Round Up: 6 Made in the USA Cranksets

Nov 18, 2021 at 12:46
by Alicia Leggett  


We love to write about exciting handmade bike frames and the builders behind those creations, but let's not forget the other essentials that make a bike a bike. A great frame, after all, is just a piece of neat wall art until it's fitted with the parts that make the bike go. Therefore, today we're highlighting six small and medium-sized brands that make cranks in the USA.

There are small-scale operations all over the world that make high-quality components, but the USA loves to pride itself on its industrial roots, and lately we've seen a few exciting new names break into the American-made parts world - especially those that make cranks. There's something to be said for the grit and creativity it takes to start locally manufacturing bike parts, so here's a list of those brands, new and old, that are doing things their own way and powering ahead with their USA-made cranks.





Ignite Catalyst Cranks

Ignite's Catalyst cranks are available in silver, black, purple, or just about any custom colors and designs to suit your fancy.

Custom anything.
Ignite says these cranks are enduro strong and road bike light.

Ignite, a New Jersey brand that makes aluminum cranks and other components in-house, released its Catalyst mountain bike cranks earlier this year, cranks that seem equally at home on a carbon wonderbike and an all-metal cruiser. The cranks are available in lengths from 155mm to 175mm in 5mm steps, but if you need something different, engineer Ian Colquhoun is happy to work with customers to figure out the right custom options, both in terms of length and colors. The stock colors are silver, black, and purple (of course), but customers can choose to personalize their orders with custom base colors and hardware. Starting at 510g, they are a bit lighter than most mass-produced aluminum cranks, too.

bigquotesCatalyst Cranks laugh at rock strikes and 1400w sprints. Strap on some bags and bikepack the world knowing a drop off the front of a bus in Nepal won't leave you with shattered parts.Ignite Components


Details
• Made in Allamuchy, New Jersey
• 30mm spindle
• Custom lengths, anodizing, and ceramic coatings available
• 510-550g - arms, spindle, and hardware
• 3-bolt splined chainring mounting
• Pricing starts at US$399
• More info at ignitecomponents.com and @ignitecomponents





Boone Technologies Twist! V2.0

Need a crank that doubles as a mirror?

These Twist! V2.0 have the same 90-degree twist as the originals.
The styling is from the '90s, but these have been modernized.

I'm pretty jazzed on the sci-fi look, even if Boone has stepped back from the full futuristic craze and returned to its '90s Twist! roots with the Twist! V2.0. The Twist! V2.0, while seeming more sensible than the Cranx! linked above, still bring plenty of retro flair to the domestically-manufactured cranks game, and are Boone's return to the mountain bike industry after 25 years away, during which the brand instead made titanium wedding rings. These new Twist! cranks are available for BB30 or old-school square taper interfaces, weigh in at about 175g per arm (170mm), and are available with both polished and raw finishes. As for those other ones that look like they're either from 1950 or 2050? They don't appear to be available on Boone's website at the moment, but for the sake of all the reckless hearts out there who lean into the weird and wonderful, I hope they stick around.

Details
• Made to order in Kennesaw, Georgia
• Available for BB30 or square taper interface standards
• The same nostalgic 90-degree twist you remember from the '90s
• Boone also makes titanium Adapt-Rs to fit Boone's chainring spline system to existing chainring interfaces
• US$395
• More info at booneti.com & @boonetechnologies





White Industries M30 Crank

The White Industries cranks are sleek and industrial.

Want a chainring, too? White has you covered.
Want a colorful extractor bolt? You can have that, too.


White Industries, based in California, makes aluminum parts for mountain, gravel, and road bikes, and its M30 cranks are a go-to for anyone looking to build up a metal bike using locally manufactured parts without breaking the bank. The crankarms come in lengths ranging from 165mm to 180mm, mostly in 5mm increments but with a 172.5mm length thrown in for good measure. The cranks come with a 30mm spindle and work with BSA, T47, and PF30 bottom bracket systems. The cranks are available in silver or anodized black, with colored extractor bolts available to add some personality.


