SDG Announces Their First Dropper Post

May 21, 2018 at 4:39
by SDG Components  

PRESS RELEASE: SDG Tellis

What do you get when one of the most reputable MTB saddle companies with over 25 years of experience buys a $140 linear actuator? The dropper post you’ve all been waiting for, that’s what! SDG has been committed to making saddles for decades and after watching silently, we’ve decided to address the four problems we found with dropper posts on the market: durability, simplicity, feather-light actuation and affordability.

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST

bigquotesThroughout the development, we sent 120 posts to SDG athletes, product testers and key product managers at several large bike brands, from all over the world. The final results have all been positive and that was the ultimate goal. SDG will never put our name on a product we don’t believe in - that’s why we’ve remained committed to saddles and not just throwing our name on products for the sake of making a buck.Tyler Anspach, SDG owner


Development:

After two years of testing, refinement, along with countless hours on a “highly-sophisticated” test rig and passing all required ISO and EN standards, SDG is confident the new Tellis dropper post is exactly what we’ve wanted all along. It is an affordable, easy to work on and above all else, a reliable dropper seat post.

Sure, Huntington Beach is not the ideal environment for dropper post testing, but you didn’t know about our secret science shed in Kamloops, B.C. did you? Devyn Pelley, Chief Tester and SDG Global Sales Director spearheaded the global test team, while also setting up the reciprocating linear actuator motor to cycle the Tellis seat post for 6 months to complement our lab testing in Taiwan. And thanks to climate control features in his secret shed, along with riding his local trails in Kamloops, the Tellis post performed exceptionally in temperatures down to -20 Celsius.
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
Devyn Pelley leading the test charge, from his home trails in Kamloops, BC.

Wanting to test more than cold weather functionality, we developed a self-contained vat of muddy grit that encapsulated the seal around the shaft. The machine ran for months as we tried to promote real world exposure to water, mud and debris. The system remained clean and functioning even after countless hours of cycling through the muddy water,

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
Spy shot of the secret shed and $140 linear actuator.

Reliability & Service:

Less means more when it comes to our philosophy regarding reliability. Less moving parts in the Tellis post ensure our riders are spending more time riding and less time bleeding, adjusting or cursing.

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
The Tellis is this simple

The SDG Tellis uses a fully sealed cartridge system. Our 3D forged head is sleek and eliminates one more potential joint for creaks or play to develop. The Tellis is constructed with an intelligent keyway system to eliminate lateral head movement and uses 7075 forged clamps and nothing but the highest quality hardware and fitments to further improve the post’s longevity and performance.
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
No attention to detail left untouched.

We understand shit happens, and for that reason, we want to mention that our expansive dealer and global distributor network will be ready to handle any issues that may arise. Whether that’s inside our two-year warranty period or years beyond. Should you want to service the post yourself, you’ll find the experience to be much easier than most posts on the market. No bleeding, no tricky alignment techniques and a large network of partners will be ready to deliver whatever part you may need. And once you get those parts, we’ve got an arsenal of detailed service videos waiting on the site to walk you through the process.


To Our Users:

The bottom line is, SDG has never released a product we didn’t believe in and the Tellis is no exception. Our team set out on this mission believing that we had the ability to offer you the post you’ve been waiting for. We’ve tried to maintain an affordable price point because we know what it’s like to have a budget. And while the post is not only easy on your wallet, it’s easy on your thumb – the Tellis has one of the lightest actuations in the game. No more thumb-pump.
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST

SDG TELLIS DROPPER SEAT POST
Bryan Regnier putting his Tellis to the test on Mars (Bardenas, Spain)

Details:

Travel: 125 & 150mm (100mm & 170mm coming late summer)
Diameter: 30.9 & 31.6mm
Rail Compatibility: 7x7mm & 7x9mm C/F
Routing: Internal Only
Lengths: 390mm & 440mm + Actuator 27mm
Weight: 552g (30.9x150mm), 36g (Lever), 87g (Housing & Cable)
Warranty: Two Years
MSRP: $269.99 USD *Includes Lever and Jagwire LEX-SL Housing & Stainless Cable
Replacement Cartridge: $44.99 USD

The SDG Tellis seat posts are now shipping and available worldwide. For more information, please visit: sdgcomponents.com.

