Eurobike 2022: A Closer Look at New Products from European Manufacturers

Jul 17, 2022 at 8:44
by TEBP  
The European Bike Project is one of our favorite Instagram accounts and his feed is constantly updated with everything from interesting curios from tiny manufacturers to inside looks at European manufacturing to analyses of the environmental impact of our sport. During Eurobike 2022, he's tracking down the most interesting products from small manufacturers for you.


Hope Technology

Hope HB.916
The new Hope HB.916 (Chameleon finish)

The new Hope HB.916 high pivot Enduro had one of the best paintjobs of the whole show. Believe it or not, all the photos show the same bike!

The 160 mm travel, high pivot Enduro really has everything that a bike should have in 2022: Boost rear spacing, full 29" or mullet wheels, downtube storage compartment, a large idler pulley that creates less drag than smaller ones, geometry adjustment, 64° head angle and ~78° seat angle. As with pretty much all Hope products, the frame is manufactured in-house in Barnoldswick, UK.

Hope also showed us their new Gravity stem, which is a few grams lighter than their DH stem. They also have new tools for brake bleeding: Hope will upload files on their website for free, so you can print these parts at home with a 3D printer.

Hope HB.916
Hope HB.916

Hope HB.916

New Hope Gravity stem
Hope also had their new gravity stem on display. They are also working on coloured handlebars.


New hope brake bleeding tools
New tools for brake bleeding
New Hope AXS derailleur pulley wheels
New pulley wheels for AXS derailleurs

- Website: https://www.hopetech.com/
- Instagram: @hopetech



Intend BC

New Intend BC Samurai CC and XC
The new Intend BC Samurai CC fork

The new Intend BC Samurai fork is the lightest Intend fork so far and at 1385 g (uncut steerer) it's probably the lightest production 120 mm fork out there.

Intend went several routes in order to save weight on this fork. The carbon steerer by ND-Tuned is one of them. Having a minimal offset at the dropouts helps to save weight too - thanks to the new angled crown the offset is still at 44 mm at 120 mm travel. The flat mount DM brake mounts also keep the weight low. Finally, the thru-axle and the driveside stanchion got a drilling treatment.

The Samurai fork will be offered in three versions:
Samurai CC: 1385 g, 120 mm maximum travel, carbon steerer, carbon cable guides
Samurai XC: 1495 g, 120 mm maximum travel, aluminium steerer
Samurai GR: 1440 g, 50 mm maximum travel (aimed at gravel bikes)

The forks will be available in autumn 2022.

Cornelius from Intend would like to thank his significant other for coming up with the name Samurai.

Intend BC Samurai
Intend BC Samurai


- Website: https://www.intend-bc.com/
- Instagram: @intend_bc



Classified.cc

Classified mtb hub
The Classified mountain bike hub will be launched soon

Classified is a fast-growing company from Belgium that makes a unique rear hub. It has two gears and replaces the functionality of the front derailleur.

After the hubs quickly became very popular among road and gravel riders, the mtb-specific hubs will be launched soon. The road and gravel hubs are actuated with a small Bluetooth button, however the Classified team remained tight-lipped regarding the details of the mtb shifter. The hub shifts instantly and even under high loads (up to 1000 Watts). In gear 1 the hub is not activated and everything is running as usual. In gear 2, when the hub is activated, it reduces the ratio of the gears down to 0.7. This is similar to shifting from a 50 t to a 34 t chainring on a road bike or from a 40 t to a 28 t chainring on a mountain bike. Classified says that when the hub is activated in gear 2, the efficiency loss is around 1%.

This means that the Classified hub lets you run bigger chainrings (which are said to create less drag). The mtb hub is shipped with an 11-40 t cassette, which means that you get a very decent range, but at the same time you could possibly use a shorter derailleur cage which would not be as prone to being damaged as current 12-speed options.

Classified also had a single speed (or is it dual speed? dingle speed?) cassette on display. It's compatible with Gates Carbon Drive belts. It's mostly aimed at city bikes, which would get two gears in total without having a derailleur. However, personally I could also imagine using such a hub on a single speed park bike.

While Classified hubs were initially only available in full Classified wheelsets, dealers will now be able to order a hub-only option and lace them to the rims of your choice. Classified is now also working with several rim manufacturers including DT Swiss, Mavic, Enve, Boyd, FFWD, Reynolds and Spinergy, so you'll be able to get a full wheelset from one of these brands.

Classified mtb hub
The new Classified mtb hub
Classified single speed hub
There is also a belt-compatible hub, which gives you two gears in total



Extreme Shox

EXT Aria air shock
The new EXT Aria air shock

EXT had a prototype of their new Aria shock at the show. It will be one of the very few shocks on the market that has two positive air chambers. This means that you can tune the spring curve in such a way that it becomes more linear, rather than being progressive. This system is also used on the ERA forks, while the damping system comes from the renowned Storia shocks. Unfortunately EXT couldn't yet tell us when they are planning to launch the shock.

EXT also had a new 190 mm ERA fork on display. These new forks will have 36 mm stanchions with an increased wall thickness (1 mm more). They will also have a bigger self-adjusting negative air chamber and new, stiffer lowers. As on the current ERA, the crown/steerer area will use a special design that is said to prevent noise and provide more stiffness.

The Era upside-down prototype looks interesting too, however with a weight of roughly 4 kg it's aimed at light electric motobikes that are punching in the 60 kg weight class.

EXT Era upside-down prototype
Unfortunately, this beauty was not designed for mountainbikes
New EXT Era 190 mm
The new 190 mm ERA fork (left)




Qvist

Qvist hub
The new Qvist.cc rear boost hub

Qvist.cc is a new company from Dresden, Germany. Their rear hub got a lot of attention at Eurobike 2022 and many people said that is was the most innovative product at the whole show.

