Powered by Outside

Bike Check: Stoll Bikes T2.2 'Pushing the Limits' Special Edition

Jul 10, 2023 at 7:32
by TEBP  
Alex from The European Bike Project runs one of our favorite Instagram accounts because his feed is constantly updated with everything from tiny brands to inside looks at European manufacturing. Earlier this year the Stoll team invited him to come to their HQ in Switzerland to see their own version of the "European Bike Project".



Earlier this year I had the opportunity to visit the Stoll Bikes HQ in Switzerland and take some photos of their new T2.2 “Pushing the Limits” Special Edition.

The company was founded in 2016 by Thomas Stoll (a former pro marathon racer and manager of the Stöckli race team), Gerhard Stoll (Thomas’ father) and Jan Bhalla (creative director).

They approached Bike Ahead Composites to have their very first frames made in Germany. It’s fair to say that this was a bold move for the young team, as making those molds is expensive and having carbon frames hand-laid in Germany is not cheap either. However, as they all invested significantly in their new company, they were able to start the collaboration with Bike Ahead, who’ve been making all Stoll frames since the beginning.


Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Most members of the Stoll team are former racers, which is something you can clearly feel when you ride their bikes.


Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
That's a good looking rear triangle.
Stoll T2.2 "PTL"
Frame: Stoll T2.2
Shock: Intend BC Hover Gamechanger (135 mm)
Fork: Intend BC Bandit (140 mm)
Wheels: Erase hubs, Bike Ahead Three-Zero 29" rims
Tires: Hutchinson Griffus 2.5 & 2.4
Drivetrain: Intend BC Rocksteady cranks, Garbaruk cassette and chainring, Sram derailleur
Brakes: Trickstuff Piccola HD
Cockpit: Bike Ahead handlebar, Intend BC Grace stem
Dropper, Saddle: Vecnum, Selle Italia
Size: M
Weight: 12.1 kg / 26.7 lbs (tubeless, without pedals)

bigquotesWe already believed in the production of frames in Europe back in 2016. The limited custom premium production, made in Europe, was built on the basis of our racing prototype. Thanks to a lot of passion and know-how, we now have a perfect frame that is individually built for each rider.Thomas Stoll

Manufacturing just a few hundred kilometers away from their HQ allows Stoll to control every step precisely. They know the people who make the frames and some of the Bike Ahead employees ride these frames too.

Thanks to his background in mechanical engineering, Thomas can do a lot of the engineering himself. He is excited about all the locally made parts they often use to build bikes for their customers. To get to the next level, the team wanted to do their own “European Bike Project” and they say that they managed to use almost 95% Euro-made parts on this bike (% based on MSRP of all parts used).



Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
The Intend Bandit fork is a head turner for sure.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
A light Vecnum Nivo dropper post and 3D printed Selle Italia saddle.


Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
That's a very good looking link.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
The Garbaruk chainring looks great on the Intend Rocksteady cranks.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Whether the Intend Bandit fork should be compatible with direct mount stems is up for debate.
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
The Stoll Logo is laminated into the frame.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
That's a very clean cockpit.

Depending on which link and shock you use, the Stoll full suspension frames can provide between 100 and 145 mm rear travel.

The frames are available in different carbon lay-ups; lighter frames for light riders, stiffer frames for heavier or more aggressive riders. The quality of the surface is so good they don’t need to sand the frames or paint them. Not having to sand the frames allows them to built them lighter too, as sanding a frame will always weaken it – which means that you’ll have to use more carbon to compensate for that. Once the frames come out of the mould, only minimal finishing work is needed. The frame weight for the light carbon layups is ~ 1950 g / 4.3 lbs (without shock). The carbon is UV resistant, so it won’t turn yellowish over the years.

Small parts such as the suspension link are machined in Liechtenstein and the Swiss made bearings get a special grease treatment to make sure they last extremely long.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll also released a "PTL" edition of their R1 hardtail (5.9 kg / 13 lbs) and their S1 roadbike.

Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
Stoll Bikes T2.2 Pushing the Limits Special Edition
The Stoll HQ is based in one of the Northernmost towns of Switzerland.


Author Info:
TEBP avatar

Member since May 15, 2020
41 articles

50 Comments
  • 34 0
 They calculate the % of the bike made in Europe based on the cost of the parts???
Using that metric, any expensive frame made in the US built up with cheap, imported parts could say "85% Made in the US."
  • 21 0
 It's a very odd metric to use that's for sure.
  • 18 2
 suggest a better one then plz. weight? surface area? instagram followers? carbon content? general vibe?
  • 26 0
 @zmums: I'd go with the recognised international ISO standard, i.e. 3-dimensional volumetric displacement when all entrances to voids in the part are sealed and then said part is placed in a bath of virtual tomato ketchup .
  • 15 0
 @Woody25: The USA has switched to the Mayonnaise standard...
  • 4 0
 Marketing spin.
  • 3 1
 You raise a good point, but is there any reasoanble alternative? For example, if the spokes and derailluer are not made in europe (which is about all I can pick out), what % of the bike is that? 5% seems about right.