IG: @sdgcomponents
Facebook: @ridesdg
Twitter: @sdgcomponents


MENTIONS: @SDG-COMPONENTS



127 Comments

  • + 40
 Make an I-Beam version, please.
  • + 14
 Will anybody make a I-beam dropper please. I do believe SDG is our best chance
  • + 5
 @Camolloyd: gravity dropper had the i-beam head about 8 years ago:

m.pinkbike.com/news/gravity-dropper-turbo-preview-2010.html
  • + 41
 Certainly on our radar and eventually will offer one. I-Beam has so many benefits over railed that it'd certainly be an improvement over rails. We wanted to first introduce the Tellis and build a solid reputation first for durability, simplicity and industry's softest lever feel. After it's proven itself in the market, you can bet we plan on offering an I-Beam head and expanding our I-Beam saddle collection.
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: If the reliability is proven, I will drop my Fox Transfer for a Tellis I-beam in a heartbeat!!
  • + 1
 @IainJohnson: Some already have.....
  • + 2
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: heck yeah. That's what I'll be buying! always loved an I-beam on my DH bike and trail bike. Can't beat it imo.
  • + 1
 I used to have the KS Supernatural which was made for I-beams. Not sure if its still made.
  • + 3
 does a comfortable I-beam saddle exist?
  • + 1
 @sup3rc0w:

I think so. But it does seem optimal to sit on the padded flat bit
  • + 1
 @sup3rc0w:
This has always been my thought with I-beam, surely a significant amount of the comfort from a standard saddle comes from flex in the rails/saddle body
  • + 2
 @DC1988: Yes if you are riding a hartail I guess...
  • + 2
 @DC1988: We can (and have) design in a flex channel that offers plenty of compliance with the I-Beam system. Most people are familiar with our I-Fly 2.0 saddles which are race specific saddles that offer no compliance as they're purpose built to be super light and minimalist. However, it's fairly easy to design an I-Beam system that'll offer ample compliance, yet still have all the benefits of I-Beam (weight, easy adjustments, creak free, massive fore/aft adjustment, etc.).
  • + 2
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: Then please do so. The only reason I've never retained your saddles and posts is because the saddles are massively uncomfortable for marathon.
  • + 2
 ..or make at least i-beam adapter... Wink
  • + 1
 @zokinjo: And completely negate the weight benefits of why someone's interested in an beam to begin with Big Grin
  • + 1
 Yes! We need an I-Beam dropper! Only reason I don't run an I-Beam seat on my trail bike is that there is no droppers with I-Beam. All my other bikes runs I-Beam.
  • + 31
 Finally a brand that Tellis it like it is
  • + 15
 This looks good. I wonder how it will compare against my benchmark, the $146 CAD Brand X dropper from CRC. Anything that costs twice as much better perform twice as well, which is asking alot, as the Brand X is pretty bombproof. Nice to see a reasonably priced replacement cartridge, can't wait for the 170mm.
  • + 8
 Cheapest brand x I see on crc is $189 cdn and it's only 120mm. What one are you using that's under $150cdn for 150mm?
  • - 4
flag employee7 (May 22, 2018 at 8:04) (Below Threshold)
 That brand x post is wet garbage. One came on my nukeproof and lasted 8 rides before the lever broke. Cheap plastic mixed with high cable load equals trash. I bought a raceface turbine for $300 and it has been awesome so far.
  • - 1
 You have to deal with CRC though...
  • + 8
 @employee7: The post is garbage? Or the lever?
  • + 5
 Agreed. Been using one for 2 years now, and it's been flawless.
  • - 2
 @Surfwashington: The lever is trash and the post worked fine for the 8 rides.
  • + 40
 @employee7: "my brand x was garbage so I bought a raceface"

