Done: Ask Us Anything With Transition Bikes - Why Making Bikes is Fun

Jun 9, 2015 at 6:09
by Transition Bikes  
Transition AUA

Ask Us Anything: Transition Bikes - Let's Make a Party! Why Making Bikes is Fun

Over the last twelve years Transition Bikes has grown from a scrappy little upstart to a well respected brand based in the Pacific Northwest, but the company's owners and employees haven't lost sight of what's important – having fun. After all, isn't that what mountain biking's all about? Whether it's coming up with creative acronyms and names for their suspension technology, putting together an over-the-top Christmas card photo shoot, or adding a single speed, coaster brake equipped Klunker to their product line, it's clear that the crew at Transition do things a little differently than the rest.

It may all be fun and games, but Transition's bikes continues to evolve, and for 2015 there are some seriously high performing machines in their lineup. Four new bikes, the Patrol, Scout, Smuggler, and Suppressor have been added, all with varying amounts of travel and wheel sizes, and based around the company's GiddyUp Link suspension design, their version of a Horst Link suspension layout. The bikes have been well received, thanks to their excellent geometry and on-trail performance, and by the looks of things Transition's motto of 'Rider Owned For Life' is paying off.

What's next for the company? Want to know what the best part about owning your own bike business is? The worst? Curious about what goes into designing a new bike? Company owners Kyle Young and Kevin Menard, along with Sam Burkhardt, Darrin Seeds, Chris Pascucci and Lars Sternberg will all be on hand to answer your burning questions beginning at 10:00am Pacific on Thursay, June 11th.




The Panel

Transition Bikes
(L to R) Kyle Young, Kevin Menard, and Sam Burkhardt.

Kyle Young - Owner/Business Operations & Product Director

Has a business and tech background so he knows his way around a calculator and a server which is very helpful in the bike industry. He is also a former competitive freestyle BMX competitor which makes "Rad" his favorite movie, especially the dance scene.

Kevin Menard - Owner/Sales & Marketing Director

Used to work for a recumbent bicycle manufacturer (All those under the age of 25 please take this time to Google what a recumbent is) where he fell in love with the process of building bikes. Can be found racing singlespeed cross as well as enduro but considers riding his DH bike in Whistler one of the happiest places on earth.

Sam Burkhardt - Product Manager/International Sales Manager

Also known as Samsquatch due to his very linear movements in the forest. Sam has a long history in the bicycle industry working for shops and components makers before coming to Transition. When Sam isn't riding his mountain bikes he enjoys his other two wheeled hobby twisting the throttle on his KTM.


Transition Bikes
(L to R) Darrin Seeds, Chris Pascucci, and Lars Sternberg.

Darrin Seeds - Industrial Designer

Graduate of local Bellingham Western Washington University, Darrin took a hiatus from the town he loves to go work for Gerber (think knives, not babies). The siren song of Bellingham's loamy trails brought him back and his outspoken personality make him a perfect fit for the Transition family.

Chris Pascucci - Inventory Manager/Canada Dealer Sales Manager

A true East Coast Italian that goes by the name Scuch and has a substantial history working for bike shops around the country. A master of trails riding, he was drawn to the North Shore where he obsessed over skinny riding and hoping up and down large logs. When he is not ratcheting around the forest on his bike you can find him on a river with his fly rod.

Lars Sternberg - Marketing Project Manager/Pro Rider/Sponsorship Coordinator

AKA Lars n' Bars, he grew up in Reno Nevada where he traveled through the ranks of BMX racing to pro status. It wasn't long before a move to the Pacific Northwest got him on his first mountain bike and a love affair with DH bikes. Nowadays Lars is focused on enduroing as much as he can, helping to develop and market rad products and traveling as much as his wife will allow him.



How ‘Ask Us Anything' Works:

Starting at 10:00 AM PST/6:00 PM BST on Thursday, June 11th Transition Bikes will have a go at answering your questions. Sometimes your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a while, as they will be busy responding to the flood of questions. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously. To make the process as efficient as possible, try to follow these simple guidelines:

Stay focused. Try to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later.

• Try to keep your questions to about 100 words.

Ask Us Anything is a service to PB readers who are seeking helpful information, not a forum to broadcast opinions or grievances. If you do have a negative issue that you want to ask about, no worries, just keep your complaints relevant and in the context of a question so that it can be addressed in a productive manner.

Use propping to acknowledge good - or not so good - questions. Bump them up or down to where they belong.

Mark your calendars - the conversation starts at 10:00 AM Pacific Time / 6:00 PM British Time on Thursday, June 11th.

Other time zones:
• 1:00 PM EST (New York)
• 6:00 PM BST (London)
• 7:00 PM CET (Paris)
• 8:00 PM SAST (Cape Town)
• 3:00 AM AEST June 12(Sydney, Aus)
• 5:00 AM NZST June 12 (Auckland, NZ)



www.transitionbikes.com / @TransitionBikeCompany

Must Read This Week

470 Comments

  • + 76
 Hey Transition, will you be jumping on Boost 148 bandwagon? Because if so, don't.
  • - 25
flag harrisonscottson89 (Jun 11, 2015 at 4:27) (Below Threshold)
 Neg Prop me all you want but innovation will always come depending wether you want it or not, Look at Thru axels, the XD Driver, Tapered Headsets. I agree new standards suck, but theres nothing we can do, Boost 148 and Boost 110 is coming. At the end of the day the industry will continue to support older standards, How many people will it really effect? Honestly not many.
  • + 19
 decreasing the rear axle length by 2 mm will not make a single difference to how your bike rides, despite companies telling you the opposite. Slackening the head angle by 2 degrees WILL make a difference for example. Constantly changing the configurations of axles and this and that etc. makes it really hard for loads of people to find replacements in years to come... Just give me a 20mm axle up front and a 150 out back and i'm happy; even if bike companies tell me its 2% more flexy than the newest design...
  • + 55
 "Innovations" and "improvements" in bike features and technologies can come in all shapes and sizes. Sometimes a change can make a 1% or 0.01% improvement in a bikes strength, stiffness, radness or overall function. It might not seem like much, but add up all those changes and your bike becomes better. We have seen it happen time and time again... tapered steerers, even 20mm axles instead of QR axle, and then later the 15mm compromise. Humans have a natural resistance to change, and that is a good thing. But for bikes to improve, they need to change. In general you won't see Transition leading the charge on "new standards" because we don't want you... the buyer... to have a hard time. But Boost 148 is coming... and wider flanges and wider chainline do provide some improvements for bike design. Does it benefit us to suddenly change all our current models... no. Could it help us make better bikes in the future... probably. So you won't see is swapping everything to 148 overnight... but I can't say we wouldn't take advantage of what it offers us on future projects. But in typical Transition fashion... we won't be in a hurry. We would only sell you a bike with 148 if the parts are easy for you to find. No point in being first just to say we did it first. --Sam
  • + 22
 @Benread, what we can do is not buy the dumb parts. I've been not-buying a new bike so hard over the last couple of years that with the money I've saved I've been on adventures to Iceland, the French/Swiss Alps (twice) and Crete with my bike. Much better value for money!
  • + 8
 Let be honest. 15mm is a terrible compromise.
  • + 9
 Thanks for the reply. In regard to the .01- 1% improvements, it seems companies need to determine whether or not the change is enough to buy into at all, not when they will buy into it. It makes sense to me you'd get an OEM price break to spec their new "tech".

Humans have a natural resistance to bullshit, not change.
  • + 25
 @juanbendedknee that is always the struggle. We adopted 142 pretty early on because it made sense and we could tell that it would be the defacto standard for the upcoming years. But you make those choices early... before most people on Pinkbike had even heard of 142. So it is a gamble. But I will say no one is getting any OEM price break for deciding to use 148... generally speaking any new tech takes money for manufacturers at every step of the chain to implement. So tooling costs to make new hubs would mean that the long standing 135/142 hub will probably be cheaper then the newly introduced 148 version that the maker paid money to tool up. And there is no over arching bicycle industry payola dishing out rebate checks to ever company that decides to play along with there latest scheme. Any company using 148 is doing because they 1) saw a benefit in their bike for using it or 2) thought they needed help selling their bike with another latest and greatest feature.

In our case we have no immediate need, and we don't like acronyms and selling features that don't have a real benefit to you. --Sam
  • + 1
 ^^^ This is awesome. Thanks, Sam!
  • + 0
 @TransitionBikeCompany you say we have a resistance to change. It is partly true, but we embrace things we think is worth spending money on; such as a Dropper Post, the Rock Shox Maxle and wider bars. We don't, like @juanbendedknee says, embrace things that are pointless. You also say that every little bit counts, but in actual fact it does not. Most people ride for fun. Changing axle sizes by a couple of mm's can not be felt on the trail (you guys use high tech machines to calculate the difference) and will not in any way make you a better rider.
  • + 54
 Will we see carbon versions of your new line up in 2016?
  • + 202
 specifically the klunker
  • - 57
flag Matt76 (Jun 10, 2015 at 14:51) (Below Threshold)
 Hopefully never....we don't need carbon. Please Transition stick with making great quality affordable aluminium frames. Thank you!
  • + 25
 @Matt76 Stop! We get it, you don't want carbon, but maybe other people may want it. There is no harm in offering an option of Carbon while keeping an aluminum option. Now stop spamming the comments, thanks.
  • + 0
 @Matt76 its a shame that you use carbon to protect your own aluminum bike.
  • + 2
 If he used carbon maybe he would be able to pry that aluminum bar out of his butt. We all know it's so stuck in there that the extra strength would be necessary.
  • + 2
 @Matt76, please inform yourself. Carbon fibre is not universally better for everything but neither is it worse. You need the correct application and process to make it work. Bike frames are a great application, and a lot of manufacturers do great things. If you buy some $100 dollar carbon rims for Ebay are you going to compare them to a V10C? Exactly. Transition are a solid company and could probably make some killer carbon frames if they wanted too. Then we can all enjoy riding them while you can continue to buy the alloy versions.
  • - 4
flag jaame (Jun 10, 2015 at 19:26) (Below Threshold)
 @Matt76 affordable?
  • + 14
 probably you need max commencal to talk again about carbon.
  • + 4
 @Matt76 I have a Covert Carbon and that thing is crazy good. It wasn't "that" expensive either. If a carbon Patrol comes along then my wallet will be opened.
  • - 1
 isnt the operator (DH) carbon
  • - 2
 carbon is just so hot right now
  • + 2
 Make a steel Patrol.
  • + 3
 Titanium!
  • + 37
 Rocky-mtn-gman (20 hours ago)
specifically the klunker

Carbon Klunker, for real? C'mon dude Steel is real. We may as well put gears and disc brakes on it then and make it E-fat... LarsNbars
  • + 2
 carbon re-pack with old school foam pads on top tube so i don't bust my noots.
  • + 38
 We have done carbon before with our Covert, and at this point, it is no secret that some projects are in the works. Exact timing and models I can't really talk about right now. Anything we do in carbon will be top quality, and it takes time and money to do that. We are smaller company, so don't expect a ton of things at once. There are two major things I have seen happening for a while now... a push for everything to be cheaper and for everything to be carbon. Unfortunately the cost of carbon raw material is only going up... and the improvements in construction techniques are requiring more and more tooling costs. By all logic, carbon bikes should be getting more and more expensive... not cheaper. But people want cheaper bikes, and I think you are seeing a lot of second rate carbon bikes being sold with crappy builds to hit a price. And people love them because they are plastic with little fibers in them, but the parts in the build are terrible and the overall package is not a quality bike. We only want to sell you a carbon bike if it is top quality, and it will be more expensive than our aluminum bikes. But we would love to continue to offer quality aluminum bikes for lower and lower prices with a quality build. As you see more carbon coming, don't expect it to replace aluminum. Both materials will have their place and they will hit a variety of prices. --Sam
  • - 3
 @TransitionBikeCompany, can you speak to the precise occasion and kinds of projects that are in the works?

Thanks!
  • + 1
 This is why I buy Transition Bikes, they work!!! I own a BottleRocket and just added a Scout to my stable and cannot be any happier with both of them! You can tell the bikes were well thought out.
  • - 3
 I've owned a Transition Double and its one of the best bikes I've ever owned, very good memories of it too. Amazing thing was it was faster on the DH's than my Trek Session... Made of metal too!! ;-)
  • - 3
 @ibishreddin It's the only thing it's good for. The reason why I used it is that carbon shatters catastrophically so thus absorbing the impact better by distributing the energy. Best to break the cloth and glue 1st rather than dent the metal. P.S that bike was sold a while back.
  • + 3
 Great reply @TransitionBikeCompany many thanks and keep the awesome aluminium and carbon bikes coming!
  • + 49
 I ordered a derailleur hanger and it arrived in a box that could hold at least a 100 derailleur hangers. Did you run out of small boxes or was it a prank?
  • + 2
 standardisation ...
  • + 23
 It probably cost the same to ship it in that box vs a bag...and in the end we would choose the more reliable, least likely to get lost type of packaging for something like that. you'd be surprised how many postal envelopes with der hangers get lost in shipping..... -kyle
  • + 7
 You should have put my stickers in a box! Never showed up. lol.
  • + 28
 Not to mention... we can order and keep one standard box to cut down on packaging inventory. Most web orders are larger than a single hanger Wink Next time buy a t-shirt too! --Sam
  • + 3
 Bring back "I ride with cam" & I'll buy a T-shirt, I lost too much weight to fit my old one. Razz
  • + 0
 I would love a sticker too Do you offer any hometown discounts Smile
  • + 35
 If I buy a typical modern "Enduro" Bike right now, which part of it is gonna be drastically outdated first and when is that gonna be? I mean how can anything on a 650b, 1x11, 13kg, 160mm, dropper post, tubeless ready bike possibly be drastically outdated in between the next 10 years, right...

