Round Up: Carrying Solutions From the SilverStar Crankworx Summer Series Enduro

Jul 29, 2020 at 1:17
by Aidan Oliver  

As integrated tools and fancy straps become commonplace out on the trails, we take a look at how the pros are carrying their tools, water and fuel at the SilverStar Crankworx Summer Series Enduro race.

Rhys Verner

OneUp Components' integrated tool and pump system is the most popular choice for riders with a tool tucked away in your stem and a pump attached to your bottle cage. To complete the look Rhy Verner also had OneUp's strap holding a tube to his frame.


As well as the OneUp system Rhys had an emergency mech hanger tied to the underside of his seat.


if you don't want to thread your steerer tube, OneUp's large volume pump can also fit a multi-tool inside. Neat.

Remi Gauvin riding Rocky Mountain

Tire plugs are crucial in. case you fall victim to SilverStar's sharp rocks.


Henry Fitzgerald

Are integrated tools not unique enough for you? Henry Fitzgerald was using this custom leather multi-tool pouch, made using a hand cranked leather stitching machine. Very hipster.

Leonie Picton
Leonie Picton

Good old packs haven't died off yet with Leonie Picton using a 3L Evoc hip pack to carry all the essential spares.

Jakob Jewett

For those wanting something more stealth, Jacob Jewett was running this RaceFace waistband to store a pump, tube and tire levers.

Lucas Cruz
Lucas Cruz

For Lucas Cruz a tube taped to the frame a multi tool in your pocket is all that's needed.


Mckay Vezina riding Giant

Mckay Vezina had this nifty pouch stowed away with all the spares and snacks.



Henry Fitzgerald's Topeak pump has a lock on lever and delivers air when pushing AND pulling for any quick fixes.


103 Comments

  • 104 7
 Good luck to everyone strapping their (unprotected) tube right in the firing line of all kids of projectiles coming off the rear wheel...

Also, the RaceFace belt with the pump right in line with the spine does not appear like the smartest placement.
  • 181 17
 valid points... But are you fun at parties?
  • 8 0
 While we’re nitpicking, riding with a small hip pack like the Osprey Savu is not a big deal at all, and in my experience, much quicker access to tools and spares than detaching and reattaching multiple things stashed around my bike. I currently have my repair kit in the Wolf Tooth B-Rad system on a spare cage mount, and I like not wearing a bag. But if I were racing I think I’d go back to the small hip pack for quicker access. Maybe I’m mistaken though?
  • 4 3
 Partypooper.
  • 4 1
 @BiNARYBiKE: I'm not against hip/bum/fanny packs at all and use them myself (racing and otherwise). I just think that the placement of the pump is not ideal. Guess you can also just use a different slot on the belt.
  • 29 1
 @mikeserafin: I pooped at a party once. Turns out it's better if you use a toilet.
  • 11 0
 @pensamtb: If you really want to be the "party pooper", put one in the upper deck.
  • 4 0
 Gotta day I’ve got a buddy that broke his back with his pump that was placed vertically in his pack. Unfortunately, this is a real issue.
  • 12 4
 Also I would like to see Rhy Verner get that *double* zip tied RD hanger out from under his seat, under race stress without injuring himself with a knife )since I cuppose he does not have side cutters in his pocket.

That one is totally useless.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I love my Osprey Savu and I didn't want to switch to fanny pack, but love that it's cheaper than most anything else, inteligently designed & definitely faster to get to than a stash pack like that.
I sweat like a hog in heat....and that's the main reason I got the Savu was just to stop drenching my back.

And just like you, I strap my tube & tire levers to my frame (the tube is wrapped inside a thin piece of innertube and electrical tape closed so it doesn't get nicked).
My frame won't let me stash the CO2 safely anywhere, so it's int he Savu with my boo boo kit, mini pump and tool, snacks, contact solution & chapstick, Stans Dart, zip ties and big section of folded flat duct tape
  • 5 0
 I landed on my back hard a couple years ago and the multi-tool & pump in my pack did a wonderful job of bruising my spine.... I now have them strapped to the frame.
  • 1 3
 @gooutsidetoday: You win the internets today!
  • 1 0
 @thedirtyburritto: I was thinking the exact same thing!
  • 1 0
 @thedirtyburritto: yeah, i've been looking for a place to store my extra hanger because its such a large one. got excited by this, then after like 5 seconds, started wondering how the heck he cuts those ties
  • 3 0
 @thedirtyburritto: I do this (hanger under the seat). Plan is to just put my multitool allen in there and twist. Should be really easy to get out.
  • 2 1
 @thedirtyburritto: It also begs to ask the question of why every bike doesn't have a way to click an extra hanger onto the frame somewhere as an option. Say...make the port where cables go internal have a longer window with a hanger holder molded onto the back of it. Click it out to route cables or salvage a ride.
  • 2 0
 @thedirtyburritto:

OK...so that was weird. After I typed that comment about hiding a derailleur hanger in the cable port, several comments down from here someone posted this about the Kona Process. It literally has that exact setup. I don't remember ever reading that they did it. But everyone should:

ep1.pinkbike.org/p5pb15157045/p5pb15157045.jpg

Now...for the real question. @Aidan Oliver why does Rhys not put his hanger in that port if his bike comes with a port for it?
  • 5 0
 @thedirtyburritto: I carry a one up tool in my steer tube. I can easily pop that hangar off the seat rails if I stick the 2mm Allen key in there and break the zap straps. The same setup saved my race in Zermatt last year.
  • 3 1
 @blowmyfuse: because the port is full of weed.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: It would take too long to get it out is my guess. Every second counts during a repair....
  • 1 0
 @thedirtyburritto: There's also a spare hanger attached to the underside of the internal cable routing port cover on the downtube of the Process. so zipped to the seat is useless and unnecessary!
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: the Process already has an extra hanger on the underside of the internal routing port cover on the downtube!
  • 36 1
 Interesting - I usually run my OneUp pump with the tool sliding in from the top, so big or repeated hits won't pop it out out the bottom... Bold strategy Cotton!
  • 3 0
 Yeah same. It can slide out
  • 1 0
 I have the opposite issue, my tool will never slide out of the pump but on big / repeated hits the pump part will slide out, so I run mine pump side up to prevent this. Noticed this especially in the park.
  • 2 0
 @rowyoboat: I stalked your strava - we're on the same page Smile

Also, Nice GG!
  • 3 0
 Same same- I was thinking that when I saw the pic. I find even with it angled up (pump mech on top)that really rough trails can dislodge it from the little gasket and it will rattle around till I figure out where the rattling is coming from and reset the gasket to hold it in place. I couldn't imagine if it was upside down trying to telescope down with every hit. Bold indeed. Love the pump though- really well thought out. I also constantly loose the O-rings so have been clipping it in ring free for a while and it seems to hang in there just fine.
  • 2 0
 I run my pump with the tool sliding upwards also just because the logos go that way.
  • 2 0
 @iduckett: Thanks! It's a fun bike!
  • 1 0
 for sure! tool up is common sense!
  • 34 0
 Am I the only one that ist concern about having something as hard as a Pump attached to your Spine?
  • 5 0
 Nope.
  • 3 0
 who falls?
  • 40 0
 Just stick it up ya bum
  • 5 0
 No, i am not concerned. I am very sure it will brake your vertabre. I don't understand how people can think that this is a clever idea.
I broke my L1 once (despite wearing an evoc backpack) and i will not think about what had happend if i had something hard in my backpack.
  • 1 1
 @bummel42: are you saying the backpack didn’t protect you, or that it actually made it worse?
  • 2 0
 @BeKwik: No, it saved me. Without it would have been worse!
  • 1 0
 Nope. And Mike Leavy has a good story about being damaged by such a thing.
  • 1 0
 @colincolin: you forgot to say "NO HOMO"
  • 1 0
 @typerk87: No he loves that stuff, like a Man an another Man
  • 22 0
 Just do what I do and bum all your kit trail side off other people, it doesn't make you popular but it does make it easy - zing
  • 22 0
 Richard Cunningham has disappeared people for that type of behaviour.
  • 17 0
 I wonder how long before we see personalized drones following each rider carrying everything needed for an emergency repair.
  • 24 0
 Autonomous e-bike that rides better than you while also filming your Friday Fails submission?
  • 1 0
 And capable of charging batteries (ebike/phone/smartwatch/gps/gears/dropperposts/powermeters/HRstraps/lights/and all those needed gadgets for Real MTBiking
  • 1 0
 @TDMAN: oh god am i not doing it right? time to use my life saving i guess, because i need that internet gratification
  • 1 0
 My own personal Lakitu (Mario Kart cloud guy) to rescue me?!
  • 1 0
 @justgoride: don't forget riding kit Wink
  • 1 0
 @silentbutdeadly: You did it. You crazy son of a bitch, you did it.
  • 11 0
 If there’s room to strap a multitool or a spare tube behind the seat tube, there’s room for the frame designer to use a non-kinked seat tube.
  • 11 3
 Hope he's carrying some snips to get that gear hanger off his saddle rail...