lol
  • + 13
 @employee7: so instead of replacing the lever you bought a whole new post for ~10 times the prices of a better lever?
  • + 4
 @Dustfarter: I live in San Diego and have bought parts on monday and received them by friday. That's pretty impressive for overseas shipping. I did hear of issues in customs for larger items like frames and wheels but I've had nothing but positive experiences from CRC.
  • + 4
 @literally: I've got a brand x and it's been awesome 125mm for $135 with shipping! When there's a product that is relatively less expensive compared to it's competitors and out performs them as well it really makes you think how much of this stuff is just name brand BS. That and some people think if they pay the highest price for something they are getting the best.
  • + 5
 @employee7: Haha aye because the turbine is a great post. Mines lasted all of 10minutes before it failed!
  • + 1
 @employee7: hate to break it to you but its the same post with a different collar and lever
  • + 1
 @Abite: You are all correct. The dropper X is the best post ever. Please disregard my comment / experience with the lever being a complete dumpster fire. It is awesome. I don't know why anyone even makes another model at this point. The science is settled and the best dropper post is brand X. You hear that Sram, Fox, 9.8, bikeyoke, go home. The dropper wars are over and Brand X is standing on your tattered remains.
  • + 3
 @Abite: Hate to break it to you, but the only similarity the Tellis shares with Brand X would be that they are both cable actuated posts.
  • + 3
 I just got the one up 170 and it has been flawless thus far.. No play at all.
  • + 4
 @nvranka: my race face was absolute garbage! Lol bought a one up components 170 and it's been stellar.
  • + 1
 @onemind123: $138 CAD 2 weeks ago, comes on special pretty regularly. Never said it was 120mm, but the actuation is great, as good as my KS Lev.
  • + 3
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: I was talking about racefaces post not yours
  • + 1
 The BrandX post is fine, had one on my hardtail. I did have to upgrade the lever to a Wolftooth light action lever and ditch the cable/housing that came with it, though. It in no way is as nice as my Transfer or, especially, my BikeYoke but can't beat it for the price.
  • + 2
 @nvranka: No kidding!! My Yeti SB5c came with a raceface dropper and it crapped out after two rides! Leaking internal air seals due to very very poor design caused a 1/2" drop over 30min time period. Had to pump it up half way on every ride. The quality of the parts seemed really good, but after taking it apart and seeing the problem area, I couldn't believe they designed it that way! (I'm a Mech Engr. by the way). I will seriously be looking at this post along with PNW post and One up. By the way, replaced the Raceface with a RS Reverb. Flawless the last 2 years... 3rd Reverb owned without issues, just normal rebuilds every other season. But man do I hate the side to side movement and cost!
  • + 1
 @yeti951SD: Yeah its a decent dropper. I have one on my Kona. I bought a YT Jeffsy and the e13 one that it came with is trash, lateral play, top cap has play and it sticks. Only thing worng with the BX was the lever which CRC replaced free and quick. I am going to change out the e13 with BX dropper while i try and get ahold of a OneUp.
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: think he was referring to the raceface and the brand x...
  • + 1
 Had the Brand-X post for a year nos and it's still working great. Gotta admit the stock lever was garbage, replaced it with the KS Southpaw, absolutely no issue since then.
  • + 15
 Boom! This post rocks, I've been running this post since February, riding in nasty winter conditions, then hitting Mexico, Chile and Colombia for some racing, EWS's and more bike punishing. I've literally done nothing to this post. I pickup my bike from the seat daily, no sucking or weird sag like reverbs and it just works, everytime.
  • + 1
 That's good to hear! Want to replace the Gravity Dropper on my son's Devinci Troy with one. No issues with the G.D. in 6 months, but it weighs a ton and so does his bike! Not ideal weight for a 14 year old who just wants to keep up with his old dad but suffers with a 33 lb carbon trail bike!
  • + 13
 Cool. If the cartridge blows I'll just kife the one from my screen door.
  • + 5
 theres hardly anything "real world" about that test cycling the dropper through 10mm strokes. its not mud that is blowing seals in dropper posts. push it all the way down, put some actual pressure on the seals, then pick it up by the seat a bunch of times while in the down position to get some negative suction in there. then maybe leave it in the down position and go to different altitudes, different temperatures, put the bike on an airplane, etc. etc. then after a year we'll know if its average. would take a couple years to know if its really really good.
  • + 1
 Maybe mud in single digit temperatures (C) with lots of lateral pressure on the saddle.
  • + 26
 That test rig was only built to compliment the 120+ test riders we had on the post globally and the massive number of hours logged internally. Considering the jig was made with 2x4s it has pretty terrible tolerances so in addition to the vertical pressure it's applying, it's also constantly applying lateral load with every cycle. Pairing this with having a seal head constantly submerged in mud, it's pretty reflective of what I found prematurely kills posts. For riding testing, the post was always stored compressed in a non-climate controlled shed which saw temperatures drop well below -20c on a consistent basis. I'm still on the same post & cartridge as day 1 which has seen every condition imaginable across coastal and interior BC. Additionally, while compressed it's seen multiple trips by plane, helicopter and consistently gone through +/- 1500m changes in elevation.
  • + 1
 don't forget to make 150,000 of them too.
  • + 7
 external cable routing? yeah they sure thought of everything.... listen I get it, internal could be the thing, but not all bikes set up for this (like mine).
  • + 8
 Drill a hole? I did that on my previous bike a few years ago and it's still working fine with its new owner.
  • + 2
 @onemind123: Same here on a Transition Bandit. The guy still rides it daily
  • - 3
 If I'd run a dropper, I'd still like to have the option to be able to raise it all the way up to XC height or slam it all the way down. That's 300mm difference, hence I'd use the seatpost clamp too to do that. The way internal routed cables enter the seattube, I don't think this is going to work. First, the drill is too high for the post to slam all the way down and more importantly, I expect the cable (outer) to wear too quicly sliding in and out through that port. For those happy with the limited range current droppers deliver this shouldn't be an issue. But yeah if you want to use the seatpost clamp too to go through the full range, external routed (with the cable outer connected to the collar, not the head) would be the way to go. Or wireless, of course.
  • + 2
 @vinay: I have a 150mm and it has zero limitations. Most of my riding crew feels the same. I can ride 90% of what I ride on my DH bike plus XC. This includes everything here in Colorado, Moab plus a few days at Whistler. Only limitation is the suspension compared to the DH bike and not the dropper. To say 'limited' is laughable unless you are looking to put one on a DJ. The idea of cable on the collar is a good one though for externally mounted.
  • + 1
 @bman33: If 150mm is sufficient, why would there still be people calling for 170mm travel? Apparently some people prefer more adjustment than you need. So as it is, what's available is great for you. But not everyone is you.
  • + 1
 @vinay: 170 is available. You are calling for more, close to 300mm in your example. I am not saying don't make one. However, I don't see currently available 150mm-170mm limited anyone. much lower that 170mm gets it into DJ range. I assume not many people are riding trail on a DJ's. I could be wrong.
  • + 1
 @vinay: You also say you just use your seat clamp vs. getting a dropper. How is that practical? Stop at every point on a trail with tech sections to get your tools out, lower, got thru it and then raise it back up?
  • + 1
 @bman33: Sorry for the confusion. I'm not calling for a 300mm dropper, nor do I claim a dropper seatpost with 150mm travel is useless. As it is, I'd probably prefer to be able to use a combination of dropper post and qr seatpost clamp. And I'd say this won't work nicely with internal routing. The cable guided to the collar would be ideal. For most of my riding, I prefer to have my saddle at knee height when cranks are horizontal. This is a few cm lower than shown in the picture of my bike (see my profile) where the saddle was such that my workstand can clamp the seatpost. I like to slam it all the way when getting of higher obstacles when I tuck my bike as deep as possible. Or when pumping sections. So for stuff like that (and if I'd have a dropper), I'd use the qr to set the post in the lowest position and have the flexibility to go 150mm (or how much travel it offers) higher on the fly. If I'd ride a marathon for instance (something I haven't done in well over a decade where you'd have longer non-technical sections I may do some more seated pedaling and I might set the qr so that I can get the saddle all the way up to XC height. The on the fly adjustment would allow me to drop it by 150mm for the technical sections. That should be enough though I think it would still scare me, not having had my saddle that high for a fair while. Anyway, that's how I'd combine dropper and qr lever.

