of £5000+ bikes. they don't wrap 20 bikes a year.

I just do not see how this is a useful thing for a bike shop. but like I said previously, a small OE wanting to offer kits pre installed on bikes? absolutely
  • 2 0
 @mi-bike: I would hope all the pieces are arranged in really a tight fitting way that would be the same or less waste than bulk printing.
  • 1 1
 New? You mean the cost savings will go right into RW's pockets...?? We're not seeing anything in terms of savings.. hahaha
  • 9 3
 @conoat: You dont know how many bikes the shop wraps though, you have no idea.

You also have no idea if the shop really tries to sell the service currently - I would guess it probably doesnt but would if it was as easy as printing the wrap and applying it.

They dont need to clear £40.00 either, how about 'free wrap with every bla bla' as a selling point?

Who cares if you dont see how its useful, you are full of shit.
  • 2 0
 No need to go hunt around for frame specific protection
  • 3 0
 @conoat: What is the difference when the LBS just sells the RW straight to the customer? They make a very small margin on the sale only (I'm guessing less than printing themselves with shipping and margins etc). They HOPE to get the install as well, as that is where they make all of their money. Not the product sale.

Being able to supply the customer with a wrap on demand (where a lot of customers probably bring their own RW that they bought online before that) should allow them to sell more kits (making the money on the sale like you described) AND make the installation costs.
  • 2 6
flag onawalk (Jan 31, 2022 at 7:26) (Below Threshold)
 @bishopsmike: think of it like this, RideWrap, cause they are cutting designs for multiple frames/designs, can more efficiently use the spec in a given amount of film. Where if you’re only cutting for 1 frame, you could potentially have more waste.
Think of cutting the film for only bottom tube protection for multiple frames, sizes/designs, you could stack them really close to maximize the film usage, where if you’re doing 1 bike, you’re going to waste a bit more film. It could be negligible, and likely the savings on individual packaging out weighs the wastage issue.

Might be worth setting up an agreement with a local sign shop, turn around time would be great for larger centres.
  • 10 1
 @onawalk: that isnt how RW or Invisiframe or any other company prints though. your specific bike is printed on a piece. one bike, one piece of vinyl. it's not like you get 34 individual pieces that go to your bike. lol

so this waste issue is a non-starter. same amount of waste whoever is printing it, wherever they are printing it.
  • 1 3
 @conoat: but then you’re likely using less power, and potentially consuming less in general….
Willing to bet there is a correlation to our access to disposable income, and consumption….
  • 2 6
flag conoat (Jan 31, 2022 at 7:31) (Below Threshold)
 @onawalk: nothing wrong with consumption.

let me crib a saying real quick.....

each to their own ability, each to their own need. Smile
  • 3 1
 @onawalk: Film cost would be almost irrelevant at the qty a shop would use it in terms of waste from inefficient nesting, the products value is in the time it takes to measure / draw/ design the kit and apply it, not the material itself.
  • 4 0
 @mi-bike: No criticism, but I think you're missing the point here. The plotters (cutters) are already out there. Nothing is proprietary, except the film, perhaps. Any sign shop will have at least one. The cutting/ nesting is no different if you run 1 or 100. The real difference is no packaging or shipping waste.
  • 1 9
flag jamesbrant (Jan 31, 2022 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @IntoTheEverflow: the environment isn't going anywhere. all this stuff is meaningless. there are 8 billion people on the planet son.
  • 1 2
 @conoat: here’s an idea,
Why not approach a local sign shop, maybe the one that does your printing anyway, the likely hood of them having a cutter is pretty good.
Then have printed off what you need, when you need it.
Pretty easy value added service for all bikes that shops sell, along with printing generic kits/patches for others.
The only reason that shop in Surrey isn’t selling more, is that THEY don’t see the value in it. Local shop here installs a tonne of them. Surprisingly, things are different in different places around the world
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: Because then you deal with the local shops lead time, communication time, your transport to and from the local shop or delivery of the kit, the cost of their labour, etc etc.

The whole point of cutting in house is to avoid all of this.
  • 6 1
 @conoat: Where did you learn math? 5000 bikes wrapped at $100 cost is $500,000. Far cry from a $10,000 investment.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: granted, my experience will likely differ from others. Local sign shop turns around stuff for me same day, I use them at least twice a month for different things, and they are around the corner from me.
Would be fairly easy to make a case as a shop to do some of the more popular bikes ahead of time as a value added option.
My circumstances are different than yours, so I can easily make a case of fit, maybe you cant
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: was thinking more about reducing waste, not the added material cost. That would really depend on the volume that was being done. Either way, RW would still be able to more efficiently nest the pieces.
  • 3 1
 @Three6ty: He is a pretty horrible guy and his math is not the only thing that is terrible - check out some of his views here: twitter.com/conoat
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: I can see your point, but staff time is limited, for example at our business we used to outsource laser marking, it was local and they were fast but we purchased our own for many of the same reasons a shop would benefit from cutting its own protection kit.

