Burning Question: How Long Are Bike Shop Service Lead Times Right Now?

Apr 23, 2021 at 9:10
by Alicia Leggett  

With the bike boom making shops more slammed than a roadie's stem, we wanted to hear straight from the source: How long would it take to get some bike work done?

We've heard rumors of shops that have been scheduling repairs so far in advance that a customer might as well build a whole new bike out of zip ties in the meantime, and other rumors of shops that seem more or less unaffected by the surge in mountain biking participation, so we reached out to a selection of bike shops with some questions.

How far out are you scheduling major bike tuneups?
How far out are you scheduling minor bike work?
Why are shops so busy right now?
How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?
Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


It's worth noting that although we reached out to shops worldwide, the responses below are all from shops in North America. We will update this article if we receive other responses from regions not yet featured, as we aim to accurately represent the state of the global bike shop industry.



Fanatik Bike Co - Bellingham, Washington, USA


How far out are you scheduling for major bike tune-ups?


Right now, we are about four weeks out for major, mountain-bike-specific tune-ups. Certain tune-ups might take longer if we have to order parts, such as full-bearing replacement kits.

How far out are you scheduling for minor bike work?


We always have one mechanic stationed out front to handle minor bike work. We have a large garage door where the mechanic sets up and checks in bikes throughout the day. They can replace broken parts, adjust drivetrains, install new tires, etc, as time permits. This is done on a first come first serve basis. On the weekends, we prioritize on-the-spot work, and always have at least two mechanics on hand. There is typically a steady flow of riders who are trying to get up to Galbraith or any of the other local trail networks and just need some minor adjustments.

Why are shops so busy right now?


There seem to be a multitude of factors that have made things extra hectic for us. The pandemic drove more people outside last year than we can remember in recent history. This week, Governor Inslee has urged Washingtonians to “take it outside,” in regard to gatherings and recreation, which mirrors advice experts have been expressing for the past year. Over that time, many people who haven’t been on their bikes in quite a while have rediscovered their love of riding and have found that their bikes are in disrepair. More people riding means more bikes needing service.

How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?


Supply issues haven’t affected servicing bikes for us as much as it has affected our custom-built mountain bikes. While our turnaround time on a custom build might normally be fairly short, that is largely dependent on the accessibility of parts. We have customers going with their second or third choice on parts in hopes of getting their bikes shipped sooner.

Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


Bike shops seem to be doing quite well for themselves currently. The challenge many of us will face will be to keep this momentum going in the years following this spike in business. At Fanatik, we have the opportunity to reach a large population of new riders. We are excited to help welcome more people into the sport, but we also have a responsibility to balance those efforts with continued appreciation towards the customers who have been with us for a long time. Despite our large web presence, we are still a local bike shop serving a vast community of cyclists.



Flagstaff Bicycle Revolution - Flagstaff, Arizona, USA


How far out are you scheduling for major bike tuneups?


This year, with the ever increasing demand, we are experimenting with some new service models. The traditional first come first serve check in model and an appointment based model. We are allowing a small number of appointments per day but they can only be scheduled after the current checkin turnaround time. First come first serve is already much busier than normal, with April averaging 7-14 day turnarounds. Some exquisite spring weather and drier than normal trails are definitely a factor. Our appointment option is already booked out into mid-May.

How far out are you scheduling for minor bike work?


If we can tackle it on the spot, then we will. If we can’t, it gets checked in or we schedule an appointment.

Why are shops so busy right now?


The Covid-19 induced bike boom brought large numbers of new cyclists into the sport and into our doors. Majority of these riders are inexperienced and need assistance on a myriad of bike topics. While we are adjusting to handle the increased demand, the positive takeaway for us is that all of these new participants appear to be stoked on the sport and are eager for another season's riding. When the big rush of bike sales started around this time last year, we were worried that this would be a flash in the pan and that all these sweet bikes would become dust collectors in your neighbor's garage. At least in our community, this doesn’t appear to be the case.

How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?


Massively. When parts are scarce, bikes take longer to fix. It also forces us to get creative and find some alternative solutions to keep your bike rolling while we wait on parts. Being good neighbors to the other shops in town has been crucial as we search for parts that they might have in stock, and we may have something that they need.

Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


I personally think 2021 is going to wilder than 2020 for bike shops. With bikes and parts scarcely available, and all of these new riders itching for help, service, and fresh gear, it's going to be trying times for shop employees. It’s easier to say, “be compassionate” than to do it, but I think it will be an important thing to practice for both customers and employees. We all just want to help you find your next dream bike, or to keep your current rig in prime riding condition. But it’s gonna be harder and busier than ever this year. Stay stoked and happy trails.



Missoula Bicycle Works - Missoula, Montana, USA

Before we go any further, it's worth mentioning that the Missoula Bicycle Works Instagram is amazing.

How far out are you scheduling for major bike tuneups?


We are currently going about 3-4 weeks out. We are doing about double the amount of repairs per day as we would be doing in a "normal" year. In the past if we were booked out two weeks we are stressed out.

How far out are you scheduling for minor bike work?


We are able to get to small stuff like flat fixes we are able to get to the same day. But since we are so backed up on major repairs we are having people leave their bike for a day or two to get something done that we would usually do on the same day, like chain installation, brake pad installation, wheel truing, etc.

Why are shops so busy right now?


Our region has had a huge population boom in the past year with new people moving from the cities to the small town to get away from Covid. The allure of cheaper housing, remote work, and the opportunity to live in the mountains has created a boom inside of a boom for our city. Everyone here has a bike or has a friend that just got a new one so they want a new one. We also saw a lot of people lose their prefered way of working out like going to the gym or spin class so they saw biking as a great way to get out and exercise.

How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?


Since we are so far out it gives us a little buffer room to try and find certain parts or we have to tell the customer to try and source the part online. That is unfortunate to send people to the online stores but people seem to be appreciative of you helping them find the part. But there are some items that are just getting harder and harder to find like chains and brake pads, those are things that every bike will wear out if it is ridden and it is frustrating not having those basics readily available.

Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


As an industry as a whole we are not set up to handle this level of back orders and looking 1.5-2 years in the future. Is this boom going to continue? Do I need to stock up for this kind of continued growth 2 years from now? We are having to place orders for all of 2022 in April of 2021. That means no special orders for someone looking for their dream bike.

Wear items like chains are among the most difficult parts for shops to stock right now.



University Bicycles - Boulder, Colorado, USA


How far out are you scheduling for major bike tuneups?


We are scheduling 2 weeks out for repairs.

How far out are you scheduling for minor bike work?


We do most minor repairs on the spot, if they are going to take more than 10-15 minutes, we schedule them 2 weeks out.

Why are shops so busy right now?


The global pandemic has proven cycling to be one the safest activities for people to do. They can maintain social distance while getting exercise and having fun. This has created a large spike in demand for new bike sales, and repairs. Locally, we had multiple bike shops shut down or restructure, so we are absorbing a large number of new clients.

