Field Test: 2022 Stumpjumper Alloy - As Versatile As Ever

Apr 5, 2022 at 12:03
by Alicia Leggett  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Specialized Stumpjumper Alloy



Words by Alicia Leggett; photography by Tom Richards

It feels like just last week that we released the Field Test review of the Specialized Stumpjumper Evo Alloy, but it's already time to write about the Stumpy Evo Alloy's budget-oriented little sister, the Stumpjumper Alloy. Like its aggressive sibling, the Stumpjumper Alloy rolls on 29" wheels and is made, as you could probably guess from the name, of aluminum. Specialized describes the Stumpy Alloy as "your all-access pass for trail adventure," which is certainly a promising claim. We put it through its paces in Tucson, Arizona, to see how those words hold up when the tires hit the dirt - err, rocks.

This iteration of the Stumpjumper Alloy arrived in 2021 with updated kinematics, more progressive geometry, and a bit less weight than previous versions, aiming to be that one do-it-all bike that every brand seemingly wants their 130-140mm bike to be.
Specialized Stumpjumper Alloy Details

• Travel: 130 mm / 14 0mm
• Aluminum frame
• Wheel size: 29"
• Head angle: 65° - 65.5°
• Seat tube angle: 77.2° - 77.7° (size S4)
• Reach: 475mm - 480 mm (S4)
• Chainstay length: 440 mm - 444 mm
• Sizes: S1 - S6 (S4 tested)
• Weight: 35.6 lbs / 16.1 kg
• Price: $2,650 USD
specialized.com

Expectations for this Stumpjumper were high from the start. After all, the Stumpjumper webpage manages to use nearly all the bike review cliches, with notes about how the bike is "a refined mid-travel ripper that eats big terrain like a gravity fed beast, handles like a dream everywhere, and climbs like it has a motor" and how the geometry numbers have been tweaked to be more, uh, "carvealicious," but the 200mm rotor up front, beefy tires, and tried-and-true Stumpjumper platform seem up to the task of delivering something good.


Moving beyond the neon salmon color (yes, it also comes in a neutral black and a pleasant sage), the frame has a few things to note. First, unlike the carbon version of this bike, the Stumpjumper Alloy uses a Horst Link design rather than flex stays that we saw appear on the latest carbon version. The Horst layout, in line with all the rest of the full suspension Stumpy's history, makes for a more relaxed ride than the snappier flex stay design, which was borrowed from the much racier Specialized Epic.

The other details look familiar, too: the cables are internally routed, it uses the same asymmetric design as the rest of the Stumpy lineup, and there's a flip chip on the chainstay that can raise or lower the bottom bracket by seven millimeters while changing the head angle by half a degree. Sadly, though, this Stumpjumper has no SWAT Box, so we had to go back to using our pockets and hip packs like we did in the good old days.

The Stumpy Alloy weighs in at 35.6 lbs / 16.1 kg, making it the heaviest of the full suspension bikes on test, though to its credit, it arrived with a proper Specialized Butcher and Purgatory tire combo. The bike also came outfitted with a SRAM SX drivetrain, Tektro Gemini Comp brakes, a RockShox 35 Silver fork, an X-Fusion 02 Pro RL shock, and a TranzX 34.9 mm dropper post with 170mm of travel for the size S4 bike.

It's also worth mentioning that while the Stumpy doesn't have size-specific everything, it does have two chainstay lengths. Sizes S1 to S4 have 440 to 444 mm chainstays, depending on the flip chip position, and sizes S5 and S6 get an extra centimeter of length, coming in at 450 to 454 mm.





Climbing

Specialized gave the Stumpjumper Alloy a steep seat tube angle, and that forward pedaling position is quite noticeable when climbing. That's a good thing - being centered over the bike while climbing and having a comfortable spot to perch while mashing makes a huge difference in my willingness to actually try on climbs, even if it did make the dropper post even more crucial when on the flats or even choppy climbs to get the post just a little bit out of the way. The steep seat angle also means that those of us with long legs can run the seatpost high without finding ourselves way out over the rear wheel when pedaling.

Overall, the Stumpjumper was a fair and comfortable climber. While it weighs 35.6 pounds, dialed geometry means that it carries the weight well, and it climbs better than some other, lighter bikes.

On both the climbs and the descents, the suspension became a focal point for me. I found it difficult to settle on the right amount of air pressure for the shock, as it performed best on the climbs with a bit of extra air, but the trade-off was a loss of sensitivity on the descents. On the flip side, I thought it settled into the suspension too much on the climbs when the air pressure was optimized for descending. A climb switch on the X-Fusion 02 Pro RL shock somewhat mitigates the issue, and I consider that little lever a nonnegotiable on this bike, but I would have appreciated a slightly firmer pedaling platform all around.

We also need to mention the SRAM SX Eagle drivetrain: none of us loved it, or even liked it. The SX group does get the job done, for the most part, but the shifting lags and doesn't have the satisfying, crisp feel that defines most of SRAM's range. It also uses a conventional HG freehub body, rather than the XD driver used by the upper echelon SRAM groupsets, so someone who wants to upgrade the (heavy) SX cassette to GX or above would need to swap out the freehub body.

Still, the bike does what it needs to do on the climbs: it holds onto every bit of traction, even on the desert rocks, and it's a comfortable bike to pedal, even if it does like to wallow a bit sometimes. Don't we all?


Found a silly bonus line.


Descending

The Stumpjumper's personality on the climbs - comfortable and versatile - showed similarly on the descents, where, for the most part, it soaked up the harsh hits and chatter nicely.

Since it is a Stumpjumper, it's meant to be a well-rounded machine - especially in the alloy version. The bike has been through so many generations over more than 40 years that Specialized has more or less cracked the trail bike code, and this iteration of the Stumpy remains an easy bike to ride.

The 130mm bike handles nicely on the descents, with obvious stability that doesn't overwhelm its ability to play around. Even with the slightly squatty rear suspension, it rides lightly over the sharp desert rocks and feels capable enough to take anywhere an entry-level trail bike should reasonably go.
Timed Testing

Our timed lap consisted of steep, technical climbs full of ledges and hard efforts, and a rough descent littered with rocks that lead into a fast, loose section of trail. Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.

The Stumpjumper stayed cool and collected all the way through the test lap for a winning lap time of 2:46. It was the second-fastest on the climb at 1:43, four seconds back from the winning YT Izzo, and it tied for the win on the descent with the Fezzari Cascade Peak at 1:03, three seconds ahead of the Canyon Spectral, making it the fastest all-arounder of our five full suspension bikes in the overall.

Throughout the Field Test, we rode the Stumpjumper on a variety of terrain, and the bike definitely isn't a specialist - it feels similarly comfortable on rolling cross-country terrain and choppy, rocky trails. The geometry is essentially what we've come to expect from a modern trail bike, and it works. Compared to many other 130mm bikes, the 65-65.5° head tube angle gives it a pinch of extra stability that pairs nicely with the moderate 440-444mm chainstays on our size S4 test bike: all around, it's a balanced ride. Carvealicious indeed.

My gripes about this particular salmon Stumpy come from the spec, though I know I'm nitpicking, since the fact that a bike this capable exists for $2,650 is impressive in itself.

The X-Fusion 02 Pro RL lacks finesse, with just a rudimentary rebound dial and a climb switch, so there aren't too many settings combinations to play with. Similarly, the RockShox 35 fork does absorb some bumps, but doesn't have the fine-tuning adjustments found on high-end forks. For me, the suspension worked just fine at low speeds, where it did its job of soaking up rocks and giving the bike a pleasant, forgiving feel, but felt less at-home at higher speeds, where the bike felt chattery and I would have appreciated more sensitivity from both the fork and the shock.

I was also underwhelmed by the base-level Tektro brakes, which did have enough power but lacked initial bite.

As for the good parts, I got along with the Specialized Butcher and Purgatory tires famously. The grippy T9 rubber on the Butcher up front and firmer T7 of the Purgatory struck a nice balance with traction and resistance. Plus, avoiding flat tires in the desert is a good thing, right?