Also, stowing things on the back of the seat tube is a terrible idea, if you ever see any moisture on the trails and still not a great idea with desert riding in summer. And a bespoke leather holder for an (exposed) multi-tool is just crying for attention without any real thought to practicalities. Would you keep your socket set in a non-water tight container in the wheel arch of a 4x4?
  • 2 16
flag EarlyRise (Jul 29, 2020 at 5:44) (Below Threshold)
 Fun at parties...
  • 6 0
 Those tiny zip ties take barely any force to break! The 4mm hex key on your multi tool would easily lever them apart.
  • 1 0
 twist it, dude
  • 7 0
 Norco provide a lovely extra set of bolts on the inside of the top tube for attaching a little pouch with all the essentials, then their factory riders go and strap stuff to the back of the seat tube.....
  • 7 0
 Stupid question, why are saddle bag not popular on MTB? I find them really useful and you don't feel it when riding.
  • 4 0
 They’ll come into fashion like bum bags... or what about jerseys with pockets like those evil road cyclists!
  • 32 0
 They usually don't clear the rear tire when the seat is dropped.
  • 10 1
 Most ones I have used wrap around or at least make contact with the seatpost. That can cause issues with a dropper post, which is why I run one on the gravel bike but not the MTB. The tire being pretty close to the rear tire is another issue on certain frames.
  • 11 0
 Running a little Ortileb Micro Two saddle pack on all my bikes. No tyre buzz and dropper compatible. Fits a tube and a tool + a few other bits. Pump next to the bottle cage. Snacks and phone in short pockets. Job jobbed.
  • 4 0
 dropper posts, rear tires. and they are noisy as all hell, no matter how many rags you cram in there.
  • 1 0
 @ItsWilkoed: Almost exactly same except I'm still not happy with my phone position! Wish there was a good way to have it on the bike. I use a top tube bag for that purpose but it's not the most elegant.
  • 3 0
 @IamZOSO: They also can interfere with the dropper if they wrap around the post. But your right, the bigger issue is a having something to rub against the tire in full compression after a drop.
  • 3 0
 @justgoride: Yeah, seat bags are loud. Like Samwise Gamgee carrying your luggage
  • 4 0
 OneUp's integrated steerer tube tool is alright, but definitely has its drawbacks. Syncros has had a better solution for years. Their Tailor Cage bottle cage comes with all the trailside tools you could need. 14 tools slide into a cassette that locks neatly below the bottle cage. It's quick to access, rattle free, keeps the weight low on the bike, requires no steerer tube modification, and you can move it from bike to bike. It's THE best solution for carrying tools on-bike. Not sure why more people don't use it, but I think Scott doesn't market the product enough. Anyone else here using it?
  • 3 0
 Topeak ninja cage does the same. Or just use the oneup pump which holds the tool.
  • 2 0
 Some bikes don't have bottle cage mounts at all, and some can barely fit small bottle into the cage before they run into clearance issues, so having the cage higher than usual is impossible.
  • 1 0
 @ondreja: Good point. My rig has plenty of room in the front triangle, but with the Syncros Tailor and my shock reservoir taking valuable real estate it has forced me to run a smaller water bottle. Bummer for sure, but it's a trade-off I'm willing to make.
  • 2 0
 The OneUp system is the only one I've seen that also includes a tire plug storage. With the Syncros you'd need to carry one separately. I use my OneUp EDC tool in the 100c pump (rather than in the streerer tube) so it really is an all-in-one system.
  • 1 0
 My 2018 Process 153 has the bottle cage on the downtube so bottle cage style tool mounts just act as a way to punch a hole in my bike
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: was gonna ask if anyone uses the Topeak ninja for janky enduro trails. Do you have use one? Any rattling?
  • 1 0
 @Snapcatcher: nearly bought one, but went oneup instead
  • 1 0
 @Snapcatcher: I have one, but I'm not completely convinced. The rotating tool box doesn't have a particularly strong detent or feel very solid so I think it would rattle. I haven't used it on the enduro bike, because the tool box fouls on the downtube kink
  • 1 0
 @jon123rjk: Yup that's true, no space for tire plug storage on the Syncros. Since I run a tube strap anyway, I utilize that space to store the tube, bacon strips, co2 and tire lever.
  • 4 0
 Bike manufacturers need to start integrating a bolt on spare der. hanger. Do it already!
  • 6 0
 I recall seeing a Solid Strike with a spare hanger integrated into a suspension linkage, which I thought was ingenious