I always have trouble thinking of what's gonna be the "next big thing" and come to the conclusion there isn't gonna be anything in the near future. I then continue buying a bike and half a year later I realize that it should actually be unridable buy then because its wheels are to small, it has a front derailleur und tubes in its tires.

So if if I would buy a Patrol frame right now for example, would I be kicking myself in 1.5 years from now because it wasn't clear to me that square shaped wheels would come up and they don't fit my frame or what and when would it be that I could consider that Patrol bike outdated if you would have to make a guess? Because right now I really cant think of anything that could be that drastically improved in the next few years...but I know thats not true and some marketing hype will get me probably sooner than later...

The bike industry is literally making me afraid to buy a new bike. It got almost as bad as the PC stuff.
  • + 7
 Also start making new better components that are compatible with old components, so I don't need a whole new drivetrain if I want a new rear deraillure
  • + 5
 if you know what you need to ride like you want -> buy the right bike and the components and don't care about the industry (they do whatever they want, no matter what you think)
  • + 8
 @mirskeinereingefalln Have you tried square wheels?? You can stop and take a break anywhere on an uphill without rolling backwards! When these hit the market, you won't be able to find round wheels anymore!
  • + 30
 I think people sweat the everchangingstandards thing a little too much. We see both sides of it too - adaptation has made modern mountain bikes what they are and we stand behind the need for innovation and change, but at the same time we looks at plenty of new idea's and standards with a raised brow too. Ultimately, spend less time worrying about what's coming out next and get the bike that's available now and you like. You wont kick yourself in two years for buying a new Patrol now, you'll be too busy having fun. If you always wait around for the next best thing, you're just going to wait forever. - Chris
  • + 44
 Your bike is only outdated and unridable if you think it is. People have ridden some of the gnarliest stuff out there on bikes that we would now consider "outdated". We are in business to sell you stuff.... no doubt about it. And new stuff will probably make riding more fun for you, and that would make us stoked. But that doesn't mean you wouldn't still be having fun on your 2 year old bike. And when that bike becomes a 4, 5 or 6 year old bike and it is REALLY time for an upgrade, we will still be here. For some people it's about the gear, which is OK too. But eventually everyone will need a new bike and it should be better than their old one. Here in Bellingham, I know a lot of solid riders that don't pay any attention to technology. A friend of mine, Gil is still riding a 90's Stinky with torn and taped saddle, no dropper post, narrow bars and mismatched non lock-on grips worn through to the aluminum, but he keeps up just fine with all the people on new bikes. It's all about having fun in the woods, new bike or old. --Sam
  • + 2
 Couldn't agree more, there is always too much negativity in these comments. Having so much choice on bikes these days has to be more positive than negative. I have just bought a Scout and a TR500 and effing love them. Can't imagine not having fun on them for the next 3-5 years. They will be fixed when broken and only updated when I think enhancing my experience out weighs the costs. You don't have to upgrade a bike every time a new bit of kit comes out, find a bike you like, ride it and have fun, once you are not having fun, repeat
  • + 30
 Hi, I dont see anyone specifically called "engineer" on the ask me anything panel, do you guys do your engineering / mechanical design (think material stress analysis etc.) in house? If so, how do you determine what loading conditions a new bike will face? What safety factor is applied?
  • + 0
 and may I add, how this loads compare between differerent disciplines
  • + 38
 yea we don't have anyone here with the title "engineer". i guess that's my "role" here but i'll shed some light on how it works with us....

when setting out to bring a bike to market, you have to have a multitude of skillsets to do it. it takes product mgmt, industrial design, engineering (which can include materials, mechanical, etc), modeling, fabrication. We are a small company of 10 people so we all wear many hats. I act as the head of product, Sam is the product manager, Darrin is the industrial designer, i do a lot of the modeling, and production is outsourced. WIthin the engineering role, there are many things to be done. We are equiped to do the mechanical engineering and the modeling in-house and for some projects we do all this work in-house. for some other projects we will bring in other professionals with specific skillsets to get the job done. For example when we set out to design our giddy-up bikes we knew we wanted something specific so we brought in Luke from sotto design to help us dial that part in. We also sometimes use outside resources for the modeling part of the project. We are probably at the point where we should bring in more engineering resource in house but honestly we feel like we have solid resources that we can utilize depending on the projects specific requirements. This allows us to be flexible, and be able to benefit from a wider skillset than if we had 1 engineer sitting here in house.

With respect to material stress analysis, we are able to perform computer testing in house as well as going further with it with outside resources. Also, on the manufacturing side, we must test each product against specific standards (the same as every bike brand) and ultimately we can choose how far we safety factor each product. typically we test everything against the DH standard and then we have a few extra machine tests we perform. Picking safety factors can be difficult as the standard tests are pretty easy to pass so knowing how far to push a product past that is tough. Typically we look at the high stress areas (headtube junction) and apply FOS to that + perform additional tests beyond the standard tests to ensure those areas hold up. Coming up with these tests and FOS is a collaborative effort between us and our manufacturing partners and is product specific. Ultimately we both have to stand behind the product so we take a lot of care to ensure we go above and beyond in this area.

-kyle
  • + 5
 Thanks for the great answer Kyle.
  • + 4
 Just curious, do you guys test ride competitor bikes?
  • + 27
 How devastating was it to your small company to invest so much time and money in to developing and releasing a 26" carbon Covert, only for the industry to turn around the same year as its release and push 27.5" so hard? Had you hoped that carbon frame would be a long-term investment? Did you lose a lot of money on that bike? Did what happened with the wheel-size shift scare you off for a few years, is that the reason it's taken three more years to see your next offering as you were waiting for the industry to stabilize?
  • + 6
 It was alluded to elsewhere, but shame this didn't get a more insightful answer @TransitionBikeCompany
  • + 1
 I have a carbon covert and I love it. I always wondered why it disappeared so quick.
  • + 24
 Did you know about the horst link patent running out and decide you wanted to build your next models with it OR were you in the process of redesigning the range (as.obviously its not a overnight job) when it came available and you thought "mmm, you know what we should use this".
  • + 1
 I'd also be interested to know this. For how long were you working on a Horst Link design, and did you have it nailed down just waiting for the day it expired, then SURPRISE new bike range?
  • + 33
 For sure, we starting working on the GiddyUp bikes about 2 1/2 years ago knowing the patent was not going to be extended...We've always been fans of HORST's design so it was a perfect platform for us to "tweak" to get the performance and function we looking for. Not to mention the amazing play on words...ie HORST, and people call it HORSE....Where do you think we came up with GiddyUp. -Darrin
  • + 5
 Im just going to say it -- thats a brilliant answer
  • + 22
 How much further can MTB geometry go? Will we reach a point where "Race bikes" for the pros will be a struggle to ride compared to more conservative geometry? And also what happened to a series of geometry articles by Transition that were supposed to be appearing on the Internet?
  • + 6
 Yes I'm interested in Lars answering this one too. Or is a super long reach and wheelbase beneficial to all skill levels?
  • + 10
 Ohh man. This is a tough one. At the moment I think we are still within a reasonable realm of usable geometry for professionals and regular riders. Currently it seems location plays a much bigger part in geo functionality than anything else. Our Patrol shares very similar geo numbers to the Iron Horse Sunday which back in 2005 had some very progressive geo for a DH bike. Now those same numbers are somewhat standard for more aggressive trailbikes. It's all about progression, within reason. As for the articles, we've been fairly wrapped up with other projects. We have some follow up's in the works, it might just take till Fall when things slow down a bit to dedicate the time necessary to do them properly. Good to hear you liked it though! - LarsNbars
  • + 2
 Yes,yes they are beneficial for all levels. We mountainbikers are the only ones making such foolish distinctions. Look at any other sport. There are no beginner mx-bikes, no beginner race cars, nothing. Literally every other sport uses just ONE specific and optimal tool for the job. Now guess why that is. Because it's a sport. It's about pushing your limits. If you can't even handle a bike because you are a beginner, get better! Improve yourself and don't castrate the poor bike just to make up for your own shortcomings. There is only one optimal tool, be it for beginner or pro. No blacksmith would use a light hammer just because he can't wield the one that is required for the job. Bike geometry is no different. There is an optimum. It's up to us to make it work to it's full capability!
  • + 1
 I agree with a lot of what you are saying, but I don't want our sport to become elitist with the attitude that "you aren't a mountain biker because you can't ride this bike" and also I feel there are steps up in other sports, for example not many MXers go straight to 450s and similarly no drivers go straight to F1
  • + 1
 Progressive geometry is the future IMO with different measurements to reflect styles, such as what is seen in BMX. Canyon is one of the most forward thinking companies with both Race and normal geometry on the Strive
  • + 1
 Of course, that´s not what i was trying to say.
It´s not about being a real mountainbiker or elitism. I´m just fed up with people who can´t ride, blaming it on their bikes and then go on telling other people how bike xyz is bad because it handles like crap. "I totally missed that corner because of those freakishly long chainstays! If only they were 3mm shorter i´d totally cleared that!" You know what i mean? Wink
I have seen too many beginners given bad advice in forums to get a "beginner" bike, when in reality the person giving the advice was either just a bad rider/beginner themselves or the advice was given looking down on the beginner like "you should get the cheaper bike. You as a beginner won´t be able to appreciate the better bike anyways!"
Like i said, even beginners can benefit from the better design, i f they are willing to adapt to it.
As we are talking sports here, in my opinion, adaptation is just a necessary part of it.

F1 or 450ccm isn´t exactly comparable. It´s just different categories. There are incredibly good sportsmen in the "lower" categories of those sports who just chose to stay there for various reasons (mostly because they just wanna have fun i guess^^)

Bringing engines size into this is different imho.
Those enable higher speeds, demanding more from the rider. Plain and simple, you are quite right there.
I was however more talking about the chassis design/damping on cars or motos, as those compare more directly to what we have on a mtb. Should have made that more clear :-)
I think comparing engine sizes in different leagues is much more comparable to going from cross country riding to enduro and then downhill.
However, if we compare 450ccm mx-bikes in among themselves, they are quite similar.
  • + 0
 The Canyon "sizing approach" imho is much more of a marketing trick.
If you compare the "M-Pro" to the "L-normal" they are quite similar. So basically, a racer could just upsize and basically get the same bike.
I read an article somewhere, in which the author states that he struggled to find the bike that suited him because across the two Canyon sizing ranges there were too many similar bikes, albeit branded as different sizes. Don´t remember where the article was though.
  • + 1
 Ok I understand where you're coming from regarding geo for beginners it is better for them to learn on appropriate bikes because the speeds and risks are substantially lower than in motorsports, and I know the canyon model isn't perfect but it was just an example of a company being prepared to think outside of normal sizing parameters.
  • + 0
 Yeah, motorsports was probably not the best example^^
Should have gone for skiing. There are beginner skis, but they are not good skis for anyone who wants to do more than slide down a hill, but instead take it as a challenge to his/her personal abilities.
Then again, and this is just my personal opinion, one should not engage in any potentially dangerous sport (as most outdoor sports are inherently dangerous) if he or she is not in it with all they got (meaning to strive for personal improvement). Reason being, that it makes a dangerous activity even more dangerous if you are not good at it and don´t try to get better.
So giving untrained people a false sense of security is not what any company, that cares about making great products, should aim for.
Instead, make great products that work as optimal as possible for the intended purpose, not bolster customers egos by making it seem easy until they (literally) hit a brickwall in their progression Big Grin
  • + 1
 "Reason being, that it makes a dangerous activity even more dangerous if you are not good at it and don´t try to get better." In this sense don't you feel that certain "beginner" bikes should be more conservative to allow them to push until they realise they need a longer and or burlier bike? ( me being a prime example having just ordered a new stumpjumper to replace my rockhopper Smile )
  • + 2
 I don´t think that is what beginner bikes do.
They trick you into thinking everything is fine, because you do not progress. They let you be faster than your buddies on the local flow trail, where really any bike would be manageable.
On the subject of longer toptubes for example. I can´t tell how often my long downhill bike has saved my ass from going over the bars. Maybe i´m a little slower in the corners, but me being an average rider, i do very much appreciate this added safety. Same goes for the slack headangle. Saved me countless times.
The other thing is, on a small bike you do not have much room to move, therefore the chances for a fatal (meaning going over the bars) mistake are much higher.
This results in beginners riding with very poor technique and wrong body position on the bike (because they are scared and try to compensate for the bike by bringing their weight way back behind the saddle), which in return limits their ability to handle the bike like it´s supoosed to
--> insecure and slow
On a more aggressive bike, the bike limits their speed, but they still get the advantage of the added security.
All in all i´d much rather crash in a tight corner at slow speed (because that´s when those aggressive geos overpower a beginner) than in a high speed rockgarden, a jump or go over the bars (because that´s where those geometries shine and safe your ass).
At least that´s my thinking.
  • + 1
 Your point is perfect about where you'd want to crash but beginners in my experience don't start by riding trails that are gnarly or sketchy enough to justify extreme geometry, I do believe long geometry is better for "serious" riders but beginners on flow trails? It's not as important
  • + 1
 To clarify this. Flow trails do not qualify as a basis for design decisions on any mtb-geometry imho Wink
Like i said, those things could be ridden by my grandma in her wheelchair.
My point stands, as soon as terrain gets even remotely challenging, aggressive geo is superior.
If terrain isn´t challenging, who the f*ck cares about the bikes geometry?! Wink