It was also nice to spend some time getting to know the TranzX dropper post. The simple, cable-actuated dropper uses a 34.9 mm clamp, has a decent lever, and - the important part - just plain works.




Pros

+ Versatile, workhorse trail bike
+ Adjustable geometry
+ Good value for an entry-level full suspension bike
Cons

- Entry-level suspension components feel less at home at higher speeds
- On the heavy side






The 2022 Value Bike Field Test was made possible thanks to Visit Tucson and Norrona clothing.





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268 Comments

  • 194 6
 Obligatory "SX is garbage" comment
  • 41 6
 Looks like a sxession
  • 71 2
 Its so bad. And so heavy. I'd take that Microshift budget 8 speed over it, and its lighter.
  • 42 0
 @hamncheez:

Absolutely. Would be nice to see drivetrains like microshift and box on these budget bikes.

Alas companies like the big S probably get these low end drivetrains for pennies from sram/shimano.

Cheese whiz drivetrain on my daughter’s rocky mtn edge self destructed shortly after buying it and rather than warranty a piece of sht I just put 8 sp microshift on it which was under $100 for shifter/mech and works great for her.
  • 12 0
 @hamncheez:
And it shifts better
  • 17 0
 Stumpy Evo with SX and tektro
Status with NX & Code R for
  • 44 1
 Goddamn clumsy fingers. Stumpy Evo- SX, Tektro and Rockshox gold Status- NX, Code R and Fox 36 Rhythm for a few hundred more. Easy choice
  • 44 27
 Who the heck spends less than 8k on a bike. All bikes under that feel like trash.
  • 5 3
 @SacAssassin: NX isn't much better, but if you pretty much have to replace the shifty bits on both anyway, definitely.
  • 2 1
 @SacAssassin: not an evo, though. But, valid point.
  • 10 0
 @WasatchEnduro: If it was the "competing" shimano, it would get the job done without problems.
  • 11 0
 I've said nearly every time it gets mentioned, my Advent 9 with the 11-46 cassette has been a solid performer for nearly two years on my commuter, and cost less than an XT cassette.
  • 23 1
 I have Advent X on two of my builds. It shifts pretty good, I'd say like GX eagle, but much lighter.

For entry level builds, I actually think 8/9/10 speed is a better experience for newer riders anyways (I'd say for everyone). The point of 12 speeds is closer steps, making the ideal cadence easier. Newer riders don't care about this.
  • 7 1
 @SacAssassin: ^^^This^^^. The Status is the best bang for your buck at the $3,000 price point, and arguably one of the most fun bikes at any price.
  • 10 2
 @WasatchEnduro: Cant beat deore 10spd with 11-46 or if you have to have the range, deore 11spd with 11-51
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Yup. I love my Advent 9. Got it on my mountain bike and gravel bike and it has been faultless.
  • 8 1
 @hamncheez: I'd rather run Advent X on a bike over SX or NX 7 days out of the week and twice on Sundays. Both of my partner's bikes run Advent X, one with the trigger shifter and one with the brifters (the brifters don't feel nearly as nice as the trigger shifter but I understand why), and every time take a spin on it I'm in love. Feels nearly as good as my GX eagle (or 11s for that matter) group and spent far less cash, albeit with bigger jumps on the casette but how many MTBers actually care about that.

There have been so many occasions where I'm at the local co-op teaching someone to tune their SX or NX drivetrain where we just have to accept that despite being unsatisfied with shifting consistency we just have to call it good. Gotta keep that shit as clean as absolutely possible and even a slightly misaligned hanger can be the cause of many shifting woes.
  • 2 1
 @Graham4stevens: normal people
  • 8 0
 @Jakesmith32: I'd say bigger jumps are better. I almost always double shift.

On a road bike I'm super picky and I need close spacing. Anything less than 2x11 makes it feel like I'm never quite in the right gear. Mountain biking is a different beast.
  • 5 0
 @PivotPoint1: I've run Deore 10sp 11-46 in the past and now run Deore 11sp 11-51 on my hardtail. Both are excellent and dead reliable!
  • 10 4
 Well that comment performed better than expected.

Now for my actual opinion: SX is not garbage, rather it's a decent drivetrain with a garbage part. Specifically the shifter. It drags the whole system down. Figured this out when sat back one day wondering why SX was so garbage. I had recently blown up the plastic-y derailleur everyone complains about, so I decided to upgrade to an NX. To my surprise, nothing improved. Odd, I thought, since I'd had good experience with NX in the past (LBS employee here). Then I just said screw it and changed the shifter to a GX that was laying around. Night and day difference. The clicks were suddenly more authoritative, and I was satisfied. I think that the SX shifter just doesn't pull the cable well or something. Always feels like your housing is gummed up.

Ultimately I can still get on the "SX sucks" train because no one should have to upgrade right out of the box, but it's not all bad. Heck, the chain on SX, NX, and GX is literally the same fricken thing with different labels.
  • 4 1
 @hamncheez: Totally agreed, on my most frequently ridden trail I only end up needing maybe half of the 12 gears, and I could likely get away with using even less.
I've even toyed around with the idea of a 2 or 3 speed setup assembled with singlespeed cogs. Just select a climbing gear, all-around gear, and a descending gear, slap on a derailleur with a clutch, and a decent friction shifter, and call it good. I ran a manually shifted two speed setup for a couple months, ended up just using the 2:1 gear 95% of the time and the 1:1 on like two rides, but it required me to bring along a cone wrench to adjust the tensioner and about a 5 minute swap at the top of the trail. A friend made a townie "tringlespeed" setup with a single cog and dual roller tensioner in the back and a 3 ring front derailleur setup that actually worked pretty nicely (once he put on an Ultegra FD).

For the tinkerers, masochists, and co-op cheapskates out there, there are so many good alternatives to a 1x12 drivetrain. Don't need to go fully into the rabbit hole of custom gearing, or singlespeeder, but for those who are sick and tired of constantly fiddling with barrel adjusters on their 12 speed, one of the many "lesser" gear count drivetrains are the way to go.
  • 3 1
 @Bikesbecauserunningsucks: In my experience NX and SX are effectively just as bad as each other, the GX derailleur is a major improvement over NX, and for anyone needing to replace an SX derailleur it's definitely worth going up to GX at least, same regards to the shifter and I do agree that upgrading the shifter has much more noticeable impact in performance.
  • 3 0
 @Jakesmith32: I've had the new Kindernay 7 speed in the cart a few times, and almost pulled the trigger. I'm considering welding up a steel bike with a mid-high pivot and slap the Kindernay mid mount, like the old Zerode DH bikes.
  • 2 0
 @Jakesmith32: b-bolt upgrade for $30 on the NX works wonders. That being said, my son’s Status 160 will get a GX when the NX derailleur dies. I am personally happy with a Saint 10 speed shifter to an XT rear mech and a wide range cassette .
  • 2 0
 @Jakesmith32: Ya. Everybody is going to have a slightly different experience. GX is definitely the first big performer in the line. As far as the budget drivetrains the Deore stuff all seems pretty solid (especially the 10 speed) I just haven't found the sweet spot with the adjustable clutch. For whatever reason on bigger hits I've had the lever for the adjustment fall down into the off position, and then get confused as to why my chain keeps falling off. Seems to not be a normal problem though, as no one else ever mentions it.
  • 2 12
flag grahamstevens04 (Apr 26, 2022 at 14:50) (Below Threshold)
 @SacAssassin: okay boomer
  • 1 11
flag grahamstevens04 (Apr 26, 2022 at 14:51) (Below Threshold)
 @preach: poor people
  • 2 0
 @Jakesmith32: you could run a Classified Hub with a singlespeed setup for if you only want two gears. Or a front derailleur with 2x and no rear rear derailleur
  • 1 0
 @SacAssassin: Did you hear Honer Simpson complaining?
  • 1 0
 @birddog69: Good point!