Imagine selling 2 kits a day and having to take daily trips to a sign shop, deal with communication, lead-time, accounts, payment etc - twice a month, fine, 10 times a week, not so much.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: I understand the desire to reduce waste, but completely disagree that there would be any meaningful reduction of actual waste in the real world, I would much prefer to reduce the amount of deliveries a product requires, 3-5 deliveries a week to a shop for example vs none? - Plus numbers will be small, a local shop wont become a wrap fitting factory.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: yeah... and I can find you a mountain bike at Wal-Mart for $400. How much does a quality one (that won't crap out in 6 months) like the one in the picture included here cost?
  • 1 0
 @trillot: Are you talking about the machine? - If so, the one I linked to is one of the machines Ridewrap suggest as supported, and several different levels of, going between £500 and £2000

What do you think a vinyl cutter costs?
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: maybe we’ve gotten confused, RW, in theory should be able to produce significantly less waste on the production side, as they are in the business of cutting wraps for bikes.
The argument on doing it locally is for less packaging, transport, etc. Those should outweigh the increased wrap waste by having it cut locally.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: if you’re selling and installing enough wraps to make the purchase of your own cutter worthwhile, then I think that makes sense.
The space, employee time, and production time don’t make it practical for me to have my own plotter/cutter, but having that available locally, around the corner, is invaluable to me (for my current businesses, not for wrapping bikes)
If I had a shop, I see this as a great option rather than ordering from RW, as the turn around time would be great. In theory, most of the items you listed as concerns (communication, payment, etc) are the same whether I’m dealing with the local sign shop, or ordering direct from RW or it’s distro. In fact, once the cut file is saved, it’s simply a matter of uploading, and picking up same day. The correct kit, as long as there was film a available would always be “in stock”
  • 3 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: I see it as extra protection for the frame therefore I can keep it longer and ride it more. I'd like to see tests on frame durability with and without film.
  • 24 2
 Quite a few comments and a good discussion on this thread.

- Yes, we believe there will be a positive impact on the environmental footprint of doing business. Namely, because the product is so specific, shipments from our production locations are typically a couple of kits. With this system, we ship bulk materials, and the kits are cut on-demand at the shop.
For every single roll of material, we will remove 15+ individual shipments.

- There should not be additional material wastage at a shop. As some have mentioned, we have efficiently nested kits, and in our productions, we produce on demand (where we also don't have a lot of wastage, because it's bad, and it's throwing money out, we don't like either). Shops have access to the same efficient nests, and when following best protocols for equipment set up, machine wastage is sub 1%.

- I have fear of saying this, but data points suggest that wrapping a bike can have a positive effect on the environment. Many keep their bike longer since it's not 'beat up'. Many will consider purchasing a used bike rather than a new one because it is not beat up. Both extend the effective lifespan of a bike and keep them out of a landfill longer.
This one will really get the keyboard scientists fired up... A protective layer disperses impact energy, which, in certain cases may protect the substructure from crossing a damage threshold. Very simply, if the damage threshold is 100J, and a rock comes flying with 101J of energy, this protective layer disperses/absorbs some energy and the effective impact is 99J, in this case, the threshold is not crossed and the bike is not irreparably damaged, it is kept out of a landfill. There are endless variables, but extending this concept over millions of strikes on millions of bikes and statistics will keep some number of bikes from being busted up!

- The ROI for dealers will be very quick. Cutting equipment is not proprietary and can be acquired at low cost, the machine we will offer to supply is list price at $720usd. All other costs are relative to usage and they will make margin on each kit sold.
Shops will be able to make margins (higher than ordering from our production) on the product, and they will make install fees.
For shops, scheduling service one week down the line because they are waiting for the product to arrive reduces the probability of that service actually happening. At worst, they ordered the product and then the customer bails, which leads to either an inventory item, or a return process.
On top of that, this machine does have other uses that shops can take advantage of. Who doesn't like a spiff die-cut decal?
  • 1 0
 @conoat: that’s not true,
Kit on my buddies bike was individual pieces, can’t remember the manufacturer. With high enough volume, there could be loads of variation.
Roll size both length and width would be a huge factor as well, as the end and start would likely create the most wastage. If RW was using much larger rolls (I’m making an assumption, as I’m not entirely sure) there could be significant wastage savings.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: but for shops that already have vinyl capabilities, it's a no-brainer. I work at a shop that prints and cuts all of our own decals, so adding RideWrap (of which we install 3-4 kits weekly, and have hundreds in stock) will make our waste and unused kits go down significantly. But yes, it's quite unusual for a shop to have any equipment of that sort.
  • 7 0
 @RideWrap: spec-friggin-tacular.
Excellent info/backup, appreciate it.
$720 is a pretty low cost investment to be able to cut your own film on site.

Can the files and licences be downloaded immediately, if a customer walks in, with a bike the shop doesn’t have the files for, can that still be turned around right away?
  • 2 0
 @conoat: You're forgetting the service charge to install, which is far more profitable then the material margin. If you charge 1hr of labor for an install at $75-100 and you get $40 in margin you'll clear $80-100 per wrap. Not bad.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk:
Were always here to answer questions!
The system is online and communicates directly with the machine, no files are downloaded. Once they are set up with their equipment and account, literally choose the bike from the selector and the machine cuts it.
If you've been to our site as a customer, you'll see our 'Super Checker' bike selector which pulls up the available kits for a given model. Same same, but with the ability to cut.
  • 2 0
 Some passionate people here on the subject of frame protection.
  • 6 5
 @onawalk: the main reason? no one is willing to pay to have them put on! a top notch job takes 2.5-3 hours. the shop rate is £60/hr.

