The European Bike Project: 5 Exciting Products from Small European Manufacturers - March 2022

Mar 21, 2022 at 1:34
by TEBP  
The European Bike Project is one of our favorite Instagram accounts and his feed is constantly updated with everything from interesting curios from tiny manufacturers to inside looks at European manufacturing to analyses of the environmental impact of our sport. He's going to be doing a new regular column for us here at Pinkbike and Beta that will be mainly focussed on bringing you exciting products from small European manufacturers. Here's is his latest edition that includes a steel downhill bike, Swedish carbon and more.



BTR Fabrications "Gasser"

photo

The "Gasser" was a custom project for longtime BTR customer Chris, who already owned a Pinner and a Ranger frame. When Chris asked Burf from BTR what he thought about some of the steel DH frames available, Burf said "I think I should make you one instead." It was basically designed to be a bigger version of the Pinner with a few tweaks to the kinematics.

Burf describes the whole project as an extreme challenge for him, he looks back on it "as a marathon or Everest type thing". Chris wanted the bike for a road trip that was planned for June 2020 - and we all know how the start of 2020 went. It was looking like the trip wasn't going to go ahead so Burf was hesitant to order a lot of the things needed and it wasn't until the last second that everything got the green light, culminating in a 36 hour shift to get the frame finished and off to the powder coaters. Burf documented the whole thing with Instagram stories and saved them in the highlights section so you can go and see the whole gruesome ordeal unfold in real-time.

The build took five weeks just as the first lockdown in 2020 was coming to an end. This includes the time it took to build the swingarm jig and a few other bits required for the building process.

The suspension design is a linkage driven single-pivot. Burf says that "although the flexible properties of steel are wonderful for hardtails, the flex does become a bit of an issue with multi-pivot suspension systems. So the single-pivot swingarm allows me to build it nice and stiff for the 'feel' and the durability of bearings and dampers. The linkage then allows me to tune the leverage ratios and whatnot to get the progression we wanted. We did look into one of those yoke type extensions for the damper instead of a linkage, shout-out to the crew at TF-Tuned for giving us a heads-up on the fact they destroy dampers."

Chris topped off this stunning frame with some very interesting Euro-parts from Intend, Extreme Shox, SBone and Hope. His custom frame has a 62° head angle, 500 mm reach, 440 mm chainstays and 27.5" wheels, but Burf could tweak the geometry within certain limits to your liking.

So far, there is only one Gasser frame in existence. Because of the layout of the suspension, Burf can only make frames with a minimum reach of 500 mm, so if you are in that size range you're in luck.



photo
photo

photo
photo


photo
photo


Details
- Frame made in UK
- Custom geometry (62° head angle / 500 mm reach / 440 mm chainstays)
- Travel: 200 mm
- 27.5" wheels
- Price: from 4000 £
- Website: https://www.btr-fabrications.com/
- Instagram: @btr_fabrications



Cörrent Carbon Components handlebar and stem combo

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cörrent Components is a small one-man show from Sweden that has set out to rethink every bike component. Karl, the founder of Cörrent, says: "There are many unexplored possibilities with carbon fibre when it comes to mountainbikes and bike parts. Sure, it's light and stiff, but what about the special flex properties and ability to withstand abuse if built properly?"

With complete inhouse manufacturing from computer modelling, high end CNC machining to prepreg autoclave, Cörrent Components have everything they need to do things their way. The workshop is located in Lofsdalen, a small mountain town in Sweden. Karl says that his workshop is so energy efficient that it is run on only one 10 A fuse - that’s fully operational in under 2,3 Kw including heating and lighting. "It might be impossible to call yourself environmentally friendly when producing new stuff, but I'm trying to limit the footprint of my products as much as I can" says Karl.

This handlebar and stem combo is Cörrent Components first product to hit the market and a proof that they really think outside the box. Cörrent Components wanted to create a bar that has this nice flex that’s not tiring to your hands and which is still able to take the beating of your bike life. They paid a lot of attention to the clamping area too, so you can mount your favourite brakes without the risk of destroying the handlebar before you're on your first ride.