What makes the hub stand out from the crowd is the double ratchet system. The left and right ratchet rings both have 64 points of engagement, but only one side is engaged at a time. This means that you get 128 points of engagement in total. So far, such a high number was only seen on pawl-style freehub systems. The advantage of ratchet systems is that - in comparison with pawl systems - more teeth engage at the same time.

The ratchet rings are machined from hardened high-strength steel and the rear hub comes with a 17 mm axle, large stainless steel bearings and a 6-bolt disc mount.

It's available with 28 or 32 holes. Qvist offers XD and Micro Spline drivers. At 270 g, the hub is not the lightest, but to the best of my knowledge, there is no ratchet-style hub that offers more points of engagement.

Qvist hub
Qvist hub

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- Website: https://qvist.cc/
- Instagram: @qvist.cc



SQlab saddles and shorts

SQlab Infinergy saddles
Three "made in Germany" Infinergy saddles: 6OX, 611 and 610 MD

At SQlab, everything is about comfort and pain-free biking and their new "made in Germany" saddles are no different. The 6OX saddle is aimed at Enduro riders, 611 is for All Mountain and the 610 offers maximum pressure relief for touring or people who have problems finding the right saddle.

The saddles are made from "Infinergy", a material that you might have seen on running shoes. Infingery offers very good cushioning and rebound properties. In order to get the right amount of cushioning, SQlab uses up to two layers of tape on the saddles, which makes the saddle firmer in these areas.

Infinergy saddles are completely made in Germany, with the Swiss-made carbon rails that are used on some models being the only exception. All saddles also use the SQlab active system, which means that the rear end of the saddle rail is attached to the shell at just one point. With the saddle you get three different elastomers that slide between that shell and the rails, which allows you to tune the lateral movement of the saddle. The goal of the active system is to allow the saddle to move in such a way that it corresponds to your hips.

SQlab liners and bib shorts are also made in Europe (Lithuania, Italy and Portugal). While some brands use very thick pads, SQlab decided to do things differently and offers very thin, but high-density pads. SQlab says these reduce shear forces on your seat bones more effectively. SQlab offers four different pads, two of them get a layer of TPE gel. The thickness increases the more upright your intended seating position is.

Last but not least, SQlab also offers "made in Germany" insoles. How do you know that insoles might be a thing for you? Numb feet and toes, knee pain, cramps and aching soles are among the signs that you might need a decent insole. SQlab says that your feet are made for walking and not for cycling. However, they have a built-in cushioning mechanism for walking which can cause trouble when cycling. So the idea behind the insoles is to de-activate the natural cushioning mechanism of your feet, which will reduce a lot of foot-related problems when cycling.

SQlab also launched the new "Profiler" app for dealers that helps them to measure your in-seam length, hand size as well as the distance between your seat bones and will recommend suitable products.

SQlab Infinergy saddles
SQlab Infinergy saddles


SQlab shorts
SQlab pads

SQlab insoles
SQlab insoles

SQlab Profiler software

- Website: https://www.sq-lab.com/en/
- Instagram: @sqlab



202 Comments

  • 131 14
 That Hope paintjob is stunning!
  • 22 7
 Cannondale was big into that paint in the 90’s. They called it Chameleon. Good to see it back in use.
  • 21 0
 DuPont Chromalusion paint, came out in 90s, very famously used on Jeff Gordon’s car at the Winston in ‘98 (and rattle canned onto every ratted out mid naughts Chevy cobalt)
  • 16 4
 The whole bike is stunning. Got to be the best looking/spec frame released this year - can’t wait to read reviews
  • 44 0
 Looks a little like the spot I park my landrover
  • 6 3
 If a little oil slick is good then a lot of oil slick is better! Find a matching helmet and you're on the podium 4 sho.
  • 10 14
flag Someoldfart (Jul 18, 2022 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 Stunningly hideous
  • 1 0
 @Someoldfart: the brake feel? Work fine on #Ebike
  • 6 9
 Is hope a European bike manufacturer?
  • 15 3
 @thewanderingtramp: erm, yes. The UK is still part of the continent of Europe.
  • 1 14
flag thewanderingtramp (Jul 18, 2022 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @teethgrinder: PMSL is it (Hope)part of the geological formation of Europe.
  • 18 4
 @thewanderingtramp: Hope is based in Barnoldswick in England, which is one of the countries in the UK, which is geographically part of the continent of Europe.