who wants to pay £265(parts and labor) to wrap their bike? very few people. so most buy it online and spend 7 hours doing a worse job themselves. lol

see also, Cushcore installs.
  • 2 2
 @IntoTheEverflow: Wrapping the bike keeps it looking great and likely being ridden longer (even by subsequent owners) because it "looks" newer. I cannot see a way that it would have a net negative effect on the environment even if the actual wrap is plastic. I think your way off on this statement
  • 1 1
 @RideWrap: deadly
  • 3 1
 @conoat: An experienced installer is generally complete (wheels back on) in less than 2 hrs. Most first-time installs, DIY, are 3-4hrs. For shops, one of the biggest things we have heard is that acquiring product takes time, they order the specific kit, and even though our production and shipping is fast, there is still a time delay, thats what makes this software so cool for the dealers, no delay!
  • 6 1
 Do people actually dispose of a bike because the paint is scratched? I can imagine it being creaky, bent, dated geometry even. But no one wants to ride a bike because of too many scratches? I've never heard of that one. If you want the bike to last, get a durable bike in the first place and do the basic maintenance to avoid play and other expensive repairs. But I don't think a plastic layer is going to help much there. Even corrosion, the places where you should/could be worried about that aren't the places that are covered by the wrap.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: I think that you are missing the point. The LBS doesn't have to wrap every kit they sell. Till now, people don't buy them locally and tend to buy them direct because of the custom nature of the product. This changes that dynamic and the customer would have in hand in 5 minutes. Also, my LBS charges $150 to install a ride wrap. So the service revenue associated can be significant. Finally, placing this at the shop allows this to be an "afterglow", emotional purchase with little to no wait. Car dealers have added these kinds of products in the states and offer them post-sale with pretty large success and really strong margins. I think for larger LBS this could be a nice revenue/relevance win.

Either that or could be a good win if a local print shop with a lot of smaller LBS nearby teamed up.

Lots of options that could work IMO
  • 1 0
 @RideWrap: question - can your films be used with specialist vinyl application fluids like Rapid Tac instead of using soapy water?
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: same pattern on same size sheet,
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: That'd not how it works, you don't get 30 pieces in a kit.
You get one sheet with your kit cut on it. No different that a shop doing it.
  • 3 0
 LOVE PB COMMENT SECTION!! So many clueless responses.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: Wow,
I don’t work in a shop anymore, but that seems like a long install time.
I did my buddies bike, bunch of beers involved, and I think we were 2 hours into it. ..

Any shops with experience have any input?
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: take almost everything he says as bullshit, he just wants to win an argument after making himself look like a tit.
  • 2 0
 @ODubhslaine: Yes, they will play nicely with many application fluids although we cant guarantee as we have not tested them all.
  • 1 0
 @RideWrap: thanks for that. I find it much easier to work with than soapy water.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: why are those views terrible?
  • 2 9
flag conoat (Jan 31, 2022 at 13:31) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: lol. go ahead and argue with me about anything I say on twitter(not that I use it that much these days). Your lefist, feels-based ethos will not stand up to even the thinnest schmear of logic.
  • 1 0
 @IntoTheEverflow: dumber than rolling coal? Dumber than buying a house just to rip it down and build a bigger one? Dumber than throwing old tires into a ravine?
  • 2 1
 @mi-bike: Agreed... demand isnt that high. One or two of these plot cutters in a time zone is more than enough. If LBS shops have to buy or lease the cutters, and pay RideWrap... they are going to be pretty expensive.
  • 2 1
 @bishopsmike: No bro... bikes that are old get sent down the line (sold, donated, parted, ultimately scrapped) . Old in terms of geometry, or standards. The kind of beat up your talking about... a thin layer of film isn't going to help.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: you’re prolly right
  • 2 0
 @conoat: why’d you feel the need to descend to that kind of behaviour?
  • 1 1
 @Basketcase889: ever install a kit? unless you do it all the time it will take hours.

No way the shop is going to make money on install or they would have to charge $250 on top of the kit. RW making more money now selling the "printers" and bulk plastic. Dont fall for the trap LBSs!

i like ride wrap but after spending all day doing my bike, i don't think its something a bike shop would want to invest in.
  • 2 1
 @DDoc: I've installed a bunch, once you have it doesn't take too long. Taking the bike apart eats some time.

Where do you get the idea you have to buy the cutter and vinyl from them.

Little more knowledge before posting Smile
  • 2 1
 @DDoc: After 4-5 bikes, installs take about 2 hrs. Shops can comfortably charge shop rates for their time + make margins on the product. The payback period, especially if factoring in service charges, on a cutting machine is negligible. If it wasn't a valuable proposition for dealers, we wouldn't have had a team of developers spend a lot of time on the project. At the end of the day, the savings from our typical production and shipping get passed back on to the dealer.
  • 2 0
 @bishopsmike: I fully agree with you. I wrapp all my bikes, kids bikes, wife bikes etc. since years now and it really makes a difference when reselling the bike. Actually it's a win-win, from experience the bike is sold in no time for a decent price and the buyer feels great having a top looking second hand bike.
  • 2 0
 @RideWrap: Feel bad for whoever it is there who's had to wade through these comments, but thanks to them for providing some more insight/info about things.
  • 3 0
 @CleanZine: Happy to be here!
  • 2 1
 @IntoTheEverflow:

Thank You.....Simple but valuable observation...Crazy how long it takes us to get to, "just don't use it" these days ..
  • 2 0
 @mechatronicjf: The number of frames that have been destroyed by scratches is close to zero.
Sometimes a cable can scuff pretty badly, but you don't have to wrap your whole frame for that.
  • 2 1
 @IntoTheEverflow: Agreed, but @mechatronicjf is calling for a test so yeah, why not have some magazine (Pinkbike comes to mind, otherwise something German probably) perform such a test. How is the term "frame durability" defined? Seems to me something along the lines of "how long it can perform the intended function at an acceptable level". Where acceptable may be different for everyone, so that's up for debate here. But after that, just do the test, publish the results and have a more informed discussion. At this point it seems to me like a lot of talk about durability and landfill without any foundation. There is no question that the original paint won't get scratched easily if you cover it. But I honestly doubt an otherwise perfectly functional mountainbike would end up on landfill because it is scratched and therefore no one wants to ride it. Just my doubts though, by all means prove me wrong.
  • 1 1
 @DDoc: I'm replying on what I know LBS's around here charge.. I've heard quotes for $250-350 for install only depending on the bike, so yes you are exactly right! While proving my point exactly
  • 2 0
 @DDoc: i had it installed on my Forbidden and they charged around $200 with the sale of the bike. bike shop seemed happy to do it.

seems like a great innovative idea for LBS to offer more services to their clients
  • 1 0
 @meathooker: At $200 with $85 being the cost of the product, that seems like a hell of a deal. $115 is probably right around where I'd price the install if, as @RideWrap mentioned, the install for someone experienced is around 2hrs. Maybe $130 which is the cost of a full-tune up at our shop, since we typically budget about 1.5-2hrs per tune up for an experienced mechanic.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: iirc $200 was the install cost only
  • 15 0
 The Super Cutter Program sounds like a self help program.
  • 7 0
 "I wish I had emo hair so it would cut itself"
  • 2 0
 Next iteration is self cutting machine at home, like for 3D printing.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: Of course, you can buy those. Like those from Cricut. The kind of dimensions you'd need for a bike probably won't fit though.
  • 17 3
 Raw aluminum frames remain undefeated. Let the nerds wrap their precious fragile plastic bikes with more plastic.
  • 7 1
 We make kits for raw aluminum bikes as well, some are quite popular ;-)
  • 2 0
 I agree, isn't paint the original ride wrap. Once your whip gets too scratched up you can strip it down to its raw form.
  • 5 0
 @RideWrap: blasphemy!
  • 2 0
 Still gotta wrap that fork though!
  • 4 0
 @islandforlife: I only wrap my stanchions
  • 4 0
 @wburnes: Dont forget to protect your tire knobs as well.
  • 14 1
 Well, be here to answer questions!
  • 24 0
 You've been waiting here three days?!
  • 16 0
 @dubod22: Pinkbike's first ask-me-nothing?
  • 3 0
 When will bikes come from the OEM already wrapped? Could be an option for all these direct to consumer brands. Should be since I have the patience of a gnat
  • 2 0
 @h20-50: I agree. It should be standard, I mean they’re already giving us DT protectors, adding PPF shouldn’t cost very much when done as a standard part of the frame/bike finishing/assembly process.
  • 7 0
 @h20-50: it’s not worth their labor cost.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: If the plastic cover is non-optional, wouldn't it make more sense to then dip the frame in plastic before assembly? Plus of course, part of the audience doesn't want this. To cut back on plastic use, because they'd have to stick their sponsor/fanboi stickers on anyway, because their name is Dangerholm... Some brands do offer to wrap the frame though. Cotic comes to mind. But it is an option and I think that's good.
  • 3 3
 May I ask where the cost savings will be deposited? Yours, or our pockets? No offence, but this wreaks of half baked marketing, and no cost savings... just for you. If I am wrong, I apologise.
  • 3 0
 @Afterschoolsports: What if bikes were Ride Wrapped at the factory as a way of reducing packaging needs?

i.e. apply ride wrap and make a larger box that can bulk package 15 frames for a trip overseas. Less bubble wrap on each one. Effectively re-use the ride wrap as a shipping material then as a product people want on their bikes eventually anyway.
  • 1 0
 @husstler: that’s certainly a possibility. I don’t know enough about the logistics chain of moving frames about in bulk but I would guess that they’re not individually packaged until they’re in the possession of the bike maker in whatever country they operate out of. Cardboard is relatively high volume for a low value product. I bet they’re just hung on racks and strapped down to each other.

The one issue with spinning it as saving packaging in the manner you’re suggesting, is if damage en route is common, customers wouldn’t want the wrap to be damaged on their new product.
  • 2 0
 @h20-50: It's a process and shift in the market. A lot of OEs have already brought our products into their distribution channels, and some of the DTC are even offering install as an option, generally, if there is a 'build my bike for me' option.

