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Socket officialcrankworx's article
May 24, 2019 at 10:27
1 days
Socket danielsapp's article
May 13, 2019 at 23:35
May 13, 2019
First Look: Intend's Hover Shock - Garda Trentino 2019
@iggzdaloc: if that thing at the end of the chamber is meant to be a bumper that the main piston hits, that looks even worse than nothing at all - it's not captive and it will fall out, get chewed up and end up jamming the damping circuits open. Source: have worked on more than one Rockshox shock with Countermeasure...
Socket danielsapp's article
May 13, 2019 at 16:10
May 13, 2019
First Look: Intend's Hover Shock - Garda Trentino 2019
Given the lack of bottom out bumper, I'm guessing this makes a hell of a bang when it bottoms. Don't really place much faith in a design that omits a detail that simple.
Socket danielsapp's article
May 9, 2019 at 20:53
May 9, 2019
First Look: Cavalerie's Blackbird Carbon Gearbox Bike - Garda Trentino 2019
@R-M-R: the drag from the Pinions at least is pretty minimal once they're broken in. If you jumped on a Zerode and nobody told you it had a gearbox, you wouldn't notice the difference in the pedaling drag. That part is the least of all the issues. Nobody's really noticed for example that literally only one company in the world (Shimano) makes decent cranks - what are the odds that the gearbox manufacturers, who are making cranks basically as an afterthought because they have to, are going to do a better job than SRAM, E13, Raceface etc who keep churning out weak pieces of crap in spite of having decades of experience with it?
Socket danielsapp's article
May 9, 2019 at 20:35
May 9, 2019
First Look: Cavalerie's Blackbird Carbon Gearbox Bike - Garda Trentino 2019
@diggerandrider: I don't want a belt drive, they suck in the mud and require concentric outputs to maintain proper tension, which has many other drawbacks (although brilliant for less noise). A double trigger shifter might have been designed but none are available today for the bike I rode today. As I said before, not all that interested in what the future may hold based on the gearbox concept - interested in what I can actually ride TODAY. If I can't actually buy it and ride it now... I don't really care. We'll be living on Mars one day too, should I invest in martian real estate? ;)
Socket danielsapp's article
May 9, 2019 at 15:28
May 9, 2019
First Look: Cavalerie's Blackbird Carbon Gearbox Bike - Garda Trentino 2019
@rockchomper: I hope that turns out to be the case, but the idea that they're more reliable and therefore justify the fact that pretty much everything else is objectively worse is total BS - mine's caused more downtime than a derailleur ever has. At least Gates' customer service in North America is absolutely excellent. Every issue they currently have CAN be fixed (weight aside perhaps) but I'm not interested in buying your company's long term potential, I only care about whether option A is a better purchase for me than option B. And right now gearboxes distinctly lose the battle there, to the point where I've considered machining up a conventional BB and a derailleur mount for my bike just to get rid of it.
Socket danielsapp's article
May 9, 2019 at 13:19
May 9, 2019
First Look: Cavalerie's Blackbird Carbon Gearbox Bike - Garda Trentino 2019
@hardtailparty: I own a Pinion gearbox and the drag on it once broken in is basically similar to riding a bike with a chainguide with a lower roller. You can barely perceive it - the idler pulley on my bike adds more drag than the gearbox (comparing back to back with a Zerode, the Zerode feels like any other normal bike to pedal). The range is great and efficiency is good enough for me, but what's not fine is 1. Proprietary cranks (damaged one set already, good luck finding those when you're on a riding holiday somewhere that isn't Germany) 2. Proprietary rear cogs (not many people making 30t single rear rings... and they do wear out) 3. Ridiculous clip-on plastic dust covers that fall off all the time 4. Grip shift only - just make a double trigger ffs 5. High weight 6. High cost 7. Having to send them back to Germany for repair when they leak (and many of them do, my first one included) 8. Having a second freewheel for no good reason (like 20 degrees between engagement points too, and tons of noise because the chain can overrun forwards). Inability to downshift under power isn't great either but it's a reasonable tradeoff for being able to shift when not pedaling at all. Efficiency and range are IMO the things they HAVE got sorted. It's all the other stuff that sucks.
Socket mikelevy's article
May 2, 2019 at 22:04
May 2, 2019
Point: Suspension Lockout Levers Have Made Bikes Worse
@dthomp325: some chain load is effectively used to compress the suspension (in a not very direct manner - basically the rear wheel tries to drive itself forward underneath the rider's mass, which loads up the suspension causing compression, and allows the rider's mass to not accelerate forwards as hard as it otherwise would). If the suspension resists more, it's a more rigid connection to the wheel, thereby a higher percentage of the load is transmitted to the wheel and energy is not dissipated as heat by the damper.
Socket edspratt's article
Apr 19, 2019 at 11:08
Apr 19, 2019
Video: Behind the Scenes of Aaron Gwin's World Cup Preparation
I think fitness holds everyone back with DH racing in the absolute sense, ie not just relative to other riders. Anyone can smash 10 seconds of trail at 100% effort with no real compromise due to fitness (ie it's just down to technique/skill/courage and maybe also outright strength), but try doing that for 3-5 minutes and even the fittest guys in the world are having to pace themselves to some degree. If you've ever raced DH you'll be aware of how utterly destroyed you are (or should be) by the end of a race run.
Socket mikekazimer's article
Apr 9, 2019 at 8:24
Apr 9, 2019
Staff Rides: Mike Kazimer's ‘Foxzocchi’ Equipped Scott Ransom
Z1 stanchions (which btw are the same as 36 Rhythm stanchions) aren't going to be noticeably stiffer than 36 stanchions. They use 6061 instead of 7075 (or some closely related equivalent alloys, those may not be the exact ones used) which is both weaker and less stiff, hence the increased thickness. Basically all that's done is make it heavier :)
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