Hope is not, and never was, a member of the EU, because it's not a country.
  • 3 37
flag thewanderingtramp (Jul 18, 2022 at 12:34) (Below Threshold)
 @teethgrinder: HAHA thats an even worse analogy you have obviously turned a blind eye to the fact the UK left the EU. It is for all intents and purposes not a European manufacturer , Spin it whichever way you want but you aint going to be exporting those things by saying the UK is geologically part of Europe because the Euros give zero f*cks about anything but money.
  • 10 8
 Yikes. I don't care how many times they bring back iridescent flip-flop paint back, it always was and always will be hideous.
  • 5 0
 @whambat: Had that color on a Klein Mantra Pro with gold hoops. That bike looked fantastic but was absolutely terrifying on the downs. Regret selling it as it had full XTR 950 and Chris King hubs and would make a great wall hanger.
  • 25 1
 @thewanderingtramp: Is Switzerland in Europe?
  • 1 0
 @Charliegoodvibes: I remember that bike. I worked at a shop that carried them and wanted one so bad until I rode one on trails. It was a sexy bike. To be fair, all the bikes in that era were sketchy AF going down. And all suspensions except URTs were pogo sticks on the climbs without a climb switch until we got compression damping that was figured out.
  • 1 0
 @thewanderingtramp: i like your #Ebike
  • 1 0
 @whambat: I'm pretty sure it's inspired by the old TVR chameleon paint jobs
  • 48 0
 Was hoping the classified hub would come with a 7spd dh style cassette, so could run shortcage dh style mech but have same range as current 12spd drivetrains
  • 3 0
 Is that configuration not possible? Does someone know what the equivilent of 28 teeth front (gear 2) and 28 teeth back (maximum for sram dh dereailleur, 36 even for zee 10 speed) would be compared to a 32 teeth front with a standard cassette? Asking for a friend.
  • 5 0
 Ok, looking closer at the pictures I see it requires a special kind of cassette. So hey @classified please give us an option to run short dh dereailleurs.
  • 10 2
 Also really hope classified aren't thinking we can/are going to run 40t chainrings on mtbs...
  • 1 0
 So playing around with ritzelrechner.de - my conclusion is that it's not close to enough. Shame.
  • 4 0
 with a classified 0.7 lower ratio a 36t largest rear cassette would be roughly equivalent to a 52t cassette I think
  • 19 1
 @ottifant: Yes, and I would be happy to go back to 8spd, 10spd, 11spd. I dont need 12 spd!
  • 4 0
 @Yellow-bike: what's wrong with running a chainring on my bike that doesn't fit? Should be fine...
  • 6 4
 It kind of seems like a product that is just 10 years too late.
  • 5 0
 love the 2 speed jib hub thou!
  • 31 4
 @djbrickhouse: Yes!

Anything to get rid of 12 speed. Tolerances that leave almost no margin for error, and an 8 inch long cage that eat clutches and bushings a month after install, I’m so sick of it. Unfortunately, my fat ass still needs the range and front ders suck.

I would happily go back to a 9-speed 11-36 cassette paired with a medium cage derailleur as long as I didn’t have to run a front mech.

This could be a game changer, everything the Hammerschmidt should have been.

If it’s reliable and not too heavy, sign me up!
  • 2 0
 @mrosie: 11-40 is still good, all 11-speed mechs will work fine with it. Even ZEE FR works with 11-40 (albeit 10 speed of course, yes, I was running it this way).
  • 4 0
 I will buy a couple of classifieds just so that I can offer them for sale on my local classifieds page.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: Yeah totally! I’d be more than happy with 11-40 with the range of 11-52.
  • 9 1
 @mrosie: lol if you're going through clutches and bushing a month into AZ riding you're doing something really wrong.
  • 6 4
 @NorCalNomad: I live on South Mountain, an area known for ruining bike parts prematurely, so I realize I’m not the best example, and if I’m being honest, it’s not me ruining derailleurs on a monthly basis, it’s my wife. I'm just the lucky mechanic that has to fix them or install new ones regularly. She’s not a typical rider, she puts in 6 days a weeks of very hard riding, but my point still stands. She was not running through derailleurs nearly as often pre twelve speed.

12 speed mechs are more temperamental, more vulnerable, wear more quickly, and are more easily knocked out of adjustment than any derailleur made in the last 15 years. A small amount of slop in the linkages and good luck ever getting them to shift consistently again.

…but hey, they’re super easy to setup, and they feel great for the first 200 miles, I’ll give them that. Just don’t ride too hard or ever accidentally bump them on anything and maybe you’ll never notice the difference. If that’s your experience, I’m happy for you!
  • 7 1
 Call me an armchair engineer (I actually have standing desk), but wouldn't this make more sense in the crankset, like the old HammerSchmidt? More space, mechanical instead of electronic shifting, etc.

Personally, I'd love to combine the two on a park bike and get 4 speeds.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Yeah that’s a fair question. Maybe this solves the issues the Hammerschmidt had?

I rode a bike with Hammerschmidt for a couple weeks and it was pretty nice, certainly better than a front mech. If I remember correctly though, it had its own freewheel and the engagement was terrible. On top of that, it was really heavy and there were some issues with it using the ISCG tabs (not sure what the problem there was). Anyway, I’d welcome a similar solution and preferably at the crank, as you’ve suggested.
  • 5 0
 Just give me the dingle speed park bike, maybe with a belt drive - that's all I'll ever want. No rear mech, very low maintenance, one gear for moving faster and one if I need to grind a little. Take my $.
  • 5 0
 @mrosie: I owned and rode the crap out of one for two seasons. The engagement was fine (plus we are all going to O chains anyways) and its own freewheel wasn't an issue because usually the hub's freewheel would do that job. I absolutely loved it. Instant shifting no matter the load, integrated bash guard + chain guide, NEVER dropped a chain in the pre-narrow-wide days, never had an issue. Even my DH bike at the time had a chain guide that would occasionally jam up.

The major downside was 1. Efficiency and 2. Weight. It was about as heavy as a double chainring+ bash guard setup. The efficiency drop didn't matter to me, as it only affected the overdrive. Unlike this hub solution, the lowest gear was fixed, with 0% efficency loss. Who cares about drag in the highest gears!
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: That sounds pretty amazing, would love to see an improved version make a comeback!
  • 3 1
 @Yellow-bike: A 36 chainring with this would be equivalent to a 32t chainring with a 10-52 cassette. The disadvantages of a 36t chainring are that it might require extra offset to be compatible with the chainstay spacing of many frames, it requires a longer bashguard, and it decreases anti-squat excessively. Did you have anything else in mind with your comment about 40t chainrings?
  • 2 0
 This system left me quite excited, but I agree that these are considerable, though not unfixable, drawbacks.
  • 1 0
 @Yellow-bike: Namely, with the Hope bike that's on this article, none of these drawbacks would apply except for the bashguard one.
  • 5 0
 @mrosie: Ya. This hub is DOA for me because the efficiency loss is in the climbing gears. The HammerSchmidt was gen1 tech; I bet the weight could be dropped easily. Or, instead, try and stuff 3-4 gears in there! That would rock.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Indeed, that would be a real game changer! You hear that Sram??
  • 5 0
 @mrosie: they don't; Sram is busy working on SX etap; electronic shifting where your cassette finally crosses the 1kg barrier!
  • 3 0
 @DavidGuerra: I meant 36t cassette
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Oh for the love of God no.
  • 2 0
 @Yellow-bike: With 40t chainring you meant 36t cassette? Alright then. Not having big "dinner plates" at the rear wheel does bring along great weight advantages, in addition to a reduced price, and allows the use of a more compact and less exposed derailleur. And it's non-suspended weight.
  • 4 1
 perhaps i’m missing the point, but i’d see the advantage of a 2 speed hub to be getting away from huge, heavy and expensive and heavy cassettes. the one on this hub looks like a fancy custom number.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: that's what i was thinking of, that large chainrings will cause packaging issues, reduce ground clearance, increase weight and mess with antisquat of current bikes, and require bigger cassettes to get same low gear.