We will always offer DTC products and look to support LBS and other businesses.
  • 2 0
 @stevemokan: This is one of the biggest constraints within the factories.
  • 2 0
 @cky78: This is a system designed for dealers. It increases their margins by a couple percent, allows them to offer better/faster service to customers, and is easier for them. After working with so many and learning about their pain points, we wanted to develop something to rectify some of those! The costs associated with the development, maintenance, and support of the program are taken on by us and our retail pricing has remained unchanged.
  • 6 0
 @dubod22: Were pros at installing bike protection, very patient.
  • 2 0
 not a question but from a guy who buys expensive bikes and loves to take care of them I absolutely love ride wrap. Had it on my last two bikes and I wouldn't go without. My arrival was just wrapped with the new material and it came out awesome.
  • 1 0
 @h20-50: Never, because it's not needed.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: Maybe not a dip in plastic... but perhaps a dip in a wax? Something leaving a 5-10mil thickness. Something biodegradable for all the climate change bros! After a scratch or ding... just heat it up a little and smooth it out?
  • 1 0
 @RideWrap: The same goes for the LBS's. No way they can spend 3 hrs doing a bike and charge $75 for the install. i spent the better part of a day doing mine.
  • 1 0
 Ok, whats the fastest time anyone has every "Wrapped" a bike perfectly without any bubbles?
  • 2 0
 @DDoc: I wrapped my son's Specialized Hotwalk in 30 minutes tops
  • 1 0
 @DDoc: The record at our shop in Whistler... 15 min. Frameset, did not require cleaning, and an alloy bike which are generally quicker.
  • 1 0
 @DDoc: We suggest a shop charge 2 hrs stand time for a Tailored Protection kit install.
  • 5 2
 This would actually be good for a local, mobile business. With zero inventory risk. Shops would likely want to sub-let this to a local installer since it's time consuming, takes up valuable mechanic/shop space. And is a larger up-front investment.

A local mobile installer could do several in their area in a day out of their truck where as every LBS would need to own their own account/cutter.
  • 6 0
 My understanding is the RW is a fairly intensive process... I doubt anyone is doing "several" a day....
  • 8 0
 Installing RideWrap is hellish. I can’t imagine anyone doing it as a business.
  • 3 0
 Doing a full wrap in a day, would be a good day. Depending on the bike, you most likely will never be doing multiple a day... But I completely get your point
  • 4 1
 This was my first thought as well. I disagree with some of the other comments who say you couldn't do multiple in a day. I did a full invisiframe install on my own bike, and I agree it kinda sucked. *I* wouldn't do more than one in a day, but it was also the first time I'd ever done it, and even I got better/faster towards the end of the process. After doing a few of these an installer would get much faster/skilled at it than your average home mechanic whose sum total experience of doing the install is doing their own bike once, and maybe helping a friend or two with theirs.

Also suspect this won't be a big hit at shops 'cause I don't think they *want* that business (Maybe the printing. Not so much the installing.). I asked around at nearby shops, about installation, when I ordered my frame wrap, and the few that even offered the service all wanted a hellacious amount of money (Like, I could've got a total suspension rebuild for less.). I suspect this has as much to do with how time consuming it is as them not wanting to do it much at all. Price it such that most people aren't going to be willing to pay, but you'll be making a a handsome profit on the ones you actually do end up having to do...
  • 2 0
 @Basketcase889: I did mine in under 2 hours including fork and crank - and an asymmetric frame. Didn't think it was that big of a deal?
  • 9 0
 @cky78: Trained installers can consistently complete 4 frame+forks sets in a day. Generally, first-time installers complete in 3-4 hrs with a couple of beers in tow.
  • 2 1
 @whitebirdfeathers: wrapping vehicles is an entire industry
  • 1 0
 The two I did (using the RW most complete kits available, whatever their full coverage ones are), the first one was about 3 hrs (first time ever doing it), the 2nd one was 2hrs. This was on brand-new frames so minimal cleaning or de-installation needed. I think you could shave more time off if you did it all the time.

The only way this makes sense as a freelancer is if you can line up enough jobs to make it worth it, and ideally on new framesets, not already-built bikes. Those seem like it would slow it down a lot, more cleaning required, etc. on an already-built frame.
  • 3 0
 @friendlyfoe: It's completely different, you really can't compare the two.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: so is wrapping Christmas gifts. Completely irrelevant to ridewrap.
  • 1 1
 @Freakyjon: there actually is some overlap. Some of my clients want their bonnet and or front bumpers wrapped with a clear protective film and the fitting process is pretty much the same for both bikes and vehicles.
  • 1 0
 @Freakyjon: We have lots of automotive businesses using our products to support their local bike community :-)
  • 2 0
 @RideWrap: Yeah, that was my thought. One person specializing in this in an area could really get the hang of it vs. one shop mechanic that does it a couple times a month.

I can see the business model working like this:
- LBS does full disassembly / assembly
- The sub-let jobber gets a completely stripped frame. I've got to think that some of the feedback that it takes a shop a full day could be including the assembly/disassembly time too.
  • 2 0
 @neons97: There is no major disassembly required... Wheels, chain, bolt-on guards. Definitely not a requirement to be a bare frame. I hate to say it, but generally when we hear about super long installs, theres just not been any time put towards reading the instructions and watching the short videos. First timer = ~3-4hrs, capable installer (5+ installs) sub 2hrs.