How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?


We are running out of parts that we are accustomed to having in stock. That means we are pivoting to different brands and suppliers to try and keep bikes running. It also means that clients are having to deal with nagging issues while waiting for parts to come into stock. There is also a growing list of clients that have unrideable bikes and are waiting for essential parts. While that list of clients is small, we have concerns about our ability to fix issues for clients as they arise throughout our busy season.

Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


The pandemic has proven bike shops to be an essential business. The skilled labor of quality bicycle mechanics and the presence of brick and mortar bike shops are extremely important to the cycling community. Shops that can provide high quality customer service are thriving, while other shops are struggling with the demand. The service provided by a good bike shop is even more important as new bike sales have shifted more to a direct to consumer model. People who bought their bike directly from the manufacturer still need help with service issues. Along with that, sometimes people just need to buy a tube or some sealant and not wait for shipping.



RideHub Cafe - Squamish, British Columbia, Canada


How far out are you scheduling for major bike tuneups?


1 week.

How far out are you scheduling for minor bike work?


1 to 2 days.

Why are shops so busy right now?


Lots of new people into the sport.

How are supply chain issues affecting service delays?


It's been tough, but we saw it coming and ordered ahead.

Any other bike shop state of the union thoughts?


Well, our shop is diverse as we are also a cafe and hub for riders in Squamish, if we don't have a part a friend of a friend might and we are really working to keep everyone on bikes and keep the community vibe high.


252 Comments

  • 125 11
 Short answer: too long.
  • 8 6
 Much too fat & a little too long.
  • 84 6
 Long answer: tooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo looooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong
  • 22 2
 Short Answers for the win though... RideHub doin it right!
  • 74 0
 Long answer: I just quit my mechanic job after a decade of wrenching on bikes because sick of shit pay, no benefits and annoying customers. f*ck YA'LL I'M GONNA GO RIDE MY BIKE I FIXED MYSELF.
  • 38 1
 Longest answer: Any shop worth their salt is trying damn hard to keep you stoked on riding bikes right now. Parts are scarce, demand is high, and experience level is more varied than ever. Shop employees are lending out personal bikes, selling or giving away their own spares, and staying way late or coming in early sacrificing their own ride time to keep you on the trails hooting and hollering. Be nice and pay it forward if you can, it shouldn’t be that hard if you really love this community.
  • 6 5
 So entitled...
  • 4 2
 @deonvg: no kidding
  • 7 0
 The longest answer here was 4 weeks for a major tune-up scheduled by appointment. The others were 7 to 14 days. Honestly that's really good for this time of year. For the past 4 years, every april/may I've spent in 3 different shops, it was all 4+ weeks for a major tune. Obviously little things still get done on the spot.

I really don't think Covid has anything to do with the service turnaround times. This is pretty normal. As soon as we get into June, you will see turnaround times drop back down to 4-5 days for a major, and 2-3 for a minor.

In our shop specifically, we actually have less work than normal, because there are no bikes available to sell or be built. So the staff that typically build bikes are able to answer the phone and work the front desk, while the mechanics can focus on cranking out service.
  • 5 0
 I don’t see anything mentioning stimulus. A lot of the biking population is eligible for it and im sure that effects their amount of flexible spending.
  • 2 0
 @deonvg: tell me about it
  • 7 0
 @nation: This summer I did a handful of 16-hour shifts, I got my shop from 2-3 weeks back to 2-3 days. It ain't much but its honest work
  • 2 0
 @deonvg: That's not what I was going for. Perhaps "Short answer: very long" would have been better wording.
  • 2 0
 24/48 hour turnaround repairs in Chattanooga @Trek Store Chattanooga Smile
  • 1 0
 @boogereater42069: Did the same a few years ago mate... and when they come to a guy saying that they saw how its done on youtube?? God Dam!
  • 6 1
 @carreiro-12: I've managed shops on either side of the country in major cities and small towns, worked as a field rep and worked alongside big shops all over the country, and what I learned from 10+ years of customer facing industry work is....cycling would be great if it wasn't for all the cyclists.


edit: Also, everyone go out RIGHT NOW and buy a spare chain cuz that shits about to be impossible to get.
  • 3 0
 @kcy4130: okay, fair enough. I am a bit jaded right now due to dealing with many entitled customers. maybe I'm projecting a bit. Happy trails my guy
  • 1 1
 I was quoted 3 months wait +£60+£20 spokes per wheel for a wheel build at my local shop yesterday! Thats with me supplying the hubs and rims! I think I "will" be building them myself. It might take me a while, but it won't take 3 months!
  • 1 0
 @tall-martin: good for you man, learn something new
  • 1 0
 @tankthegladiator: I went there a couple of weeks ago looking for a simple part. There were two staff in the store and one customer, I waited 30min before leaving as no one would help me.
  • 1 0
 @rocky-mtn-gman: It may be short...but it sure is skinny.
  • 1 0
 @nation: +1 could not agree more!
  • 94 2
 At my own house there is no wait time, but the mechanic goofs things up sometimes, forgets to buy parts, loses parts in garage, and sometimes has a bad attitude when working on bikes.
  • 62 0
 The one at my house is always drinking on the job, but is willing to work late hours to make sure I make the ride the next day.
  • 28 0
 The mechanic at my house can’t seem to work on my bikes sober. It’s super frustrating.
  • 16 0
 @deez-nucks: life lesson I've learned. Disassembly is acceptable drunk. Assembly should be done sober. Don't ask how I learned that.
  • 12 1
 The mechanic at my house tends to use KY jelly for grease in a pinch. Also, he always test rides the bike in the nude. My property taxes don't go up that's for sure. That reminds me, I need to find my saddle.
  • 6 0
 @friendlyfoe: how'd you learn that?
  • 2 0
 @johannensc: Motorcycle track day I had my rear suspension come unbolted mid corner and spit me over the front. By some miracle of luck it happened on the slowest corner of the track. Never again! Also loctite on freaking everything!!!
  • 3 0
 @SexyBiker69420: username checks out.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a lot people's home mechanics need some lecturing by the management or possible replacements. Can't find any good help these days. Jeez.
  • 122 54
 love how RideHub didnt waste time with their answers, just the quick and dirty and bike to fixing bikes for that one week scheduling, while other shops are writing a dang novel and 3-4 weeks out for repairs. put the pen down and pick up the wrench, shakespeare!
  • 39 0
 The older I get, I tend to favor an economy of words.
  • 83 9
 you clearly don't work in a bike shop, not only do we face lack of parts or availability from distributors, combined to a lack of available, competent workers. It's really not an easy year and saying that people in shops don't work hard is just being blind to the general issue, the whole industry is facing.
  • 63 2
 @rocky-mtn-gman: “Why waste time say lot word when few word do trick” -Kevin Malone
  • 12 27
flag ssteve (Apr 27, 2021 at 12:42) (Below Threshold)
 Definitely. Those people who actually took the time to explain why they can't deal with your problem, which really is an "easy fix," are simply too slow and are not focused on the job. I mean they're there to serve and nothing else happens in their day anyway, right?
  • 4 2
 @jeremy3220: I'm sad it's run on Netflix has ended.
  • 50 8
 @tgr9: No industry lacks competent available workers... there are just some industries that don’t realize they need to pay more.
  • 83 4
 @rocky-mtn-gman: I too value concisety in the scrivener's art.