I.e. it'd be a big missed opportunity to reduce rear cassette size, weight and rear mech size.

Article wording worried as they mentioned 40t chainrings for mtb...
  • 7 0
 The concept seems great - with an 11-40 cassette you'd have a greater gear range than you would with a 10-52-tooth cassette without an internally geared hub, and you'd be able to run a shorter cage derailleur.
  • 4 1
 @LAT2: I doubt this would save any weight overall (yes cassette would be lighter, but hub is obviously heavier), or be any cheaper.
The only advantage would seem to be using a more compact derailleur, but that's a fairly minor advantage.
Also you have the minor efficiency penalty too.
Doesn't seem that appealing to me overall.
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: a nice compact drivetrain with a short cage mech would be rad. i guess shifting would be a bit fiddly (ie, having to drop down a couple cogs after the hub shift to grab the next lower gear), but we somehow managed back in the front derailleur days. now if you paired it with an electro mech & mapped the hub & derailleurs to shift as required for seamless sequential operation...
  • 1 0
 @Paco77: if they offer it with a tightly spaced cassette (eg 10-34, maybe 12speed) it could be a massive win for XC, and i would convert.. the jumps between the smallest cogs on the Eagle make them unusable for anything but sprints..
  • 1 0
 @GZMS: Actually thats a great point - I hadn't thought of that advantage. Definitely a big plus for racers.
  • 1 0
 @Yellow-bike: You're getting me confused here, you maybe it's you who is confused. This is precisely a way to reduce rear cassette size, weight and rear mech size, EVEN with a larger chainring. You might only require a 40t if you want to have a gear as heavy as a 36t chainring with 10t cog. It's basically 4 extra teeth at the chainring to make up for going from a 10t smallest cog to a 11t. Plenty of people ride cassettes with an 11t smallest cog and single chainring though.
  • 3 2
 @GZMS: Not so fast for XC- it has efficiency losses! Especially in the lower gear.

If it was fixed in the lower gear, and had an overdrive instead, then it would be more feasible; riders would be more tolerant of inefficiency on the downhill rather than the climbs.
  • 5 0
 @mrosie: box prime 9 and microshift advent x both use shimano hg freehubs and their grannies run as a high as 48-50t. the advent you can get the shifter, derailleur and cassette for $200 usd.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: yeah I'm not buying their 99% efficient claim yet either. Is Terrence Howard on the list of investors with T.Boonen? Cuz 1% loss is much less than the textbooks tell us (sheeple). Moot point I think, Nino n dem aren't willing to give up 1% anyways...are they?

Saw a Hammerschmidt guy a couple months ago, time warper. Dude said it still worked. Still went around in circles. His 26" wheels looked crazy too. I asked him to shift it a couple times as I stared into his eyes while he felt that "thunk." Mmmmmmmmm.

I said "nice," put it back in boost, and went about my way.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: 1% loss is a difference between bad and good chain lubricant.. if there are weight savings too, some XC riders might have a real dilemma haha
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: I think we're saying the same thing....

Forget about chainring size for a minute...

52t cassette x 0.7 reduction from classified = 36.4 I.e. a 36t cassette would be equivalent to 52t.

Get your point you might want to up chainring size if you're bothered about going from 10t to 11t (personally that would make no difference for me and my riding).

My worry is we'd be tied to classifieds cassette (unless garabuk or someone starts making after market ones) so if classified decide we should be using 40t chainrings and size the cassette accordingly we'd be stuffed as most bikes wouldnt fit a 40t chainring, but surely they've thought of that!
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I've got one on a gravel bike - no noticeable drag in the reduction gear.
  • 1 0
 @mattmatthew: That’s certainly an improvement because the wider spacing between cogs should solve the sensitivity to adjustment issue. However, it still requires a really long cage, so ultimately I’d prefer a cassette with a narrower range paired with a 2 speed hub or crank. In other words, I’d like the benefits of a 1x drivetrain with the range of a 2x, but you’re right, both those are good options.
  • 1 0
 @mrosie: If you wanna go through, take the 11S shimano XT 8000 or a XTR9000 with cage and pulleys from Garbarku and run your 12s system, with shimano or sram shifters. It'll work fine, and you'll feel like a hero.
  • 2 0
 @xy9ine: My main drawback with 1x instead of 2x was that I had to upshift a lot of gears when a sudden uphill apeard. Before I could just drop from big to small chainring and the difference would be enought to power trought a lot.