The reason I currently don't use a dropper isn't because I don't see the point. I'm doing fine without though. Just leave the saddle low enough, stand up and ride. The height of my hips doesn't depend on saddle height. The height of my hips depends on how high I keep them. Other than that, my previous frame (DMR) took a 26.8mm seatpost. There are no dropper posts for that, simple as that. Finally, I only buy expensive stuff if I expect it to last me a good while. Judging by PB comments, the reliability of the current crop wasn't quite there and the latest releases were good reason to abandon something only two years old. Sure, "progress" needs early adopters but I don't care to contribute. Once they have something I really like with the reliability of a good suspension fork, I'll buy it. This SDG post claims to have the reliability sorted. Once that's proven to be true and they also have a model with an external cable then yes, I might get one.
  • + 1
 @bman33: ya, that's the dumbest shit I've ever heard of in this day and age!
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Alright, go ahead then. Explain how you'd raise and lower a dropper seatpost in the seattube with internal cable routing and how that'd be easier than a dropper with external routing. That was what this was about. Good luck.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Looking at your bike you probably need a 300mm dropper!... Seat tube looks tiny, more like a DJ bike than a trail bike... I'd imagine most people using droppers have bikes with seat tubes more appropriate for their height & style of riding... For instance my own bikes have seat tubes around 500mm length and I can use 170mm droppers with very little post showing out of the top. The only reason you'd need to raise and lower a dropper in the seat tube is because your bike is too small for the intended use?
  • + 1
 @buckley: No, I intentionally got a 400mm seattube. I want to have my saddle all the way slammed when practicing getting over large logs etc (bigger than wheelsize stuff). I also wanted the top tube so low because I like to still have my knee above the top tube with the cranks level. So I don't necessarily need to drop the outer foot when cornering while still enjoying the room to move around. I could go lower but I decided I wanted to be able to get the seatpost up to XC height just in case. A regular 400mm rigid post needs 100mm insertion so I can have 300mm exposed if need be, just enough for XC height. The original geometry was with a 440mm seattube but I had it changed intentionally because I decided a 400mm seattube should be sufficient. The bike is not small. It has still got a 460mm reach, I think.