And of course, beginners don´t start on those trails. But sure enough they transition to them relatively soon. Like, half a season of riding should be plenty to alleviate their skillset to the required level.
I would not invest money into a bike which i will be riding for less than half a year.
  • + 1
 Well played sir, long extreme bikes for all! Smile
  • + 21
 Sorry one more carbon question. Not really a question. Please look at making a Smuggler in carbon, no one does a bike with similar geometry that comes close. The Following looks good but is shorter and higher size for size. A 5.5-6lb version of the Smuggler would be the best all round trail bike money could buy, and would sell like hot cakes I just know it. P.s all the new bikes have been amazing, top job.
  • + 11
 Carbon Smuggler - take my money!
  • + 2
 Sooo much fun to ride . I have been owning my small size for some months and the more i ride it the more i like it. I am looking forward to being able to buy the carbon version and just for a nicer touch to add a dbinline
  • + 12
 We have a lot of carbon projects in the works right now. We can't go into details about specific ones and dates but we are working really hard and are pretty excited. Carbon is a huge part of product direction but we aren't going to rush any projects to market. All we can say is wink wink, you will be stoked with what is coming down the road. - kevin
  • + 22
 I'd love a Carbon Smuggler too!!! - LarsNbars
  • + 4
 Did i say how much i love my Scout
  • + 1
 That smuggler is the steeziest 29er I've ever ridden. Carries frightening amounts of speed and takes drops like a champ. Never thought I could rally a 29er like that, but Transition makes it possible for a 110mm travel to feel like a 160mm. Also that Patrol is so aggo it's silly.
Say hi to Dave Wink Whats up DCON!
Yay Transition
  • + 19
 Just like the article says, I would be interested to know what the best and worst parts of owning and running your own bike company are. Thanks
  • + 29
 Best Parts:
1. Working with awesome employees that Kyle and I consider all close personal friends.
2. Owning a bike company forces us to ride our bikes more. Even though we are super busy you have to take time out to ride on a regular basis and continue to push yourself so you don't loose touch with what is happening with riders all over the world.
3. Travel. Both Kyle and I will agree that worldwide travel is a true passion. Being able to do that with a bike and get work done at the same time is a magical combination.
4. Being able to use your creativity to mold and shape a brand is something that never gets old. The mountain bike industry is an extremely competitive industry and that challenge is what makes it fun.


Worst Parts:
1. Lawyers
2. Stress. This one goes up and down but as an owner everything is on your shoulders and it is a battle to keep everyone happy from your family to the IRS
3. Changing Standards. Like when we launched the 26" Carbon Covert right when 27.5 got introduced.
4. Keeping our Kitchen and fridge clean

- kevin
  • + 4
 Cheers guys, appreciate the response
  • + 8
 I would suggest that you don't stress about having released the 26" carbon covert when you did. I love mine and wouldn't trade it for anything else.
  • + 1
 If lawyers are number 1 on the shit list you may need a different one, happy to introduce you to a few Smile
  • + 9
 I would amend Kevin's answer on #1. It isn't lawyers we dislike (we actually have a great lawyer that is a friend that also rides bikes)...it's really the reason for needing lawyers that sucks. i answered another question here about how we price bikes....and i forgot to mention the part about defending lawsuits that makes bikes more expensive. lame but true.....
-kyle
  • + 17
 You can come in here and answer questions we ask, or we can play my game, my rules. You come in here and I'll answer the question you didn't know you were asking: Yes the highlighter lime/yellow TR250 was the greatest bike of all time. Thank you for asking.
  • + 43
 My real question: The diamond stitched seats you used to sell on the TR250's chapped my gooch really bad when I rode it. Are you guys proud of that?
  • + 95
 Pics or it didn't happen.
  • + 18
 How much Giddy Up could a Giddy Up Giddy Up if a Giddy Up could Giddy up?
  • + 1
 You owe me a coke...
  • + 26
 If a Giddy Up could Giddy Up, a Giddy Up would Giddy Up as much as a Giddy Up could. Which is a lot... - LarsNbars
  • + 3
 Horst would be AMP'ed at all the Giddying up Wink
  • + 14
 What happened to C.O.C.K. and B.A.L.L.S. technology? ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb8341172/p4pb8341172.jpg

I understand it is probably hard to put your COCK and BALLS into each bike that you make, but something about it just made them special.

Will you have any COCK and/or BALLS to show us in the future?

Thanks,

The world.
  • + 9
 We feel we exposed the world to C.O.C.K and B.A.L.L.S more than enough and look forward to new innovations and technologies that will be changing games and optimizing riding experience to exponential levels. - kevin
  • + 18
 That was great stuff! Like many things in life, that was conceived in a van. In this particular case, a van driving to the Dirt Magazine office in Monmouth, UK. We were just flipping through magazines and laughing at all the ridiculous marketing BS that a lot of (especially Euro) companies put on their bikes. We started joking around about coming up with acronyms that would spell out other words... and this one worked out too good not to use. Using that stuff in our actual marketing was total tongue in cheek, and it helped us to remember that super rad trip to the UK and reminded us that selling bikes should be fun. --Sam
  • + 15
 What does transition think of the consumer direct model? Industry game changer? Also Lars you got any #enduro edits coming out this summer?
  • + 1
 Yea. . . Just look down the road at the new Kona store. Is that what you had in mind and Kona just beat you to it?
  • + 12
 We are 100% committed to our dealer and distributor network. It has been really successful for us so there is no reason to change. If the entire industry started moving that way then it is something we would have to consider for sure. For the style of bikes we make and the price and complexity of building them, a bike shop is absolutely key to providing a good customer experience.

Regarding the Kona shop it is cool to see them trying a new model in their home market. We are moving into our new building in Bellingham not far from them in August and will have a full demo fleet and showroom and encourage people to stop by and try a bike out.

- kevin
  • + 13
 since you consider your company to be proud of supporting the riders who ride your frames, how come you guys only give a 2 year frame warranty?
  • + 22
 There's a life span to every product and true defects in workmanship should reveal themselves within that time frame. Which is why we also provide original owners with a lifetime crash replacement program, so that any issues caused by non-defective products don't leave you completely high and dry. - Chris
  • + 10
 Where is Cam? Does he still work for your company? I am a local bartender and he left his debit card here over a year ago. I have left 17 messages for him, but his mailbox is now full. He has an outstanding charge for $147.00 plus tip. He ordered 14 PBR tall boys, 7 Peruvian Bear F@ckers, and two shrimp cocktails to go. Please have him contact me at Cap Hansen's.
  • + 6
 You forgot the crabs he got there too. - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Two words: Pocket Shrimp
  • + 8
 Dude wicked bikes. i love love my Smuggler it's epic. Best bike in the world

HOWEVER

Why for the love of God did you design the seat stay brace on the smuggler so close to the tire? You have all the width in the world, but the hight is the limit. This I think was a big mistake. 29x2.35 can't even fit Frown

Also I have heard 27.5 plus tires can fit. Which rims and tire do I need to make this happen


Cheers

James
  • + 3
 I also have interest in this ^^^^^. I am currently living in quebec canada, near MSA, and we have some treacherous terrain, and the need for more durable and large volume tires are a must or you will be changing rims every ride....can you speak to the design of your 29er and the lack of available tires that are needed in a more durable DH style casing or am i better to go 27.5 and wait till the 29er has advaced more!?
  • + 5
 It's a fine line getting proper tire clearance while maintaining short chainstays, chainring clearance and stiffness....Let's just say we are very aware of that and will be addressing it, it really depends on the tire manufacturer too, with rim widths all over the place and tire volume and proportions being so different it's difficult to fit them all. I've been running Minion EXO DHR's 2.35 with plenty of clearance and durability to answer Bird-Man's Q.

As for the hot topic of +....we have tested it on the Smuggler with Stans HUGO 52 and WTB Trailblazer 2.8 and it does work....if that's what you're into. -Darrin
  • + 1
 awsome thanks
  • + 5
 I would add that the Stans Hugo 52 rim and WTB Trailblazer 2.8 tire combo does "work" but the width is pushing it and you will see some rub on the rubber chainstay protector. Not to mention it will lower your already low BB a little bit more. --Sam
  • + 7
 With the biking industry becoming more and more "suit and tie," what do you attribute to your success and ever growing fan base? I have a few ideas but I'd be curious to hear your perspective.

Side note, every bike I've had gets compared to the Bottlerocket. Not the lightest, fastest or most efficient, but I have yet to find a bike that made me want to ride it more than that one!
  • + 12
 We generally don't sit around scheming for ways to make fans or sell more bikes to be honest....We just all happen to be very passionate about riding them and creating good products to have fun on, that's really it. I think this sort of transparency shows in our videos etc, and people see and connect more on a personal level. For example, we just did the Whistler Outerbike demo last weekend....I'm pretty sure there aren't a lot of bike companies that you could demo a bike from and get setup with the guy that designed it or by one of the owners. -Darrin
  • + 1
 Thanks for the response! Next thing I have to figure out is Patrol or Scout. Keep up the awesome work!
  • + 11
 suit and tie is news to me. personally I got into this game so I didn't have to wear a suit and tie (or khakis, ewwww).

but yea, what Darrin said. we're just being ourselves and doing what we do and having a blast along the way. I think people want to associate with other people having a good time.
-kyle
  • + 1
 For the record, this works. I bought a Patrol after demoing at Outerbike in Moab. I'm not the fastest rider, nor am I the strongest or most dedicated. But I ride bikes for fun, and being able to see a fun company creating a fun bike, all while not taking any of it too seriously is a good portion of the reason I chose to buy from you guys. Keep it up.
  • + 7
 I am so happy with my TR500 but why the TR500 has a 26" geometry? I use it with the 27,5" geometry with the 26's. The other bikes in the market have a slacker geometry and more wheelbase for 650b, what do you think about keep the bike with a 26's geometry but sell it with 650b wheels?

Cheers
  • + 8
 I love my new patrol but my cables rattle inside the frame, specifically the seatpost cable. Why didn't you guys incorporate sleeves or a tensioning system? It's the only thing I could ask to be better.
  • + 1
 why internal cables at all?
  • + 1
 The internal routing on the Patrol was leagues easier to setup than the Covert, but still un-necessarily difficult. I would still love to see sleeves for both easier setup and silencing.
  • + 6
 The hot "pro build" is to buddy up your rear brake and rear derailleur cable with a section of heat shrink and run that inside the frame. It keeps the section from your frame to the bar looking really clean and the two cables together inside the frame will rattle less. For the Reverb/dropper... some people pull all the extra cable out of the frame an make sure the front zip tie is snug, others will take the extra dropper post cable and make sure it is pushed into the frame a bit so the cable is fully pushed against the tube. One direction or the other and it should be possible to get rid of most of the noise. My personal bike is virtually silent and it looks extra clean and tidy. --Sam
  • + 8
 Another way - we have been using 6mm inner pipe insulation for builds, feed it over before the forks go in - totally silent frame. Doesn't absorb water and super light, still possible to change cables etc without taking the forks out. Shame we ran out when I did my own...
  • + 1
 Interesting. Going to need to try and find some of that in Canada...
  • + 6
 Hey! I really like your bikes, in fact I bought 10 of them this year! I really like the Giddy Up suspension and the name, too! I have a little daughter and she has a horse and loves them but also wants a bike. She likes the new 24" Ripcord but she hates the colors. She wants a 24" bike with Giddy Up suspension and she wants it painted pink and she wants it to say My Little Pony on it. Can you make it happen for her? Thanks!
  • + 21
 oh i'd love to do a my little pony themed bike. let's do it! send us your idea and let's strip one down and paint it and decal it up. maybe we'll do an adult sized bike in that same scheme too. i'd ride that! -kyle
  • + 8
 Super cereal: you gotta post pics of this when done.
  • + 2
 Please do!
  • + 6
 Hey guys! I have a slightly different question, you are bike designers and builders, how does one get into a profession like that? I am almost graduated from High School and I would love to spend my life designing bicycles. I assume an engeneering degree and studying metal and composite technology would be a good start. Thanks for any info you can give!