But never droping the chain in the front again had me never looking back to 2x. I still think the Hammerschmidt could make a comeback. Or the Vyro chainring, that thing was AWESOME.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: "Schlumpf speed drive" and "Kappstein Doppio", though not up to date for modern mountainbike standards.
I have dinglespeed enduro hardtail with a schlumpf drive. 1:1.6 range. Looks way cleaner than a Hammerschmidt by the way.
  • 2 0
 @Muellbeutel: Ha, those do not look "cleaner" than the Hammerschmidt. The H was small, compact, simple, and beautiful.

The problem with bringing it back today is that most modern bikes without idler pulleys are optimized for 32t chainrings, and since the H used an overdrive it was a 24 tooth. Put one on a modern bike and you're going to have antisquat thru the roof.
  • 1 0
 @Muellbeutel: Do you know the efficiency of the mountain range?

And if they only offered with the shimano crankset option too... I hate square JIS things.
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: Just looked at a Vyro article and it is cool. Their website is now a hookah brand unfortunately lol
  • 1 0
 @L0rdTom: for our bikes yeah, but roadies just won't let go of two by drivetrains so its a good solution for that world!
  • 2 0
 @mrosie: honestly SRAM, or Shimano 11 speed is pretty solid, throw a 9-46 (both will handle it no problem) and a slightly smaller ring on the front and your all good. Or even better, ditch the mech and get a gearbox bike. Since getting a pinion equipped bike derailleurs just seem a little silly to be quite honest and I find myself making jokes about derailleurs being outdated when people are (unsurprisingly) having trouble getting their 12 speed drivetrains to play nice.
  • 26 3
 That flip paint… ruined many a beautiful JDM import car.
  • 15 3
 And every TVR ever
  • 9 0
 @gotohe11carolina: Wrong - Chameleon Blue was the best TVR colour (as seen in Swordfish!)
  • 8 2
 Nissan Midnight Purple 3 is still the best paint used on any car ever.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Exactly
  • 11 0
 Meh-keep you boring colors. I love chameleon paint, and fades, and splatter, and smoke fade, and hot rod flames. On cars and bikes.
  • 5 0
 @Stinhambo: I don’t remember anything at all about Swordfish except for that Halle Berry scene lol
  • 48 32
 Oil slick looks tacky as fk.
  • 15 5
 Tacky? I love it personally, although I appreciate it's subjective. If it hadn't been done to death already with bmx and this was the first time it was shown, would it still be tacky? Or is it just that the novelty has worn off now? I'd have this finish on my frame in a heartbeat.
  • 6 1
 Agreed. Reminds me of DayGlo everything from 80's snowboarding.
  • 15 2
 “Oil slick” is just a rebrand of “rainbow unicorn” for grown men
  • 5 4
 Agreed - it’s horrendous
  • 2 1
 @tremeer023: Agreed, the appreciation of the color(s) is subjective. But what's not subjective is that this paint and similar anodizing is old hat. The paint was played out in the late 90s, then there was the heated titanium bits of the 2000s, and then "oil slick" anodizing of the 20teens. Its not something novel that should be presented as such at a trade show.
  • 2 1
 @Chuckolicious:

Nah, that stuff’s still awesome. Oil slick is forever gaudy
  • 2 0
 It's pretty tired used like that. But I do like it used as a candy/clear over that carbon bar. Being able to see the carbon through that paint is pretty sick.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: Candy/Clear is pretty "sweet" on anything. The common carbon weave (waffle) pattern is a bit tacky now too IMO.
  • 2 0
 @Blownoutrides: weird I just finished airbrushing my e-bike Rainbow Hello Kitty Unicorn. With rainbow glitter in sealant o'course
  • 3 0
 @WoodenCrow: my 8yo daughter sends a big high five
  • 12 0
 Of all the alternative drivetrain options, the Classified hub is the one that is the most viable and polished one. This hub with a medium range 10 or 11 speed cassette would be waaaaay nicer way to get usable range than 1x12.
  • 4 0
 Hammerschmidt reborn I guess
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: Hammerschmidt without the noticeable drivetrain power losses.

All the attempts to develop a viable alternative to chain driven external drivetrains have failed to become common because of power loss.