Details
• Made in Petaluma, California
• 165mm-180mm
• Available in black or silver with red, blue, pink, purple, black, gold extractor bolts
• Available in mountain, gravel, and road versions and BSA, T47, and PF30 BBs
• 570g for arms, spindle, and hardware at 175mm
• 2024 aluminum
• White also offers compatible narrow-wide chainrings
• US$320
• More info at whiteind.com (website currently undergoing maintenance) & @whiteind





5 Dev

The beauty contest has been won.

5 Dev is quite new, but the system already seems dialed.
At 550g and $499, the cranks are a little on the pricey side, but are also meticulously-tooled and seem to be where art meets functionality.


If we're giving out awards for bike part beauty, 5 Dev deserves at least a nomination for the 7075 cranks. The new cranks from the California brand are CNC-machined from 7075 aluminum, as the name suggests; are available in a wide range of lengths; and come with an aluminum preload ring, a trend we are thankfully starting to see take off. They weigh 550g at 170mm long with a 30mm spindle, putting them on par with some of the other highest quality aluminum cranks, and it's great to see them using the SRAM interface to make brand compatibility easier.

5 Dev is a branch of 5th Axis, a sophisticated machining company that's exciting to see enter the bike industry.


Details
• Made of lightweight 7075 aluminum
• Available in 155mm-175mm lengths
• Compatible with SRAM direct-mount chainrings
• 29mm and 30mm spindle options
• 550g
• US$499.99
• More info at ride5dev.com & @ride5dev





Lightning Cycle Dynamics

Weight weenies rejoice.

This might be the most carbon-y of all carbon cranks.
There are both old-school and modern configurations.


If you thought this list would only contain metal cranks, you thought wrong. Lightning has been in the bike industry since the dawn of time, or at least since 1977. The California brand was started by a rocket scientist who prefers recumbent bikes over upright ones and so began making the eccentric pairing of high-performance recumbent bikes and lightweight carbon cranks. The cranks come in a variety of lengths and BB standards to fit everything from everyday road and mountain bikes to recumbent and tandem ones. They are fitted with removable aluminum spiders to be adaptable between chainring standards, and come in XO and XX1 versions that start at 420g (including Lightning's BB and spider).


Details
• Made in Lompoc, California
• Available for all kinds of bikes
• 160mm to 190mm length range in 2.5mm increments
• Available in gloss or matte finish, with or without the Lightning logo
• Comes with bottom bracket of choice, variety of standards available
• US$890
• More info at lightningbikes.com





Profile Racing

Sturdy, stiff, stylish. Check, check, check.

There are both white and black powder coat options.
The whole set comes in a decorative gift box.


Profile Racing actually started as a racecar chassis shop in Flemington, New Jersey, but the brand has become known for its BMX parts in the half century since its inception. The brand's focus has remained on making sturdy steel, aluminum, and titanium parts that will withstand the test of time, and it now manufactures not only for BMX bikes but for mountain and even road bikes.

The product we'll focus on is Profile's Elite cranks, which Profile says are the stiffest cranks the brand has ever made. The steel crankarms are burly, weighing in at more than 300g per arm, but Profile acknowledges that they're oversized, and the focus clearly is on making them strong, not svelte, and the brand backs up that confidence with a lifetime warranty to the original owner.


Details
• Made in St. Petersburg, Florida
• Made of 4130 Chromoly with titanium spindle
• Available in smaller increments than most crankarms: 170mm, 172mm, 175mm, 177mm, 180mm, and 182mm
• Crankarms available in chrome, black, and white
• 311g per arm, plus another ~176g for spindle
• Lifetime warranty to original purchaser
• US$466.99 – $497.99
• More info at profileracing.com & @profile_racing