To achieve this Cörrent had to rethink both the usual fibre orientation and the shape of the bar. The rectangular 30x32mm shape isn’t just to keep the nice flex in the right directions. It also gave Cörrent the possibility to create a very special stem. Instead of using a “built in” carbon stem "that messes up the flex", Cörrent created this very light one-piece stem that works together with the bar to create a good flex while keeping the weight down. Karl says that his handlebar and stem combo turned out even lighter this way then integrated bar/stem combos.

The stem uses only two screws that clamp around the steering tube. The top cap bolt adds the usual pretension to the headtube bearings and at the same time it adds clamping force to the bar.

Copyright by C rrent Carbon Components
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


Details
- Made in Sweden
- Weight: 315 g (handlebar and stem)
- 32x30 mm rectangular bar shape
- 780 mm wide, 5° upsweep, 6° backsweep, 27 mm rise
- 32 mm stem length
- Cörrent Components is currently taking pre-orders for the first 50 handlebar and stem combos
- Price: 490 Euro (including Swedish tax and shipping to all EU countries)
- Delivery starts May 2022
- Website: https://correntcomponents.com/
- Instagram: @correntcomponents


Ingrid RD1 rear derailleur
photo
Photos by Kilian Reil

"We wanted to build a derailleur, so we did it." That's how Giulio Mancini from Italian manufacturer Ingrid Components describes the company's motivation to tackle one of the most difficult tasks in the industry.

They started to work on the derailleur back in 2017 and sold the first batch about a year ago. Before that, they built a very good reputation for machining very light cassettes, chainrings and stunning cranksets, so designing their own derailleur came somewhat naturally.

The RD1 comes in 11 or 12 speed and according to Ingrid, all parts are replaceable and available as spare parts. The derailleur can be ordered with different cable fins that adjust the cable pull ratio, so it can be used with any shifter for drop or flat bars.

The Ingrid Team is also working on their own shifter, however this turns out to be a very difficult task considering the very crowded patent landscape.

As many small-scale manufacturers, the team at Ingrid opted for CNC machining and additive manufacturing to create these gorgeous works of art. Building custom tools for the production of the derailleur is not economic, as the derailleurs are more or less made on demand. Not using custom-made tools also allows for more flexbility in case Ingrid wants to make changes to the current design. When people tell Giulio that this is not "industrial", he replies: "No, in fact. But for us it is the coolest solution ever".

While the price tag is hefty, it's great to see a fully rebuildable and adaptable derailleur made by a small company. If you want to find an alternative to the usual offerings, this might be what you're looking for.

photo

Details
- Made in Italy
- 11 speed or 12 speed
- Road and mtb compatible
- Max teeth: 52 (long cage)
- Weight: 270 g
- Price: 599 Euro
- Website: https://ingrid.bike/
- Instagram: @ingridcomponents


Bike Ahead Composites

photo
Photos by Paul Masukowitz

While German carbon specialist Bike Ahead Composites is best known for its remarkable six spoke wheels, it's worth noting that its product range goes for beyond that. Last year, Bike Ahead launched a series of new products that include some very interesting rims.

On the one hand, their new Two Six wheelset is mainly aimed at XC racers and comes with 26 mm inner width rims, 28 holes, DT Swiss EXP 180 hubs as well as DT Swiss Aerolite spokes. A set weighs in at 1119 g and will set you back 2499 Euro. According to Bike Ahead, the rim works well with tires up to 2.4" and offers a comfortable ride thanks to its low 19mm rim height.

On the other hand, the new Three Zero rims come with the new "Safe-Wing profile" that is said to offer several advantages. According to Bike Ahead, the shape of the rim flange minimises the risk of pinch flats. Moreover, the "Safe-Wing profile" has a completely circumferential laminate, so the material is closed at the rim flange. Quite often, the rim flanges are made in a way that makes them susceptible to delamination and Bike Ahead claims that their rim flange can take big hits without failing. As with the Two Six rims, Bike Ahead chose to opt for a rather low 20 mm rim height which is said to improve comfort. These rims are available with various DT Swiss EXP hubs and a set can be as light as 1380 g.

However, if you're looking for something extra, the Biturbo RS could be the right wheel for you. It's a very versatile versatile six-spoke wheel with a 27 mm inner width and a 29" set weighs just 1249 g. People who were lucky enough to ride them describe them as more comfortable than you might think and very easy to accelerate. As these rims don't have any spoke holes, you won't need a rim tape and a tubeless setup should work very well.