The Classified hub offers the advantages of 2 chainrings and 1 chainring without the drawbacks of either. If it becomes a commonly available (and reasonably cost effective) option I'm in.
  • 4 0
 @wyorider: ? This one has power loss too; and unlike the Hammerschimdt the power loss is in the lower gear, where its less tolerable.
  • 11 0
 I've been on SQLab saddles for about 2 years, mountain and road, and my butt has never been happier. That dingle hub is pretty interesting - I would love to be able to run a DH style compact, 7 speed cassette and use this to get a full range of gears with better chainline, less chain and derraileur bouncing around, better ground clearance, and probably net out lower weight. I'm not sure if it's capable of delivering the ratios required to make that viable, or if it's beefy enough - it seems to be aimed more at the roadies.
  • 5 0
 I finally put the $ down for an SQLab saddle after using and loving their 711 grips. Was previously on a WTB. It's been so good so far. I hope the durability is as good as my WTB's.
fwiw, WTB were great in sending me a replacement for free when the seams split on my Volt.
  • 15 2
 You Guy's should try the SQLab Handlebar with 12degree backsweep!
  • 6 0
 @Hamburgi: gotta agree. way more comfortable for me.
  • 6 0
 @Hamburgi: definitely! Been running one for a year so much better.
People def should experiment more with backsweep - I suppose its just an expensive endeavour if your arent sure .
  • 9 0
 @rrolly: I've been on a SQLabs 611 for five years now and will never try anything else...it still looks like new and wears better than any other saddle I've used over the years. I used to ride WTB as well but can honestly say I have never been tender even early in the season using the 611, I highly recommend.
  • 6 0
 @pen9-wy: I went all in on the 16deg bar, cut to 760 on my plus hardtail. Amazing with Ergon GP3 grips. Even the 16deg still "looks" like a real bar, not gimmicky at all. People with any wrist/elbow/shoulder stuff going on should have good luck trying one of those to tweak that wrist angle.
  • 2 1
 I used for few years fabric scoop saddles. Last year i decided to try the sqlab (i think it was the 611 ergo something) saddle after i read how comfortables these are. I used their solution (the cardboard one) to identify how wide the saddle should be for me. I feel no difference comparing to scoop saddle - comfort wise, just 3 times the price of scoop saddle.
  • 4 0
 @pokrywa: SQ Lab saddles aim to have the least pressure in the front. Alot of saddles are just to narrow or round(ish) what causes the pain. on the most sqlab saddles they have regular foam, nothing to special. but the shape is! also the little ramp on the back help on uphills alot, so you dont need to adjust you saddle stupidly down.
  • 5 0
 @pokrywa: TBH it is quite strange, that you didn't feel a difference, because the shapes of the Scoop saddle & the 611 Ergowave are totally different:
The Scoop has a classic "round" profile, while the 611, like all SQlab saddles, is way more flat.
Just to be sure: you measured your sit bone distance, but also added CMs according to the sitting postition, right? (see here: step 3 -> www.sq-lab.com/en/ergonomics/sqlab-measurement-concepts/sit-bone-measurement ).
If you didn't do so, the chosen saddle size might be too narrow & the reason why you didn't feel a real difference.
Where are you based? Maybe we could connect you with a LBS close by for additional consulting on fitting & size.
Please drop us a PM.
Thank you.
  • 1 2
 just here to say i spent $200 on a fancy sqlab saddle and it was the worst fitting saddle I have ever ridden. couldn't even return it because i actually mounted it and rode it. waste of money on a bull shit product that was designed to "look cool".
  • 2 0
 @mojopedaler: Sorry to hear, please drop us a PM with info when & where purchsed, and info about communication so far.
We will check, what's up & if we can help from the German HQs.
It might have happend during our distribution partner change / related transition time in US.

In general: it takes a few rides to get used to the unique SQlab saddle shape, to really feel & enjoy the difference in construction and riding comfort.
And most important is the fitting / size. You won't be happy at all if you didn't measure your sit bones distance, before (your regular apparel or waist sizing can be totally different, you do need to measure the sit bones distance, first).

HUGE APPOLOGIES still in advance.
  • 5 0
 @mojopedaler: It sucks having to drop so much money on something that doesn't work for you and that you can't return. I hope you take SQLab up on sorting your problem out. For me riding without numbness and discomfort has been awesome.
  • 4 0
 @mojopedaler: As already been said, these products need to be adjusted right. I see people buying these from the internet and cry after 1 ride and return or resell it... go to a proper LBS and get it measured and properly adjusted. You wont regret it. Me and most of my costumers love them!
  • 3 0
 @Zany2410: Agreed, but even if you don't want to involve the LBS one needs to put the effort into the sizing and then following recommended installation procedures. And then be prepared to fiddle a bit as it is a different take on seating. Usually have to lower the saddle a bit and you have to have some patience for saddle angle. Not easy but until recently with an out of the box Fizik Argo it's been the best saddle I've ever used as well. And the Fizik only gets kudos because I've never had an out of the box saddle be that good straightaway.
  • 1 0
 @Zany2410: I really appreciate the kind responses to my rant. I bought the saddle online, thought id give it a try because of the positive reviews. I'm glad it works for some butts! Mine butt likes a less square saddle I guess. LBS cant tell me shit about what my ass likes. Thats why I quit wrenching years ago Smile
  • 1 1
 @Zany2410: also, the people working at your LBS are not saddle experts, even though they are your dealer. They are kids with no experience, maybe 5 years in the saddle tops. I was a career mechanic for last 15 years. you see a lot of bullshit products in that time. so maybe my personal claim against the saddle was not justified because everyones ass is different. but I know a well researched and designed product. sorry for the negative review but im not here to sux dix. sold the saddle on ebay and recouped 80% money back.
  • 11 1
 classified 2 speed hub- "Awesome"
Bluetooth connection - "Nevermind"
  • 6 0
 That hope is gorgeous but my favorite thing is them making the bleed tools available for 3d home printing. I have hope brakes but am unfortunately unlikely to own a 3d printer but still , pretty cool .
  • 2 0
 I forsee 3d print cafes in our future where you can walk in with your files and hire a machine. Or just slip someone a fiver over the internet.
  • 1 0
 Thingiverse may have something
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Some public libraries already offer 3D printing, for free.
  • 7 0
 Still patiently waiting for that ext dual crown for my pedal bike. Coil with hydraulic bottom out please.
  • 4 0
 "The advantage of ratchet systems is that - in comparison with pawl systems - more teeth engage at the same time."

Pawl systems are "ratchet" systems, too. I think you mean "star-ratchet type system".

There are also disadvantages: more teeth slide at the same time when freewheeling, and that sliding means that high-engagement systems, with their very small teeth, need to be kept very very clean to prevent extremely fast wear, despite that "high" engagement not really being very high. Shit, something like a Spank Hex Drive with 102 PoE has as many teeth "engaged all the time" as an 18 tooth/PoE star-ratchet, since each of the 6 pawls engages 3 teeth at once, but there are more than 5x teeth in the drive ring to spread the wear.