243 Comments

  • 223 3
 First they set us up with the "your cranks are too long" article, and then show us some nice cranks to buy. Well played Outside
  • 20 4
 Remember a few years ago when 175mm was the standard? Next it's gonna be 100mm cranks
  • 12 1
 Like it or not this is a result of great programming/planning
  • 53 5
 @stumphumper92: sram just released 172.49
  • 8 10
 @stumphumper92: I don't remember 175mm ever being the standard. I've run 170 and shorter since the late 90s.
  • 3 5
 @stumphumper92: Nope people have been preaching 165 or shorter for a long time.
Just like 650B just takes the rest a while to catch on to it.
  • 9 0
 @stumphumper92: hmmmm.... we can make them you want to test? Smile
  • 7 1
 @seraph: What size frame do you get? I have been on 175 on every bike since 1991 and I never was offered a choice. My bikes are size medium or large.
  • 1 0
 @rcrocha: My 2017 medium E29 came with 165.
  • 1 0
 @5DEVMFG: Just give me some purple cranks dang nabbit!!! Now back to busting on you on the 'gram!!! lol
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: when was that? I cant remember when I had this long cranks. I would have bought 160mm last year for my new frame but those length are not that common for lighter cranks.
My 2017 rig also had 165mm cranks so ...
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: that's pretty interesting. Did you buy a main brand complete bike? He is correct that pretty much all complete medium and large bikes have 175mm spec here in the USA. If you got a bike that a shop had pieced together that could explain your experience...or maybe just regional trends as far as spec. Each big brand does make minor changes for different markets. Also what size bike are you on? Xs and S get 170s typically. But I am very surprised.
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: my 2018 Santa Cruz nomad, size large and bought in the states, came stock with 170 cranks.
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Propain even back then sold bike to us directly without shops. It was the 2016 Spindrift, Size M.

My current bike the 161 Privateer can get pretty low so I like to have short cranks. Because I could not get a replacement fast I had to change 29" to 650b with + size tires for the rear wheel because of a dead carbonara wheel. I immediately have hit the cranks after I had to change it on a trail upwards.
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd :
They are thinking Outside the box...
  • 3 1
 @5DEVMFG: 100mm cranks would pair well with the Grim Donut.
  • 3 0
 Im just going to put my pedals direct to my bb thats the new standard lol @stumphumper92:
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: This is correct and for all those that disagree, by a few years ago, that is tongue is cheek for about 30 years ago. For some of us, that was not that long ago.
  • 32 0
 Been riding the 5 Dev cranks through development. They are absolutely beautiful and I believe the latest version is now down to 475 grams. They are not just machining and using the first buyers to test either. There is an entire engineering team working over there using FEA and generative software to build this stuff. FYI they also have pedals out and will be releasing stems soon as well.
  • 8 3
 FEA and computers are great and all...but have they actually been tested to the CEN MTB fatigue standard?
That test is tough!
  • 1 0
 They are beautiful, if data and test results can back them up that that is a win.
  • 15 3
 @bikebasher: we will have some youtube content soon about the design, testing and strength of all the products we make. We can have them "tested" too... but our standards exceed most "tests". We have worked with JPL, SpaceX and some other companies whom we can't name.
  • 19 5
 @5DEVMFG: I'd love to see the CEN MTB fatigue standard.
Cranks fixed @ 45 degrees, 600lbs(?) applied at the pedal interface, 50,000 cycles with no damage. I don't remember the force exactly, but it's not low...

Not interested in satellite vibration testing. Smile
  • 15 33
flag 5DEVMFG (Nov 19, 2021 at 15:42) (Below Threshold)
 @bikebasher: okay. you should stick with some of the major crank mfg's that have been proven to fail on this website. They most definitely passed the consumer safety standards of the European Union due to their sales volume. Best of luck and appreciate the feedback. Have a great weekend.
  • 5 3
 @bikebasher: I agree! FEA is good but Garbage in Garbage out. FEA is just a tool which should be followed up with some intense fatigue testing......like cane creek did on eeWings.