For was it not the great Bard of Avon, uttering through the mouth of noble Polonius, in act 2, scene 2 of Hamlet who said, "brevity is the soul of wit."

Of course, the great English playwright was himself dabbling in the ironic (as he so often did), by making the long-winded Polonius utter the now oft-quoted idiom at the end of a lengthy and unnecessarily word-filled speech.

It is, therefore, without irony that I more readily embrace the words of not the great playwright or another literary man, but of our 32nd president, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who so succinctly argued for succinctness (a ha!) in saying, "Be sincere, Be brief, Be seated.”

Of course, there is another kind of irony in Roosevelt's statement, uttered by a man who was paralyzed from the waist down with possibly Polio, or as some medical historians have argued Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS), telling others to "be seated."

But, let us not get distracted. I want to emphasize my original point, which is to say that just like @rocky-mtn-gman ever as I advance through the years of my life, so am I more and moreso committed to extreme brevity, and to using as few words as possible to make my point, while eliminating unnecessary distractions and literary or historical flourishes. For they do but stoke the ego of men less committed to concisety than myself.
  • 14 0
 @atourgates: I love your style , though I feel the irony is wasted .
  • 3 4
 @mrgonzo I agree dude. Too many shops in my area are 3-6 weeks right now depending on service. I started buying my own tools, and everything short of a shock rebuild or damper service I handle myself. I dig Ridehub's short and to the point responses. Bikes, we fixem. Parts, we gottem. Espresso, come get some!
  • 1 0
 Man I love that shop too. Just worked with them on a video and it was a blast!
  • 2 0
 @rocky-mtn-gman: "Me t........"
  • 1 0
 @tgr9: It's also annoying when you apply and they don't even bother getting back to you
  • 4 0
 @atourgates: Another English major, methinks.
  • 4 0
 @tgr9: As one who works in a shop as well its been chaos. We are lucky enough to have bikes and its been a true blessing however with that blessing is a curse, we're selling more bikes than we can build and we intentionally turn aways bikes that aren't worth our time, even with all of that we are about 1.5 weeks out. However too keep this most of us show up an hour to two hours early, its hard work but everyday at the shop is better than any job I could imagine doing!
  • 8 0
 @iantmcg: interesting and true to an extent. But have you seen the comments on pinkbike the second something is more expensive than 5 dollars? I suspect people wouldn't be willing to pay more to decrease lead times.
  • 3 0
 @hmstuna: Yeah to an extent thats something we've done except it has done little to negate lead times. The people who truly care for their bikes will pay, those who don't re-think, we've increased out our tune-ups by x% and other services by x% and even still they still come in hordes.
  • 6 0
 @atourgates: Holy shit. Funniest thing I have read on Pinkbike. Just perfect.
  • 4 0
 @rocky-mtn-gman: When you wish to instruct, be brief. Every word that is unnecessary only pours over the side of a brimming mind. ~Cicero
  • 5 1
 @tgr9: if you don’t find the right people you are paying them not enough. easy equation
  • 8 0
 @Sethimus: I couldn’t agree more. At the larger bike shops that I managed, every year I was told to lay off employees in the slow months and that we could only pay mechanics so much. And EVERY spring we “can’t find mechanics, or the “turn is too slow”. I never understood why bike shop owners would run their employees through the mill and then boot them, and also expect them to come back when it was best for the shop. Pay people a realistic wage and maybe the person that wants to be a mechanic doesn’t chase a different career.
  • 3 1
 @atourgates: Yeah, real concise and to the point that.....Wink
  • 1 0
 @Molesdigmyjumps: there should be a video and a podcast for this comment.
  • 1 1
 @hmstuna: yeah maybe it is a bit of a chicken and an egg thing but if you are going to increase your shop rates and pay your mechanics more now is probably the best time to do it. In my experience the best shop mechanics are the kid studying mechanical engineering at the local university, the long timers either really love what they do (which is rare) or they are to mediocre to move on to a higher paying career. Although I do think the at home or mobile repair model allows for a higher wage while keeping the shop rate down, in the future I suspect we see more service only type businesses.
  • 4 0
 @kd233009: it reminds me of the assisted living employment model. “Sorry for your grandmas poor care we just can’t find good employees at 10 an hour”
  • 1 0
 @jeremy3220: wel sai
  • 2 0
 @atourgates: maybe you should have drawn a picture
  • 38 0
 Started wrenching bikes out of my garage a year ago for something to do during COVID lockdown. Business is still booming.
  • 2 0
 Smart! What sort of work are you seeing the demand for?
  • 6 0
 @falcon6xa: Everything. General tune ups, brake bleeds, suspension work, wheel building, frame rebuilds.bearing replacement. There's such a backlog in Squamish and I can turn bikes around in a day or two compared to 2-3 weeks. Hopefully I can keep getting my hands on parts.
  • 19 0
 I'm not sure how liability works in Canada, so please take this with a grain of salt. I frequently do wheelbuilds and tune ups for friends, and a couple years ago I thought about advertising a wheel building service until I talked to some local bike shop owners and they told me how much liability insurance they have to carry just have a fighting chance should a customer get injured and decide to sue. Anyway, if canda's liability laws are even have as wierd as ours are, it might be worth just having folks you don't know personally sign a waiver. Good luck, and thanks for using your skills to help folks keep riding!
  • 5 0
 @IamtheNIGHTRIDER: Good point. I don't think liability laws are anywhere near what they are down there but I am getting busy enough to start looking into insurance just to have myself covered.
  • 5 0
 @adrock-whistler: 100% this is something that you need to look into.

Great advice @IamtheNIGHTRIDER
  • 3 0
 @bogey: It's interesting this was brought up. I've worked in bike and ski shops going on close to 3 decades. You basically have to sign your life away if we ever worked on your ski bindings, but I honestly can't ever remember any customers signing any form of legally binding agreement for bike work. The only signature we ever required for bikes was authorizing the work needed to be done. This was at shops big and small.
  • 7 0
 @IamtheNIGHTRIDER: It is not the liability that will get you, but the cost of defense. Make sure any insurance policy you get is not what is termed a burning policy (i.e. funds spent defending go against your coverage limit).