Does it count that I said "DOH!" when I accidentally hit submit?
  • 1 0
 @Stihlgoin:
You don't even need the b-bolt upgrade.
I just replaced the original o-ring and washer with a thick rubber o-ring.
And it's super thight and rigid. Even more than the XX1 b-bolt.
Those o-rings are super cheap.
  • 1 0
 @OneTrustMan: Good to know. Thanks.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I would definitely rather a good working 9 Spd 10-42 system that shifts well and when you need it to, rather than a garbage unreliable 12 speed dead-weight
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: I find newer riders benefit from the closer gear ratios for tech climbing, and undulating terrain. I find experienced riders are more capable with their body positioning to clean climbs, and have a “deeper talent pool” to better make use of switching between gears to work their legs and lungs.

I think we all benefit from good shifting, close spaced gear ratios, but cuts need to be made somewhere….

Hey @mikelevy @brianpark @mikekazimer, maybe a series where we are given a budget, and component costs, and we have to play “Fantasy Product Manager”. Everyone builds and submits our choices to PB, you guys pick a top 10, and then the whole of the community votes on the top 10 to see who the winner is. Could be how you spec the Grim Doughnut for eventual sale…..
  • 1 0
 @grahamstevens04: You came on too strong. You gotta pull them in first, chum the waters, get them emotionally committed to the conversation - only then can you strike and properly troll muahahaha.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: its hard enough to get beginner riders to even shift at all...
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: One of the first things i work on with new riders, part of the whole “operation of controls” section along with brakes, foot placement, etc…..only time its an issue is when kids hands are real small
  • 2 0
 @Bikesbecauserunningsucks: SX and NX perform exactly as SRAM intended. Its not "budget" because its sooo much cheaper to make that GX, X01, XX1, its budget because of its relative performance to those other lines.

SRAMs margin is considerably greater on the GX and up lines. The only reason to produce the budget lines, is to make the higher profit lines more attractive.
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: I am pretty sure they spec Microshift 2x on their budget spec’d Rockhopper hardtails so I am surprised to not see a 1x version on the Stumpy alloy.
  • 63 12
 I realize "value" is relative, but why in the world would anyone buy this garbage specced bike for MORE money, when the Polygon Siskiu T8 exists...?
  • 6 1
 my thoughts exactly.
  • 52 1
 The reviews need to call this kind of thing out. Many people interested in this review are likely considering a bike and you don't want them walking away thinking this is a great value for 2600$+ with components that will last, are easily serviceable and good to go. To much of it just feels like marketing, I can't imagine anyone reviewing these bikes would be stoked to recommend one to an intermediate riding friend without significant upgrades. The polygon is vastly superior spec wise with SLX/Fox, lighter super well reviewed and...wait for it...cheaper. Its a done deal right out of the box aside from maybe the 4-piston tektros (at least they aren't Alohongas! lol) and doesn't need upgrades. Its also better looking in my opinion with that metallic purple. I'd be an idiot to buy this or the Kona or whatever other value bikes with junk suspension over the Polygon.
  • 26 17
 The same people that say, “Specialized make good bikes.”
  • 3 9
flag addisonchen (Apr 26, 2022 at 9:42) (Below Threshold)
 @Svinyard: The Tektros are a mute point as this Stumpjumper uses them too..
  • 34 6
 Maybe they want the shorter or longer reach on either end of the Stumpy size range. Maybe they don't want super short chainstays, especially as on the larger Siskiu sizes. Maybe they want a bike with local shop support. Maybe they want a bike that is actually in stock.

(Your capitalized MORE money is $50 at MSRP. Calm down)
  • 27 1
 Or the Marin Rift Zone. Or the Stance 2. Or Ghost Kato.

$2,600 sounds good until you realize there are very decent $2k and under FS bikes from other companies.
  • 2 0
 Exactly!
  • 6 1
 @justinfoil: Sure you can quibble about geometry but at this price point its a bit silly considering your options and budget at this price point...there are also other options beside the Polygon too. That's way different than getting a bike with hot garbage bolted on to it like this and saying its decent. The local shop thing is also a farce. My buddy bought a Polygon and a shop in Denver was more than happy to do the very minor assembly for him for like 60$. I build most of my own bikes and every shop in town supports me, be shipping off a fork, fixing hubs etc.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: the stance geo is way conservative though
  • 7 18
flag SunsPSD (Apr 26, 2022 at 10:10) (Below Threshold)
 On 430mm Chainstays the Siskiu will be objectively slower on L & XL sizes. Short chainstays are a no go.
  • 8 2
 I wasn't familiar and just looked that up. 10 times out of 10 I would recommend the Polygon. Significantly better spec for $50 less. The problem of course is availability, but if both were available it's not even a discussion - Polygon for sure.
  • 3 0
 T8 is out of stock, unless you are 5'2 and want the small 27.5 wheel sized model. LBS have a few of these specialized in stock.
  • 4 10
flag Graham4stevens (Apr 26, 2022 at 10:34) (Below Threshold)
 @nickfranko: You are wrong. If you buy those other bikes I assure you they will fall apart.
  • 5 4
 @SunsPSD: As a tall guy I don't entirely disagree but garbage spec is also a big negative. I can work with those chainstays. For 2600$ what's your best option? Its certainly not this Spesh. Trance X is fine but junky spec as well (we one of these in the family). Marins 2350$ bike has a garbage fork on it. Trance 2 2600$ build is really nice tho a bit less travel. Fezzari is more money and butt ugly.
  • 1 3
 @justinfoil: $150. Stay in school, kids.
  • 6 0
 @addisonchen: The Tektros on the T8 aren't the same as the ones on the Stumpy. They're up the line from the Gemini's and aren't too bad if you put metallic pads and rotors on.
  • 10 0
 @SunsPSD: slower where? I can assure you that almost anyone purchasing either this Stumpy or the Siskiu T8 isn't worried about being "faster" or "slower". They are more or less entry level trail bikes.
  • 2 0
 But what came first, the value or the relativity? LET that sink IN!
  • 6 0
 There are differences - Horst link vs. Single pivot suspension design os probably rhe biggest one. Any warranty issues would require you to work directly with Polygon vs. taking the Stumpy back to the store. Beyond that I agree with you.
  • 4 0
 @addisonchen: No, 4 piston Orions are gonna out perform 2 piston Geminis, and not just because of the pistons. Are the margins small? Sure. But they are not the same brakes.
  • 7 0
 @williammunny: Let's not bring titanium frames into a budget bike discussion...
  • 11 0
 The most understated thing is that a budget bike which you have to upgrade to ride on intermediate level is not a budget bike, it's just a marketing trap. The whole idea in buying a whole bike is that it has all pricey parts ok, so you can ride them to their death and then (and only then) upgrade for better ones. There is even no point in reviewing bikes that do not meet this criteria. Damn, I would pay Robin with my own money if I would believe that something would change in those reviews. The problem is that PB crew does a great job, but they review the wrong stuff (or maybe they review a more or less random stuff).
  • 3 0
 Apparently a lot of people will buy this "garbage spec bike" because its sold out everywhere. Its kind of funny how they talk about which model to buy in the video, when there is no stock to be found anywhere for most low to mid range full suspension bikes.

To be fair though this bike does have some lousy parts that will cost a fortune to upgrade. Even less noticeable stuff like hubs, brake rotors, power-spline/square taper bottom bracket suck! Not too mention the fork, shock, brakes, wheels and the whole drivetrain are parts that a serious rider will likely end up swapping out.