P.S. your bikes rule!
  • + 7
 It depends if you're really good at math or drawing...ideally both, although this is pretty rare. Do you like geeking out about suspension kinematics or the way a frame looks. I have Bachelor of Science Degree in Industrial Design, with this a strong base in Engineering with a focus on the creative side, and yes I spend all day designing/creating and thinking about bicycles. I would suggest picking up Solidworks and sketching a lot -Darrin
  • + 3
 Thanks Darrin! I am already taking drafting and CAD classes but I am only average at freehand drawing. I definitely trend towards geeking out about geometry, kimematics, and technical stuff, but aesthetics are very interesting to me as well. Thanks again for your answers!
  • + 6
 @HaydenBeck - getting to know people within the industry will go along ways. Like most things in life, a lot of it comes down to who you know. Work hard, pay attention, be friendly with everyone and work your way through bike shops and other related jobs. Being passionate about bikes is key. It is pretty rare for someone to step out of college and go directly in to an "industry" job... usually it takes some time to figure out the path that makes the most sense for you. --Sam
  • + 7
 My bike shop has been trying to get response from your warrenty people for two weeks about my broken Covert frame.Can you please hurry, wont be long and winter will be here again.
  • + 13
 I'm sitting about 12 feet away from Blake who handles all of our warranty cases. He's here from 9-5 Monday - Friday, and bust's his ass making sure all of our customers are taken care of. I would suggest sending him a polite email to warranty@transitionbikes.com to help him connect the dot's of your claim and your shop, and get it taken care of. I guarantee if they've actually been in touch with him he's responded to them somehow. Sorry for the hassle, sometimes shops are mega pinned and there are multiple people dealing with one thing and things slip. We're here everyday, so feel free to get in touch with us directly anytime!

-LarsNbars
  • + 11
 I had a similar issue:
Last year I sent my Grand Mal in for warranty and some guy named Mike sent me a post it saying "congratulations" stuck to a stack of gay porn instead of a replacement frame? Is that your normal warranty return policy? You could have just told me the bike out of warranty and offered me a discount on a new frame. My next bike will be a Kona. I hear they are pretty much just like my old bike anyway...
  • + 1
 ^ this is hilarious
  • + 5
 Rode the Patrol this weekend at Outerbike. That bike so totally doesn't give a f$@k about anything you ride it on. I got a stick through my spokes and the bike just busted that stick into bits. Tons of fun.

So my question is this; how do you engineer for that kind of burliness and fun? I mean all these bikes look the same to me but the character can be soooo different.
  • + 6
 The Patrol actually uses thicker wall alloy tubes as compared to the Scout and Smuggler. They all have the same shape on the outside but the wall thickness varies by model.
  • + 5
 If you had to choose one bike to do it all, scout or patrol? I love the thought of having a playful short travel bike but I also like the extra room for errors that the patrol has!! hopefully I'll be able to buy one of your bikes sooner than later! Props on making great bikes
  • + 7
 I currently have a Patrol and Smuggler built up and I like how these two bikes compliment eachother. The Scout and Patrol are almost too similar to justify having both. For me, if I had to choose one bike I'd likely have to pick the Patrol based off what I primarily ride, and what the majority of our terrain is like here in Bellingham. However, if I lived somewhere else I might be more inclined to go with the Scout or Smuggler. Where do you live? - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Aw damn I just saw this! thanks for the answer, I live in Chile btw, close to "nevados de chillan" (first stop of the ews 2014), tbh I think my local trails would be better suited to a scout, but I won't be sure until I try them out!
  • + 2
 Patrol for taking enduro times seriously, Scout for just a dam fun bike @pasteldepapa
  • + 5
 I recently chose to buy a frame which allowed me to run both 26" and 650b wheels by changing dropouts and a fork, as I can see 26" support being reduced, illustrated by the fact that my friend who has a suppressor couldn't get a 26" tyre at a trail centre shop last Sunday. With the Suppressor and Patrol, what made you choose to develop separate frames for 26" and 650b, as opposed to using swappable dropouts/geometry to switch a single frame between the two sizes as some other manufacturers have done?

I admire that you continue to fully support 26", it's a shame the rest of the industry seems less keen.
  • + 5
 A few reasons.

Weight is one, additional hardware and small parts add up.
Complexity is another, too much to fiddle with. And we wouldn't have been able to use the current axle configuration we are, which works really well.
However the biggest reason is that we are not compromising with a geo corrected 26" frame. With a modular dropout system to alternate wheel size you are still compromising the actual bb drop in relation to stack, and head tube angle etc. We wanted the Suppressor to provide the exact same riding experience as the Patrol, and offering a geo corrected 26' frame was the only true way to do this. - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Thanks Lars
  • + 7
 1.Has klunkin ever been easy?
2. How is mike metzger doin these days? He was always great with customer service with my covert way back.
  • + 9
 1. people that have never klunked probably think it's easy. Wink
2. mike is doing really well actually. he bounced around a bit and worked for boeing which I guess probably burned him out and just sapped the life out of him a bit which is why he went to work for Evil for a bit. He just left Evil and took a regular job as a "sales guy" which I think he will kill it at. he is a natural born salesperson so i'm personally excited to see him really go for it with that. hey, mike, if you're on here why don't you tell your superfans how you're doing. Wink
-kyle
  • + 8
 Klunkin is never easy. Just ask Carl Hulick (freeride11), he train's through the entire football season at UCLA just to be ready for Klunkin season...
  • + 1
 Haha. Thnx, gentlemen. By the way... Blindside and Dirtbag are the best bike names ever given to dirtbikes of any sort.
  • + 9
 Carbon Patrol? or the future of carbon and transition in general?
  • - 57
flag Matt76 (Jun 10, 2015 at 14:48) (Below Threshold)
 Let's hope not, carbon is just not needed!!
  • + 9
 @Matt76 What's wrong with having the option?
  • + 4
 Hi transition, I like the geometry of your bikes, especially the tr500 which is shorter than most dh bikes today, I have 2 questions:
1) The TR500 is designed to fit both wheel sizes, does the geometry actually favours 650B over 26"?
2) Apparently any 650B bike can fit 26" wheels, what sets the TR500 apart?
  • + 0
 C'mon @TransitionBikeCompany
This question is not that tricky
  • + 4
 I once owned a Transition Preston FR, I rode that bike into the ground, to this day, I will recall all my firsts on that bike, what a fun ride - thanks for being ahead of your time with the short travel do everything bike design and geometry.
  • + 5
 Thanks for your support in the early years! --Sam
  • + 4
 I've owned and shredded a Preston Fr and Blindside for the past 8 years and finally graduated to an...other bike company DH frame, sorry!!! I felt the price of the TR500 was quite steep and did not have any shock options. I like the adjustable geo of the TR500, but it wasn't enough to sell me for a "premium." Can you talk about pricing, is it just as simple as following your competitors, or are you mostly looking at mfg. costs and profit margin?
  • + 1
 P.S. Ignore the first 3 sentences, that's just me being a complainer.
  • + 2
 I'd love to hear about this too. I owned a Bottle Rocket and sold tons of people on the Transition dogma of a great bike at an affordable price, but it seems that you guys have moved on to "just another premium cost frame company". Back in the days of the Preston, Dirtbag, Vagrant, etc, Transition was who I turned to for a tough as nails bike at a reasonable cost for core riders... What happened?
  • + 20
 Great question...and thanks for riding our bikes in the past! Picking a price for a product is incredibly difficult and takes into account a multitude of things. Here's some insight into how we look at it.

1) You have the manufacturing cost of the product. what does it actually cost to make it (materials, + labor to fabricate it).

2) You have a certain amount of R&D cost associated with developing the product. This could include industrial design time or engineering time, physical prototyping, 3D printing/testing, machine testing, etc. Typically you would look at this cost and either call it overhead and just eat it or you can spread this cost out over each product you plan on producing for the particular products life-cycle. We typically absorb these costs as overhead as this is the business we are in. some companies would apply this to the actual product cost.

3) You have tooling costs that we would amortize over each product we produce in the products life. Tooling can include carbon molds, fixtures for CNC/welding, tube mandrels, etc. This cost is typically a pretty large cost for a small company such as ours. To give an example, a typical full squish carbon frame can have tooling costs in the $75K - $120K range...and that's for one product. so take that and divy it up between however many frames we will produce over the course of the products life and add that to your frame cost.

Once you have the above, that tells you what the product actually "costs" to make. This basically tells us how low our lowest pricing can be, and is the most important part in ensuring your pricing strategy is sound.

For most traditional bike brands, you would have multiple tiers of pricing. ie: Manufacturer Cost, Distributor Pricing, Dealer Pricing (USA/Canada), Retail Pricing.

The challenge is to look at retail prices and make sure we can be competitive there in a multitude of markets (ie: every country has its own set of issues that affect pricing). Also, we have to make sure that each link in the chain has the appropriate margin to do the job of selling the product. So, a USA/Canada dealer needs their cut, as does a distributor that is making a larger committment than a dealer. And then last on the list, we need a margin. Most typically we are forced to look at retail pricing and this kind of tells us where we have to be...and in the end, we are left with whatever margin we are left with...which is by far the smallest margin in the chain. Typically our margin gets eaten up first as we have to do what we have to do to be competitive. Also, being a small company affords us less advantage when it comes to buying power and achieving lower costs for our products.

The above is how it usually goes as we don't have the luxery of lower costs than our competition, so we have to ensure we are price competitive at the retail level and then we are left with what we are left with. The other way of doing it would be to look at our margin first and add in all the other margins for the distributors/dealers through retail and then the retail price ends up where it ends up. There are certain products that we use this model with as they are just higher margin products for our industry so we can afford to push the retail prices lower.

In a perfect world we would be able to do bottom up pricing and have enough room to be price competitive with other products, but in reality it's a bit of a dance between bottom-up and top-down pricing...

-kyle
  • + 6
 Great insight Kyle. Gives a lot of perspective on why bike prices are at the levels they're at now. If you don't mind I'm going to steal a lot of this when I have the "new bike budget" discussion with the wife.
  • + 8
 my pleasure. i don't troll pinkbike much but i do keep a pulse on overarching themes in the comments sections of articles... and one resounding thing i keep hearing is about how expensive bikes are getting. and i do agree with this. the problem is that most people on pinkbike have no idea what the structure even looks like and why bikes are priced the way they are. i think people assume bike brands are making tons of money and artificially up-pricing product just because they can. well it aint so. we can't. in the course of us being in business we've seen prices climb, costs rise, and margins shrink in every link of the chain. the bike quality has definitely gone up and really that's the driving factor in rising prices. people expect more out of their mountain bike than they do out of their car these days... which is awesome, but that costs money.

anyway, i feel your pain with the wife. if you need more ammo i'm happy to help. half the reason we started Transition was so we had a justifiable reason for adding to the collection. Wink
-kyle
  • + 2
 @TransitionBikeCompany Thanks so much for the detailed break down Kyle...and reality check. I didn't mean for my comment to say you were overpriced. I now see how complicated it really is...

Btw, I am still loyal to you guys, just need some time to save up for a Giddy Up. Oh yeah, and if you want a killer one of a kind sign for your new HQ, let me know, I work for a porcelain enamel sign company called Winsor Fireform (in Tumwater, WA). They don't fade, and last for generations in the gnarliest of conditions. Enamel on steel, like the ol' vintage gas station signs!
  • + 4
 What went wrong with the distribution of this year's Transition bikes? I know dealers are having a hard time getting Scouts and Patrols. Is it a supply chain issue or simply too much demand?

And great bikes btw. I can't wait for my Smuggler to arrive!!
  • + 7
 Nothing ever goes quite as planned. We faced three particular setbacks this year; a redesigned lineup with production delays from tooling and dialing everything in, a port delay on the west coast of the USA, and an overwhelming (though appreciated) new level of demand from riders. All said and done, it's usually about 5-6 months from the day we order bikes to the day they're in our warehouse. So by the time we realized how oversold we were going to be for the season, there wasn't time to meet demand in the 2015 production window. Combined with some pretty lengthy production delays in our supply chain and an extra 3-6 weeks of delay at the ports this winter and it got pretty tense around here at times. But thanks for sticking it out! We appreciate the patience and promise the ride will be worth the wait! - Chris
  • + 2
 Pretty much same across the industry. Ibis, evil, trek, norco, kona...all have had the new bike availability blues. A standout exception would be Intense. They're not advertising a new model until/unless they're in stock.
  • + 3
 We still have a few scouts, patrols and a smuggler at my shop! Smile
  • + 1
 so glad to live in europe, my patrol arrived at my home at mid december, as my 500 last year ant the end of april like one or three months sooner than there
  • + 3
 After years of having notoriously bad paint that chipped and flaked so readily, it seems to have been a lot better in the last two years. I guess now this breaks down a bit:
1. Did you switch paint manufacturers, technique, better lacquer, or what as it does seem to be a lot better?
2. How much paint testing do you do?
3. Have you ever considered offering anodizing option for your frames? My girlfriend's anno Kona doesn't have a mark on it after three years
  • + 6
 We have moved to a different paint facility and the new facility has some super high end automated equipment that applies a much thinner coat of paint. Everything is still hand finished, but he results are a better finish, thinner paint layer (which also saves weight) and less chipping.