With that, I have done my pro bono work for the week. Back to paying clients so I can buy more bike shit.
  • 7 1
 @adrock-whistler: Yeah- @IamtheNIGHTRIDER makes an interesting point worth looking into. We had a little community enduro league here that I ran that we had to end last year as we talked to lawyers and walked away terrified. They told me that it wasn't even about the racers and way broader- for example they said if a dog walker was seriously injured by rider, the family might blanket sue everyone- race league, rider, trails organization etc.Then a few weeks ago I tried to organize a community highway clean up and spoke to lawyers about individually organizing it and again walked away terrified. One of those things where if you can rest the liability on an organization and insurance you can protect yourself but when it rests on you without that if something goes wrong you are on the hook. 99.9% it may not go wrong... but when it does it could be catastrophic. I thought Canada was different in regards to this but think it is still an issue and maybe more of one than people realize. This is why we can't have nice things. I want to say I miss the days of people accepting the world is dangerous and being reasonable about accepting consequences but know it is more complex than that and who knows if those days actually existed or I just blindly thought they did.
  • 4 0
 @snl1200: I totally agree and appreciate you trying to see both sides of the issue. I think the seemingly crazy aggressive liability laws exist because large entities have historically gotten away with hurting individuals either through intentionally cutting corners or just plain negligence. I think we can all agree that shouldn't be allowed, but as with most laws there are unintended consequences (like the ones those lawyers told you about). Anyway, I hope you can find a safer avenue for running your races and cleaning up highways in the future, those are great things every community could benefit from.
  • 31 6
 Ridehub's brevity is satisfying.
  • 9 7
 Is it just me or are there far more downvotes showing up recently on non-controversial comments?
  • 7 4
 @n00bmtbr: definitely more downvotes than usual
  • 25 1
 Ride hub must be the busiest, barely had time to answer questions haha
  • 8 0
 I guess that’s what happens when you’re trying to make crapachinos for all the shuttle bros huh
  • 18 1
 I support my shop , bring them coffee and buy all my stuff and bikes there without question. My bikes are done ASAP .

This is what supporting your local shop gets you .

If you never step foot in your local shop and than are shocked that they have a wait time to get you in it shouldn’t be surprised .

Lynn valley bike I love you guys !!!!

Thanks for everything you do for me !!
  • 17 1
 @mxmtb This is 100% the truth. As a Shop owner / Mechanic I'm regularly taking bikes out of my stand to squeeze in a regular who needs a quick wheel true or cable replacement. A little regular support goes along way.
  • 1 0
 @NielsensBicycles: yo Matt if I still lived in Ontario you’d be my guy .
  • 2 0
 Can't agree more. Had a front triangle go bad, needed to get everything swapped over to the replacement. Had it done same day because they 'realized' they weren't actually booked up until tomorrow. Be friendly - buy parts and consumables - bring beer. You will get taken care of!
  • 16 0
 Not that I don't want to give business to LBS, but a basic set of allen keys and a willingness to get your hands dirty will go a long way to avoiding long turnaround times for repairs.
  • 5 7
 That same mindset can go quite the distance in screwing things up too.
  • 13 0
 @SexyBiker69420: Labor: $50 an hour, $75 an hour if you watch, $100 an hour if you worked on it first.
  • 9 0
 @carym: how much if it's a pissed on tri bike?
  • 4 0
 @carym: $125 an hour if you tell me how to do it
  • 2 2
 @illili If they don't have allen keys and aren't willing to work on your bike, you're probably not in a bike shop
  • 12 0
 Our current workshop lead time is 10 weeks. No joke. We're booking service work in for the 2nd of July and trying to get round to smaller jobs like wheel true's, new pads in a couple of weeks. Throw in warranty work and PDI's and yeah i guess you could say things are pretty f**ked right now haha. All good fun though. Been this sort of lead time since the pandemic begin and everyone wanted to be out on bikes and isnt showing any sign of slowing down either
  • 3 1
 at least those customers who keep moaning about delays are helpful, without them I dont think I'd know there was a parts shortage... Although saying that I don't blame them, people just wanna ride their bikes
  • 11 0
 my closest local shop used to have one day turn arounds on almost all in house work, including certain suspension rebuilds, now they're so busy they can't offer it. the owner works after hours and weekends trying to get peoples bikes back to them asap. other shops in the area i'm hearing are 4 weeks out for services.
  • 29 0
 I really feel for bike shop owners and staff. They're bringing a sport they enjoy or at one time did, to the community - and then it becomes overwhelming. After hours and weekends often leaves no time to ride, and thats what they got into the sport for, love of the ride. Real time online inventories have helped me to spend more money at their store. I usually know what I want before I'm even there. I try to go in to the shop educated, researched, and if they're busy I keep it as brief as possible.
  • 11 0
 @tankthegladiator: you sir are a bike shop worker's dream
  • 3 0
 Lead times in the Okanagan valley are 5-8 weeks right now and summer hasn't even started. Booked a fork lower service today for the beginning of June.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: Got my front and rear service done way back in February and I'm so glad I did.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: Insane man! I'm in Kelowna, last I heard it was 4-6 pending shop. A lower service is basic stuff, 30 mins all in on a Rockshox bike.
  • 4 0
 @tankthegladiator: Yeah even on Fox it's simple enough but I don't have anywhere that I can make a mess so for the like 40 bucks it costs I'm happy to pay Sovereign Cycle to do it (I freaking love this shop). My wheels could use being trued as well so that's getting done at the same time. TBH I don't really need much at the moment but have had such good experiences at Sovereign that I'm happy to throw a few bucks their way whenever I can, even if I am broke lol.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: 200% agree. Sovereign has treated us exceptionally well. Truly passionate group they are. We bought our bikes new from them in Jan, no major services for us yet!
  • 10 1
 Say what you want about the answers Fanatik gave but those dudes know their stuff, have a great stock even with today's issues, and build up some sweet bikes. Its no wonder people want to do business there.
  • 10 0
 Glad to see my local shop in the Q and A! Props Bike Rev (and the other excellent Flagstaff/Sedona shops)
  • 10 0
 Diplomacy , beer and baked goods will help speed up service. Not to mention these overworked underpaid people deserve it.
  • 14 1
 Beer and food is cool but actual tip money is way cooler.
  • 7 1
 @Sshredder Yeah, we don't need anymore snacks that just make us fatter thanks.
An actual money tip is far more appreciated
  • 1 0
 @swillett116 @timbud: no judgement either way just general curiosity. Do you tip your auto mechanic if you don't do your own vehicle service? If you do, do you tip for an oil change or just more involved repairs? If you don't, why do you expect to be tipped for performing the same job just on a different type of machine?
  • 3 4
 @swillett116: this is going to hurt. You get into the bike industry for the love of the sport. You want money. Get a well paying job. Not a bike industry job.
Way more thought goes into choosing a tasty craft beer or a box of fancy doughnuts.
  • 2 0
 @Sshredder: Hahaha yeahhh.... exactly. I AM in it for the love of the sport. For how much time, effort, and money I've invested in my professional mechanic education (most of which I've learned from just growing up in shops but also have well earned certifications) I know what my time is worth. Most shops don't pay their mechanics well and offer very little incentive for someone to want to be a lifelong mechanic. I don't drink alcohol and prefer to not put junk food in my body. I could go work another better paying job at ANY time, but I choose bikes because they bring me joy. I'm still allowed to prefer monetary tips instead of beer. Beer doesn't help bills get paid.
  • 3 0
 @kleinschuster: That depends. If it's routine scheduled maintenance, especially at a dealership I don't tip. If my car sh*t the bed and I'm in a bind and they got the car running again by going out of their way to fit me in, I will absolutely tip. I use the same logic with myself in shops. While all tips at any time are appreciated, I certainly don't expect them for scheduled service where I've had time to order necessary parts, etc to make sure the bike is done when I said it would be. For the customer who decided last minute to take a week long trip or wait until the last possible second before a race to get their suspension overhauled, tipping me certainly makes a HUGE difference in whether or not I'm willing to stay late after work to knock those things out.
  • 4 0
 @Sshredder: also lolllllll at your original comment NOTING how mechs are "overworked and underpaid" but then saying why you don't think they deserve monetary tips and should continue doing what they're doing "for the love of the sport". Just pick a side.
  • 7 1
 How was the question of "what are you doing to scale your business and adjust your business to deal with the new demand?" not asked? All the shops are saying they have more work then they know what to do with or that they can process with their currently available resources be that staff or location or parts. Are these shops not confident the growth in the sport is real so they will continue to be understaffed or under resourced and minimum 4 week repair turnaround time becomes some sort of new normal? I know Velofix is out there but this seems like a prime time for a some good mechanics to buy some cheap vans or box trucks and setup "we will come to you" service businesses.
  • 5 1
 Not living where you do, I can't provide any real world info.