There are several bikes out there that offer much better value. For $100 CAD more check out a Norco Fluid FS 1 with some descent parts (RS Pike/Deluxe, SLX drivetrain, 4-pot Deore brakes, better wheels). Plus the Fluid is actually in stock at some local shops, at least here in Canada.
  • 4 6
 not sure anyone asked. This is about specialized doing the impossible. Bringing the best bike in the world at an affordable price. No other company has ever been able to do this. Please don't take the stage away from the best company in the world!!!
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: t8 has shimano slx on the last models, and they work great out of the box. The brakes on the stumpy are hot garbage.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: The brakes are listed as Tektro HD-M245. That's what my cousin's T8 came with. They are certainly not garbage and I'm sure far better than the ones on the Stumpy. On a T8, I'd probably change the saddle, grips, rotors, and pads. Not much else though. It's quite a nice spec.
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: depends on the "year" bikes direct states components differ. Mine came with veetireco instead of schwalbe and slx instead of tektro. Everything else spec matched. That was after the first price bump up.
  • 3 0
 @RonSauce: you got SLX brakes on your T8?! From factory?! Huge score.
  • 3 0
 @rtiEDGE: yeah, I was bummed about the tires until I saw the brakes.
  • 4 0
 @J-Sheridan: I just went from a Stumpy Alloy to a Fluid 1, and I'm not sure how I feel about it. No comparison on the drivetrains - The Norco is so much better. The brakes on the Stumpy also suck; I had to replace them in less than a season. On the other hand, the the Stumpy just feels more comfortable. I feel like I'm going to go OTB on the Norco. I'm going to try adding a riser bar and a slightly shorter travel dropper, hopefully that will straighten things out, but so far I like the Stumpjumper more, warts and all.

Also, in the US the Fluid is $750 more than the Stumpjumper.
  • 3 0
 @dcreek: even worse than dealing with polygon is dealing with bikes online.co. It is infuriating trying to work with their customer support. I had issues with the bushings on my n7 failing after 3 months of kitsuma laps and it took them so long to replace them that I had my own made by IGUS and had them for months before the ones from polygon arrived. Meanwhile bikes online made excuses and passed me between 4 or 5 different customer service reps during the time. The final straw for me was when bikes online told me I needed a $30 set of hardware, which ended up being wrong. Facepalm. I had such a poor experience with them that I bought a specialized stumpy Evo alloy and put the polygon frame up for sale. It comes with 6 sets of the custom bushings I had manufactured for it and a super deluxe ultimate if anyone's looking for one! Lol
  • 1 0
 @rtiEDGE: 2650 (from this article) - 2599 (straight from the Polygon website)

Shit, it's 51 dollars. You got me!
  • 2 0
 @Pghbrown: shorter travel dropper? How will that help? Unless you have it already fully hilted and it's still too tall. In that case you mean "correct dropper length for my height".
  • 1 0
 @Pghbrown: Sorry to hear that your upgrade wasn't a total success. Norco does have a degree steeper head tube angle and shorter chain stays, but that doesn't seem to be enough to cause the feeling you are getting. Maybe you should have sized up. I have only had a bit of time testing a Fluid a couple years back when it was updated in 2019. I usually ride a large in most brands but I felt more comfortable on an XL. Surprisingly according to their fit guide that's what's recommend for me at 185 cm (6'1").

That said the most important component on a bike is the frame. If you don't get along with the geometry or the fit is worng having better components doesn't matter much. I made this mistake myself a few years back buying my first full suspension bike. Maybe talk to your dealer and see if they can help you out.
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: bikesonline is the polygon retailer in the US. $2499. Polygon redirects to them as well.
  • 1 0
 @J-Sheridan: at 6' 1", an XL is what most brands will recommend. I did some extensive bike shopping 2 years ago and i was recommended an XL on almost every bike i tried, same height. Ended up with an S5 Stumpy Expert
  • 1 0
 @brass-munky: D2C. Winning!
  • 1 0
 @arrowheadrush: I bet that S5 rips the downhills! Being the height we are you can definitely move between a L or XL bike, which ever is most comfortable. The rides I own from Giant, Devinci and Kona, I fall just below the recommendation for XL and just within the L (179-188 cm) fame size. I like the maneuverability of the L frame and having the option to run a 200 mm dropper then. Its always best to try before you buy, but I realize that's not always possible these days.
  • 1 0
 @nickfranko: The stance and ghost are awful bikes (I've ridden both) but the rift zone is great and is overlooked.
  • 1 0
 @brass-munky: Are they bushing or bearings?
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Sweet score on the SLX brakes! They must have run out of Tektros and upgraded your bike to SLX. :-)
  • 49 0
 “In loving memory of the $3k DVO/Deore Ripmo AF”
  • 28 0
 God that was such a great value build. I was trying to sell one of my bikes for right around 3k when that one came out, and the buyer called me the morning he was supposed to come pick it up to tell me he'd decided to get that Ripmo AF instead. Probably a good move tbh
  • 5 0
 @alicialeggett: I'm trying to find one used and people doesn't seem to want to get rid of them!
  • 11 0
 $3900 now in 2022 for the same bike. Sad times, RIP value
  • 35 2
 "Entry-level suspension components feel less at home at higher speeds"

I always find it weird when facts end up in the cons column. Like, yeah, of course low-end suspension isn't as controlled at higher speeds... Otherwise what would be the point of the high-end stuff?

I feel this should only be a con if the components are lower-end than the average bike at this price, and then the con would be "cheaper suspension components than expected at this price".

Great review overall!
  • 10 0
 I would absolutely consider the X-Fusion shock and 35 SILVER (not gold) low end for this price range. I suppose if you are only looking at the major shop brands... It's "average". But most of the other bikes in the ~2500 range are rocking things like 35 GOLD RL, Bomber, Fox34 and shocks like Fox Float and Rockshox Deluxe.

And the spec hurts even more when you are pairing it with stuff liek sram sx and tektro geminis... So you sit there and you just think "ok, all the budget is in the frame". Which is fine, getting the frame right is priority number one, then you sort out parts and specs. But at 2650 the spec is trash and you are buying a frame with a more reliable warranty through a shop. That's about it. Otherwise you can get a Giant with a Bomber or a Commencal with a Yari.
  • 4 1
 @lepigpen: This is the problem tho with these fluffy reviews. So many people are laymen when it comes to understanding quality and function of these el cheapo components. There aren't reviews out there on most of these low-end components like there are for a Lyric or 36 etc. So they see a brand name they like and the price works and assume its a good value when in reality its the opposite. I've got 12 bikes in the garage, I've bought el-cheapo bikes before and its ALWAYS been a bad idea that I've regretted until I sold the bike...aside from my Astronut DJ which is freaking amazing. The only thing worse than a bike with junk components is maintaining a bike with junk components lol.
  • 4 0
 @lepigpen: yes, with this they're really selling a frame with things to take off to practice your work shop skills.

SX, that suspension and Gemini brakes made for 500€ bikes are a waste of ressources.


Same even with the Enduro for 5500€, the NX derailleur lasted only 15mins of bike park on mine, wheels are 2,3kgs, tires paperthin,...
  • 12 0
 That's a fair point. It's tough because there's such a wide range of what to expect, especially with so many direct-to-consumer brands in the mix. Is it a garbage spec compared to any d2c bike? Yeah, totally. Is it bad compared to most of the other traditional shop brands? Not really, but arguably the d2c brands are turning all the traditional brands' bikes into bad value. Unless you factor in the shop relationship and good warranty support, where Specialized has historically excelled.
  • 1 1
 @alicialeggett: And then you're the person rolling into the shop with your entry level d2c bike nickeling and diming the shop for every minute of labor. Not that it's every person, but there is a type.
  • 6 1
 @blinglespeed: Just say you don't like poor people. It's okay. You can say it.
  • 3 0
 @Svinyard: if you have 12 bikes, you are NOT the target of this. The target is the dude (or dudette) that exploded the department store bike he hauled out of his parents garage as he realized he loved biking, but literally cannot go over his budget or risk missing a car payment. But he hasn't wrenched on anything in decades so wants some shop and easy warranty support if something does die immediately.