Anodizing can be expensive, and you have a lot of rejects with colors other than black. If you offer ano colors you would generally have to re-do a large number in black or paint the rejects. All that adds cost and extends the delivery lead time. In general I don't think a lot of people in our office are huge fans of the ano finish look... but we have definitely talked about it over the years. We were super close to doing a rasta ano Bottlerocket (j/k). --Sam
  • + 2
 Would have bought (and would still buy) rasta Bottlerocket in a heartbeat.
  • + 4
 I'll be passing through Bellingham in July. Can I stop at your place and get a Giddy Up pony sticker? Also, having never been in the area before, recommend me a trail to go rip around on my Patrol.
  • + 4
 Come on by, we got a GiddyUp sticker waiting for you and some rad trail recommendations.
  • + 6
 What were you thinking with that brown paint job?
  • + 1
 That paint job is quite frankly the sexiest MTB I've ever laid eyes on. I gravitate towards matte or flat colors on my MTB's but that thing has given me a serious chubby.
  • + 4
 Loving my old Bandit, loving the transition upto a Scout now haha see what I did there, honestly though the Scout is so AWESOME !! Will the frame be coming in carbon in the future ?
  • - 51
flag Matt76 (Jun 10, 2015 at 14:49) (Below Threshold)
 Please.....no carbon!!
  • + 1
 Seen as we don't want technology to move on ey..... Idiot.
  • + 5
 @matt76 chill fam, have you even ridden a carbon bike.........?
  • + 2
 minus 37 and dropping for "no carbon" Matt76 ... that tells a pretty convincing story. I would love to see at least the Patrol and the Scout in Carbon. Was surprised that they didn't launch that way.
  • + 4
 Scout is definitely one of my favorite bikes and what I am riding this year. Can't get into specifics about which models and timing but we have a lot of carbon projects in the works so if you are wanting carbon we should be able to make you happy, it just comes down to when you will be happy. - kevin
  • + 3
 What do the next 15 years hold for Transition Bikes? Who are the next generation of Transition Owner/Riders when you decide to klunk it? When can I purchase stock in TR? Could you become victims of your own success (could you ever get too big)?
My new Patrol rocks! Short vid I made www.pinkbike.com/video/411486
  • + 4
 great question...and one kevin and I think about all the time. hard to say exactly what the next 15 years will look like. in a perfect world, the industry won't fully sap us of our passion for bikes and sharing the experiences they give with other people and as long as we're still having fun and doing it because we love it then we should be the same in the future as we are now. as long as we continue to be the same people we are now then i don't think we can be victims of our success. honestly we have taken this little project a lot farther than either of us thought it would go so maybe we've already succeeded? fortunately we don't really think about "success" in the traditional way. we measure success by our ability to create something other people connect with (not just product, but brand) and i think that's a moving target.

also, i don't think a brand can get too big. i think people can get too big for their britches and that's the real problem. if i ever do that please slap me across the face. Wink
-kyle
  • + 3
 How might you recommend the shock setup so you can best utilize the remaining ~65% after sag of such a short stroke on the smuggler. Would you say the ride would benefit greatly from a CCDB or Monarch Plus system?

How did Kevin like his b+ smuggler experience?

I'm trying to source a teal XL smuggler frame via Hub Cyclery in Bend. Can you help a brotha out?

Please sell me a smuggler Smile
  • + 5
 The Smuggler has some pretty amazing kinematics to the shock, that allow you to effectively utilize all your travel whether you are just trail riding or riding more aggresively and hitting some drops or jumps. No special setup other than the sag and rebound. You can bottom it (which you should be able to do on any good bike) out but it isn't harsh and feels very natural. That is how you know you have a good setup. The monarch plus is not needed but we have tested with it and it feels really good on the bike as well.

The 27.5 plus was an interesting experience. There were some pros and cons. Definitely amazing traction for climbing and cornering (almost too much traction for cornering) but the bike definitely felt slower and clunkier. I could see a beginner or intermediate rider being able to utilize it's benefits and get confidence from it. In the end it was not compelling enough for me to want to run it, but I do see it as a viable option for riders out there craving a different experience.

XL Smugglers have been a hot commodity this year and definitely hard to get. We sold out of that size pretty quick, the 2016 Smugglers should be available to shops in late summer/early fall. If you really want to get one you can have the Hub pre-order one. - kevin
  • + 3
 1. Now that the horst link patent has expired and its use is wide spread, how does your implementation of it differ from the other companies using the same platform?
2. What roll did the Sotto group play in the development of the new line of bikes?
  • + 3
 1) That is a complicated one. Every suspension platform can be implemented differently for pretty broad ranging results. Faux bars can be done in a lot of different ways, even single pivots can have a drastically different ride depending on that pivot location and shock position. Our giddy up bikes have generally a bit less anti squat than some other bikes, which was intentionally done for a more neutral feel. Our overall change in leverage is also smaller than some other models, which gives you a more consistent feel. Each bike's kinematic is specifically tuned for the amount of travel and wheel size, in order to get the right feel from each model. There are a lot of variables at play, and the kinematics aren't completely isolated from the bike geo, wheel size, etc. So no single thing is necessarily that different than what you would see on bike A or bike B, etc. But the magic comes in aligning all the variables at the right place and not letting one thing be out of balance from another.

2) Luke Beale, then with Sotto, now on his own as Level One Engineering, came to us a while back to pitch some suspension platforms. To be honest, I think some of us were pretty skeptical at first. We had already played with the idea of moving towards a horst link setup, and some of the ideas that Luke presented at the time felt a bit too exotic for Transition. In the course of that meeting and subsequent conversations, we decided that Luke was going to be an awesome resource for us to really ensure that our new designs were everything they could be. In the end, every bike with a variable wheel path uses the same basic concepts... a sub frame attached with multiple links. They can be two short links, two long links, one short and one long, maybe even six links, etc. But the basic principals still apply... and Luke knows his stuff and knew how to help us make the most of those points while also staying clear of other legal issues that might exist outside of the Horst Link patent. In this day and age there are a lot of patents out there and knowing how to get the results you want are only a part of it... how to avoid other peoples patented technology is (unfortunately) another part of selling bikes.
  • + 7
 Slopestyle bike anytime soon?
  • + 14
 Can't release specific details and dates but if you like slopestyle bikes you should be stoked in 2016.
  • + 8
 spoiler-alert:













maybe.
  • + 1
 BOTTLE ROCKET 2.0??? THE DOUBLE 2.O AKA THE DOUBLE DOUBLE???
  • + 15
 This worries my wallet but excites my pants
  • + 1
 The Triple
  • + 2
 You called it!
  • + 2
 Beyond the actual "designing" of the bikes from an engineering starting point, how (or who?) do you do come up with the visual esthetics? And where in your process does it "fit" in? - also stuff like graphics, colors and the overall visual identity for Transition: do you have people in house that do this? and how important is that stuff to you guys? Where do you get your inspiration from beyond other bikes and manufactures?

...Also, can I have job doing does things for you guys? Smile
  • + 4
 So you want my job huh....All of our new bikes really start with dots on a blank sheet of paper, I then start hand sketching the forms, we argue a lot, I sketch some more, eventually we all agree on a direction. Then we spend a few weeks or months doing the cad design, all of this is done in house between Kyle, Sam and myself and with a few private contractors. I also handle the graphics, colors and overall branding....as for inspiration, I try not to look in the bike industry too much, but more on the motor sports side of things, especially the classics! -Darrin
  • + 4
 Free tip, if you're in to classic motor sport racing; I'm assuming we'll see something inspired by the 1970 Porsche 917 Le Mans "Psychedelic" Wink

www.simeonemuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/historic/1970-porsche-917lh-f3q-historic.jpg

Thanks, for the answers, my resumé and CV are in the mail Wink
  • + 5
 You guys are a smaller company, yet you still are up their with the big brands do you guys like being a smaller company?
  • + 6
 No questions, just wanted to say I love you!
  • + 2
 How do you guys feel about having to put out a new version of a bike every year? I feel this must put a lot of pressure on a bike designer to come up with something new even if its not needed. Or is this a good thing letting you tweak your bikes yearly plus leading to more sales?

Some companies are using more of a version model disregarding yearly models. Do you guys see yourself ever adopting that?
  • + 2
 Yup, the model year approach definitely puts a lot of stress on a company our size. Over forecast your production and we could easily end up with way too much product that's irrelevant next year. Underforecast (like we did this year) and you can't make up for it because those frames would already be outdated by the time they arrived. So it's a constant struggle to get new products out, available and sold out just in time to repeat with the next year.

We were actually early adopters of the Version model from the beginning. But little by little, we've been pushed into the model year thing. Often time it's just new kits and a paint job, but really we've found that bikes that don't change in some way annually just don't sell as well in their second year. Still, this is one of many topics that's often discussed internally. - Chris
  • + 1
 also worth noting, we look at a product life as a 3-4 year deal. basically introduce a new product and over the course of 3 more years you're just refining it in small ways. then you have to come out with something new and fresh. it can be frustrating as sometimes you think you've nailed a design that should be the be all end all thing....but history has proven that change/progression is a good thing. it has taken us a while to get into the rhythm of this product life-cycle but i think we're in tune with it now.
-kyle
  • + 6
 Is there a particular reason you haven't made a carbon trail bike yet?
  • - 48
flag Matt76 (Jun 10, 2015 at 14:54) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah, because there is nothing wrong with their aluminium bikes so why on earth would the make them out of cloth and glue for?
  • + 1
 Totally forgot about that @marseer thanks!
  • + 3
 Nailed it. - LarsNbars
  • + 3
 Carbon Carbon Carbon CARBON, no seriously who gives a shit what the bikes are made of as long as they ride good. My question is, when are we going to see new Lars and Bars clips?
  • + 4
 I love making the Lars N Bars projects, trust me. We'll do some more for sure, just need a lull in schedule. As much as it may look like all that happens here is shenanigans, we're actually pretty pinned most of the time. Inspire me with a good theme, and maybe we'll make it happen! - LarsNbars
  • + 2
 As a bit of a die hard transition fan these days, tr450 DH steed and a new xl patrol, both foxed out there tatas, I just wanna say sick bikes!
I do however have a problem with my 450, it's on its 2nd front end, after there were stress fractures round the top tube, and now there are the same on the newer one (just over a year old). My question is where does the warranty stand on that?


Still sick bikes, sick company, and any help with this would be muchly appreciated.

Howie
  • + 2
 hey Howie sorry to hear that. send an email to warranty@transitionbikes.com and we'll take care of you.
-kyle
  • + 2
 Got a question perhaps more specific to
Darrin Seeds. I'm interested in doing design engineering/industrial design with the dream of basically doing what you're doing - ie working for a kickass mtb company designing cool sh*t. Got any pointers for which kind of direction I should be heading in, like degree choice, apprenticeships etc???
Thanks a lot Smile
  • + 2
 Knowing this early is pretty rad! Wish I would of know about the design industry in high school. Picking a direction is the first choice, then sticking with that path working your butt off would be the next step. Are you more artistic or analytical? There are a lot of industrial design programs that focus more on the "artsy" conceptual side which is an asset to many different industries and companies, but from what I've scene with bike and similar industries, finding something that has a strong core in engineering and material science is the ticket....You want to be able to understand the processes and design things that can actually be manufactured. Paying a lot for an education, and not sleeping for several days at a time, just to work for free....only a few of the hurdles you can look forward too, but don't worry the pay off is worth it once you finally lock down that dream job! Get it! -Darrin
  • + 1
 Okay thanks a lot. That's useful to know that the more traditional engineeringy type qualifications are more valuable. Cheers mate Smile
  • + 2
 I seems a lot of people really like(d) the BottleRocket.
Is it true that you will never produce a lighter version of the BottleRocket because riders would never buy another bike after that, and it would destroy the bike industry as we know it?
Thanks,
Wally
  • + 1
 I have just got hold of a BottleRocket, my 3rd (TR rider since 2007, Preston FR, BottleRockets, Blindside) and can attest that it is the funnest bike ever.
Unless you are an XC weight weenie or want to win DH races it is pretty much the only bike most riders "need". Great fun on singletrack, awesome in Whistler and is completely sick-house *tm on jumps.
Fact
  • + 3
 Do you feel you are missing a great marketing and sponsorship opportunity by not sponsoring teamRobot.com? Haters gonna hate, but his site get a bunch of hits.
You could ride the wave.....
  • + 6
 We actually sponsored Charlie in the past! But his sponsorship needs $$$ far exceeded our budget. Too many 80's cassette tapes...

--Sam
  • + 2
 As people on here are asking why you haven't gone carbon or boost I was wanting to know if it's because you are more consumer based and like the rest of us just sitting back eating bacon and yelling at the computer "stop all these stupid standards" or are you just lulling U.S. interest a false sense of security before you push us in to you tank of piranha's like the other brands have done?
  • + 2
 I have been looking into getting a hardtail and am having trouble finding what I like. Is the Transam going to be updated? I'm looking for a little more reach, shorter, tapers head tube, shorter stack, and maybe a little slacker head angle. I like what you have going on with the Scout and Patrol, but right now I'm looking to add a AM hardtail to my lineup.
  • + 4
 Do you guys think that the bike industry cares enough about the environment?
Or would you also like to see this become a more important topic in the industry as a whole?
  • + 3
 I don't think the industry has a heart or soul. only the people do inside the industry. I think there are some great people doing some great things in the name of the environment. our business is all about the environment ultimately and we care a great deal about it. not in the traditional "environmentalist movement" kind of way (those guys are missing the point) but in a more daily practical way. For us, we want to promote bikes as a healthy lifestyle and get more people into the environment. more people using our resources will bring more visibility to the issues at hand, which will bring more actual resources for addressing the issues. So, in a way, any company (or industry) promoting people using environmental resources, is supporting the environment....which is rad.