I wouldn't need a full 300mm on the fly though. As I said, I would use the dropper in combination with the seatpost clamp for different type of rides. If I really expect to do a lot of seated pedaling (like a marathon race) I might consider one. As it is now, I don't do much seated pedaling let alone do I require it to raise on the fly. Maybe someday. But it really needs to be at least as reliable as a good suspension fork. It is just low on my list. Again, SDG is getting close, but I'd prefer external routing, which is what this thread was about.
  • + 9
 Will it outclass the OneUp Dropper though?
  • + 9
 Isn't is supposed to be $140? Not $270 usd? I'm confused...
  • + 1
 270 is anything but affordable. It's a seatpost after all.
  • + 4
 It is strange to me that a company that sells the benefits of the I-Beam saddle tech doesn't make a dropper specifically designed for I-Beam, and then wades into a crowded market without anything particularly noteworthy about the product. No offset head, not notably lightweight, not any different from other cartridge droppers, not any cheaper. I guess I'll never understand nor would I be particularly successful as a product designer/marketer where it seems like lately in this industry you simply replicate what everyone else is doing and then price it exactly the same as well.
  • + 1
 @colincolin: For a dropper it affordable. If it was a rigid seatpost, it qualifies as expensive.
  • + 3
 @PHeller: Trust, we definitely want to offer an I-Beam head, but for SDG to enter a market it'd never entered before and with another "standard", it'd be too much for us to tackle on our first project. The goal with the Tellis is to offer an I-Beam head later on as well as an expanded I-Beam saddle offering as the I-Beam has enough benefits to justify another standard. We rather wanted to focus on the key elements of durability, simplicity and softest lever feel in the industry.Once the Tellis proves it's place in the market, you can bet we're going to innovate on top of an already solid product.
  • + 3
 @PHeller: bc now they can sell more stuff to product managers.
Grips, saddles, seat post...who doesnt want to make more money?
  • + 1
 @clapforcanadaa: I honestly missed the light action of the lever as a feature. I always attributed the light action as a result of cable routing.
  • + 8
 So, "thumb pump" is a thing?
  • + 2
 Apparently, 1st world problems.
  • + 3
 what a joke, huh?