Sure, most of us here think we'll explode those components in two seconds, but Example Dude ain't putting in an 80-day year at the park or doing 300 trail miles in a month, he just wants to ride something that is decently future proof and won't completely explode the first time he accidentally slams it into a waterbar.
  • 2 1
 @JohSch: That the frame is upgradable is a GOOD thing. As you wear out shit*, you can go into the shop where you got it and say "I love this riding shit! I need better stuff, please help me decide and buy!" Or do some research at home and learn something while making your bike better.

Going just slightly lower on the price spectrum quickly gets you into very un-upgradable frames. Or lack of a friendly shop to help out. Maybe that's for you, but it's not for everyone.

*(If you broke a mech in 15 minutes, it doesn't matter how high-end you go, you done f*cked up and anything would've died)
  • 3 0
 @justinfoil: a normal modern derailleur from Shimano or Sram's X01/Xx1 has a clutch which reduces it's movement which keeps it from wandering around and into the spokes.

SX and NX have no functional damping like it's still 2005.
  • 2 1
 @JohSch: NX does have a clutch. Either way, lack of a clutch isn't going to mean immediate destruction, since we went decades without them and weren't exploding mechs every 15 minutes.
  • 37 9
 Just took delivery on a Canyon Neuron at $3250 CAD. Came with Fox suspension, SLX brakes and XT/SLX drivetrain. Not sure why anyone would bother with these brands anymore. At least this is a little better than that joke of a Kona yesterday.
  • 14 0
 how much was the brokerage fees? Just curious.
  • 25 8
 @rockyflowtbay: how's warranty going to be... it's a no sale for me.
  • 34 8
 Because at least Specialized will hold up to their warranty claims, while you’ll likely be on here complaining about how Canyon denied you if your frame ever breaks.
I will never buy Canyon and I will always dissuade people from buying that brand.
  • 22 4
 @nickfranko: I broke my chainstay twice when I had a Spectral. They replaced it twice with no issue (other then waiting for stock in the middle of the first Covid summer).

In fact the second time they no longer produced my frame color so they sent an entire new frame. I know this is just my experience and others may vary but it worth noting
  • 11 22
flag Graham4stevens (Apr 26, 2022 at 10:33) (Below Threshold)
 It doesn't say Specialized so it's not worth much. Specialized takes so much more time on their bikes and they are flawless. Best price to quality in the bike industry.
  • 39 1
 @mtmc99: "I broke my chainstay twice" - to me that sounds like an issue in itself.
  • 9 0
 @redrook: fair point
  • 6 0
 @rockyflowtbay: It was $426.
  • 7 0
 @team-issue: That's the crux, the total price to get it to your door. I had a Spectral in the cart, till I got to the checkout and it first dawned on me that it was going to be over a grand delivered.

Rummaged up a few hundred more and picked up a bike from the Norco dealer.
  • 4 2
 @nickfranko: oh, what a shame, Ive had canyon's... no issues, live chat available to get things done quickly.
does spesh have live chat(before online sales)?
I waited 8 months for first replacement enduro frame then anther 4 months for anther one after i broke it twice.
I've got a yeti sb150 that i can hardly ride because the frame keeps breaking around the infinity link.(currently in a battle with them because apparently at 97kg im too heavy for their bikes, the guy litterly told me i might over the weight limit for it, so expecting a full refund of my sb150.)

Canyon has been better than both those brands....
  • 2 1
 @50percentsure: Yeah, but even at $3700, it is still a better value than many other brands. You have to pay the tax, but you can't really avoid that.
  • 4 0
 @nickfranko: you'll wait six months for a warranty frameset from Spesh, for what it's worth (said as someone who works at a Spc dealer)
  • 4 0
 I'll tell you why. I had a canyon Spectral from 2018 until 2020. The frame broke 5 times. I basically had to send it back every 4-5 months and wait for a month to get a new one sent out.

I have since bought an Enduro from the local Specialized store. I've had zero issues with and when I do the shop is a couple of hours away from me with a full range of spares for instant replacement. No other brand offers that.

That is worth at least €1000 extra to me.
  • 4 1
 @mtmc99: how long have you had the Spectral? My Alluminium chain stay failed 3 times on the weld. They then upgraded me to the full carbon CFR frame for free. That's only available on the very top of the range models.

Great, I thought to myself....That proceeded to fail twice more for me and then another time afterwards to the guy who bought it from me.

They are just such crap bikes. The hassle of owning one is not worth it. I bought it as my race bike and I ended up buying a spare used Commencal frame as a back up to race that year. I missed at least 3 races that year because of that heap of crap.
  • 1 0
 @humoroususername: i believe the alloy in that time frame was not great, especially on the chain/seat stays.
i broke 2 enduro s works frames before dumping it basically.
  • 3 0
 @HeatedRotor: There was no alloy in the Spectral CFR frame they sent me and it still failed at the EXACT same place as the alloy chainstay. Obviously a very poor design. 5 times in 2 years is ridiculous. It wasn't even ridden that much between failures a few times. My warranty experience with Canyoon was pretty good but its still a disaster to be without your race bike in the middle of the season.
  • 3 0
 @humoroususername: I had my Spectral for 2.5 years. My chainstay broke along the weld both times. The first time was right before the recall on the chainstay (for breaking on that weld) so there was a replacement already in the mail when it broke. The second time looked like an identical failure. It is definitely a bit disappointing to see they keep having the same issue. After the recall I thought they would get it sorted but it seems like its persisting.

Other then the chainstay I never had an issues with the bike and liked it a lot. While waiting for the warranty replacement after the second failure I bought a new bike so I could keep my sanity during the summer of 2020 otherwise I probably would have had the Spectral for longer.
  • 21 0
 I've never ridden a "high end" dropper. I don't know why anyone would need anything other than a Tranzx dropper. Many people have them and probably don't even realize it since they seem to make them for many other companies.

I "upgraded" to a OneUp on one my bikes and I'm not convinced it's any better, other than maybe serviceability.
  • 16 1
 The only high end dropper worth the cash is the Bikeyoke. 4 years, one rebuild and it's never failed me. I'm ok paying a premium for stuff that doesn't break and keeps me riding.
  • 4 0
 I own both some cheap droppers and a high end Bike Yoke. They all move the seat up and down just fine, and the bushings on the Bike Yoke have worn out the fastest.
  • 14 0
 I got a OneUp because it had the best ratio of drop length to overall length, and really low standover hight. It drops and rises the same as any other, I just wanted to fit a longer post in a bike with less seatpost insertion depth.
  • 7 26
flag Graham4stevens (Apr 26, 2022 at 10:48) (Below Threshold)
 I would rather not have a trans dropper.
  • 3 0
 King of them all is still Vecnum.
The Nivo is the Lightest dropper available, has a mechanical locking mechanism and is practically free of any worries like air in the system.
I don’t understand why they don’t get more credits ‍♂️
  • 1 0
 @Zwiefmaster: yes, has a troublefree moveloc! And great service, at least here in Germany, their service dept so helpful, cheap and quick, and it's only one made in Germany.