edit: found it: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11880333
  • 5 0
 The Kona Process 153 CR has a spare hanger holder built into the exit port for the cables on the downtube and I thought that was a great idea. It is briefly mentioned in this article www.pinkbike.com/news/kona-process-2018-first-look.html
  • 1 0
 Liteville has a spare breaker bolt in the frame.
  • 1 0
 Whats wrong with the Topeak Cage Pack? Granted I dont use a water bottle so my cage is free but still a lot of bikes have 2 cage mounts. I can get everything in the Topeak cage pack... I carry my multi tool in my camelback for quick access but the tube, spares, CO2's, hanger, etc.. all fit.
  • 4 0
 Those rainbow norcos are a beaut for sure
  • 3 0
 Am I the last one who doesn't mind riding with a quality backpack..? It's really not an issue. EVOC FTW
  • 2 0
 I still reckon SWAT is the best solution. Whilst I don't have the burrito box on my current bike, I'm really loving my Occam Designs strap with the Boa. Super secure.
  • 1 0
 “Mckay Vezina had this nifty pouch stowed away with all the spares and snacks.”
Stowed where? Looks a bit big to do a Captain Koons
  • 17 0
 Stowed in the prison wallet
  • 1 0
 Anyone else also given up with the Oneup stem preloader? Mine came loose every 3-4 rides and it's a ballache to retighten on the trail - have gone back to a starnut for now.
  • 1 0
 One question pro all carry tubes but the y have insert as well what do they do with their after putting a tube in their wheel ?
  • 7 10
 Have none of these pros ever heard of a Camelback? Carry your water and tools in one handy bag that sits on your back and doesn't affect you at all. Mounting all these tools to the frame, or inside steer tubes, strapping tubes to the frame? I mean, come on. You get a flat on the descent, I'd think you're no longer in contention. Take the extra minute to fix your flat. You're done anyway. I have spoken.
  • 6 5
 Couldn’t agree more ... this practice of strapping stuff to bikes has got to end.
  • 26 4
 Cause Riding with a pack sucks.
  • 2 4
 @d-man: why?
  • 3 1
 @d-man: I agree with that statement ... in summer. Spring or fall, or long rides in summer (>3h pedaling), when the weather can change so fast and I need spare layers or 2L+ of water and don't have a good place to filter, I have resigned myself to a Camelbak.
  • 4 1
 @BeKwik: to hot and the weight on my shoulders is noticable. Try no pack you'll never go back.
  • 2 0
 @husstler: there are times when a pack is needed for sure. Big Alpine rides need more safety gear food etc.
  • 2 1
 @d-man: so where do you carry enough water? I use 2+ litres on a normal 4 hour ride. Then there’s tools a jacket first aid kit and snacks to carry. Where do you keep it all without a bag or do you not go out for long enough to need it? What happens if you or one of your riding buddies needs first aid
  • 4 2
 @CM999:

1. Filter, from a stream
2a,b. Steer tube tools. Grow back-hair
3. Leave for dead
  • 1 0
 @CM999: longer rides than 3hrs and or if I need to carry a jacket I do use a Dakine fanny pack.
Back country rides require a pack for the essential safety gear, first aid etc.
  • 1 0
 Why do Joes get so defensive about backpacks?
  • 1 0
 @d-man: unfortunately, I've got a bike that PB commentators would never buy. It only has water bottle mounts under the downtube. I will never mount a bottle there, so if I want to drink water, I must Camelback it. But, I've been wearing one since they were first invented, and I honestly do not even notice it.
  • 3 3
 Needs quick access to a derailleur hanger in case of emergency...zip ties it to his saddle rails.
  • 10 0
 If you can't work out how to snap a pissy little zip tie with a chunk of aluminum you're going to struggle in life.
  • 4 0
 You're not going to fix it in a stage. If it bends, you'll either ride down single-speed or run then fix it before transitioning. Not really a problem if it isn't easy to grab quickly
  • 2 2
 Or......just carry it in your pocket.

Post a Comment



You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.020230
Mobile Version of Website