I don't think we need any special attention on the environment. I believe that what we are doing will naturally be to the benefit of the environment. just gotta keep on truckin'.

-kyle
  • + 2
 Why are your frames not faced and reamed out the factory? Is it purely a cost issue, or QC? You're one of the last companies I know not to, and finding a shop with these tools gets harder by the year, especially for 1.5/tapered head tubes.
  • + 5
 Post paint facing and reaming is a best practices thing when building a bike but it is not a necessary step to getting a quality build. And yes it does add a substantial cost at the factory level which when you multiply that down the line becomes a considerable price increase to the end consumer for something that is not essential. - kevin
  • + 1
 Fair, and expected, answer. Thanks.
  • + 1
 I think the thing that amazes me the most is your marketing/branding. From the start, you've had a pretty consistent blend of serious, no-nonsense product offerings, and coupled it with the most laid-back, hilariously wacky, don't-take-yourself-too-seriously attitude. I absolutely love it! Please keep it up.
Who would you credit for the concept of this approach, and what has helped you maintain that consistency over the years? What campaigns have been the most fun for your crew to work on?
  • + 1
 thanks!

there is no "concept" for this approach. we are simply being ourselves and capturing it and using it. I've head from other people that this "marketing strategy" is genious...but really i don't think we think of it as a strategy. what you see is what you get with us. Wink

-kyle
  • + 4
 Probably everybody is responsible for this although Kevin technically manages marketing direction, and does a killer job on edits. Our videos and campaigns are generally shot from the hip and just steamroll from and idea we have around beers or during rides...The COCK&BALLS was pretty ridiculous, although the GiddyUp stuff has been pretty fun too. The real advantage I think is not having VP's or upper managment saying NO to things, since this doesn't exist at Transition Bikes we are free to express ideas and do what we want. -Darrin
  • + 1
 Firstly - Awesome bikes! Especially so now that you’ve moved to a proper four bar system.

What prompted the switch from faux bar, and why have you not taken this system to your longer travel bikes?

Why do you think some manufactures are still using faux bar?
  • + 1
 Hi, I really like your bikes and I really like the name "Giddy Up"! I have a daughter that loves horses. She like your new 24" bike called the Ripcord. But her favorite color is pink. So she wants to know if you can make her a 24" bike with the Giddy Up suspension and paint it pink and call it "My Little Pony"!
  • + 1
 hi TR guys ! I have a tr500 and I had a 450 before. I know is a stupid question... but why in the new 2015 tr 500 there was not spare paint? ahahah I know sounds stupid.... but is the only thing I need to ask! since most of the questions had being already answered.
cheers ( here in athens-greece is time for a beer )
  • + 1
 We had a couple of instances of blown up paint inside a new frame box. And we had a few more instances where the paint got old and wasn't usable by the time people needed it, so ultimately it just wasn't worth it. - Chris
  • + 1
 thanks ! it makes sense !
  • + 1
 A close friend of mine want to start biking, but he is 205cm tall with a 220cm wingspan and 115kg, so do you have a DH frame that might suit him??? A lot of mainstream frame brands doesn't have something to suit him....
Thanks!
  • + 1
 I've got a patrol and I'm thinking about getting a coil shock for my patrol as I find the monarch plus, which is perfect for the majority of my riding struggles on some of the fast rocky descents i regularly ride. First of all will a coil shock fit? and if so what shock/tune would you recommend. I've got a large frame.Cheers.
  • + 1
 Transition for Life!!! Loving my new patrol! Any special editions in the works..like the PBR bottle rocket? Thanks for building great bikes and staying true to what mountain biking is all about. More swag too, bring back the champagne of bikes jersey...
(P.S. The best christmas card I got last year was from you guys!)
  • + 1
 Hi guys, I'm a current bsc Product Design and Technology student in university. Do you think my degree would be suitable to work for a bike manufacturer like you, or do you think I would be best suited in the aftermarket side of things, eg components, finishing kits and accessories. Cheers
  • + 4
 How will putting a Boxxer on my Klunker affect the geometry? Also, will it be harder to do skidz?
  • + 1
 Really appreciate your guys willing to come on here and answer the questions asked in an honest way. Speaks volumes about a company that i've had a ton of respect for since your early days. I had a 05' PrestonFR that I rode the snot out of until for almost 10 years. Sold it to a new rider in Santa Cruz and it'll likely go for another 10. Even though I don't currently own one of your bikes, when it comes time to get a new bike (hopefully sooner than 10yrs) i'll be checking out what you have in the line up.
  • + 1
 Hello there at transition..!!

A slight different question i have a 2006 dirtbag yes its old haha but fun to ride indeed i want to know if the frame will take triples upfront..?

Gunna run 2012 r2c2 boxxers on it well thats if the frame works with em like on the rear i have
a fox dhx5 200 i2i 57stroke
Hope you can shed some light on it

Thanks in advance

Mark
  • + 1
 how much of an overlap is there between the patrol and the scout? looking for a great all rounder that i could have fun on in my local techy east coast trails. but i also want to race enduro next year and do some park riding (mountain creek). could a scout be able to handle it? and are there any places to demo any of these in the NY/NJ area?
  • + 1
 @Giladgu Community Bikes and Boards in Philly has the both the Scout and Patrol in their demo fleet. Get in touch with them to go check them out. I bought a Scout, but I also have a TR500. The Scout is really fun and playful, but the Patrol will be better as your only bike, and for running laps at creek.
  • + 1
 Not so much a question, but a comment and a suggestion:

I love your bikes and ride a TR250, a Carbon Covert and a 29er TransAm. My partner is on a Patrol and it took her riding skills to a new level.
Waiting for the Carbon Patrol myself and will order as soon as it is being released. Hoping the build kit will include the Pike fork.

I find sizing the bikes super tricky and hate to take a gamble on sizes. For example, my TR250 is a M and I wished I had a L. My Carbon Covert is a size L and it is perfect. With the Patrol I might go to an M, but how to decide without test riding it. You have a well established LBS in BC's Interior that is pushing your bikes hard. How about hooking Shreddie up with some test bikes. Hey, I might even get a Smuggler if I can test one. Can I test your bikes at your headquarters as an alternative? Of course having some bikes locally would be best.

Keep up the great work, loving my bikes every time I'm out there riding!
  • + 1
 Try this. From the bike you're most comfortable on, figure out what your reach/stack measurement is. Square both and add, then square root. This will give you the direct/straight distance from the BB to headtube. This method is much better than comparing just effective toptube lengths (ETT) or reach. For example:

Large TR250 : 411/597mm : 724.8mm
Medium Patrol : 432/600mm : 739.3mm

The medium Patrol will feel slightly roomier than the large TR250, when slamming your stem and using the same stem/bar combo on both bikes.


@TransitionBikeCompany It would be pretty awesome if you guys got rid of the slightly cryptic reach/stack measurements for a single Headtube to BB (HTB) measurement as this would be much easier to understand when comparing two bikes. The industry really should move on from stupid measurements like "sloped toptube" lengths as well (not saying you guys use it)!
  • + 1
 Met you fine Galoots at Outerbike,

I don't think you can get much more donwardly capable than the Patrol in my opinion, a very nice all-day-anytime-anything steed indeed!

The TR500 is just a crazy speeder bike,all
That is missing is the sound of happy screaming ewoks.( the tires do start to howl a speed a bit but its more of a horny wookie sound)

I unfortunately had an impromptu lesson in loose over hard and brike my collar bone doing nothing particularly awesome.
I did not get to say thanks guys before I split.
Will bring more Beer to try next year!

Question Time.
1.Did you guys get to hit the Half-Nelson trail in Squamish?
2. Sam ,I heard you took some trail to the face,you ok?
3. Will you guys come again next year?

Cheers Guys!
What a kickass time!

Joe
  • + 1
 It seems to me like Slopestyle bikes are going the way of the Dodo bird, which is a shame because I've never tried one of your Bottlerockets, and they seem like great bikes! Do you have any plans to introduce a new model similar to the Bottlerocket, or do you feel there is not enough market interest for new Slopestyle bikes?
  • + 1
 I have a 2011 Covert and I LOVE it! I have it under 30lbs with no carbon parts and 27.5 wheels. If I want to freeride it, I just throw on my old 26's and its bomb proof! Even though my larger wheel fits within the chainstay with what looks like room to spare, the only downside is that it has significantly raised my bb. Any chance I could get my hands on a 27.5 model chainstay with that extra bb drop?
  • + 1
 Hey guys.
I'm an engineering student passionated by mountain bikes and my goal is to enter the mountain bike industry when I'll have my degree in three years.
Do you have any advice to give me that could help me pursue this dream?
I already planned to do internships in mountain bikes companies in the next three years and I will try to orientate the projects I have to do during the mechanicals courses on mountain bike design.
  • + 1
 Sounds like you are on the right track, get really good at Solidworks, and ideally some drawing/sketching too...ME's that can work seamlessly with ID'ers is a powerful tool regardless of the industry. Yes, having projects that focus on solving problems or unique creative solutions in your portfolio will be great when you're out pursuing those internships and making connections. -Darrin
  • + 1
 --> Well I have posted that comparison in a forum again , but if you could answer that I would be very pleased

Among Patrol , Suppresor and Scout ...which one would you be tilting towards considering its pedalling efficiency and shredding capabilities?
It should handle some drops and jumps too. However it should be used mainly for pedal and average difficulty trails.

Thanks
  • + 2
 I'd probably go with the Scout in this case. A perfect blend of all three of the above. - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Perfect ,thanks a lot. Cheers
  • + 3
 As a graduating engineering student who loves racing, building, dreaming about bikes what's your advice for ending up with a sweet job in the bike industry?
  • + 2
 I would say don't just look at who's hiring, but find out who you want to work for. Figure out a way to make your self so valuable that they "want to hire you" This may involve years of working your A$S off, sometimes for free if necessary, so don't be afraid to take an internship and absorb as much knowledge and experience as possible. Being really creative and having the ability to effectively and clearly present ideas is invaluable as well. Good Luck! -Darrin
  • + 1
 Any way to demo bikes in the mid west? I really like the company and your philosophy/attitude towards all the various BS bike categories. Seriously looking at the smuggler, but at 5'10" I fall right between med and large. Our trails are more XC oriented, but hate the stretched out feeling of XC bikes.
  • + 2
 We get asked about demo's a lot, and with only 10 people in our whole company, long demo tours are pretty unrealistic for us right now. We have been increasing our presence at larger demo events though and those would be a good opportunity for you to check out the bikes (Outerbike, Dirtfest, Duthie Demo). Off the top of my head, I would probably say go medium, but you are on that line... - Chris
  • + 2
 Thanks for doing this. Can you please explain how BB drop influences bike handling? Your patrol and suppressor have identical BB absolute heights, but the 27.5 version has more BB drop. Congrats on the Decline Mag award.
  • + 1
 The goal is the have the BB the same height in relation to the ground and the stack height. This is one of the things that provides an identical ride between the Suppressor and the Patrol. BB drop is measured from the horizontal plane between the front and rear wheel axles, and with the 27.5 wheel being taller than 26 you achieve this by creating more drop on the Patrol than the Suppressor. More drop/lower BB is usually associated with increased cornering prowess as it makes for a lower center of gravity. It comes at a sacrifice through, and in the end it's all a balance between every part of a bikes geometry.