The only dropper I ever had that lasted without worries,while I went through Levs, Reverbs, a BikeYoke, a Transfer and a OneUp, which all didn't last.
  • 2 0
 High end... I have a tired old Fox Transfer that needs a service, but will cost about 75% of what I just paid for a brand new OneUp to do so.
  • 2 0
 Try a KS post, anything seems high end compared to those...
  • 1 0
 @Grundlepunch: I have a ks that has lasted 4 years flawlessly. It hates when the temps get below zero, but thats it. My ks is more smooth than my transx without a doubt unfortunately.
  • 24 2
 That is one good looking cheap bike. But specialized, just make that fork a Pike for a couple hundred extra and make the riders on a budget that much happier.
  • 14 1
 "for a couple hundred extra" the 3600 comp model comes with a base Fox 34 so that should tell you everything you need to know. This bike at least needs a 35 Gold RL, with the newer air spring. But they would toss a Revelation/Yari on that before they moved to Pike. They'd probably charge 3500+ for anything with a Pike. If they are charging 2500+ for SRAM SX and Tektro Gemini brakes... It's simply a model to buy the frame (with wheel stem bars etc, you start out on it and upgrade as you go). But people should be looking at the Comp if possible. Which is ridiculous. 3600 for NX (slaps forehead)
  • 12 1
 @lepigpen: If you're trying to stay in the RS 35 price range, go with the Bomber Z2.
  • 5 1
 @danielfloyd: Totally. I'm not sure if Specialized has any bike with that. They seem to really love their Fox and SRAM branding builds. But this is what makes brands like Giant such a better value. That Bomber is the best fork to be had in that price range, aside from going with outliers like the Polygon which has a nice Fox34 for the price. Vitus has also made great use of the Bomber but bumped their prices nearly past Giant this year. Sigh...
  • 6 2
 @lepigpen: Fox produces the Bomber. Its not like they would have to go outside of the SRAM/FOX network to spec this fork.
  • 7 0
 What we really need is someone making aftermarket suspension upgrades.
Back in the 90s there were plenty of brands making all sort of cartridges and coil kits for forks,today it seems its only for top of the range suspension.

Imagine a $50 damper with decent quality that you can put on a 35 and improve it.
  • 2 1
 @nozes: MRP Makes Ramp Control upgrades for both Fox and RockShox. Not a $50 upgrade but definitely an upgrade.

mrpbike.com/pages/suspension-upgrades
  • 13 0
 That's not who buys these bikes.
The guy who buys this bike is the overweight guy I work with wants to ride the dirt path with his kids. I tell him he can't go wrong with a Spesh, so he buys it. He doesn't notice any of that other stuff.
Anyone can save up for a $4K+ bike quite easily for a long term bike purchase, if they care much about the sport. This spec isn't for those people.
  • 1 0
 You can swap the damper for that much
  • 6 0
 @HB208: I know, but so many of the big brands avoid it. Not entirely sure why but my guess is simple. Branding. When selling the majority of their bikes to lesser informed riders, they want Fox. They want Rockshox. And as lame an explanation as it is, when you look around society and how things operates it 100% makes sense.

So when I said branding I really truly meant, branding. Not manufacturing or quality... Literally branding. Marketing lol. The Nike swoosh logo. The Supreme brick. etc.
  • 6 0
 @lepigpen: This is kinda my point. How much would they have to charge to JUST give the rider a better fork. You've always gotta move up on all the parts which adds a lot of cost. Sure, there are junk parts on there, but you can still have fun with them. A junky fork really impacts the fun. Marz, Fox, whatever, just no pogostick style suspension products. Everything else gets replaced regularly even when they are higher quality (tires, rear mechs, etc. etc) but forks and frames should be built for the long haul and I feel bad for anyone that has to ride that fork for a long time.
  • 3 1
 @jesse-effing-edwards: Yeah, I just find it aggressive cost cutting not too dissimilar from the Kona. And I find Spesh and Kona to use objectively worse forks in similar 'drivetrain' builds. Lot of other brands with SX or Deore are still speccing 35 golds, bombers, fox34s, revelation/yaris.

I find the specs to be a lot more balanced and a lot more on the nose of the value price point, the budget, from Giant and a slew of direct order brands. Trek and Specialized are just laughing on the way to the bank on brand name alone. And with that they want the most common fork stickers on their bikes. They out here sellin logos and stickers man, swear to god lol.
  • 3 0
 @lepigpen: good point. I do wonder why they don’t spec a Revelation on any of these bikes. I was impressed with the performance for mid-tier fork when I’ve been on it recently.
  • 4 0
 @Hayek: Absolutely. It's like a dead spot within the industry and you only see it rarely on something like a Commencal. I think the sad thing is it actually still goes back to my original point. Familiarity to less informed buyers. The Revelation and even the Yari don't stick out in common buyers minds as worthy upgrades. So as production manager, you just make hard stops like cheap bikes get the cheapest forks and the mid range bikes get something like a base Fox34 or RS Pike/Lyrik. Insinuating the extra spent on a Yari doesn't come across well enough on increased sales and perceived value by a customer. People either want the cheapest bike possible or they want to FEEL like they're getting a great deal by getting a Pike (even if its the base Pike and the build is still kinda overpriced). But they can say they have a Pike. Full stop. It sounds cringe but there are so many people like this in society so... It's not unusual
  • 2 0
 @SunsPSD: In your country,yes.
In others,with much lower income,these models are pretty much only what the majority can afford,at least those who are starting or aren't shure if trail MTB is their thing.
i.e. Portugal has a minimum wage fixed at 705€, that's about $750. Yes,monthly.
  • 1 0
 @lepigpen: This makes sense. I just come at this all from the view that my wife's cheap fork is so dog awful that I feel bad that anyone has to be forced into using one.
  • 22 2
 PB comment section is so funny. Budget bikes these days are amazeballs. Look at the trails testers ride, most people who buy this bike will barely ever send anything like that.

I got 4000 CAD ( pre covid MSRP of 3600 CAD ) Trek Fuel EX 7. The bike just blows away my previous 2010 Spesh Enduro Comp Evo ( a 7000 bucks bike in 2010, not top of the line, but pretty close to it). Yeah I got RS 35 Gold and NX, also 2 piston Shimano brakes but suess what... I am keeping up with my 8-9k bucks firends bike just fine Big Grin

Anyway my point is... if all I had was 2500 USD to get me a brand new, brand name, locally supported warranty bike and WAS IN STOCK I would more than happily buy this bike and ride the shit out of it for the next 3 - 4 years!!!
  • 14 1
 SX will not hold up for years, it's not made for biking - just for looking like a 12x drivetrain on the shop floor
  • 3 1
 2500 usd budget? This bike is 2650 before tax...

Also the relativism you're using doesn't change the relativism of the value compared to other brands. So smirking and saying such and such bike is just as capable as something or other bike... Is basically no different from smirking and saying 'i spent 2500 and got Fox & SLX while you spent 2650 and got SX and X-fusion'...

Not a zero sum game. Both concepts can exist. The bike is capable and worth upgrading with a solid frame... While ALSO being a shitty value proposition. And shouldn't be people's first choice. If you want a bike shop warranty, buy a Giant Trance (X).
  • 1 2
 Well if your friends are riding something similar to Fuel EX I can easily understand it wasn't easy to keem with them on enduro evo
  • 23 15
 Another absolutely stunning review. I am completely flabbergasted at the finesse with which they reviewed this splendid bike. The beautiful composition of this review is comparable to that of Shakespeare, and the bicycle that they so graciously wrote about is a work of art to behold.
  • 12 0
 A bit late for your New Year's resolution of staying positive, isn't it ?
  • 10 4
 I was reading this comment and I died laughing XD It was so funny to read! Back when I was in English class I learned about Shakespeare and now I see the similarities. Thank you for making my day and making pinkbike such an awesome place to drown out all other sorrows!
  • 2 0
 @Big-Dave-Martin-Zanazzi: Literally teaching Shakespeare as I type this. Julius Caesar to 10th Graders...
  • 3 0
 @laureneckert22: hahaha! Same! What school? I teach English to 12th graders in Arizona!
  • 1 0
 @Graham4stevens: Up near Bellingham, Washington! I'd rather teach Hamlet if we are doing Shakespeare! At least I don't have to do Romeo and Juliet anymore haha
  • 3 0
 @laureneckert22: That's so awesome! I totally agree!
  • 4 0
 @laureneckert22: And here I thought I was the only English teacher checking PB too many times a class period... We did Twelfth Night this year. Currently having them write satire but my jokes about the bike industry don't seem to break through the tiktok trance. Bless the comment section!
  • 2 0
 @laureneckert22: And here I sit having just taught Midsummer Night's Dream to 8th graders. I was hoping Pink Bike would deliver on some palate cleansing.
  • 3 0
 @laureneckert22: I remember my high school English teacher would not shut up about how the Beastie Boys always used iambic pentameter.
  • 12 2
 I would take the Status 140 over this in a heartbeat for $350 more. You get the fox suspension, NX drivetrain and Sram Code 4 piston brakes.
  • 9 1
 It's too bad that Shimano can't get their supply chain figured out. A Deore groupset would solve 75% of the issues with this bike. Throw a 150 fork on here and you have a go anywhere bike from the bike parks to XC.
  • 7 12
flag Graham4stevens (Apr 26, 2022 at 10:50) (Below Threshold)
 I would rather kill myself than ride xc on this.
  • 10 1
 @Graham4stevens: as the owner of both an Epic Evo and SJ, I disagree with you. For a newer rider that is going to be doing a little of everything including 20-30 mile XC rides this would be a great bike.
  • 2 10
flag babamartin (Apr 26, 2022 at 12:06) (Below Threshold)
 ‎‎‎‎


























































‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎‎
  • 2 23
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 26, 2022 at 13:46) (Below Threshold)
 @salespunk: Deore is every bit as cheap as SX. Stop acting like it isn’t. Doesn’t matter if it’s deore or SX and even NX or SLX, ride at a decent standard regularly and most of that crap will be in the bin after 12 months.
  • 9 1
 @thenotoriousmic: you must be a SRAM sales rep or blind
  • 1 9
flag thenotoriousmic (Apr 26, 2022 at 15:33) (Below Threshold)
 @JohSch: Yes I’m definitely a sram sales rep for saying deore and SX are equally as bad and not fit for purpose. No semi decent riders are using that junk and if they did it would be in bits after a few months. Probably explains all these nonsense comments on here from people who don’t ride or don’t actually run the products they advise people to use.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I have a Deore derailleur coupled with a XT shifter that’s done 6500km and survived quite a few direct hits. It still works just fine.
  • 12 0
 Needs Alhonga brakes
  • 7 0
 Pinkbike has reviews from last year's value field test. Most of the last year's bikes still exist in 2022. It would be nice if the review does a comparison with last year's reviews.
  • 3 0
 Second that… would love to hear a general comparison of this alum stump jumper vs ripley af, though I don’t think “spec” can compete on specs
  • 9 1
 The simple fact that Alicia was smiling the entire time while riding this bike is the best marketing one can do
  • 10 1
 Put deore on it please for the love of peace. SX isn't worth it.
  • 8 2
 "From Dirtbag to Dentist..."

False. No self-respecting tooth jockey would find themselves on anything non-turquoise. Stop trying to make S-Works as dentist bikes happen Palmer.
  • 5 0
 My GF & I test rode one of these when she was shopping for a bike last year. I was not impressed. I don't know if the one we rode was a dud but it felt heavy, sluggish, and the front fork wasn't smooth at all. It wasn't quite like a lead brick but it certainly didn't feel very fun to ride. She ended up with a Liv Embolden which was 3 lbs lighter, had Shimano 4-pot brakes and rode like a dream. The Liv was also $300 cheaper.
  • 9 1
 Pick cheap components and be a dick about it.
  • 4 0
 Regarding value, the frame is the most expensive part, this was the fastest all round bike on test, even with its cheap components. If I was on a budget for now, but wanted a bike to upgrade over time, this would make the most sense. Also the fit and finish of my wife's stumpy is so far ahead of my Mondraker Fox
  • 6 0
 these videos make me want to wear Viking clothing and ride in warm dry places. for a change.
  • 7 2
 There's something unnerving about a picture of pulling sick shapes on a jump over sharp rocks with no kneepads wearing Harry potter glasses
  • 5 0
 nah, did you watch the movies? If you've got magic on your side you can do anything.
  • 8 0
 Worry about the rocks meanwhile the cactus sneaks up and murders you
  • 3 0
 Oh, and the very best part of these Field Test videos: watching the the other two presenters not knowing how to look when the third one is talking. Especially Alicia.
I mean this in a very positive way. It's very relatable and it contrasts with overproduced ultra-slick TV or other video.
  • 3 0
 Yeah yeah yeah, y'all have found lots of creative ways to call me awkward this week. Trust me, I know Smile Here for your entertainment!
  • 3 0
 Anybody looking for a cheap bike in the UK just go for a Vitus. You can get a Mythique VRX for the same price as this, which has 12 speed Deore, Z2 fork, and Shimano MT501 brakes (Same as the old deore before they added the bracing on the bar, and moved the clamp).
  • 2 0
 Deciding between this and doing upgardes down the road and saving for a Izzo...leaning Izzo. Dream bike would be a Nocro Optic, Carbon Spark Trail, or Stumpy Carbon Comp, but those are all $4k...Izzo has almost better specs then all those and is $500 cheaper.
  • 4 0
 FYI - bought a Core 2 Izzo last fall. Although the Fox 34 can be bumped up to 140mm, I swapped for a 150 Pike. Also the tires had to go. Otherwise have loved the bike, hauls ass up and down, can handle big hits, YT service has been excellent and the Ice Grey looks fly.
  • 2 0
 Don't buy upgardes, ride up gardes
  • 2 0
 If you want a short travel bike you can actually get pretty rowdy on, buy a Norco Optic. I had one for a year and have nothing but praise for that bike. Punches way above its weight on the descents.
  • 2 0
 @Muscovir: as I said, that’s my dream bike but out of price range. We’ll see how much side hurdling I can do this summer
  • 1 0
 @bmied31: Hunt down a used Optic? That's the one you want.
  • 1 0
 @ViolaVesperlin: def an option...midwest isn't exactly a cornucopia of bikes
  • 2 1
 @Moonie2123: I also did the same thing but kept the 34 and it rides great. I take mine to the bike park near my house and with the 140mm fork and a stiffer setup it is great in the air. If you want to be throwing big tricks in the air like big whips I might try to get a Jeffsy in 27.
  • 7 1
 I'll take an SX drivetrain over Alhonga brakes
  • 3 1
 Same tho
  • 7 2
 Alicia is a bit of a ripper I'd say. She looks very capable on the bikes!
  • 4 1
 I would be interested to hear more about the specialised tyres and comparing them to the ever popular and massively more costly maxxis tyres.
  • 1 4
 Here's some more, the spesh tyres are the same as maxxis
  • 5 0
 We need a value tire shootout! Lots of options, including the Specialized tires, are popping up at a much lower price then the staples (Maxxis). Are they Mike Bears or worthwhile?
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: the spesh tyres have been good for years. I remember back in 2012 my mates were getting butchers instead of dhf's. Deven better casings now too
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: Delium for the win.
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99:
That's a bloody great idea and would make a great article/viewing. Henry Quinney did a job with a comparison article regarding rear tyres a while ago. Something similar with a budget cap would be very useful.
  • 3 0
 Gone back and forth between the two for years, Specialized for the better price, Maxxis for the better casings. Each in hand Maxxis is always a slightly better product. Compounds, tread design, but especially their casings.
  • 1 0
 Currently running a butcher on the rear of my hardtail in their enduro casings. Can not recommend. Love the tree pattern it’s one of my favourites, compound could be better but I can’t keep the tyre on the rim. It will burp at least once a ride and I’ve managed to put a few holes through it. I’d like to try a DH butcher see if that solves the issues because that tread pattern is incredible.
  • 5 2
 Typical of specialized. Most, not all, of the bikes in their lineup are nothing special overall and generally come equipped with below average components, for the money.
  • 5 0
 Bonus line looks like death?
  • 2 0
 I bought one of these for my oldest son to ride. Other than the fork I really like the bike and am amazed at how capable and well rounded it is. The fork is terrible, amazingly bad at all pressures.
  • 4 0
 Alicia sending it hard. also SX should be Federally banned from import by the CPSC
  • 3 0
 Palmer looks so unnatural without a beer in his hand. More "round table" on the side of the trail or fireside reviews! A little BETA/PB remix style?
  • 1 0
 I was thinking the same thing. Palmer looks like he's being interrogated by the FBI...give this man a beer in the car park and he'll be back to his normal Bible of Bikes self.