I can say that after a short google search, the average rent in Murrieta is around $1800/mo. The gross(!) (according to google) wage for a bike mechanic is around 12 bucks an hour, which equates to about 1900 a month before taxes. Again, these are just google figures..

I guess if you were to also live in a rooftop tent on that "cheap" van and finance your life away on tools and supplies, it would probably be no problem (as long as no one gives you a bad review).
  • 7 0
 Keep in mind the shops that are in places which get winter have the problem of 6 months with no work to do. It's a really fine balance deciding the right amount of techs to keep on staff.
  • 5 0
 @ssteve: if bike mechanics are only making $12/hr abbey need to quit selling them all titanium hammers.
  • 2 0
 @ssteve: I’d like to hear from current or recent mechanics on what the pay is like these days. I made $12/hr as one back in the early 2000’s... Hard to imagine surviving on that today.
  • 2 2
 @ssteve: Minimum wage is $14/hr not much better but no one is saying you're going to get rich being a bike mechanic working at someone else's shop, nor should you expect to. Those that have the mentality of an employee earn what is their fair market value. Those with an entrepreneurial mentality make there own success and pursue the ability to earn the value they or their customers believe they are worth. If you are good mechanic you could be running your own mobile business taking advantage of the current situation for a relatively small amount of money in terms of start up costs. If needed you could get a vehicle loan and a basic business plan would get you a small business loan if you're a person with negligible savings to seed the venture. In a higher cost of living area you could easily charge higher than brick and mortar shop rate for convenience and additional for rush service. Make your own hours, rates, location, and decide who or what you work with.
  • 8 0
 RideHub Cafe, not really the loquacious type.

“That the kind of bike shop you need? The loquacious type?”
  • 5 0
 The other question is have you had to change spec based on what parts are available. I had to install an xx1 chainring because that is all I could get. Gx in the back (still getting some life out of the xo1 cassette) and xx1 in the front. Some kind of mullet setup.
  • 5 0
 While service is booming it's a bit scary to see such a lack of bikes in the shop. They seem to be well stocked on clothing and accessories but a shop that usually has 20-30 bikes on the floor now has 10 and they are all odd sizes and models.
  • 5 0
 I found a local mechanic that in his off-time comes to your house to work on bikes AND he is extremely reasonable in pricing. Trying to build up his own business. This is a great time for mechanics to freelance/moonlight. A brake bleed at my LBS is 2 weeks out. The mechanic, 1 day.
  • 3 1
 ...or you could just figure out how to do it yourself and be done in an hour or less. Just saying.....
  • 2 0
 Hope his employers don't find out
  • 4 0
 I was in Ubikes yesterday. They checked an issue quickly with on bike. They had all the parts I needed and I got my other bike in in two weeks. They had bikes, I had them built my Stumpy this fall, glad you highlighted them, they have been my favorite shop as long as I lived in Boulder!
  • 4 0
 This article doesn’t address the reality for small shops that are basically surviving on their service income since they are last in line for parts, etc behind online retailers and major shops. Getting bikes to sell is very hit or miss so the only way they can keep the lights on is through service. It’s a bit troubling, tbh.
  • 14 11
 If people were as good mechanics as they said they were in that PB poll a while back, then we'd have enough shade tree workshops to keep things in check, no? Service parts have better availability on amazon than most LBS providers do anyways for a shameful amount of basic parts.
  • 27 5
 Yes, comparing Amazon to a bike shop is a fair and realistic thing.
  • 1 5
flag Scotj009 (Apr 27, 2021 at 12:52) (Below Threshold)
 Most shops who saw this coming have more than most online retails... those that don't either couldn't afford it or weren't smart enough.
  • 8 1
 @ssteve: I am not a competent bike mechanic, I f*ck shit up all the time. I am happy to pay someone to do the work, but I also feel shitty showing up with a box of parts to a LBS. Am I supposed to not fix my bike because they can't get a part until August or do I buy it on Amazon and ask them to install?
  • 7 0
 Not necessarily. I enjoy doing all my own repair work, but don't have any interest in doing it for money. Helping my friends out sure, but turning it into a business? No thanks. We do have a couple of mobile mechanics working out of their vans, and they seem to be doing very well.
  • 3 0
 @PTyliszczak: I would tell you were to find it and to get it delivered to the shop for me to fit it. Different shops offer different policies. If the bike shop thinks you'll wait on them to get the part or that you can't bring parts in if they can't get them, they need to rethink.

Obviously you rocking up with a cassette and chain they stock or a wheel or whatever else that they have in stock is a different question. Let's not get into that hahaha.
  • 8 0
 LOL Amazon Canada says I can have a GX Eagle chain for $160 and it'll arrive mid june from France. Thanks Amazon, you're the solution for everything!
  • 5 1
 @PTyliszczak: in said theoretical situation (if I was a bike shop owner or mechanic), due to the current and particularly unusual situation, I would repair your bike with the parts you provided. Honestly if I had a vested interest in a bike business I would actually never see an issue with that.