-LarsNbars
  • + 1
 This one goes out to the industrial designer. How is your work as an industrial designer of a mtb company? How is it different from othe industries in general (say auto)? Did you get a specific degree for it? How much time do you get to ride?
  • + 2
 Pretty amazing, considering this is the industry I initially wanted to get into when I started design school...Yes, I have a BS in ID from WWU. I've mostly worked in the outdoor industry as this was my main passion. I've worked for firms and corporate doing everything from shoes to military tools, but have not worked in the auto industry so I can't directly comment on that. Working in bike industry is definitely a decision you make for quality of life and passion not for $$$ with that said, I ride/race a lot and it's awesome! -Darrin
  • + 1
 hey! I just graduate with a degree in mechanical engineering from Penn State, but i don't have true bike mechanic experience and minimal work experience in design. what is the best way to break into the bike industry so I can work for a bike company? also please higher me, I am hard worker, quick learner and I brew my own beer so I would be a true asset to the team.
  • + 1
 congrats on graduating!

i would say get experience first...in bike related endeavors and in the real world.

most people won't break in to the bike industry without some real world experience. well, i guess i can't speak for the larger companies that have lots of MEs but for us (10 people) getting a break without experience is gonna be real tough. most bike companies don't have huge teams of engineers so probably not a lot of room for Junior level MEs.

having said that, it's not what you know, but rather who you know. Wink

-kyle
  • + 1
 I find current frame geometry to be a revelation. Great climbing, great descending bikes. Being 6'6" I love the trend towards longer front centers and 150mm dropper posts make 19" seat tubes possible even for me. But I really struggle to understand the drive to minimize stack, especially on the bigger sizes. I get that smaller riders need help getting their bars low enough, especially with bigger wheels and taller forks. But why not extend the same courtesy to taller riders and give the bigger sizes longer head tubes? Nobody wants to run 3cm worth of spacers or a 40mm rise bar.
  • + 2
 I am 6'4" and run about 20mm of spacers and a 35mm rise bar and love the setup. The deal is that we do get a lot of 6' and up riders that ride our XL and if we had really tall headtubes and a tall stack you are stuck with it and can't go lower for riders that want a lower setup. At 6'6" you are definitely at the end of the gammut for our sizing but can make it work. Ideally for your size we would have XXL but for a company our size it is tough to justify since there are so few people over 6'4" to justify it. Probably need a 150mm headtube length to make it work so you wouldn't need a massive amount of spacers and could run a 35mm rise bar. - kevin
  • + 2
 Some of the reason we have made somewhat shorter seat tubes in general is to allow for + and - sizing across the board. The stack equation falls into this realm a bit as well. For someone who's 6' and REALLY want's the length of an XL, might not be able to do so with a 3cm taller headtube. Where as at 6'6" you can always add spacers. It might not be cosmetically ideal, but from a functional standpoint it allows us to account for both situations. Not to mention the potential structural changes we would have to look at by having the top and down tubes meeting so far apart on the headtube...

- LarsNbars
  • + 0
 i know loads of 6.6" riders and none of us can get a frame to fit, so what makes you think there is no buyers for XXLs,
someone needs to take a good look around,,,,
  • + 0
 oh and by adding more spacers you are actually shortening your reach which defeats the object
  • + 1
 WHAT'S UP GUYS? I have in my quiver of bikes a PBR edition BOTTLEROCKET. I love that bike to death, I recently retired the frame and saddle. It now hangs proudly above my fireplace still caked with HIGHLAND MUD. All I have to say is please bring back the BOTTLEROCKET!!! And please tell me there is a PBR light edition RAPTURE OR KLUNKER in the work (Or maybe some OLY edition frames).
  • + 1
 I'm doing a month in whistler this summer and i don't really want to take a DH and trail/enduro bike. So i was planning on just taking my Patrol, i will be riding everything from the bike park laps to natural trails. Will my Patrol frame survive that?
cheers dudes!
  • + 1
 Bro. Thats what your bike was built for. Go freak in shred it, real question is if you can handle the patrol.
  • + 2
 @Robfarrer for sure dude, perfect bike for Whistler. As long as you're not 100% in the bike park it's the ticket.

- LarsNbars
  • + 2
 You are seeing a lot more all mountain bikes in the park these days and Whistler has really stepped up their trail building to accommodate them. The question of can the Patrol survive that really depends on a lot of variables. How hard to you ride, how many times will you ride, will you be smashing DH trails, do you plan on crashing or coming up short on jumps etc, are you smooth rider or are you hard on equipment, are you riding park everyday or are you going to be mainly riding the out of park pedal trails (Which are awesome and rugged too). Personally I think the park is meant for DH bikes especially if you are riding a ton of days up there. I think if you are smooth rider and take care of your equipment and aren't smashing your bike everyday in the park you could be fine but you will have a lot more fun with a DH bike. - kevin
  • + 1
 Hi guys. My question is about converting my 26" 2012 Bottlerocket to 27.5". With a fixed budget, getting a new frame is out of the question for a long while, but with the space I have in the rearend, would there be a benefit of trying to fit a low profile tire along with a 27.5" wheel, and only upgrading my front fork? Or would that mess up my geometry?
  • + 1
 Lots of questions here, so in the event you get to mine, I should clarify that I use my Bottlerocket as my main "all mountain" rig. I'm finding it harder to find stores that stock 26" tires now, and with the trend moving to 27.5" and 29", it is the next logical step for me to move up to 27.5" for the riding I do.
  • + 2
 Personally I don't think it is worth it to change the Bottlerocket to a 27.5" wheeled bike. We have never tested it that way so can't comment on how much it is going to affect it or if you can even get the rear wheel in there. If you want to make it more all mountain friendly I would invest in a lighter wheelset and tires. Right now there are amazing deals on high end 26" products that you can get super cheap. If you love your bike don't buy into marketing buzz that 27.5 bikes are better. 26" bikes are just as much fun. - kevin
  • + 2
 Thanks for the reply. I love my Bottlerocket. As long as Maxxis keeps making the Minion & Ardent, I'll keep riding the 26" wheelset. Smile
  • + 1
 "Maybe next week" has become the bane of my existence for the last few months. I've been checking back with my LBS every two weeks to see if my Large Trans AM frame has arrived. Its seems as if it is very up in the air about shipping due to the dock worker strikes in California. So my question is, do you have any sort of time line when orders will be caught up?
Side note: I've probably watched your Trans AM Espresso video a hundred times in anticipation of my frame!
  • + 1
 Hey Cin - where are you located and who is your dealer? - Chris
  • + 1
 I'm in Cincinnati, OH and I'm buying through West Chester Cyclery. I ordered a large Trans AM frame in black. Your response to JBinKC makes the delays understandable. I'm just really anxious to get my frame and start riding!
  • + 3
 Why the hell are your bikes so damn expensive in Australia? Will you ever do direct sales? Would love a transition smuggler but 5k for the base model here
  • + 1
 Consider yourself lucky cause its 6k here.
  • + 1
 No, it's not. A Smuggler with Build Kit 2 has an RRP of $5,645 - which once you add tax to the US price plus some freight for bringing it halfway around the world is pretty reasonable...
  • + 2
 Yeah, please ditch Supersports or go direct sales!
  • + 1
 US price for Smuggler Kit 2 $3299 which is awesome value for money. Australian price is $5150 :/ I would direct sales the crap out of a US Smuggler if I could, even with the exchange rate being bad I'd still be well in front after shipping
  • + 1
 So US price converted to AUD is about $4300. Add Australian sales tax (which I believe is 10%) adds $430 brings you to $4,370 - leaves a difference of $780 AUD which can be explained by additional freight, duty, and some distributor margin. I really can't understand what you're griping about...

You've got to remember that US pricing never (generally) includes sales tax whereas everywhere else in the world it does.
  • + 2
 Nice point, but remember that the Australian distributor doesn't buy in at RRP. They would typically buy in from Transition at a significant percentage under RRP.
Seafreight over 200 bikes amounts to about $60 per bike. Duty is the same as GST here. 18% price difference.
  • + 3
 get a cheap plane to us, buy the bike , ride it there and come back with it!
  • + 3
 I think the logical next step is to go Carbon. The new suspension is proven and tested so that the addition of carbon will give a choice to people looking for a lighter setup
  • + 4
 Exactly why isn't Cam on the Panel???? I see a total loss of credibility and demand recompense!!! Pistols at high noon!!!
  • + 5
 I was going to ask where Transition's own grumpy cat was...
  • + 4
 He's on the bike but you just shut him away! Atleast give him a beer!
  • + 2
 Don't worry, he's right here in the Peanut Gallery heckling the hecklers.. Where's Melton?

- LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Have you though of offering both a carbon and an aluminum line up for your bikes such as other brands do ? As well, have you considered working with marzocchi so you bikes could be sold with marzocchi suspension right away ? that would be great Big Grin
  • + 3
 Hypothetical. If I was to wreck my beloved 2010 transition covert, do I qualify for a patrol? Under some sort of warranty scheme
  • + 1
 Fellas,

Can I work a deal where I cook for you post ride for a TransAm 29? I'm local, will travel north... In all honesty, on my third transition and cannot think of riding another brand after swinging my leg over my Covert. Are there any plans to make another longer travel 29er frame like the Covert of old? If so, I would certainly go that route again.
  • + 0
 Hey gentlemen, what was the real decision maker to push you towards the Horst link when you were already producing really solid bikes. The new paradigm of linking long front and shorter rear travel seems to be catching on which is something you guys are really pressing and making it work very well, bravo!
  • + 0
 On top of the first one, are you guys looking for another ME who is passionate about riding, culture, design, etc... Smile
  • + 4
 Can I be your slave in exchange for free bikes?
  • + 1
 How many lab coats must be worn to properly engineer a bike, and is this affected by whether beer is sipped normally, shotgunned, or eschewed for the most caffeinated coffee this side of Alpha Centauri?
  • + 4
 What happened to the "Bottle rocket"???
  • + 1
 Hi my name is shane haines .I live in the wasteland of Canada. Saskatchewan. My question is your can't going to join the trend and cut out 26 inch wheels.and is the company focusing in on enduro type bikes and klunvkers
  • + 2
 Will you be following up with more of the Get Dialed: Geometry Discussion series? I found Pt 1 informative but never saw any additional parts added.
  • + 2
 We're working on it. We've got a seat angle article in the works, but it has been on the back burner (or Afterburner as Cam would say) for a while since we're hella pinned this time of year. It will happen, promise. Just might be a little while.

- LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Are you planning to make the Patrol, Scout, Smuggler in Carbon? Exact same geometry, or do you plan to "tweak" anything? When would they be available for purchase (realistically)? Thank you. SICK bikes!!
  • + 3
 any tips for a mechanical engineer (student) who f*cking LOVES bikes to enter the industry??
  • + 2
 When are you guys going to sign Mercury Morgan as the newest member of the Klunk Crew? www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZhME5rVcP8
  • + 1
 Ooh, I don't know @Shadowracer80, he didn't land that Elephant gap with his feet on the pedals.. He's got some work to do.

- LarsNbars
  • + 1
 True. He is lucky he had that huge cruiser seat to soften the blow to his twig n berries. Impressive on a coaster though.
  • + 1
 Hi Guys, Do you happen to have a medium sized 2010-2012 Transition Blindside lying around in your warehouse? If so, would you be willing to sell it? I really like the way the bike fits me. Cheers!
  • + 3
 Can we please get some more frames in some awesome PBAST or Blue Ribbon vinyl raps that the bottlerocket had?
  • + 1
 Any changes planed for the 2016 Scout frame? I'm planning to build one up this coming winter. Not sure if I should hunt a deal at the end of the season or wait and see what's in store for next year.
  • + 1
 I love my Transition Covert 1, wicked spec and one of the funnest bikes I have ever ridden. My only small complaint is with the first generation Fox CTD rear shock. What shock would you guys recommend for a 225 pound rider?
  • + 4
 Do you guys prefer a Carbon or Aluminum shaft on your clubs?
  • + 6
 i prefer drinking beer and getting rad on golf-carts. -kyle
  • + 1
 Hi I'm looking forward to getting my transition suppressor in the summer and I'm 13 years old love transition my dad has a bandit are there going to be any carbon bike from you this year.
  • + 1
 What was the reasoning behind the 30.0 seat tube on Blindside and Bottlerocket? I love my Blindside to death but not being able to put a regular 30.9 dropper in there is killing meeeee.
  • + 2
 Will there be another run of the "everybody relax" liscence plate frames? I wish I bought one.
Thanks for making great bikes and even better advertisements.
  • + 3
 Why is Cam Burnes not answering questions?
  • + 3
 How does being based in the PNW influence your designs?
  • + 2
 i think where you live and style of riding that place has to offer is the biggest influence. our style of bikes comes from our style of riding, which in the PNW has lots of long climbs and burning descents. we travel a lot so we have a good pulse of what other people ride....but we always come back to designing our bikes to ride best how we like to ride them, which is here in the PNW. -kyle
  • + 2
 A lot! Rad trails and a lot of progressive riding going on. Wouldn't want to be based anywhere else! --Sam
  • + 2
 How many transitions could a woodchuck shred if a woodchuck could shred transitions?
  • + 1
 What does somebody need to do in order to work as an intern in your company and learn from you guys? (if they dont have an extensive work experience in the bike bussines)
  • + 1
 Depends on what sort of job you are looking for, I hired our last design intern after a collaborative project with our local University...He did have some shop experience and passion for riding/racing, but his strong work ethic and creativity is what got him the job. -Darrin
  • + 3
 When can we expect to see the pedal-assisted Jabron-E make it's debut?
  • + 3
 No, we decided to call it the 'Noah' now since you decided to ignore the bike park warnings and crash on your first run at Whistler - LarsNbars
  • + 0
 I had 3 buddies that ordered your bikes this winter and after months of waiting, all of them had to cancel and buy other brands. Good luck to you guys. Like your brand. Hopefully next year goes better for you
  • + 1
 Any chance of a raw Patrol like we saw in Lars' Loam Ranger edit? If so, I'd have one, along with many other people I'm guessing. Bikes look better naked.
  • + 2
 Maybe, but not in the immediate future. Raw is tough as it oxidizes so you need to clear coat over it. You don't even want to know how many times i had to polish that Patrol to keep it looking spiffy. We might have some 'Raw' colors soon, just maybe not shiny.
  • + 1
 How much does the community of the pacific northwest influence how you guys do business? could you see yourself being as successful if your headquarters was someplace else?
  • + 2
 I'm torn between the new patrol and the pivot Mach 6. What gives you the edge over the Mach6?
  • + 1
 FWIW, I have a lot friends that bought Pivots, & almost all of them sold them pretty quickly. The ones I've personally ridden just haven't "clicked" geo wise. Every Transition I've ridden, OTOH, has had geo that felt great.
  • + 1
 thanks mate
  • + 3
 Do you wanna give me a free TransAm... you know for 'testing'?
  • + 1
 I'm currently making a certificate to become a "UX Professional" (UX = User Experience).
Are there any jobs related to this segment in the MTB industry?
  • + 2
 What brand of horse did you guys use for Giddy up. Did you consider a donkey or mule?
  • + 5
 Patches is a Fjord horse or Norwegian Fjord Horse, which is a relatively small but very strong horse breed from the mountainous regions of Western Norway. It is an agile breed of light draught horse build. All Fjord horses are dun in colour, with five variations in shade recognised in the breed standard. One of the world's oldest breeds, it has been used for hundreds of years as a farm horse in Norway, and in modern times is popular for its generally good temperament. It is used both as a harness horse and under saddle, and great for Giddy Up'ing and carrying El Jimay. -LarsNbars
  • - 1
 Our company - Xiamen Finehope Polyurethane Co., Ltd devoted in promoting widely usage of polyurethane since 2002. During the past 12 years, we had worked with many prestigious companies.
www.polyurethanesupplierschina.com/jp/products.html
www.polyurethanesupplierschina.com
  • + 2
 How does a Mechanical engineer go about getting into the mountain bike industry, and is it a reasonable goal?
  • + 2
 please open up a bellingham thrift shop and sell all your demo bikes for dirt cheap please thanks
  • + 3
 Have emu's evolved into hipsters or are they separate classes of society?
  • + 3
 I must see a return of COCK technology
  • + 2
 We always keep everything Completely Optimized!....and some new Carbon Kinetics are on the way! You're welcome -Darrin
  • + 1
 Are you guys going to make a XC/trail hardtail? Why did you guys change the paint job on the rapture,the 2014 colors are awesome--the 2015 colors not so much.
  • + 1
 When your new HQ building is ready, are you going to throw a big party? Maybe a co-party with K2 (the new kulshan brewery) about a block away!
  • + 3
 Will you ever go the direct selling route like YT?
  • + 1
 Why are you guys the first company I personally have seen to spec such a difference between rear/frame travel and fork travel? Ps Stupid ass finals.
  • + 1
 I am currently in the market for a new bike. I'm looking for an all mountain do-it-all rig. The patrol is one of my top choices. Why should I buy the patrol over other bikes?
  • - 1
 So I see you guys like argyle and what not. You guys actually play golf or what? Hey, my favorite golfer was the late Payne Stewart. He often wore the argyle threads too. Maybe you guys can come up with a cool polo/golfing bike and name it the "Payne" or "Royal Pain"! Just an idea!
  • + 1
 Is a carbon front triangle or a whole carbon frame options going to be available on multiple models in the near future?
  • + 1
 i think there could be lots of triangles in carbon in our future....
  • + 2
 How many bikes do you think you've sold over the years?
  • + 2
 Somewhere between 10 and 50,000 - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Any chance you guys will be lowering prices soon? maybe making a more budget minded dh bike?
  • + 1
 Are you guys going to be hopping on the the + size bandawagon? FATBIKE KLUNKER (GROWLER)?
  • + 1
 @TransitionBikeCompany