I think the real advantage is very few moving parts. Even a basic 3-pawl system has at least 8 individual parts beyond the hub body (3x pawls, 3x springs, drive ring, freehub) that need to match. A single sided star-ratchet has minimum 4 (fixed star, sliding star, spring, freehub). And I guess each could go one lower if the drive-ring or fixed star was integral to the freehub... Oh and really cheap pawl systems get down to 6 parts by using one shared spring... but star-ratchets still take that prize.
  • 12 1
 I can't wait to pair my ultra-fast engaging hub with an O-chain ring!
  • 4 0
 Years ago out shop had a bunch of those single spring pawl hubs on cheaper hardtails come back with engagement issues. Bike would freewheel both directions on occasion.
No name brand whatever hubs so of course no replacement parts and lackluster warranty.
We started using key rings as a stronger replacement spring. Cut a nice piece off and bend it over the pawl. Made the hubs way louder.
Did it to a couple dozen bikes. As far as I know none of them failed after…
  • 5 0
 The Hope 916 was by far and away the best built and finished bike at the show. INCREDIBLY beautiful layup and paint work. The translucent paint over the PERFECT 3K weave layup is just mind blowing.
  • 5 1
 The problem with offset in the crown, and why most every reputable fork maker ceased building forks that way, is the offset decreases as the fork compresses. Back when suspension fork travel was only 2 or 3 inches...Rockshox could get away with angled crowns because the offset only dropped a couple mm. But as companies began going past 75mm of travel, they pretty much all went to crowns where the path of compression was perfectly parallel to the steerer tube, with any offset either being in the dropouts, or the crown (with the stanchions forward of the steerer tube) because it meant the offset remained constant no matter where you were in travel. Fork offsets are also measured with the fork at full extension. So from the very moment its on the bike and you set it up with some sag, you're already going to be having less offset than you had before you got on the bike. A bike that steers a particular way with 44mm of offset is going to steer slower when that offset drops to 42 or 40mm if using this brand's fork on it.
  • 1 0
 And if it's gonna steer slower, it's because of increased force trying the straighten the bars. I can only see benefits. Steeper headtube angle for shorter wheelbase, longer toptube, shorter stem and more stability? Sign me up.
  • 1 2
 Less offset makes the steering quicker, not slower. It's effectively less trail.
  • 2 1
 @EdSawyer: Bzzzt Wrong ! But thanks for playing. Reducing the offset increases the trail. Increasing the offset reduces the trail.
  • 2 1
 @EdSawyer: The Ground Trail is measured from the centerline of the steerer tube on the ground, to the centerline of the tire contact patch (center of the hub, straight down). Offset doesn't matter, i'ts just a measurement from the centerline of the crown to the centerline of the stanchions.

Motorcycles already know that you don't need the stanchios to be back or in front of the hub.
  • 4 0
 Regarding the Classified hub. Sturmey Archer sells a 3x9 hub and has so for years. Granted, it's 135 spacing so it's outdated but no one talks about that possibility. The Classified is a massive upgrade from the SA but the idea has been out there for years and no one has cared until now.
  • 1 0
 prettysure a guy on one of the old school face book groups has a sturmey archer hub with a 3 speed cassette and it was something they sold, maybe if they can connect it to an iphone SA would be popular again, oh here ya gohttps://www.sjscycles.co.uk/hubs-internal-hub-gear-brake/sturmey-archer-rf3-3spd-cassette-hub-36h/ and you can stick a modern hyperglide thing on by the looks
  • 1 0
 The same concept has already been around in the 90ies, called sachs orbit: 2 internal gears & 7speed cassette hub. I just do think classified is on a total different construction level.
FYI: sheldonbrown.com/sachs-orbit.html
  • 2 1
 Greg Herbold's FM-5 crankset imported from Japan back thirty years ago... 5 speed planetary gear crankset with one chainring and no front derailleur, effectively gave his downhill bike 40 gears when paired to the original XTR rear hub.

Sachs Torpedo hub (even came in a disc option, mind you for the thread on Sachs disc rotor) was a 3 speed planetary gear hub shell that accepted a 7 speed cassette. Again, no need for a front derailleur and triple chainrings. That was back in the mid 90s.

S.A. has been owned by Sun Race since 2000 and as you said nobody other than niche markets like touring expedition bikes, and compact wheel folding bikes has cared that those cassette-disc brake hubs are offered.

This classified company might claim that gravel bike owners love their hub but really how many sales are we talking about ? A few hundred per year ? They're super expensive and the reason has a lot to do with how they shift...its WIRELESS electronic shifting. A critical detail largely left out of PB's little review above other than mentioning a bluetooth button. Another detail omitted is the unique hub driver requires cassettes also purchased from Classfied.
  • 1 0
 the minute sturmey archer can connect to a garmin or iphone bobs your uncle instafame
  • 8 1
 nobody can stop me from putting that 4kg USD fork on a regular bike Smile
  • 8 2
 Can I just get that paint job on my existing bike ?
  • 3 0
 Classified looks like it could be a game changer, I can imagine going 2-4teeth more on chainring with that so I could pedal harder when going down while still have enough gears to climb back up
  • 2 0
 I don't get all the hype around the classified hub. I bet they're awesome at marketing because it makes no technical sense. You get the added losses of the drivetrain in the low gear, added suspended weight, added number of parts and associated failure, added complexity to choose your gear in rolling/ quick climb descend configurations, for no measurable gains.
1x12 is awesome what's wrong with that really ? You get the range, the reasonable spacing between gears, it's super intuitive just appreciate and ride that. There is room for geared hub like shimano alfine but the circa 5% added friction means the use cases aren't that numerous.
  • 4 3
 the different configs for that Classified hub is pretty damn neat! want an insane high gear but don't want to give up 32/52 climbing? it can do that!

want a ridiculous granny gear without giving up 32/10 for top speed? can do that too!

want something in the middle? just run a 38t chainring and a 45/10 shimano XTR cassette with the shorter cage XTR mech, and get expanded high and low end with the benefit of a shorter cage and closer ratio cassette, with the added added benefit of those pieces being in stock. lol
  • 6 0
 As far as I understand, you can only use their own cassettes on these hubs. Which for the MTB version only seems to be a 11-40 for now (as listed in this article, MTB version not yet listed on Classified´s website). They do have plenty more options for their Road and Gravel setups, but I don´t know if they are compatible. And it would obviously be great if some aftermarket brands could produce cassettes for these hubs as well. Garabaruk comes to mind.
  • 6 0
 How many trail/enduro mountain bikes can run large enough chain rings to make this product worthwhile??
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: EY. that is a good point. didn't think that bit out
  • 1 0
 @ultralord: For now......