Of course, I would have to charge accordingly. Bike shop service prices which account for the cost of shop supplies, tools, skilled labour, electricity, water, sick & vacation days and so on are largely unacceptable for most people. For the simple reason that "it's just a bike, can't be that hard."

I get that thought process, but the reality for a shop that would rely solely on service and try to be profitable, is that no one would actually pay the prices that would keep that business afloat.
  • 3 6
 @Scotj009: indeed. Most small to small-medium sized bike shops, as they have the same buying power as well as the dedicated buyers who's specific job it is to concentrate on and forecast market changes, not to mention the fact that they had nothing better to do, were simply too poor or stupid to predict the current situation. Good riddance!
  • 10 0
 @ssteve: That's a spicy take! Small to medium sized bike shops have buyers who's job it is to forecast market changes?

LOLOLOL Most small to medium size bike shops have a head mechanic who once a week jots down a list of stuff he wants and gets the store manager to throw it on the vendors online order site, or fire it to the outside sales rep.

Forecasting market changes. I can't get over that. What degree of confidence would you have put in a forecast in 2019 that said in 12 months time you will need 150% of the inventory you would normally have (as a minimum), and the vendors would be sold out for months with little to no steady resupply/end in sight?

The best a business can be doing right now is being agile, and in most cases it is the LEAST efficient businesses that are most free/able to be agile. Of course they are often cash poor so that is a restriction that they face that a more efficient business may not face.
  • 1 0
 @ssteve: availability, not pricing. QBP’s purchasing power should be greater than some small online retailers gig, which is who’s providing most of the stuff on Amazon.
  • 2 0
 Anyone know lead times on Shimano brakes these days? I’ve been waiting for 2 months from my LBS on a full set of XT brakes.
  • 3 0
 @nouseforaname: can't up vote this enough. Well said.
  • 1 1
 @nouseforaname: I would still perhaps argue they need to plan better, POS systems these days are very elaborate and you can stay on top of stuff quite easilly and order accordingly.

But yes, no predicting what happened and it was more by educated guessing and risk taking than anything.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: I just checked on their dealer portal: XT front 2-piston brake, ETA is June. XT rear 2-piston, and XT front and rear 4-piston, ETA is "TBD" which seems to mean at least 3 months.
  • 5 0
 I started looking for a bike last year, and I just found one last week. When we picked it up the dude said that he had 50 messages after mine.
  • 2 0
 You got lucky. I tried to help a buddy buy a used bike last year and we kept getting picked off because people were putting down big ($200-$300) deposits on bikes, sight unseen. These people just saw a pic on facebook marketplace and threw $300 at the account associated with it. Seriously? Who the hell can compete with that level of imbecilism? We gave up.
  • 1 0
 @swiftgruve: Yeah I know I got lucky. The bike I got will need a new rear hub and headset, but it was a good deal and not worth passing up with how difficult it is to find bikes these days. We didn't put down a deposit (that's very very imbecilic) but we did drive 5 hours there and back to pick it up.
  • 3 1
 That's Crazy! This year, for the first time in the nearly 25 years I've been biking, I paid full price for a complete bike. And I had to pre-order it!
  • 6 6
 I bought a Trek Marlin 6 that had fallen off a car for $100. I fixed it up with used parts and a few new ones for another $96. I sold it for $500 in one day and had 4 people in line...
  • 4 1
 I'm in Bentonville, Arkansas. Pretty busy here but our turarounds are almost always 24 hours or less as long we have parts if needed. We do alot of on the spot repairs for riders on vacation here....broken spokes, new pads, brake bleeds, forgot front axle at home, etc.
  • 4 0
 In shop that I work :

When you have a appointment you leave the bike in morning and if every pieces and materials are in stock in shop in afternoon the bike is ready in same day.

My boss rules.....
  • 3 0
 Chili Pepper Bike Shop in Moab is the cat’s pajamas. They’ve saved many a trip for the bros and I, and always cheerfully and stoked to talk bikes. In the 3 trips to Moab I’ve made during the pandemic they’ve rebuilt a wheel, fixed a stripper crank, installed a brake, and other big stuff under 24 hours. A ton of shit just done on the spot. They deserve a shout!
  • 4 0
 @boogereater42069: there's a stripper's crank fix joke somewhere in there, but I can't quite materialize it.
  • 3 0
 When you take a car to a dealership a mechanic doesn't just drop what he's working on to talk to you about your car. That's the service writer's job. A good service writer translates customerspeak into carspeak for the mechanic and that leaves the mechanic free to fix things and be more productive. This is how we run our shop now and it works beautifully. I'm doing probably 50% higher volume than last year and turnaround times are averaging 4-7 days on tuneups and 1-2 days on suspension and wheel builds. I don't answer phones and customers don't talk to me unless they really need to. Buying staple items in bulk at the end of winter has paid off tremendously as well. This is a great time to be in the bike business if you're well organized and thinking ahead. The only time a job gets stuck in my shop these days is when the bike needs a part that's on back order into the next millenium.
  • 6 0
 Bike shops bought chains the public bought toilet paper
  • 3 0
 Our shop is taking major service bookings for mid August, but we try and do running repairs on weekends for people to keep them on the road. People are happy to wait for a good mechanic..
  • 5 1
 Hell My lbs is still waiting on spokes to build my wheels I said no worries it’s crazy busy feel for the guys and girls in the industry right now.
  • 2 2
 Feel what? Business is booming. Or its boomed i should say. Now that all the pubs are fully open by me I already notice the trails are looking less packed.
  • 3 0
 Whenever I bought a new bike I kept my old bike as a “spare bike” . I kept it for years, sold it last summer and kinda regretting it given how difficult it is to get parts never mind a whole bike.
  • 5 0
 24 hours for my LBS when work doesn’t require out of stock parts. If it does, then indefinite.
  • 2 0
 We have two great mobile mechanics locally that are amazing and their turn around time on nearly everything is 1-2 days unless they need to wait on parts. Its been great, and they are keeping all the high end bikes up and running while the bike shops are dealing with all the entry level bikes breaking down!
  • 3 0
 DIY, only thing I cannot do or want to do is build wheels everything else I can handle including fork and shock rebuilds. To me building bikes and maintaining them is a big part of the fun of the sport.
  • 4 0
 Grit Cycles — Bellingham, WA. Stop by if your in town ! We’re working hard to get people back on their bikes as quick as we can !
  • 4 0
 +100 for grit cycles!