He may be secretly alerting us to the secret robot take over based on Alicia and Levy's behavior...and well...Kaz is an alien so whatcha gonna do? @NotOutsideCEO has seemed quiet lately...hmmm.

"Take me to your leader?"
  • 1 0
 Overpriced for the spec. I'm sure it's a nice frame and all but for the same price I can get better bikes. Even if I want to compare mainstream US brand LBS stocked bikes. I could get a Fuel EX 7 with a 35 Gold/DPS suspension, NX and Shimano MT401 brakes at Trek. And if I go German D2C brands it gets even more ridiculous. Carbon frame, Pike/Deluxe, GX/NX mix and Magura MT5 is what I get for the same price at Radon. I have first hand experience with Radon support and it is excellent, except for the marmite looks I really don't see a reason to prefer Specialized over that bike.
  • 2 0
 16kg... that was the weight of my (still alive and indestructible) 2002's Kona Stinky with the same travel, both coil suspensions (Fox and Marzocchi), Hayes mech disc brakes, and burly Tioga DH tires!!
  • 1 0
 It can't be emphasized enough that SX with a Powerspline BB/cranks and HG cassette is pretty much a dead end for upgrading. I bought a bike with SX thinking I was getting a low end entry into Eagle upgrades but that's not really the case. The cassette is OK but that Powerspline BB is hot garbage.
  • 1 0
 Gonna sound like a complete douche here, but I feel like Alisha could benefit from some proper prescription cycling glasses while riding - all of the video shots have her in her daily prescription eyewear. Just a personal style gripe, but they would probably provide better wind and debris protection too.
  • 2 2
 Note I am not an aspiring teeth fixer when I say, I would probably rule this out due to the lack of SWAT storage, oddly I wouldn't care if it was something like the Meta TR where nothing in the range has in frame storage but becuase it's on some of the range I don't want to miss out on something that could save me strapping my breakdown kit here and there. Makes no sense.

That said, curious to know how much better the Comp actually is - and I'd upgrade from NX to GX as soon as an excuse presented itself (chain needs cleaning), but not the cassette because hub stuff. And I mean, how much worse can the cassette be really be?
  • 2 0
 I too have a RS 35 Silver fork on one of my bikes and can confirm the set up issues. Actually just serviced it and it feels nice and plush.
  • 3 0
 Good point. I wonder how much of the issues with lower end forks is QC? Even a brand new 36 often only comes to life after a proper lower leg service.
  • 2 0
 @ViolaVesperlin: the damper is shit as well
  • 3 3
 "I'm on a budget, what can I afford?"

Shop guy shows him some bikes ...

"What, that thing isn't worth a dime over 3k, I want a better suspension, better brakes, better tires, better ..."

Only on a Pinkbike, where boys can play at being toddlers.
  • 3 0
 IMO definitely makes sense to upgrade to Comp model
  • 3 2
 Comp model is $3650, that's encroaching Ripmo/Ripley AF Deore territory which are vastly superior. Low-end Stumpjumpers are a shitty deal compare to other brands (Polygon T8 at this price range, and the Ripley AF at the next level price range).
  • 2 0
 This prices are insane anyway. This bike recently was for 2500 euros
www.bike-components.de/de/FOCUS/JAM-6-9-29-Mountainbike-p82678
this is huge value
  • 9 5
 SX is garbage
  • 3 1
 Devinci Marshal with the Shimano group is a tough one to beat... My 2 cents
  • 1 0
 Are the prices in these videos listed in CAD? All the USD prices I see on Specialized website are significantly more... $2600 vs $3300...
  • 5 0
 Nope, they're USD. Is there a chance you're looking at the Australian website? My browser, for whatever reason, has tried to take me to the Australian version of the site (even though I've been firmly planted in the US this whole time). This same bike costs $3300 AUD. Here's the US link: www.specialized.com/us/en/stumpjumper-alloy/p/199784?color=320391-199784
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: Thanks Alicia - nice catch! It was doing the same thing for me... defaulting to Australia... duh.
  • 1 0
 I was always told to put a heavier casing tire on the rear. Has that rule-of-thumb changed? Unless they don't make a T9 Purg and T7 Butcher.
  • 3 0
 The T is for Tackyness..or summik. T9 is very gum, T7 less so, T5 sketchy but fast. T9 is great for wet & slick stuff, but it sprays sand and pebbles all over your frame. I only run T5 up front if it's wet.

Casing toughness For Specialized tires is control - grid - grid trail - grid gravity an so on.
  • 1 0
 Shimano SLX is 110 dollars for a derailer and shifter. Deore is 90. I'm just pointing this out as a reminder that SX does not kill a bike.
  • 2 0
 That photo of Alicia among the saguaro really shows how tall the cacti are!
  • 3 0
 They can get to over 50' tall and the big ones are very old. They don't even reach adulthood until 35 or so and their first branches don't appear until they're 50-70 years old. Lifespan averages about 150-175 years, some are more than 200 years old. Think of it, that would be the year 1822 or so when they took root. Oh what they have seen...
  • 1 0
 We had one of these in our shop for service annnnd with Race Face Chesters on it the weight was.... wait for it..... 37.4lbs!!!! It's a led sled. Ridiculous for any money.
  • 1 0
 The shop i work at has had a few of this exact bike sitting around for a while. probably cause they're fugly and not that good.
  • 1 0
 The Comp is about $1,000 more, but looks like a decent deal, and since the parts are pretty much workhorse.
I'm looking at one online now.
  • 2 1
 Hey, I'm moving to Tucson soon. What trails were you guys riding for your tests? TIA
  • 5 0
 For the sake of some short, easily repeatable test loops, most of our testing was in the Enchanted Hills zone. However, I highly recommend Mt Lemmon for some more fun riding! Bug Springs to La Milagrosa was a good one.
  • 2 0
 If you're on the NW side, the 50 year trail out to the Chutes is great. Upper 50 for Tech. Also the Honeybee Canyon trails for ripping XC type riding, and head east to the Tortolita trails like Ridgeline, Mustang, Burro for more techy loops with incredible views that feel like you're really out in the middle of nowhere. East side of Tucson, Mt. Lemmon and the aforementioned Bug Springs down to Prison camp is a great shuttle. Can also hit Fantasy Island on that side of town for fast twisty XC.
  • 1 0
 It is nice that the alloy version retains the 4 bar setup while the carbon version does not.
  • 2 0
 Yet another non-value "value" bike.
  • 2 0
 What up Alicia! Shoutout from Sugar Bowl patrol
  • 2 0
 Hey hey!! Hope you're doing well. All things SBSP bring back the best memories for me!
  • 1 0
 Anyone know what trail this is in Tucson?
  • 1 1
 Happy with my Specialized Butcher Grid Trail tires on my Marin RFZ 27.5...jaja
  • 1 0
 Fat fingered that, meant 65 HTA, but I’ll bet 64 would be fine too.
  • 2 1
 Glad to see they didn't Mullet it.
  • 1 0
 How many stumpy reveiws can you do. HF guys.
  • 1 1
 if u do eny hard riding that for is gonna blow i have the same for and i hate it and it is leaking oil
  • 1 0
 Available online everywhere. Not from your local bike shop.
  • 1 0
 Why would anyone buy Stumpy when they can get some serious Status????
  • 1 0
 How does it "not stop"?
  • 2 1
 coward levers
  • 2 2
 SX is crap of a drivetrain...hard pass
  • 2 2
 Best frame worst components
  • 1 1
 assholes. no frometry chart
  • 1 0
 Wheels are too big.
  • 1 3
 knees to the breeze in those rocks in bananas. I'd be armored up on the bike path down there
  • 5 7
 This bik is actuly a reely good deel. It has som of the best compnents for practly free! Pleese excse my engish im hi
  • 1 2
 YALL ARE SO GOOD AT TYPOS
  • 15 0
 *Y'all
  • 3 6
 Why
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