Apart from building fine carbon parts for their own product range, Bike Ahead Composites also makes frames for frame companies such as Stoll and Last.

photo
photo


Details
- Made in Germany
- Website: https://bike-ahead-composites.de/
- Instagram: @bikeaheadcomposites


Ride Works

photo

Rideworks is a UK based company that has built a very good reputation in the field of CNC machined bike components. The Rideworks team is pretty small - two brothers and their dad, who helps out as the tool maker. Their products are well known for their good sealing and bearing quality, which makes them ideal for British weather and anybody who likes hassle free bike parts.

It all started with the idea to build a mechanical dropper post that was lockable at any height along its travel back in 2009. The small team made a few prototypes but realised that they were very costly, so they moved on to bottom brackets and chainrings instead.

Starting with their hubs (44 t ratchet system), more and more Rideworks products are currently getting the signature "bean can" look. They just recently added a "bean can" bottom bracket to their range. Besides manufacturing products such as stems, seat post clamps and headsets, Rideworks is also one of the few companies that offer eccentric bottom brackets that allow you to run a single speed (or gear hub) setup in a regular frame.

Apart from the look and function, it's also the finishes and colours that make Rideworks products stand out from the crowd. They offer a really nice selection of colours, including rather rare options such as copper. Some of their products and colours are only available upon request, however they do generally stock black parts. All products are made in the small Rideworks workshop in Coventry.

I'm using Rideworks bottom brackets and headsets on several bikes and they have worked flawlessly, no matter the weather.

photo
photo


Details
- Made in UK
- Bottom brackets come in various standards and colours
- Special colours and some products made upon request
- Website: https://rideworks.cc/
- Instagram: @rideworks


Author Info:
TEBP avatar

Member since May 15, 2020
34 articles

82 Comments
  • 71 1
 it's like a normal cockpit with all the disadvantages of a one-piece cockpit. but it looks quite nice
  • 9 2
 Easy, Just stoppie or manual to rotate the bars forward or backwards.
  • 20 2
 Pigeon-holing themselves with a 6 degree backsweep doesn't seem like the best idea these days. Maybe it's just my ageing wrists, but (even if I could afford this, which I absolutely cannot) I wouldn't consider under 9 degrees and I think a lot more people are this way inclined in recent times.
  • 15 0
 @codfather1234: Its meant to compete against single integrated bars, mainly for XC racers. This guy did it on his own and did it better, lighter, etc. I'm super impressed.
  • 3 3
 @rich-2000: you've seen it's a rectangular shape in the clamping area though?
  • 10 0
 @danimaniac: yea hence my joke that the only way to rotate the bars is to rotate the bike :-)
  • 2 0
 @codfather1234: Agreed. I know the bar is designed with racing in mind, but that's a curious decision on the backsweep. Hoping there'll be more options in subsequent production runs.
  • 4 2
 FYI Corrent, a Renthal fatbar carbon lite and Renthal stem is considerably lighter than your setup, and yes I can adjust bar roll. I hope it rides nice.
  • 1 0
 @EarIysport: 5g lighter? I agree with your point, but 5g isn't much!
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: are they for XC racing though? I really can't emphasize enough how little I know about XC racing and race bikes, but 780mm bars with 1"+ rise and a 32mm stem do not scream XC to me. That's near identical to what my enduro bike came with stock. When I picture modern XC I think low 700s, longish stems and zero/negative rise. Can't imagine nice carbon like this wants big chunks cutting off each side to get down to those widths.
I don't see how they're mutually exclusive either; surely an XC racer would want optimum sweep for hand/wrist comfort over long, intense sessions. My hands tend not to know if they're in a race - they just hurt if they're in the wrong position.

Again, not attacking or anything, just curious why an XC racer might not want larger sweep angles.
If I were to build up an XC bike (and my liberal attitude towards n+1 suggests it's inevitable sooner or later) I'd still want 9 degrees or so.

I don't want to give the impression I have a downer on this or anything - quite the opposite. If I had a silly amount of money to spend on a proprietary cockpit I'd far rather something attractive and off-the-wall like this rather than some daft one piece thing. I like it very much.