There are definitely already some of the LBS/local business partnerships setup and they work great. Our shop in Whistler supports install for a couple bike shops in the area, and future shops will do the same.
  • 2 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: My buddy bought a bike and wanted it to get wrapped. The shop here in Calgary had "a guy" that was a serial wrappist. The Guy did a great job, and it sounds like he's the go-to for this kind of job. I bet you get the hang of it pretty quick. When I do a thing like this I end up with a lot of dog hair and greasy fingerprints under the wrap so it's clearly not calling me.
  • 2 0
 @husstler: Serial wrappist. Awesome career description.
  • 1 0
 @husstler: i did my last bike and it turned out fine but what a sh!t job it would be to do full time. Though I am lazy and prefer my life of semi leisure.
  • 1 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: After a few bikes, the initial frustrations disappear and it turns into quite a therapeutic process.
  • 6 0
 Serious question: are people doing Ride Wrap for resale value or because the scratches matter to them that much?
  • 2 0
 Resale for me. I go through bikes every year or two just to switch things up and try different things. Especially riding places like Moab, Sedona, St. George where there’s chunky rock to tear through my paint if I toss the bike, the ride wrap definitely is noticeable after a while. My bikes usually look like they’ve been through the wringer after a year or two but I pull the RideWrap off before putting them up for sale and they usually look really mint, makes it much easier to sell than trying to explain every little nick and scratch on the paint is just paint damage to a prospective buyer. For the cost relative to the bikes nowadays I put it on every bike except road.
  • 4 0
 yes
  • 4 1
 We hear about both! Personally I do it for how easy it is to clean my matte bike.
  • 2 0
 Scratches for me. I see it as extra protection for a carbon frame. Would love to see more tests done on chip resistance, but my hypothesis is that it helps prevent chips. The outer carbon layer and is there for cosmetic and as a boundary from the elements. If any of the structural carbon layers get scratched or exposed to UV, micro fissures could start spreading or layers delaminating. I'm actually more worried about these kind of chips from handling/transporting the bike and accidental tool damage than actual riding cause the OEM frame protection cover the risky parts.
  • 2 0
 First carbon frame, we hit the ground a lot. Protection against me, I guess.
  • 1 0
 @RideWrap: I went with another brand and had to design and cut my pieces myself... I'll agree with you, my matte bike always looks awesome after cleaning when those mostly hidden spots not covered are really hard to get really clean looking.
  • 1 0
 I don't use the RW product, but instead buy my own 3M tape off Amazon and cut it with scissors to protect high wear areas.

I do it 100% for resale value. It's amazing how much a scratch through the paint devalues resale...let alone limiting the number of potential buyers (some people won't even touch a bike with a scratch on it...so the more buyers in the pool, the higher the value you can expect).
  • 2 1
 Let me offer a third option: Wrap the bike because I like it looking nice. Smile I don't especially care about scratches, they will happen anyway because the bike doesn't live in a museum. The look of the bike was one important factor when purchasing, so i would like to keep it.
  • 3 0
 @RideWrap Nice one! Minimizing guessing for LBS', potentially unused materials, Brick and mortar or online can use it, and you guys leverage SaS as a revenue stream. Win, win, win, win.
  • 2 0
 Again, I find it hard to conceive that shops can do this in a relatively dust/dirt free environment in a timely manor to make money.
How quickly can even the best install this pre-cut kit on a full suspension mountain bike for instance?

Those suggesting mobile installers - same deal - how on earth would you have the space and contaminate free area to do so.

The cutter being small enough to get tucked away...... these items are dust sensitive. Even if covered, the lifespan in a shop environment would be quite subjective.......

Wrapping your bikes - yes.
Suggesting this business model..... questionable.
  • 3 0
 We have thousands of shops successfully installing these products, including mobile (most run a van tall enough to stand up, fits a bike stand no prob). A trained installer is consistently sub 2 hrs start to finish.

On the equipment front, a little wipe-down keeps it good to go!
Our very first plotter, 'Gail the Great', is still in service at our Whistler install facility years later.
  • 2 0
 @RideWrap, make the templates available to me, as a consumer. Charge me appropriately for your development time for the file. Ensure I can't copy it and re-cut it more than once. I already have my own plotter and source of vinyl. This may be a much bigger market opportunity for you than trying to get a LBS to do this.
  • 1 0
 Were always in support of small businesses. If you want to start up a bike wrapping business, thats what this product is about and we support you! Weve got a load of people doing the same.
  • 3 0
 I had a levo SL, put ride wrap on it day one...I sold the bike pretty quickly, well, within a few months and I think the ridewrap helped the resale value on it. Great product, I did the satin finish and it looked dope.
  • 2 0
 I got my 5010 ridewrapped when the guys were doing it out of their living room (maybe kitchen) in Whistler - great service and great to see a local business grow into what it is. I did my own hardtail with one of their kits and my second hand Bronson was done by the original owner and still looks great.
  • 3 0
 I am sorry I just don't get the need for wrapping the frame for protection, I need to save my money for $300 cassettes $100 tires, shit even beer is more expensive these days.
  • 2 0
 This is brilliant! Any high end shop will be all over this for sure. I can't figure out why any carbon bike costing so much would not have this installed. It will be up to RW to keep up on the catalogue of the designs as their will be lots and lots of competitors jumping all over this concept but will not have the catalogue of designs. I for one congratulate RW for taking this protection to the next step. Think of it this way, you get your car done locally and the real serious shops will cut the vinyl on-site. If a piece get done incorrectly then RW should have the sw just replace that one panel. This will also apply to a bike taking a wreck. Good stuff RW
  • 5 0
 This is a really good idea
  • 5 0
 Getting a kit is easy. The installation is the hard part.
  • 2 1
 We hope that this will lower the barrier to entry for shops and thus make install service even more widespread.
We are also expanding our online tutorials and our own physical footprint, we get it, install is not for everyone.
:-)
  • 1 0
 Pro tip: ask the staff from an automotive tint shop to do the pre-cut kid install for you. They work with vinyl all day long.
  • 1 0
 @Geography78: These shops are one of the big reasons we developed this software. Weve also seen these businesses partner up with a couple local shops around them and its definitely a win-win
  • 17 16
 Ride wrap is like your grandparents that used to keep the plastic cover on their sofa. Plastic wrap is soft and scratches easy, clear coats are easily fixed. Don't understand why you'd ruin a perfectly gorgeous new frame for some superficial protection. Lets just add 100g of pointless weight to something new spend so much on just to be light. Add protection to the areas that wear, not the entire bike.
  • 12 0
 If you’ve ever shuttled, nowhere on the bike is safe
  • 3 0
 @canadianenduro: shuttling on a rough road ate through my ridewrap in multiple spots. Hate to think what my bike would look like without it
  • 3 0
 @McKai: Weve got a subsidized replacement piece program, just reach out to our team!
  • 3 0
 z-man doesn't paint his car or his bike, why ruin those gorgeous frames? my guy shaves his head DAILY and sleeps OUTSIDE. Clothes? HAH! Don't even try to go there! Live raw bro
  • 1 0
 @RideWrap: for real?