Same day service. they’re literally the only shop in bellingham that can offer this right now. hit them up!
  • 2 0
 Still depends on the shop and lots of luck too, broke a crank in Utah and got same day fix. But got very lucky with parts and had to go to 5 bike shops before I got it fixed but once I found the right place I was back riding in under 2 hours
  • 2 0
 My friend and I run a shop here in southern AZ that focuses primarily on service work and bike builds. We're about a week out on repairs due to volume and parts availability. As for people suggesting just to "hire more".. as others have said, it's not easy to find quality mechanics that take pride in their work and it only takes a few bad reviews to where people aren't going to consider your shop anymore as a valid option for sales or service.
One bad apple...
  • 2 0
 My personal experience this spring has been: Whatever my LBS promises + at least two weeks. I'll let you know exactly how much longer when I get my bike back. I can't be too hard on them though. The store is filled with repair bikes. The moment they get any new bikes in, they sell as fast as they can build them. They need the repair business right now to make up for how crappy of a year its been. I just wish they wouldn't over-promise.
  • 1 0
 I work at a busy shop in TN and we can turn around repairs in a day or so. If parts are needed of overhauling a bike maybe 5 days, It blows my mind to be out weeks on simple service!
  • 2 0
 That is cool all these shops do minor things on the spot. Last time I took my bike to a shop I just wanted my spoke tension checked and they said I’d have to drop it off for a week and that was pre Covid.
  • 2 0
 Probably only one mech there capable of using a tensiometer.
  • 2 0
 @Inertiaman: could be... I wasn’t trying to be a hater but I have other options so I am going to do what is best for me personally.
  • 5 0
 Kimi Raikkonen is secretly the spokesman for RideHub
  • 3 1
 Who waits a week for someone to change brake pads or fix a flat? Even if you're a complete novice at bike maintenance it would take longer to drop your bike at the shop than just do it yourself.
  • 3 2
 Warning to anyone riding a fox nude t shock! Be extremely confident in what you send this season! I sent my bike in march 23rd for a 50 hour service on fork and shock. I was told last week that fox wouldnt let them do the rebuild on my shock because of some kind of negative wear in the housing. Fox's inhouse turn around is at 30 days as of last week. Dont effing break your fox nude t shock this year, or probably next year !
  • 3 0
 @cycling-jokester: TL;DR my 1 week turn around quoted to me from my LBS turned into a 2 month turn around because fox wouldnt let my local bike shop do the rebuild and fox's turn around is 30 days.
  • 1 0
 I can confirm that I sent in my Fox CTD Float shock for service to their East coast service center and it took them 6 weeks!
  • 1 0
 2 weeks, but that is ok, when you know lead time you can plan in advance; use lbs for suspension services only, and plan to switch to service at home, since it easier to order spare part online( lbs for some reason do not carry anything except of few roadie parts and do same ordering as i would )

Sram service manuals are top notch to dyi
  • 3 2
 All the boobs that can't manage to Google how to change a freaking chain are just more reason I need to buy expensive ass tools so I don't have to get in week long lines behind their lazy asses. Getting to the point where there's not many jobs I can't do, and I'm not a smart mechanically inclined person.
  • 2 0
 So you're a self described boob?
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: 100% a boob, but not so lazy that I can't take 5 minutes to replace tire sealant myself.
  • 2 0
 @Peally: fair enough. Look at r/bikewrench though, there are tons of hackjobs by people who thought they Google enough. The truth is, the bigger the boob the bigger the need for the shop mechanic.
  • 1 0
 3 weeks for full blown Tune-ups, can try to get to minor repairs within 3 days when we have a cancellation or a mechanic just has some free time. Paying full pop to order chains from Amazon and Aliexpress and those kinds of sites just to try and keep up with the sheer amount of demand for drivetrain parts right now.
  • 1 0
 wow. I‘m surprised they state a few weeks.
Need a bit of work on my gravel bike. Can‘t do it myself because of a warranty issue. Due covid restrictions you can only book an appointment online. Did that on March 5th. My slot is June 10th. Just to drop off my bike. Noone knows how long repair is gonna take
  • 1 0
 Out of the three shops I contacted they were all too busy or unwilling to take in a frame bearing replacement. Which is great really, because for the same price now i have all the tools to do it. And since the turnaround time for my suspension service right now is 2 months, I have plenty of time to do it in. Win win Smile
  • 1 0
 Not been to a bike shop since 1998 after having them fit a pace chain ring and they used the wrong sise ring bolts. I sead the rings still loose, thay said it will get you home.... Most UK bike shop mechanics know nothing and are useless at best, suspension tuners seem to be the only guys with any gumption.
  • 1 0
 I had a crank arm that kept coming lose, I was actually told "carry a 10mm hex and just tighten whenever you stop to catch your breath or drink".
  • 1 0
 My local in Hamilton NZ is great. If you buy your bike new from them (and clean it first) you become a preffered customer and get bumped up the list, back on the trails for the weekend. Plug for Cycletime, thanks Dave, Brian and all the team.
  • 1 0
 I'm in western NC which is flush w/ riders but most shops can still do quick-n-dirty quickie work on the fly, but otherwise its a week out to "schedule" then 3-4 waiting on the bike after dropping it off which is just slack.

1) I totally get having to book out a week or two - fine. But when anyone's slot is coming up, don't sit on the bike for 3-4 days - get software that lets you know what work has been completed and whats coming up and ETA to dropping the bike off within a few hrs or day - ON DECK

2) that being said once CV19 hit and every Dick & Tom flooded the shops w/ their outdated 90's & 2000's crap that's hardly worth fixing - I bought tools & started reading / watching vids not just on repairs but on normal maintenance, so i've saved $100s and lots of otherwise lost ride time by doing my own work vs. bitching about my ride sitting in a shop 3-4 days AFTER the scheduled "appointment"

3) wheels are the exception to my gripes. Wheels are the most complex bike part to work on so I don't bother. On out one of my local shops installed spokes incorrectly & then stripped all the nipples truing the wheel, I bought a new wheelset from a certified badass locally who can easily replace spokes or true the new set w/o problem. This is the kind of thing no video or book is ever going to teach you. Wheels are something you prob have to wait on, at least for now.

Its 2021 - the software (or just brainpower) exists now to just have people schedule out ahead of time then drop the bike off just before it can be worked on.
  • 1 0
 Just have to give shout out to Fanatik Bike. They have done a great job with having short turn around times on the few very specific things I've need them to do in the past year or so. I'm sad to say that I'll be moving far away in a couple months and I will wholeheartedly miss the shop.
  • 1 0
 Ridehub Cafe: go away, we're busy

Article takeaway for me: learn to do your own minor maintenance at home. I can't imagine spending money and time on a weekend in front of a bike shop - instead of on the trail - cause "my chain isn't shifting".
  • 3 0
 I dunno, I dropped in on a Saturday afternoon and was served a beer within minutes.
  • 1 0
 local shops in las vegas are 1-7 days my gravel bike took a week, my mtb took a day, and i also snapped 2 spokes one on two wheels two different days mtb wheel had back in a hour
  • 2 0
 BC, Washington state, Colorado and Arizona... meanwhile high strung Yankees are turning around bikes overnight, wired on coffee and sarcasm. Joking, joking...
  • 5 0
 chain Supply issues
  • 4 0
 RideHub Cafe is the Kimi Raikkonen of bike shops
  • 1 1
 The only things I don’t have at home is a brake bleed kit and a trueing stand. I took on a frame up bike build last March. It was surprisingly easy. There’s so much information online these days. My LBS barely sees me anymore. They have enough to do anyway
  • 3 0
 austin TX here, my shop is only a few days out unless we need to order parts!
  • 3 0
 Go read the negative Yelp reviews of your localc shops sometime and weep for humanity.
  • 2 2
 Lubricate your mechanics with booze (or bartering) and watch the turn around time drop.