I assume they've done all their market research and concluded this was the best first step. I can't imagine making multiple different options in carbon is easy for a small outfit. On the basis of their €5500 enduro frame though, maybe it's not that much of a challenge.

Happy to be put in my place about any of this, just curious.
  • 4 0
 Oh boy, that was much more waffle than I intended. I should not be left unsupervised, my mind wanders.
  • 2 0
 @codfather1234: They are intended for Enduro racing
  • 34 0
 Sweet, I was just looking for a €600 derailleur.
  • 26 0
 yeah, same, but unfortunately I've just spent €490 for a cockpit.
  • 5 16
flag stiingya (Mar 21, 2022 at 11:40) (Below Threshold)
 What are these "euro's" they keep talking about? Is that some kind of monopoly money we can get by trading in our MuricaMints?




Smile Smile Smile
  • 12 3
 I mean, Ingrid is much cooler than SRAM AXS and even less expensive!
  • 21 3
 I just came #noshame
  • 28 0
 From where ?
  • 4 0
 @crazy9: from pp
  • 16 1
 If you like that BTR, show your support by buying a frame, trail tool or sweet hat.
  • 4 1
 I really like their T-shirt. Soft, quick drying blend of organic cotton and bamboo, makes me look even better too.
  • 3 0
 I’m lucky enough to own a BTR Ranger (and a T-shirt). Can confirm it’s an absolute weapon. The only thing holding it back is me!
  • 2 0
 @Unrulybeast: Hah, I've got a Ranger (#166) and three shirts Wink . Absolutely loving that bike (and the shirts).
  • 2 0
 @Unrulybeast: I have the same problem with my Ranger Wink
  • 1 0
 @vinay: My ranger is #157, but I don't have any tee shirts. I'll get something ordered up!
  • 1 0
 @brit-100: Yeah, it was actually that I ordered something extra which eventually didn't work out, so instead of a refund I went with more shirts. What's your bike like? I went with size large but with a 400mm seattube (to also lower the toptube), 26" wheel specific, bottle mounts on the downtube, ISCG05 tabs, no integrated seat post clamp and in RAL6001M (green) powdercoat. I love how you could get your absolute dream bike built, something others wouldn't even like (wheelsize and seattube in particular). But yeah, having a blast and I'm sure yours must be amazing too!
  • 3 0
 @vinay: You can see mine here: www.instagram.com/p/BmSZwoSlnfE

Mine is 27.5 f&r, extra large (480mm reach, so not crazy massive), standard geo, ISCG, integrated seat clamp, downtube bottle mounts, internal dropper and external brake & gear. And best of all, the original clear coat! Even after 4+ years of owning it, I'm still super excited to ride it. It's still my primary bikepark bike.
  • 1 0
 @brit-100: Sounds cool! I couldn't see the picture as Instagram requires me to log in. I used to have pictures of my bike on Pinkbike but didn't quite like the new terms of use now that Outside is at the helm so asked for them to be removed. For me, the BTR is my primary mountainbike. I've still got a Cannondale Prophet fully too but hardly ride it. I'm more confident with the BTR geometry and extra suspension doesn't compensate. And yeah, still super excited about the bike too. It just seems to scream "come out and play!"
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Cool! I got mine last year #247
Had to wait 13months due to Covid and Burf being so meticulous with checking Reynolds butting (a whole order was sent back due to being out of spec). Amazing to know it really is the best it can be! I’ve a 140mm Helm coil at the front doing the business. It’s done everything from big XC loops in the Dales to Antur Stiniog. Loads more fun to come I’m sure
  • 2 0
 @Unrulybeast: Yeah, just call it a mountainbike without any pigeonholing as it is up for anything. It may not be ideal for racing but then again, if a good result relies on competitive (lightweight in turn for durability) gear then it always makes me wonder what one is trying to prove with race results. My build is pretty basic and the fork is a Magura TS8 lowered to 120mm but I'll also try a higher end coil sprung fork up front at some point. Instead from what I understand (and as my bike is 26" specific) I could also get a Manitou Circus and tune the damper a bit lighter for trail use.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Mine weighs 15.3kg, so definitely not lightweight. No problem on the uphills though and so long as I’ve taken my brave pills, it’s amazing on the rowdy DH too! It really does everything very very well.
  • 2 0
 @Unrulybeast: I dread to think how much mine weighs... DH rear rim, dual ply tyres, coil fork, long cheap dropper...
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: Similar story with mine. Built to take a beating and just keep going!
  • 10 0
 It'll probably get overshadowed by the price tag, but I love the idea of swapable derailleur cable fins for different pull ratios on the Ingrid. That's good stuff
  • 7 0
 I'm no dentist but I sure love that Ingrid derailleur and the 80's BMX looking 6 spoke carbon wheels.
  • 5 0
 "The Ingrid Team is also working on their own shifter, however this turns out to be a very difficult task considering the very crowded patent landscape."