Because I always wear through mine on the down tube. I even wrap my down tube with an old tshirt first.

Definitely doesn't self heal on the down tube.

Great product, but doesn't last long in the tailgate pad.
  • 2 0
 @anotherstoneinthewoods: i'd suggest having a look at the shuttle armor!
  • 1 0
 @anotherstoneinthewoods: Yea, just reach out to the team for replacement pieces.

As @niclac suggested the Shuttle Armor is definitely what you are looking for, very thick/durable urethane pieces for the DT. Protection Film is a wear product, and with acute wear such as shuttling, it just gets worn out (self-healing features are for scuffs and minor marks, were not talking gecko limb regeneration).
  • 2 0
 @mariomtblt:

Hahahaha
  • 11 10
 Great idea, but who actually buys these overprices plastic tape kits? I struggle to understand what people are doing with their bikes if they feel the need to wrap the whole thing top to bottom. Cover contact points yes, I for one cover the chain/cable contact areas using a mixture of rubber tape and soft-side Velcro, keeps things quiet and unmarked. But honestly that's all you need.
  • 15 5
 Couple tips boss, Not everyone is you Different places in the world have different requirements Some people like to protect their bikes, cars So protecting the contact points is all YOU need, others may differ
  • 3 1
 The vast majority of people have no idea how to properly wash a bike or car. Bikes caked with dirt and mud will absolutely scratch the paint if you're washing them with a beach towel or a mit that has a bunch of stones and debris in it. I find the ridewrap makes cleaning a lot easier and you don't have to be as concerned with proper wash technique.
  • 6 1
 how many shops have that kind of real estate for a cutter......
  • 10 0
 All of them.. there’s no bikes atm
  • 3 1
 While this one was staged for the video and photo, they are quite compact and move around easily (to be tucked away as needed)
  • 2 2
 Interesting choice to create an ecosystem of hardware and software to have to support. Why not make the design/templates available through software and then centrally produce/distribute the result? That seems like a more valuable longer term business model. I just don't see someone not deciding their wrap pattern until the day it is to be installed (most of these kits are either done before a new build or as part of a tear down, not a 1hr walk-in shop service).
  • 4 0
 We already have a 'production on demand' model, where dealers and customers can order kits that are produced in one of our production facilities before being shipped out. This software integrates with market cutting machines and is a different option for shops and other businesses looking to make additional margins and ease their scheduling and availability.
  • 2 0
 The funniest part of all this is if you want to actually save, just go buy some scissors and a small roll of PPF. You’re gonna pay significantly less.
  • 1 0
 This one always comes up! Many ways to protect your bike... We put the DIY method to the test.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=as5jcZsDYsE
  • 2 1
 most shops don't have the bandwith to add wrapping to the labor menu. having done 2 bikes as a mechanic. i don't like wrapping them. i would rather rebuild shocks or do repairs than put on wrap. nope
  • 1 0
 I love their product, but my last kit about a third of the sheets were not cut out Frown