For me, aesthetic its 5-Dev but longevity it's Profile. Those lightening carbon cranks just look scary.
  • 31 6
 @5DEVMFG: maybe let your PR person respond? Probably a good idea.
  • 3 2
 @rivercitycycles: the CEN test referred to above is a frame test not a crank test. the Crank and BB standard relates to the BB failing or the frame failing and was resolved with 73mm BB's. These are cranks. They transfer energy to the frame or BB. Carbon can fail. 7075 Alloy? No. Cast maybe due to impurities or cheap material. The crank arm isn't going to fail. The frame or BB will fail first on an Alloy crank arm.
  • 11 2
 @5DEVMFG: Thin Skin! @bikebasher is on to something. Testing to a known standard should be part of your product development cycle along with a robust FMEA. We all know everything breaks and it's often time hard to predict a failure mode but testing builds credibility. I sure you went through the 1990's cottage industry era! I certainly did and spend good money on really nice looking parts that were poorly developed.

BTW, my shop has a large inventory of 5th Axis work holding........keep up the great work.
  • 15 2
 @5DEVMFG: I get the "secret squirrel" sh*t but welcome to the Pink Bike comments section. Put on your gloves because below the pretty pictures it's a cage match.
  • 9 4
 @rivercitycycles: well give us some time and let us make the content on our own channel and you can learn for yourself.... we aren't giving away all the details here. Heck we didn't even know this was getting published. (subscribe to our YouTube... not so subtle hint)
  • 4 0
 @5DEVMFG: FWIW I first saw your cranks on Hardtailparty's channel. His install vid and initial impressions got me stoked--he did a good job explaining that you guys aren't just nerds, you guys are also big mountain bikers. I'll be keeping an eye on your stuff, for sure!
  • 5 0
 @5DEVMFG: subscribed. I can't wait to see all the new content. Your cranks have my head spinning. Absolutely beautiful. I want them so bad. They would look so good on my 2021 Commencal Meta AM.
  • 10 3
 @5DEVMFG: Love your 5th axis products, using them in the shop right now as I type this (same as rivercity) but maybe take on a better public approach and you will bring more people with you, especially as you are brand new to the bike market, not everyone will know your background or give a shit that you have cnc'd other peoples parts for them, even if they are for spacex etc.

The cranks look awesome but if someone suggests testing to a recognised standard, the best answer is not 'go and buy the other stuff then' - We develop a few non-bike parts ourselves and in-house test beyond CE standard but we do use it as a baseline.

Thats all you really need to say - 'Our cranks will be tested to exceed CE/ISO etc whatever applicable standards' - job done.
  • 6 2
 @justanotherusername: they did 2 times now. And they recognized the guy was being a smartsss like most people on Pinkbike.
  • 3 0
 @DigRideParty: Hey I like the company, I have spent thousands of pounds with them on their workholding stuff but the answers were vague.

Want to shut up a smart ass, answer the question directly as I said and they melt away.
  • 9 4
 @5DEVMFG: lol "tell us youre broke without telling us you're broke" is what you told me on social media when I said 500$ was steep for aluminum cranks that weigh more than bigger mfg carbon cranks. GX aluminum, 138$. Come to find out, 5dev not fatigue tested. solid PR job

Seeing how you conduct yourselves here, along with social media is interesting. For this, I am out; Machined or not marketing wise it would have made more sense for you to explain why this crank is dependable and worth my money versus sram or whatever other mfg
  • 6 6
 @justinroehlk: sounds like you can't afford 500.00 cranks.
  • 5 4
 @justinroehlk: There's no difference between a NX crank and eeWings. They do the same thing. NX crank is $100.00 eeWings $1000.00. Same with NX shifter vs AXS. Battery never runs out on NX.

If you don't understand why using Carbon is risky go watch the Pinkbike test where the Praxis carbon crank failed, or go find any video where a carbon bars fail at the clamp. Sounds like you made a crack at these blokes and they chirped back with some wit. Suck it up buttercup, this sports not cheap.
  • 3 0
 @WJTSocal: Lots of bent or otherwise destroyed crank arms going around Smile
  • 5 2
 @SoftSoilSampler: bro what are you saying lol.
Vast majority of people who run sram carbon cranks have not had failures. Add that to the list of people who own GX aluminum and dont have failure. These ones in particular from 5dev have holes machined into them. It is more than reasonable to question the integrity of these and ask about testing.

