SCOR Launches Range of Kids Bikes

Jul 1, 2022 at 6:12
by SCOR  

Press Release: SCOR

The journey to playing the mountains starts with fun.

Laps of the park, pumptrack sessions with friends, ramps in the street, discovering singletrack in the woods.
Our kids bikes are designed so that ride by ride, trail by trail smiles, skills, confidence and a sense of adventure can grow – helping all trail groms, mini-rippers or little tearaways play the mountains harder and happier.

SCOR Kids Bike

Two bikes designed for the trails. Ridden by kids.

SCOR’s kid’s bikes are created with the same fun-first philosophy and attention to detail as our larger bikes.
The 0020 and 0024 are real mountain bikes, just smaller. Both feature a strong yet lightweight aluminum frame, confidence-inspiring geometry and carefully chosen kid-specific components.

SCOR KIDS BIKE

SCOR’s smallest bike is designed for the biggest adventures.
With its 20” wheels the 0020 is the perfect introduction to off-road riding and pump track laps.

• 20" wheels
• Designed for ages 5-8, 110-135cm in height
• SRAM 1x8 drivetrain, Tektro hydraulic disc brakes
• High-volume Kenda Booster 2.4” tires
• Retail pricing: 899 USD

SCOR KIDS BIKE

The 24” wheeled 0024 is all about boosting confidence, so kids feel happy making the transition from play park to bike park.

• 24" wheels
• Designed for ages 6-11, 120-145cm in height
• SRAM 1x8 drivetrain, Tektro hydraulic disc brakes
• High-volume Kenda Booster 2.4” tires
• Retail pricing: 949 USD

SCOR Kids Bike

More details and information on our SCOR Website


54 Comments

  • 13 1
 Most kid's bike "suspension" is very heavy, not adjustable, and has barely any usable travel. The one exception I've seen is Manitou's kids stuff, which is pretty good. Larger tires are the better way to go for kids. It doesn't add nearly as much weight, and adjusting tire pressure can actually make a difference with ride feel/traction for someone their size.
  • 5 0
 Also check out Rocky, Norco, Spawn. They make good kids bikes with real deal suspension and geometry.
  • 6 0
 @MT36: commencal too!
  • 1 0
 @derekr: yes!
  • 2 1
 @MT36: The new Specialized Riprock is awesome too!
  • 1 0
 @letsgoridebikes18: My son had a Riprock 20" from age 5-7. the 2.8 tires and coil fork worked great. Had to upgrade to hydraulic brakes and a smaller chainring. Otherwise was the perfect bike for him at the time.
  • 2 0
 Suspension for most kids forks is pretty crap and the main factor is weight. I’d like to see weight for these.
  • 3 0
 @MT36: the newest one is a different animal. Fully rigid, pretty light, 9 speed, hydraulic brakes, boost axles (!) and even a narrow wide chain ring. It’s a proper MTB.
  • 1 0
 @letsgoridebikes18: That sounds cool. I'm a big proponent of at least a fork for kids but that sounds like the good specs. Kids shred so hard these days if they get the right support.
  • 1 1
 Aren't all "kids mountain bikes" a bit of a scam? Genuinely why not get them a DJ, throw trail-worthy tires on there, and have a bike they will enjoy their entire lives, even once they've grown into proper trail riding. After all, if you raise them on a DJ they're going to destroy their first trail bike you already spent thousands on.

I'm no weight weenie and I'm sure as hell not to raise one in the future. Gear range is null too, these SCORs have 1x8. If they're going to learn on a hardtail it might as well be a steel one it is so much more compliant than aluminum.
  • 1 0
 @ryanandrewrogers: the reach on a DJ is too long at least for young kids. I’m not sure they are a scam…. The material cost is only slightly less than an adult bike and any kid specific components like fork, tires, wheels handlebars are lower production volumes.

Also, I’ve found they depreciate slower than an adult bike.

Also weight is super important so I def wouldn’t go with steel! Go tubeless, lower the tire pressure and run a machete fork!
  • 2 0
 @MT36: we’ve had 2 Spawns and 3 Trailcrafts. Trailcraft is the only real option if you plan to pedal uphill. My youngest sons current setup is 24” carbon wheels full XT 12 speed, 120mm rear, 140 pike DJ - 25 lbs. He can ride faster than most adults. There are real options out there if your kid can utilize the bikes potential. Yes they are expensive, but the resale is better than big bikes and crappy heavy kids bikes are the biggest handicap to their fun and progression.
  • 11 3
 Geez. 950$ for a freaking rigid bike??