Box One push shifter flashbacks.
  • 7 1
 anyone remember the 24/7 Dark Angel bikes circa 2006? looks like BTR used it as inspiration
  • 1 2
 People draw the weirdest comparisons between bikes...
  • 4 0
 I can't help thinking that having the same bolt set the headset bearing load and clamp your bars will probably end up with neither setting being correct, or if you have one correct then the other would be well off optimal.
  • 2 0
 Without the round handlebar, my guess is that the handlebar clamp part of the stem doesn't need much force to keep your handlebar from sliding left or right, since it can't rotate. I still hate that you can't adjust bar roll though.
  • 7 0
 That DH Rig looks wild!
  • 4 0
 So, there are actually 2 positions for the rectangular clamped bars. If you don't like the usual you really won't like the other.
  • 1 0
 8 by my counting.
  • 5 0
 Steel is for real Burf keep off the turf.
  • 1 0
 Are the Ingrid's "different cable fins" also intended to be a wear part? That's a long way for a bare cable to slide under tension along a curve... I've seen cables eat into metal derailluers, that plastic just doesn't seem like it's going to last.
  • 1 0
 probably teflon
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: Teflon doesn't 3D print
  • 1 0
 Maybe that's something they thought of?
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: nylon does, and wears pretty well
  • 1 0
 @Tambo: I don't think it wears well enough for a mech cable. Like I said, I've seen Shimano mechs with metal worn away on the b-knuckle, and that was before clutches!
  • 1 0
 I just think one brand may be missing : Venna Bike Component
A young french brand with an innovative integrated multi-tool.
vennabikecomponent.fr
  • 4 0
 Personally I'm no fan of loose bit multitools. Pretty sure I'm going to drop and lose stuff. Stowing stuff in the bottom of the steerer is a good idea (you could get a Forkcork to take advantage of the available space) but I'm not too sure of the qr lever extending below the crown. Does it leave enough room for the tire when the fork bottoms out? I'm one of those weirdos who doesn't like the front wheel to jam when the fork bottoms out. But that may just be me though.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone else comment on something, see that it is posted, come back to the page and the comments are gone from the article but still in your dashboard?
  • 2 0
 It's cause you replied to a downvoted below threshold comment.
  • 1 0
 Stem bar clamps went from 1-bolt to 2-bolt, then that wasn't enough so we went to 4-bolt. Now we're back to 1-bolt. Ok got it.
  • 2 0
 The BFR looks like a curtis but new suspension.
  • 1 1
 Just curious; what about it looks like a Curtis?
  • 2 0
 @Tambo: Just the whole look of it and the typography for the branding.
  • 2 1
 @konastab01: personally I think it looks more like a session. It's BTR, by the way.
  • 2 0
 @Tambo: Im not gonna lie, I dont know how your seeing a session in that. Look at the old curtis dh bike and you'll see what I mean. BFR was a typo btw
  • 1 0
 @konastab01: I'm not really seeing a session in it, other than the number of wheels and where they are...but I'm not seeing a thumpercross either, unless having round tubes in the front is grounds for 'looks like a...'
  • 2 0
 Alright, Tuff wheels for my mountain bike! My bmx background approves.
  • 1 0
 One good thing about dentists is they don't go on Pinkbike and moan about things being expensive.
  • 1 0
 I like the Diamondback '22 model
  • 1 0
 Not exactly focused on being competitive are they...
  • 1 0
 Seems to be a Dangerholm shopping list?
  • 1 0
 600 euros for a derailleur, is the standard person ment to sell a limb?
Below threshold threads are hidden





Copyright © 2000 - 2023. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.034042
Mobile Version of Website