And your point about cost is wack. Yeah the sport isn't cheap, but as a middle class guy I can definitely effectively question price point and performance. Why would I spend 10/12K on a specialized ebike when a YT decoy is around 6k? That goes for mountain bike anything. Guess you guys down in south Africa are rollin in dough eh buttcup
  • 2 2
 These ones look like a copy of the Onza HO titanium cranks from back in the day. Nice to look at but not really offering anything Shimano doesn't offer.
  • 4 3
 @justinroehlk: if you have to ask... you can't afford it. Wink
  • 4 2
 @SoftSoilSampler: who came up with that bullshit?

If you don’t ask you probably don’t have any common sense so wouldn’t be able to afford it either.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: it's a well known phrase or saying. Don't shoot the messenger!
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: JP Morgan according to Google
  • 2 4
 @justanotherusername: my wife told me i had no common sense when i rode down a dirt trail on my modified bike in the 80's... it was not certified to ride on a sidewalk. She gave up on me when i purchased my first Klein.

Also it should be pointed at that the first point of failure on a bike is the person using it not any part. Next is the wheel. How many people ride a bike off the showroom floor at a bike park without checking the whole thing over first? pinkbike comments section always delivers. I already pre ordered these cranks.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: I know it’s well known, it just sounds batshit.

Didn’t know it was JP Morgan, guess he had enough money not to have to ask though, but it’s obviously just a weird flex used when buying things you know you can afford - otherwise total bullshit.
  • 3 0
 @SoftSoilSampler: I didn’t mean you had no common sense, I meant the well known phrase made no sense, a bit like your story really.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: I didn't know either until I looked it up. Good you said it because I learned something - that's a win.
  • 3 3
 @justanotherusername: arguing on the internet makes no sense. but here we are. i'm going to bed. you should go ride your bike. (after you do a full inspection. safety first)
  • 3 2
 @SoftSoilSampler: thanks I’ll keep that in mind

Cost=quality. Nope
  • 2 1
 @bikebasher: they beat the ever living crap out of a crank on their Instagram today. haters are still going to hate.
  • 3 4
 @DigRideParty: Randomly pounding a crank into the dirt with a mallet is ‘testing’ now?

For a company of that size / capability that’s a pretty odd answer to someone asking about industry recognised laboratory fatigue testing.

And yet again, I’ll state I love the look of the cranks and love their work holding products, I am certainly not a ‘hater’ and their crank likely far exceeds any required specifications.
  • 3 2
 @justanotherusername: you must be a high school math teacher.
  • 3 0
 @DigRideParty: Mechanical engineer (Beng) & small machine-shop owner with some experience with in-house product testing to beyond ISO standard (simple weight drop test, its not hard to rig up after all) actually sweetie.
  • 1 2
 @justanotherusername: so you know these products are legit and are just being a jackass on pinkbike. Got it.
  • 3 0
 @DigRideParty: Did you fail to read the following I wrote above:

'And yet again, I’ll state I love the look of the cranks and love their work holding products, I am certainly not a ‘hater’ and their crank likely far exceeds any required specifications'

Amongst all of the other praise I have given to the cranks and 5axis other products, of which I personally own?

Its not being an ass to disagree with something or to suggest adhering to a universal standard of testing is a good idea.
  • 1 3
 @justanotherusername:

"Its not being an ass to disagree with something or to suggest adhering to a universal standard of testing is a good idea."

You do realize that World Cup level racers use prototype parts, custom parts, limited 1 off parts or race stock parts that will never ever be tested by some universal standard lab test? No one gives a crap about universal standards. I have a Deity stem. I have never once thought "i wonder if this meets the universal standard"
  • 3 0
 @DigRideParty: World cup racers who are 100% unlikely to sue their sponsor if said part fails?
  • 4 0
 @DigRideParty: Remember when Gwin broke a crank that was a prototype he shouldnt have been running which was fitted by accident?