Get the Vitus Nucleus or one of the Wooms (xc) or a Prevelo. Way better value and a better bike too.

If you can swing it the Cub Scout Race bikes are pretty awesome. You want that Manitou JUnit suspension, it’s wildly nice and easy to service and get seals kits etc too.
  • 2 0
 Vitus 20" hands down best bike any of my kids have had. Great value and geometry
  • 8 0
 How are these kids supposed to develop a BMX background if they start on an MTB?!
  • 3 0
 HA! Easy, get one of each.
  • 5 0
 Expensive for a rigid bike. Marin and Polygon are doing it right for affordable performance kids bikes.
  • 2 0
 Marin only has a 20" version for $500: www.marinbikes.com/bikes/type/kids . Comparing that to the 20" here, I'd say both bikes are roughly the same value-wise. The SCOR is a much nicer bike, but also more expensive. If I had confidence all the bike would be used by more than 1 person, I'd opt for the SCOR. But it's hard to justify $1k for a bike that will be used by one person for only a few years.
  • 2 0
 I was so impressed with a 20" version that I bought a 24" too. Idk about over the Atlantic but here in Europe you can't find a 9 kg kids bike with decent geo for better price.

The only bad thing on this bikes is old qr standard so you're basically screwed if you want to put on a nice air fork (Manitue Machete comes in standard boost only).
Also, Kenda 2.4 tyres are actually only around 2.1 width.
  • 1 0
 @Lanebobane: I was looking more at the 24" versions
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: Merida has 24" bikes that are light and with better geo than Cube SL and many other EU frames.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: Rascal bikes
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: u have early rider from uk that age benchmarks in kids bikes
  • 1 0
 There are some good kids suspension forks on the market, and they definitely should have added one to this bike. It simply just doesn't have the capability of really allowing the kids to push themselves on these bikes.
  • 2 0
 We all managed to push ourselves on rigid bikes as a kid. I don’t think I would’ve liked the extra weight from suspension on my little 20”
  • 3 0
 I've seen these bikes and weigh them. 20lbs and 24lbs, pretty cool.
  • 3 1
 These are some very low value bikes.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, price is way out of whack. I think you can get a Salsa Timberjack 20 for around half of one of these things, or the Trek Rosoce 20 for about the same (half). I'm sure there a ton of other 20" mid-fat kids bikes that carry decent components and a Al frame for way less than $900usd.
I got my kid a Roscoe 20 and swapped on some entry level Shimano hydros for the Tektro mechs, way less grip effort and you can adjust the levers super close to the bars for small hands. I think I'm going to swap to Microshift Advent as well. I'll still be in for way less then the SCORE 0020.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: do you know which brakes? My daughters bike came with some crap I’ve never heard of and are impossible to bleed properly.
  • 1 0
 earlyrider.com proving that suspension on kids bikes is definitely a good thing
  • 1 0
 My kids had those very same bikes 2 years before official lunch
  • 10 0
 It's just after breakfast and I could already go for an official lunch
  • 2 0
 @chrod: Incredible how single letter can make a meal Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Orbea Mx 20 is a sweet bike.
  • 6 6
 If it doesn't have suspension; is it really a mountain bike?
  • 5 6
 No its not. Its a 'clunker' - and good enough for green trails only / casual riding. The truth is, a skilled MTBer can shred on a clunker, but kids (by and large) don't have that skill set yet and thereby a full ridged clunker holds them back. All my kids progressed hugely only after swapping onto FS.
  • 2 0
 Right. A lot of bikes branded as "kids MTB" have minimal to no suspension and oversized front chainrings. If you get your kids into biking, make sure they can actually climb with the thing, and getting suspension, especially front and back, helps with having a forgiving rig. It's hard to have fun if you are out of control.
  • 1 0
 *cries in rigid fixie* "I'm a mountain bike, I'm a mountain bike..."
  • 4 1
 @CDT77: Where are you getting your terminology from? A "clunker" is a converted cruiser that dudes like Tom Ritchey, Gary Fisher, Charlie Kelly, etc. rode back in the 70's. There are modern adaptations of the clunker (GT and Transition come to mind) but these are not those.
These are simply rigid kids MTBs.
And as it has been stated before, kids don't need suspension, unless they are legit dropping in on freeride lines or are competing at some very high level. I'd rather my kid's bike be 5kg lighter then they have some low grade suspension on their bike.
  • 2 1
 @CDT77: That’s a load of crap. Kids were ripping rigid bikes way back in the 70’s- 80’s! Those bikes were not easy to ride. Kids first need non-suspension requiring skills like bunnyhopping, jumping, wheelies, turning. Learning to rip on a rigid bike is important imo.
  • 1 1
 @emptybe-er: Of course kids (including mine) started on rigid bikes... but if you want to take your kids on actual MTB trails (in the PNW for example) where having suspension adds significant safety when descending - you get your kid something that can handle the terrain (given their skill set).