100% will change once this hub is actually released.
  • 3 0
 @stiingya: Running 34 teeth upfront with 11-40 cassete would give you simillar range as 30 teeth with 10-50cassete. So you would not really need that big of a chainring
  • 1 2
 @malca: the point isn't to add complexity to get "similar" range though. lol
  • 1 0
 "from a 40 t to a 28 t chainring on a mountain bike"

Or to be relevant to most of us: 32t to 22t, or 34t to 24t, or 30t to 21t even. Could be a good option to go with the tighter ratios of something like Shimano's 10-45 12-speed cassette and use the mech with the shorter cage to gain just a little ground clearance.
  • 2 0
 Never mind, missed part about custom cassette. Yeah, that's gonna be a non-starter for most aftermarket applications, I would think. Who's going to give up the shifting of a Hyperglide+ cassette (or even Eagle, I've slammed gears up and down on mine and it's not bad) for the tiny gain in watts of a slightly bigger chainring. And how does that marginal gain compare to the 1% loss of the underdrive gear?
  • 4 0
 This is great and all but the important question is where is the banana update?
  • 2 0
 I'm seriously hub-curious about Classified.cc It seems to be genui good idea. I wonder how will it work under MTB environment.
  • 3 0
 That Hb.916 looks like it borrowed the color code from Nissan in the late 90s Primeratastic Love it
  • 4 1
 My friend had a car painted in that flop flop shite colour way about 15 years ago, it did not age well. Looks terrible.
  • 4 1
 Will that EXT air shock come with data logging and an engineer so you stand a sporting chance of setting it up to its best?
  • 3 0
 Classified hub worked perfectly when I tried it on a gravel bike. Curious about cassette and shifter options now
  • 2 0
 Intend carbon guide lines....if they can be retrofitted to Edge forks, I'm in!!
  • 4 1
 Not on the list... LITELOK, Bike locks made in Wales.
  • 2 1
 Damn that Intend fork is a sexy beast. Amazingly low weight. Too bad to have to use a flat-mount caliper though. What diameter are the stanchions?
  • 6 2
 Why "too bad"? If you're worried about the grams in an offset dropout, you'd be worried about the grams in a post-mount brake as well...Plenty of good flat-mount options out there lately, too.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: sure but it’s one more thing to have to buy and Trickstuff has a huge lead time even for single calipers.
  • 4 4
 I just want to know if that 128 POE hub can be used with grease so it doesn't sound like a swarm of angry bees. I prefer a subdued sound from my bike, I could never run a Hydra hub because the sound annoys me too much
  • 4 0
 Hydra with grease is nearly silent.
  • 2 3
 @Baller7756: yeah even when brand new I would not call the hydra "loud",
  • 4 1
 Take a look at Onyx - 360 engagement and completely silent.
  • 2 1
 The new XTR freehub goes silent above 6 or 7 MPH.
  • 2 0
 I was so mad, I couldn't here a thing with my hydra...had to clean all that oem grease before puting back some I9 Torch oil! Dont worry, nobody will know that you're coming with those stock hydra!
  • 4 2
 I don't care if it weighs 4kg (same as my old Shiver) I want that USD EXT fork!
  • 3 0
 Yes, thin high density chamois....always better than big fluffy chamois!
  • 2 0
 That Qvist hub has splines moving back-n-forth in the alloy hub shell.....I hope it is running in a hardened track!
  • 2 0
 I have to say that the combination of "Infingery" and a bicycle saddle is not one I want to dwell on.
  • 2 0
 What's the weight on the Classified hub,@TEBP?
  • 2 0
 Dingle speed is just such a good phrase...
  • 1 0
 Where do i get the bleedplug for getting sticky pistons out- is it available for codes and shimano ?
  • 2 0
 "dingle speed" - That's the type of writing I came here for!
  • 1 0
 O look Hope finally comes out with bleed blocks
  • 2 1
 that EXT fork weighs the same as the burly suntours...
  • 2 2
 No mention of freehub noise probably a loud one..like to her the forest sounds.
  • 1 0
 Bet it would fit a good old big hit too.
  • 1 4
 Does or has anyone actually bought those horrendous looking Hope bars? Looks like the sort of thing that if it was a standard feature on a bike you would take them off and put them straight in the bin! I know I would! Horrific!
  • 1 0
 I think the Hope design team has positioned their entire lineup of products with this gaudy, loud, multi colored aesthetic. It works for some... obviously enough to stay in business.
  • 1 0
 Everything else looks the same. I bought a used bike that came with these and now I really like em.
  • 1 0
 That Hope is sensational as is most of the other stuff shown.
  • 1 0
 Hope stuff NEVER gets old to look at.
  • 1 0
 Jeeze Hope, not sure I want a self-printed stem thank you very much...
  • 1 0
 Does Infinergy come in a blue pill? Asking for a friend.
  • 3 4
 So they save weight with flatmount and then you have to use a heavy adapter for a descent MTB brake.
  • 2 0
 XTR flat mount brakes not only exist but are in stock.
  • 2 2
 That paint was cool for a bit, in the 90's.....
  • 1 0
 Ugh that seat angle
  • 5 6
 That Hope bike is stunning looking. Wonder if they have plans for an eeb?
  • 4 4
 Wtf that Hope...
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