Prototypes are just that, made for testing, either by test riders aware of potential shortcomings or other methods and are not for sale to the public.

Nobody gives a crap about universal standards? - That would be complete and utter bullshit, how do you think products are tested before being put to market (some before they are legally allowed to be put to market) - You dont care if your car tyres meet universal safety standards for example?

And these 'standards' are the lowest level a product needs to adhere to, nothing stops a manufacturer going further, as many do.

That is literally the biggest load of shit I have ever seen written and your Deity stem probably went through the same testing that most big brand stems have - Here is a pic of an Industry 9 stem going through some 'nobody gives a crap' testing for you: bikerumor.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/A31Eight-Stem_Testing_6_WEB.jpg

By the way, I still like 5th axis products and think their cranks look amazing and will probably exceed any testing standards.
  • 2 3
 @jaame: universal standards testing offers zero protection from lawsuits in the USA. the bar is set low for those tests.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: 100% agree that consumer safety standards have a place to regulate and maintain a standard. Especially since 95% of the industry relies on Asia production. At the same time, i would bet that most of the products that fail do meet the standards but the production quality was off that day. Carbon or cast products can easily have issues. I also hope a brand like all 6 of these know what they are doing. I use my own judgement over a standards test. I don't need to see a single test result for eeWings. But i do question some Hub brands as I have had them fail and they were "high end"
  • 1 0
 @SoftSoilSampler: An X-ray scan will easily pick up any defects like those.
  • 35 7
 Are Cane Creek's Ti EEwings not USA made?
  • 13 19
flag AvidTrailRider (Nov 19, 2021 at 8:44) (Below Threshold)
 They are, but most people already know about them. This article highlights products most of us don’t know about.
  • 35 2
 Made in Taiwan. By incredibly talented fabricators, for sure - not an easy part to build! But no, not made here.
  • 1 12
flag CPB (Nov 19, 2021 at 8:50) (Below Threshold)
 I believe they are, I think everyone knows about them already so they were omitted.
  • 3 9
flag slayersxc17 (Nov 19, 2021 at 9:43) (Below Threshold)
 They are. But are pretty well known, and cost a grand!
These are “affordable”
  • 16 1
 Designed and packaged in Arden NC, welded in Taiwan. Still the best cranks money can buy, in my opinion.
  • 4 1
 @Lokirides: Fletcher, but that's a technicality.
  • 4 2
 Speaking of EEwings,just saw a copy of those on AliExpress for $300!
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: but still just down the road from Fairview
  • 2 0
 @slayersxc17: Just as long as they are not made in Hendo. That’s like another country.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: Hey Billy, grab some more of that Ti tubing and weld up another few sets…we are selling them ourselves!
  • 16 2
 All of this small batch made stuff is cool until it is not when you need new BB / Chainring;
I'm big fan of the SRAM concept with DUB and Direct mount (probably will be downvoted for that)



Also majority of this cracks heavier then SLX/GX and do not even look too good to be honest
  • 10 0
 5dev has smartly adopted the Sram chainring interface standard and is doing both 30mm and dub.
  • 2 0
 Ignite cranks use standard sram 3 bolt chainring mounting and whatever 30mm bb you desire so no special parts needed . As a happy customer of ignite cranks can easily say fit and finish is top notch much better than any big box brand cranks I've fitted .
  • 15 0
 profile cranks have always been legendary, at least in the BMX world
  • 1 0
 Profile "Elite" Mtb cranks with Ti spindle are ridiculous! Even with hollow steel spindle there lighter then you can believe, still a bit heavier then these options but worth it for a lifelong crank. Profile for life!
  • 13 0
 Profiles will last longer than 5 years, even after you accidently run them over with your Tacoma.
  • 5 0
 I have Profiles on every BMX I own. Rock solid.
  • 2 0
 I had Profiles on my bmx bike years ago that I kept through several bikes. While other friends were either bending one piece cranks or constantly tightening other cranks, I never had to do anything to my Profiles. I beat the hell out of them for years then sold them to a friends little brother that did the same. He then sold them to another local kid that had them for years. For all I know they are still in circulation.
  • 9 0
 Great follow up to the short crank article from the other day. While searching for shorter cranks for my current build I looked all over for some 160's or 165's. All I could come up with were the FSA Comets which aren't compatible with my frame (good thing I didn't figure that out until I already owned them). Some cool options if they're in you budget. Not mine, hence the FSA's.
  • 21 1
 check out Canfield's cranks too. they're all about the short.
  • 1 0
 I found a GT Speed "BMX" crankset that uses a standard 24mm spindle and comes in 135-170mm lengths for a build I did for my son. I think there are a few similar cranksets in the BMX world.