Also, that is a damn beautiful bike (minus the garish decals imo).
  • 3 2
 @zmums: I'd suggest counting the number of parts made in Europe and divide that number by the total number of parts to build a complete bike. Here's a link to a spreadsheet listing every item required to build a bike. Ask them to fill in origin of each item you'll get you an accurate percentage. ridemonkey.bikemag.com/attachments/build-pdf.89951
  • 3 0
 @zmums:

My bike identifies as 100% American
  • 1 1
 You seem to be under the impression that anything other than $ matters?
  • 1 0
 @motts: fasteners are almost always imported, as are seals.
  • 19 0
 "lighter frames for light riders, stiffer frames for heavier or more aggressive riders" this is music to my ears, have said the same for the last 20 or so years as I am 58Kg naked and have to ride a bike that can withstand a 130kg rider.... useless, unfortunately I will never have enough €€€ to drop on such beauty.
F
  • 26 0
 Maybe you have enough for enough cheese burgers, though.
  • 2 0
 Personally, at 65 kg, I will still pick the bike built for a 130 kg rider.
  • 1 0
 @trippleacht: Comment gold here sports fans. Nearly sprayed the monitor with half swallowed coffee.
  • 12 0
 13lbs for a production hardtail is extremely impressive
  • 2 0
 I read that as 13kg at first and was thinking, mmmm well that's light-ish I guess... oooooh, 13lb! Errr yeah that's light
  • 10 1
 Wrong forum, I know, but that road bike looks fast. I like it more than I like the mtb.
  • 3 1
 I've always thought there bikes looked pretty cool and I liked the idea of keeping bikes light even as you get into 130-140mm of travel. Doesn't always have to be 30+lbs. I started following on Instagram to see all the updates, pics, specs, etc. Only concerns are.

1. I don't think there's any US sales!!
2. Never seen one in anything buy greyish or raw carbon color.
3. STA gets slacker, not steeper with the longer travel bikes so I assume they are using mostly the same frame with some tweaks for travel. It probably says that in the article above if I read the whole thing but I'm supposed to be "working" Smile
  • 1 0
 I think they now also ship to the US. They can paint the frame for you at a surcharge, but I guess most riders really want the frame to be as light as possible.
  • 1 0
 13lbs for a hardtail isn’t right. Their “lightweight” build on their website comes in at 7.6kg, which is wicked light, but losing another 4.5 lbs is pretty much not happening. I’d believe their road bike in “lightweight” guise could be at 13lbs or below though!
  • 8 0
 This specific hardtail actually is 5.9 kg / 13 lbs. We measured it when I was at Stoll and I saw it with my own eyes. However they don't offer this version on their website.
  • 3 0
 It’s got a road derailleur, a road cassette, string spokes, surely stupid hubs, 300 gram cranks, 270 gram rims, worthless tires, no pedals, etc.

It’s not really a mountain bike, but it probably does weight 13 pounds.
  • 2 0
 When money is no object and miffy must be happy ... she "would" ride this, yes she would, except for the dirtiness of it all ~ gads the perspiration, and the Unno has become sooo passe'
  • 4 0
 Could probably round up to 95%, honestly.
  • 1 1
 I'm curious what the last 5%, is tires?
  • 5 0
 @plustiresaintdead: sram derailleur? hutchinson makes their tires in france
  • 1 0
 @mior: DOH! I scrolled pretty quick and assumed it was an ingrid or something.
  • 2 0
 @plustiresaintdead: From what I remember it's basically the shifter, derailleur and discs.
  • 3 0
 The frame looks like the love child of last generation stumpjumper and Santa Cruz bike.
  • 2 0
 Still don’t understand why these weights are “without pedals”. Just chuck some pedals on there before you weigh it?
  • 1 0
 pedal weights, especially xc, are kinda all over. xtrs are like 310g, eggbeaters are 180. easier for weight weenies who have their preferences to add the weight later.
  • 1 0
 @Been-Jamin: its the same for any component though.

Why not “without wheels” or “without chain”

If the bike is not ridable when you weigh it, is it even a bike?
  • 1 0
 Bikes are sold without pedals! Not without chains. Most people pick drivetrain when purchasing a bike, and already have their pedals.
  • 1 0
 I really like the S1 aesthetics. Too bad the GT version isn't an actual endurance bike (too low front end), would be an interesting alternative to a Roadmachine/Endurace/etc.
  • 3 0
 How do you shift?
  • 2 0
 The little ring switch to the left of the grip
  • 3 0
 there's a very minimal shifter just to the left of the grip in this picture. Dangerholm has used similar shifters on a lot of his projects.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/24836182
  • 1 0
 I was thinking the same thing. What’s the name of the shifter?
  • 1 0
 @jciampa: "MTB TWISTER WE03 FOR SRAM AXS / WIRE GUIDING"
  • 1 0
 Your banker jogs along beside you fingering your ring

@scantregard: this could be your Last bike

@mior: the streets of Paris are lined with rubber trees
  • 1 0
 Does anyone on here own a Stoll bike? whats the quality & ride like? I quite like the stealth bomber chiseled looks..
  • 2 0
 And more importantly how many kidneys do I have to sell to afford something that boutique and pretty
  • 3 0
 That is a clean bike
  • 1 0
 Wow, is it a bird or a plane……. No it’s a lefty righty,
  • 1 0
 I appreciate a clean cockpit.
  • 1 0
 That’s a pretty impressive part by part build
  • 1 0
 No Transmission? WTF!
  • 3 0
 Too heavy







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.032947
Mobile Version of Website