Not sure if this is an anomaly or what

2022 XL Norco Range VLT A1 if you guys are reading this @RideWrap
  • 1 0
 Definitely not how we look to ship those out, 'weeding' the kits is a human-powered job and mistakes do happen on occasion. Just reach out to our team and well be happy to support.
  • 4 2
 This is so rad, congrats @RideWrap on bringing such an awesome idea to market!
  • 4 1
 Cutting edge technology, can’t wrap my head around it
  • 4 0
 Covering the topic can be a sticky situation. It's not as transparent as it seems.
  • 1 0
 @Xlr8n: Oh, come on-demand answers!
  • 3 3
 Sorry all, but ride wrap and bike protection is so minuscule in its impact on the environment, for god sakes human’s methane from farting is more substantial in damage. Folks need to put things into perspective sometimes.
  • 1 0
 I'd pay for this if shops just use the templates for something like a full bespoke vinyl decal designs instead of the clear ones provided by ridewrap
  • 2 0
 Everybody gangsta till you go on buy/sell and see how much nicer the wrapped bikes are
  • 1 1
 Funny how most pinkbikers make fun of people wearing lycra, like if it was not macho enough, but then wrap their hardcore MTB in a condom so it doesn't get scratches...the irony.
  • 2 0
 Very cool. Love my RideWraps. Keeps all the would be scratches away.
  • 1 1
 Considering the look of my chainstay protector (ESI tape), I suppose it would soon look as if my bike is shedding it's skin.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: doesn’t do that. Ive ridden thousands of miles on one of my bikes and the RideWrap stays put very well. No comparison to then other Ive used.
  • 2 0
 Oh yes, now we can write off our vinyl cutters!!!
  • 1 0
 This is cool. Though I don't think any of the shops in my area will actually *apply* a ride wrap.
  • 1 0
 i prefer "bike on demand"...
  • 1 0
 How much do one of those cutting machines sell for?
  • 1 0
 We've integrated with commercially available equipment, the ones that we will offer retail below one thousand.
  • 1 0
 Sick! I need wrap for my kitchen counter as well..this could do! lol
  • 1 0
 Hopefully the figure out the new formula problems they are claiming
  • 2 0
 This is what's up!
  • 11 12
 so basically you are buying a plotter some vinyl and paying for the privelege of some templates?
  • 27 2
 Yes, because it acutally takes a lot of work to design a template specific for a frame and size, especially regarding the low number of sales for that specific template.
  • 26 1
 Yes, and you could say that about literally anything: your clothes are just some cotton fabric and some templates. Start your own company.
  • 7 1
 you might be good with CAD but shop owners are probably a bit shit
  • 4 6
 @fred-frod: "low number of sales"


see, here is the issue. no shop is going to buy the equipment to do this. it isn't cheap.

small OE that want to offer on demand kits pre-installed? absolutely.
  • 6 1
 @conoat: The equipment isnt really that expensive at all - Sure a very small shop wouldnt be interested but most surviving LBS (at least in the UK) happily stock bikes that are 5-10k with fully tooled up workshops and nice displays of thousands of pounds worth of components - spending between £500 and £1200 on a plotter wont be a problem.

I know you claim to have some involvement with the bike industry, maybe you forgot how much workshop tools cost?

For certain shops this could be great - allows the shop on-demand to wrap a brand new bike literally the same day, no need to wait days for the kit to arrive etc etc.

Depending upon the cost of a download it wouldnt take long to get a return on the investement.
  • 2 1
 @conoat: Low number of sales per template! You know you can also use the equipment to plot protection kits for other frames too? And as justanotherusername mentioned a plotter is also not that expansive.
  • 2 2
 @fred-frod: no it's not. It call the wrap around function and it's on all cad software
  • 2 1
 @justanotherusername: weirdly back in 1995 the shop I worked at had a very similar idea they went out and bought a Roland camm1 however sold zero protection kits sold f*cking millions of Oakley thermonuclear protection stickers , no fear stickers animal stickers must have paid for that plotter 50 maybe 100 times over , seems like a duff idea frame protection kits , bikes cost so much money now they should come with this shit from the factory ,
  • 2 0
 @conoat: a Graphtec is 1499 a roll of vinyl 30 quid christ knows what vector software costs but 2 grand layout worst case head off to ebay and you will find loads of these people have used for running t shirt businesses or vinyl car wrappers closing up I paid less than a grand for one of my graphtecs
  • 3 0
 @conoat: your not thinking this through the shop can make a shit ton of stick family stickers for car bumpers , baby on board becomes an endless revenue stream and the amount of full on pros wanting their very own name on the top tube is a retirement fund in itself
  • 4 3
 @Compositepro: oh f*ck me.....if I see one more entitled git with a "little dude on board" sticker on the back of their Vauxall, I am going to go mental.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: join the party...... make money while the going is good
  • 2 1
 @conoat: Haha, someone as entitled as you going mental because he considers someone else entitled for putting a sticker on a car, what a world.
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: people do that a lad i know called brant made some trousers once
  • 1 0
 @fred-frod: lol course it does
  • 3 1
 @justanotherusername: This is correct, cutting equipment can be had at a low cost (there are expensive ones as well.) and we've designed the program to work with all sorts of machines.
The decision to develop this is one that was born from looking to support shops and pricing to match.

@fred-frod: Yes, the amount of time and effort involved in gathering measurements, designing kits, and prepping for cutting is our largest team of people. Some kits get produced many times, others just once, but we want to ensure as many people have an option.
  • 6 0
 @inonyme: Distilling an entire team's job into 'the wrap function will do it' is just ignorant.
  • 1 6
flag conoat (Jan 31, 2022 at 13:41) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: jesus f*cking christ dude.....do you think through what you write or do you just let your mental musings fall out without restriction, much like your mom should have let you...?

anyways, "depending on cost of download". well LADEEf*ckINGDA! isn't this exactly what I have said at least twice in this thread!? maybe we can get @ridewrap to tell us what the per print fee is, and we can stop the conjecture. Until then, perhaps go back to sucking Trudeau's micro penis.
  • 1 2
 @justanotherusername: perfectly fine, sugartits!
  • 1 1
 @conoat: doesn’t look like it…..
twitter.com/conoat
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: that is the 3rd time you have just linked to my profile page.

are you sure you understand how a computer works?
  • 1 1
 We need LESS plastic!
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