Perhaps those folks struggling with a thumb lever might be more comfortable on a road bike.
  • + 5
 Just do 15 minutes of "thumb squats" before each ride and you'll be fine. Oh and five minutes post ride cool down, then submerge your thumbs in cold water for five minutes and then make sure not to use them for the rest of the day. No problemo.
  • + 1
 @bikesoverbritches: thank you!
Ill try this for my index fingers too as they suffer from no bite point adjust option.
  • + 2
 Not necessarily a thumb pump, however, with the growing number of kids and girls getting on bikes and now droppers, they are having a hard time with some droppers being too hard to actuate.
  • - 1
 absolutely in enduro racing stages. Most "riders" wouldn't notice, but in racing scenario it is a real situation. Not often but it can happen on a long stage with climb sections.
  • + 2
 Ok. What makes this differ from the Giant Contact SL. It is exactly the same in construction (at least from the photos) from the seat clamp design all the way down to the cartridge actuator. Even the lever is extremely similar. As far as I'm concerned, this is just a shiny Giant post for more money.
  • + 2
 I've owned half a dozen Giant Droppers, every model too. I agree it is very good and has been reliable. It has been as good as my Fox Transfer except for one thing - stanchion wear. Most of mine had silver showing through the anodizing in a few months, even with taking the collar off regularly and cleaning and greasing everything.
  • + 2
 The top clamp and hardware is our own tooling so it's definitely not the same. Actuator is different as well. We took many off the shelf parts that worked fairly well and tweaked them to offer improvements (improved sealing capacity and additional seal at actuator for example) where need be. While we'd love to do a completely custom post, for us it made no sense as that would drive the cost through the roof and really offer no foreseeable benefits. We're not in the business of charging more money for a rebranded product, but rather offering something that improves on current offering abd backing it up with availability of spare parts, Simple service videos already available and top notch partners all over the globe.
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS: I appreciate the reply. I have thought about what you have said, and I guess that's why its hard to judge a product just from the photos. I appreciate what you guys are doing, and I understand that its extremely expensive and time consuming to bring something brand new to the market. I hope it works out. I guess don't judge a book by its cover.
  • + 2
 I’ve been one of the lucky ones to have it and testing and it’s working so good.
The lever is so damn soft and it’s good for when you are in a long stage and you miss some energy and with an easy push it’s going up and down quickly!
It works really well with all the type of weather.. Mud, Dry, Snow, Rainy.. There’s no enemy for the TELLIS!
- Simone Martinelli
  • + 2
 I think not focusing on a short 170mm with adjustable/reducable travel is a massive fail. Why would I buy this over the OneUp? They need to have a super compelling answer to that. For me, I want 170mm not have to freakout about a 250$ item that might not fit.
  • + 3
 @Svinyard gotta say my one up has been kick ass! Absolutely zero play as well 170mm.
  • + 3
 OneUp has always made a great product and I'm sure their dropper will be no exception. If you're looking for a longer drop post and worried about fitment theirs seems like a great choice. Our post is aimed at those that want an extremely simple post that just works with no BS. Furthermore, in the event that shit happens, we offer top tier partners all over the world with small parts already in stock. Us thinking that we're going to appeal to every customer would be a "massive fail".
  • + 1
 @SDG-COMPONENTS Finally people are not just regurgitating IFP (Intermittently functioning post) and at this price point you have a winner. I’m using a BikeYoke Revive but had this been out when I bought it I would have tried this. Reliable but the simplicity of a command post but cheaper than both with a light remote I might just try it anyway. What I need to know that I can’t find is max insertion lengths. Help?
  • + 1
 We’ve got a full fitment chart on our website under “support” that’ll give you all the measurements of your wildest dreams. Send us a PM if you can’t find the exact measurements you’re after and we can sort you out.
  • + 5
 Behold, Devyn spotted in his natural habitat.
  • + 4
 Full squid..
  • + 3
 SDG had the best saddle and post system with the I-beam. Hoping the dropper get an I-beam head soon.
  • + 4
 Any product that can survive the Great British slop is welcome on my bike.
  • + 1
 Can I just say that, while suspension fork wars seem to be driving prices up, I'm so stoked to see droppers following classic economic theory where increased competition = increased product quality with decreased cost!
  • + 4
 Anyone else impressed by that the seal test? Gotta say, it got me.
  • + 2
 Hot damn, that Guerrilla Gravity Trail Pistol looks smokin'!!!! BraaaaaaAAAaaaAApppppP!!
  • + 2
 ...serious question. Is the SDG Seatpost manufactured by Giant?
The small parts / cartridge are almost identical.
  • + 14
 It is definitely not manufactured by Giant. We utilized some of the internals already utilized by other brands in the market and improved on what we found was lacking with improved sealing capacity, detailed service videos and the strongest global partners to support the sales and support.
  • + 2
 Another Giant Contact Switch. Price for cartridge is .... And it stops working early enough. So, Revive forever.
  • + 1
 you say its all about durability, but only have a 2 year warranty compared to e13's 5 year warranty and are both the same price.
  • + 2
 Is this a rebranded Highline? And seems like a big miss to not offer it in anything but 125mm and 150mm
  • + 2
 Anyone else own an SDG pitbike back in the day? They were some of the nicest chinese motorcycles you could buy.
  • + 1
 Looks like a decent dropper and the price is fair. Should give the new OneUp a run for their money!!!
  • + 2
 everyone stop. Does it work for more than 1 year?
  • + 1
 Prestige Global Worldwide Dropper Post
"only we can offer global servicing from all our global offices on a global level"
  • + 1
 and any chance of I-spec lever ? i know, i want everything......
  • + 1
 need to make a 190-200mm version for tall people
  • - 1
 Giant makes a dropper that is identical internally... So does trek... Looks exactly like there OEM droppers but rebranded. Gee, never heard of that done before.
  • + 2
 As stated before in the comments, we utilized internals already in the marketplace as there's several pretty good options. However we tweaked several pieces of assembly to improve reliability and functionality. Good thing looks can be deceiving!
  • + 1
 No Ø27.2 option, no care #oldbikesmatter
  • - 3
 Sorry SDG but the benchmark is my GravityDropper Turbo, going into its eighth year. Costs about $15 and 1/2 hour to rebuild. Only two failures in the time of ownership due to the occasional cable snap if I over tighten the set screws in the lever.