Who wasn't ripping rigid's way back when? (if your over 40) Does that mean I'd like to do it nowdays? Hell no. If your gonna go 'rip' green trails (or almost any trail in FLA) - sure - rigid will be fine for your kid.. but if you are gonna hit something serious w your kid? FS or at least a HT.
  • 1 1
 @CDT77: For 20-24” bikes, geometry and weight is much more important than suspension, I remember distinctly.. And how many kids are going on serious trails on 20-24” bikes? Maybe quit trying to turn your kid into a mini me on the serious trails and let them just have fun? I see parents dragging their kids out on boring trail rides dressed in lycra way too much.. Kids don’t care about scenery or smelling the pines, they have short attention spans and want to have fun. Just a thought.
  • 1 1
 @emptybe-er: Horses for courses I guess. We MTB as a family - and this family does not enjoy (kids included) trails that you could smash on a full rigid. Being in Canada we had easy access to Spawn kids bikes - which helped immensely in making proper FS available to them. Anyways - we've beat this to death. Rubber side down brotha.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: it depends on the kid. Some kids do want to smash and ride aggressively. When my son was 4 I showed him how to brake, ride a pump track, corner and bunny hop. He took it from there and is 10 now and clears 20ft table tops. So not all kids ride like this, but for other kids, of course they are having fun riding this way. It’s a bit presumptuous to think that because a kid matches or exceeds most adults skill wise they aren’t having fun. They wouldn’t do it otherwise.
  • 1 0
 @MT36: Did you show him how to ride a pump track, bunnyhop with a heavy fork hanging off the front, or was it a weight-appropriate rigid bike? Do you think he would be where he’s at if he would’ve started with a heavier bike?
Of course some kids start and learn sooner and can actually deal with the added weight of suspension but that doesn’t mean every 20-24” bike needs a fork. If you were 65lbs would you rather use air pressure from nice big tires or put a fork on that weighs 15-20 equivalent lbs?
Did you guys ride as a kid?? I jumped, rallied trail, all that without suspension. Just the extra weight of mag wheels and a larger frame on my next bike was enough to turn me off, was no longer flickable.. I had no need for suspension, like the vast majority of kids.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: I would say yes, it was disproportionately heavy. It was a 20” specialized rip rock, plus tires, coil fork, so not optimized for weight. He weighted about 50-60lbs and the bike was about half his weight. He was riding bike park and shuttles with it, I would tow him behind me on long climbs up to 2k vertical. I don’t think he would have been as confident or had as much fun on black trails without the fork. I appreciate our story is not the norm. He has a kiduro bike now. My first mountain bike was rigid like the one you mentioned but that was when the bikes were total POSs and just being able to finish a trail without an injury was a big accomplishment on those older MTBs. Cheers
  • 1 0
 @CDT77: "All my kids progressed hugely only after swapping onto FS"
AFTER developing a skillset from riding rigid/hardtail presumably
  • 1 0
 @juanny: yes - I am not saying there isn't a place for rigid / HT's... but after a certain point / type of trail FS bikes are a huge benefit, even given their weight penalty. We knew it was time for the FS when I watched our youngest (6yr old at the time) after a couple big crashes. The FS immediately remedied that from occurring again - exact same trail = no crashing. Anyways..
  • 2 0
 @CDT77: I agree. I was of the mindset that a basic bike will drive better fundamental skills. I still think this is true, but the enjoyment of riding a FS bike and being able to ride harder terrain I think helped my kids faster than the slow grind and hard lessons of riding black trails on a rigid.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: For real. This mindset that you need to learn skills on a hardtail is painfully outdate. Having fun is hands down the most effective way to accelerate the learning curve. Most kids aren't into type 2 fun.
  • 1 0
 Why no suspension?
  • 2 0
 my 5 year old weighs 20kg (pretty normal for his age). he simply doesn't generate enough force to overcome sticktion on most forks, most of the time. His bike (an older speccy riprock) has big tyres similar to these and they absorb all the low-magnitude noise (roots, bumps etc) that kids at his level are likely to meet.

For the 24" bike, suspension might start to make sense, but on a 20" I don't see any point. That said, with a $50 drivetrain, these things have pretty poor vfm
  • 1 0
 So they can learn fundamentals without extra weight/variables





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