Do you have plans to head overseas? Like South America or Asia?
  • + 1
 I was in Chile twice last year, I love it there. And the product guys Sam/Darrin/Kyle usually head to Asia a couple times a year.

- LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Thanks Lars... keep on shredding.

About distribution/exportation/retailers... Do you have a market plan for these place? Maybe i'm going to Brazil to work and my plans includes a Patrol.
  • + 1
 Hey transition will you guys be making a longer traveled version of the patrol anytime soon?
  • + 1
 Even though North America is so good for MTBing, would you consider coming to Britain to ride? specifically Wales??
  • + 3
 Absolutely, you get me a ticket and I'll take the ride! - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Sure!!! let me know!!
  • + 1
 Are there any bikes that you don't enjoy riding because of your style, or do you generally shred on all the bikes you make?
  • + 2
 how many PBRs does it take to screw in a light bulb these days?
  • + 1
 nice. follow up question. is it always beer:30?
  • + 2
 Should surf-n-turf be closed?
  • + 2
 That trail is awesome, we (the mountain bike community) should work with the new land owners to keep it open and make it work with the new park planning process.
  • + 2
 is it closed?

just rode it last week....best ever!
  • + 1
 I was up there a couple weeks ago and there were logs all across the trail but if it's back then I know what I'll be doing tomorrow!
  • - 2
 We are a community/trail oriented bike shop that has inquired with Transition about carrying bikes and after filling out all the paperwork never received any responses.... Does Transition feel this a good way to grow and help get more people on Transition Bikes? Cool bikes guess we just aren't cool enough to get call back or to sell them?
  • + 2
 We can't say for sure what's happened in this particular instance, however at times we are functioning at maximum capacity and it's hard to keep up. We are a super small company and there are only 10 of us here. Please don't take it personally. Where are you located, and what's the name of your shop?

- LarsNbars
  • - 2
 We are The Hub in Napa, California-
www.thehubnapa.com -
Keith@thehubnapa.com 707.253.2453
At this point customers the customers that are interested are feeling pretty let down.
Id love to hear from someone......
  • + 2
 Can I ask question without having a Transition bike?
  • + 2
 Nope, sorry.. haha, just joshing. What you got?

- LarsNbars
  • + 1
 why did you get rid of the carbon covert, saved and waited 6 months to get it..
  • + 2
 When you wake up in the morning, do you piss excellence? Big Grin
  • + 9
 Obviously. And Rainier. - LarsNbars
  • + 1
 @TransitionBikeCompany
Simple question really.
I have a trans-am 29er 2012.
what's the fattest I can go tyre wise?
cheers
G
  • + 1
 Would you ever consider doing semi-custom bikes (like Guerrilla Gravity, etc.)?
  • + 1
 Are you guys thinking about building a XC bike? And would you consider a 2014 covert 29 to be a enduro bike?
  • + 2
 You guys rule Fack Ya rider owned forever!
  • + 1
 Ya Bud! - LarsNbars
  • + 2
 No question, just want to thank you for my Patrol, it's so rad Big Grin
  • + 2
 No problem man! Glad you like it! -LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Is something like the TR250 ever going to make a comeback? I know you have the TR500, but its still not a fun as the TR250.
  • + 1
 The tr500 with single crown is just as rad!
  • + 2
 What is the most difficult aspect of bringing a new frame to market?
  • + 4
 controlling the media release. -kyle
  • + 2
 Are you hiring? I would like to work for you!
  • + 1
 any plans to visit some german bike parks this year? met you in Lac Blanc 2 years ago

love my smuggler!
  • + 2
 ooh lac blanc! yes, that was a fun day! always open to more euro bike park shredding. maybe we'll do a pre or post-eurobike shred this year. let's do it! -kyle
  • + 1
 yeeah Lac Blanc is fun ! drop me a message when you know time an place. cheers Sven
  • + 1
 Does riding a Trasition make one more Krunk, that is, does it improve Krunkability?
  • + 2
 There's only one true Krunk, and his ability is off the charts! -LarsNbars
  • + 1
 Whats the newest bike "Standards" we will see in the future?
  • + 1
 When is Klunkers 3 coming out? Rumor has it you guys went to Repack?
  • + 1
 good stuff guys. thanks, but l need to know about the party! haha
  • + 1
 do you plan on doing a carbon patrol? loving my aluminum one
  • - 32
flag Matt76 (Jun 10, 2015 at 14:55) (Below Threshold)
 Jeez not another one.......bloody carbon sheep!
  • + 4
 you really hate carbon for you to reply to every body that said that
i personally wouldn't buy a carbon frame, in fact the only carbon i have on my bikes it's the spacers on the steer tube (and my road bike) because with the use i give to my bike and racing with it i wouldn't feel comfortable because if you crash you can damage your frame and you are fu*ked , but it would be good for the brand too appeal to more people that only buy bikes that are carbon
  • + 1
 I'm amazed at how many times this question has been asked, yet these images have been circulating for at least six months. It is coming.
fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/transition-bikes/961867d1423162212-carbon-patrol-scout-1682519-2hjpxk4ol1k6-2015patrolcf-original.jpg
  • + 1
 Do you know what type of headset I should get for the covert 2012 frame?
  • + 1
 Any tips for stopping the cable rattle on my new patrol?
  • + 1
 Some guys are routing them through a bit of heat shrink and sending that wrap into the downtube, then shrinking a small portion left outside of the top tube. Honestly, I found that any rattle on mine was outside of the downtube and a couple of clips or ties by the headtube takes care of it. - Chris
  • - 1
 Here's a question, Why does a tr 500 start to make horrible creaking sounds when you pedal, even though it's practicaly brand new?
  • + 2
 your does? where?
mine the only thing that was crappy was the bearings, and on my patrol in 4 rides some of them were starting to stop , and i don't jet wash
  • + 1
 My new Diamondback sortie does that too. Don't know if it has to do with the bike, although I have a shimano xt drivetrain. What do you have?
  • + 1
 How do you phonetically pronounce wheels?
  • + 1
 can i have a tour of the factory is I come to ferndale?
  • + 1
 SURE! We are moving August 1st to our new factory so I would wait but we always have an open door policy. - kevin
  • + 1
 YES better hurry though. we move august 1 to a way sweeter spot. -kyle
  • + 1
 What are some of the most fun trails you have ever ridden in New England?
  • + 2
 Too many good ones out there. My favorites are probably in places I've lived - northern VT, Vietnam trails, Highland....lots of good memories of those all. - Chris
  • + 1
 Any plans for a scout in 26" ?
  • + 1
 Would you guys ever consider hiring a engineering co-op student?
  • + 1
 What is the future of 26 inch wheels; obsolete or will they live on?
  • + 4
 dead. we're working on a few new wheel size standards. somewhere between 24" and 26". i think it's really gonna take off!
  • + 1
 Where did the transition bank go?
  • + 1
 PBJ?!?
  • + 2
 The Bank saved up enough money to retire.
  • + 1
 What happened to cock and balls Technology?
  • + 2
 our cock & balls is still out there!
  • + 1
 Fresh Dungeness or Kumomotos? Pick one.
  • + 2
 Get crackin with the dungeness and keep it up with the kumamotos says Cam - LarsNbars
  • + 3
 I heard Cam already has crabs this season.
  • + 2
 How's your face Sam?
  • + 4
 Looks better than yours Noah Wink

It hurts... one broken tooth. No broken bones... but 4 stitches on my face and 14 inside my lower lip. I am going to bring back freeride and start riding more of the gnarly trails with a full face. In hindsight, Gargamel is probably not a half shell trail.

--Sam
  • + 1
 Where in Socal (San Diego) can I see a Suppressor?
  • + 2
 Check Alpine Ride Shop
  • + 2
 Thanks.
  • + 1
 Have you ever jumped your Raptor?
  • + 3
 YES! I think I got like 3 feet of air. - kevin
  • + 1
 Why don't you guys make "Now in carbon" bike?
  • + 0
 Any thoughts of making 27.5 + full suspension bikes?
  • + 1
 hey Chris
  • + 1
 Is it true that you were brought on because Cam could not meet the needs of transition and his new lady at the same time?
  • + 3
 Hi Sam! I was brought on strictly for my looks. - Chris
  • + 0
 When will we see Anvl components on Transition bikes?
  • + 2
 You can see some on the current lineup, the Forge saddle and Rasp grips for instance have been on the TR500 and some of the GiddyUp bikes all year. -Darrin
  • + 1
 ANVL was started as an aftermarket oriented company and an opportunity for us to make cool parts that we would want to ride. You already see some parts on some models. But the reality of manufacturing and supply chain actually make it pretty hard for us to be our own component supplier. Saddles and grips are pretty easy for us to use on our builds. But some parts, like handlebars for example, have a high minimum order and we can't really run a production of bars every time Transition needs parts for assembly. Things would be a bit different if the parts were "open models" produced with our logos... but that isn't what ANVL is all about. --Sam
  • + 1
 What's next?
  • - 1
 What's the company policy on Marijuana?
  • - 1
 why do you guys make steel bikes? You don't see it often by other brands.
  • + 4
 We love the feel of steel hardtails. To us they have a better trail feel than alloy.
  • - 2
 I just bought a trans am this morning but I have no swag to go with it. Can you help with this issue?
  • + 2
 @Laruebc How does it ride? Thinking about building up a transam 27.5 with a 140mm fork out front.
  • + 2
 Its being shipped. I literally just bought it.
  • + 1
 Gotcha, thanks
  • - 1
 Where's the Fatbike?
  • + 3
 There are a lot of them available in the market. Right now you won't find one from us. So... yeah.... --Sam
  • + 5
 What's a Fatbike?

- LarsNbars
  • - 2
 your bikes are sweet. Can i have one?
  • + 2
 Im sure all you have to do to get one is open your wallet!!! Razz
  • + 19
 If you buy a T-Shirt for $1999 USD I think we could throw in a Patrol frame for free. --Sam
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