Those issues and complaints you addressed in your research? Don't know what you're talking about.
  • + 0
 Looks like the $250 CAD giant contact dropper post, not sure why anyone would pay more from a smaller brand
  • + 1
 Yep, I just installed a 150mm giant contact, £109 all up. Looks extremely similar. In the UK a service for a more expensive post cost £70 to £100, so I'm going to see how it lasts.
  • + 1
 There has never been a better time to be a saddle.......
  • + 1
 Global Distributor Network.....someone that answers the phone in India.
  • + 1
 Compatible with 2x shimano shifter?
  • + 1
 Looks a lot like the E*13 dropper.
  • + 1
 Its getting cold in here, hey let's burn the fatigue stand.
  • + 0
 It feels like it's like Giant,More expensive Giant
  • - 1
 Looks like the same pos cartridge gas unit that so many other crappy unreliable 'budget' droppers use.
  • + 1
 No I-Beam option?
  • + 1
 Bontrager cartridge?!
  • + 0
 We know you mean SDG.
  • + 9
 Strange they did not prioritize the 170mm, seems out of touch with the actual market demand in terms of aftermarket droppers.

Most people buying aftermarket droppers already own a 125 or 150.
Maybe just IMO, but I really think the vast majority of people buying new droppers want 170+mm travel with the shortest stack and overall insertion length possible.
Most people buying aftermarket droppers already own a 125 or 150.
  • + 1
 @KennyWatson: Exactly! I want a 170mm dropper which is 440mm or less and doesn't cost an arm and a leg!
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