In the shop I managed a long while ago, we would allow mechanics to clock out at their normal hours but perform "rush" repairs for whatever they wanted to barter the rush fee for. It shortened turn around for the people willing to give something in return, gave the mechanics some agency on their own, and still gave the shop the revenue for the labor. It was a win win... and we never had to buy beer, coffee or meals in town. The repairs were billed at normal rates, plus whatever the mechanic bartered for outside of those rates. The shop got the repair money, the mechanic got whatever he or she bartered for. Mike Ferrentino knows it well! Lol.
  • 2 1
 My experience, not too bad at the moment. About a week and a half out. Way better than it was last year at this time. Seemed like you had to wait about a month or more.
  • 5 3
 Okay, last question RideHub. Why the short answers?

A: I have bikes to work on.
  • 1 0
 However long it takes me to source the parts (if I don't already have them on standby). Been building my personal shop for years now.
  • 1 0
 If the parts are in stock one week. Unless it is the shop I go to which will then be 3 weeks until you pick it back up order some parts online and do it yourself.
  • 2 0
 2020-2021- The years that all the hoarding and working on my own stuff finally paid off.
  • 2 1
 canada for the win!

on another note: if these shops are so busy and in demand, then why not hire more mechanics to meet that demand? or maybe pay them more...just a thought.
  • 1 0
 Shout out to @nation at Flag Staff Bicycle Revolution for shipping my Kona Shonky ST! Check out the Dream Build - cog.konaworld.com
  • 1 0
 I live in central/northern utah, a Mecca for riding and we are only about 1 week- 1 1/2 weeks out for a standard tune up, it’s crazy how busy some bike shops have gotten
  • 14 14
 Everyone else has time to talk for 45 min about why they're so busy, Squamish shop gives short answers, gets back to the work and gets it done?
  • 9 10
 Don't worry, they're still dealing with customers that, for being asked to wear a mask, call them assholes and insult them. But hey, they're just unskilled workers. So it's okay.
  • 3 1
 looking forward to see more international opinions.
  • 1 0
 3-4 weeks lead time seems pretty standard around here for this time of year, every year.
  • 1 0
 I guess I "picked" the perfect time to have a ~12 month no-bike knee injury.
  • 5 3
 ...or you just effing do the work yourself.
  • 2 3
 I have never taken my bike in to service ... never considered it. lol Like others, it just a job we do ourselves. I haven't done forks yet but will tackle when the time comes.
  • 2 0
 we are doing our fucking best, love this industry!
  • 2 0
 My lead time at Velofix is 24hrs right now.
  • 2 0
 I really wonder how much shimano and sram have missed in lost sales.
  • 1 0
 I've though about fixing bikes for people...suspension work, wheel builds, brake bleeds. My stupid tools burned down.
  • 1 0
 3+ plus weeks to book a service lol. also very little high end bikes/parts.
  • 1 0
 Answer: Longer than it takes to buy the tool and learn how to do the repair yourself
  • 2 0
 Performance bikes took 6 months to a year in 2012
  • 1 0
 I’m jealous that you even have all these cool bike shops and communities. We ain’t got shit where I am...
  • 1 0
 4 weeks for a major service, 5-6 days for smaller repairs, 1-4 days for inner tubes here
  • 1 0
 In Moscow good services seems packed. So finally I had to research how to service my fork myself, lol.
  • 1 0
 "How far out are you scheduling for major bike tune-ups?"

English is my mother tongue and I have no idea what this means.
  • 1 0
 "How many days in the future is the next available tune-up slot on your schedule?"
  • 1 0
 You should reach out to Tenafly Bicycle Workshop on the north east coast. Greatest Mtb shop in the area! Just Saying.
  • 1 1
 I'm always #1 priority for my mechanic. All other jobs get dropped and mine gets done first.
  • 2 0
 Ride hub for the win!
  • 1 0
 At the bike shop that I work at, We are about two weeks out.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha come over to Australia and we will hav ur bike tuned up in 1 day
  • 1 0
 No love for the Northeast?
  • 2 2
 Why did they not check VeloFix. Big miss there.
  • 7 0
 Because they only seem to make bikes worse instead of actually fixing them?
  • 1 0
 north
  • 1 0
 *laughs in self-service*
  • 1 0
 Be Your own bikeshop.
  • 1 2
 Surely if you can't wait then you would just do the work yourself?
  • 7 9
 You ride a mountain bike. You should be doing your own work. C'mon.
  • 4 14
flag JDUBKC (Apr 27, 2021 at 14:15) (Below Threshold)
 Had to take the car in for service across town so I stopped in a LBS. Getting ready to service my DPX@ I bought the seal kit while there. Later in the week my bud mentioned we should do them together so we went online to order his. $20. I paid $40 for the SAME DAMN SEAL KIT. 100% markup. I paid the price (Literally and figuratively) 30 day return policy, I have until Friday to drive across town. I've said it before but LBS's can go %$#@ themselves. Last Time.
  • 9 5
 Honestly, if you can change your car's oil, you can fix your bike. These are bicycles, not the Space Shuttle.
  • 6 2
 Truth be told. I am having my lbs build a wheel.. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 3 1
 @Thirty3: Wheel builds and major suspension work are the only things I don't do myself. But depending on wait times if I need that work this summer, I may learn how.
  • 7 2
 @JDUBKC: I'm willing to bet the bike shop paid close to $20 on QBP for that seal kit they sold you. They make some money, you get the seal kit right then and there - with the assumption that any question you ask about the service would be happily answered, and you support a local business. I'm also willing to bet your friend paid $20 + shipping. Everyone and their mom who doesn't ride knows you can get anything online cheaper than a bike shop ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 1 1
 @thomasake: have you compared online processing gouging to msrp prices lately?
  • 1 7
flag JDUBKC (Apr 28, 2021 at 6:22) (Below Threshold)
 @thomasake: "Some" Money? Okay.. 100% mark up. I'm not telling you how to waste your money. Do what you want.

Worldwide Cyclery $20 no shipping.

www.worldwidecyclery.com/products/fox-shocks-float-air-sleeve-rebuild-kit-for-2000-current-model-float-rear-shocks
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