Spawn Cycles also offer their Brood cranks in 160mm. Not sure if they are designed for adult weights but they look pretty beefy.
  • 1 0
 Hope do their EVO cranks in 165. Love mine, super stiff, light, totally bombproof and the best thing: No more rock strikes Smile
  • 4 1
 @WasatchEnduro: I can't make up my mind on short vs. long. I'll stick with my schlong thank you...
  • 1 1
 Just picked up a pair of 165mm RaceFace Aeffect R’s two weeks ago. From universal cycles.

You can add them to the list of short cranks to keep an eye out for Smile .
  • 1 0
 @its-joe: Less strikes is great! I'm running 165mm XT cranks on one of my bikes.
  • 11 18
flag m1dg3t (Nov 19, 2021 at 9:58) (Below Threshold)
 @gtrguy: You know how I reduced my pedal strikes? I became better at timing my pedal strokes.
  • 11 7
 @m1dg3t: Not always possible but thanks for the douchy reply! Smile

Oh, there's a block function... excellent!
  • 5 15
flag m1dg3t (Nov 19, 2021 at 11:00) (Below Threshold)
 @gtrguy: OBVIOUSLY.

I did say reduce. Not eliminate. Thank YOU for the douchey reply. I guess basic reading comprehension is to much to ask in this digital age? LoL
  • 11 0
 Those white industry cranks are super nice on retro styled builds. as for Profiles timeless classics on any build if your not a bitch.
  • 3 0
 I was drooling over them but the custom chain ring interface was the deal breaker for me, so I went with locally made Intend cranks. Still love the looks of the M30s though
  • 4 0
 @Mr-Gilsch: I want profile cranks for my chromag Doctahawk, would be steel as balls
  • 1 0
 @Mr-Gilsch: Same here. It seems like more manufacturers are gravitating to the sram interface, which will hopefully lessen the number of interface standards over time. I really wanted the White cranks to match my hubs (custom steel frame and I am old, so finally building for pretty as well as ride).
  • 1 0
 @carym: yeah, I'd swap my sram carbon cranks in a heart beat to get the M30s with sram or RF Cinch compatibility! I also liked the looks of the Ingrid (from Italy) cranks but they also have a custom interface... No thanks.
  • 8 0
 I rally like that Boone can be used with multiple spider interfaces and 5dev is using the sram interface. It seems the sram one is becoming the most common, which is nice. It is a pain with evry manufacture having their own unique interface.
  • 9 1
 Cane Creeks aren’t US made??

Also, some of these cranksets would be a real upgrade, but solid CNC aluminum cranks are inferior to a forged SRAM GX crankset, let alone any hollow core (SLX or above) Shimano crankset.

I’m all for blingy parts, but if you’re going to charge a premium, make sure your product is functionally superior to the cheaper mass produced items it’s competing with.
  • 3 0
 Nope. Welded in Taiwan.
  • 1 2
 @PHeller: Shame, Shame, Shame...
  • 12 1
 Thanks so much Pinkbike!!!
  • 9 0
 The 5 Dev cranks reminds me of the Middleburn DH cranks I had before you were born
  • 2 0
 the ones where the ends fell off or the later ones
  • 3 0
 I had some Rockwerks cranks back in the day that looked pretty similar as well. To my eye the 5 Devs looks beautiful, but the tool paths you see on the Ignites bother me. If I was in the market for uber-expensive cranks, and was choosing between the two, I'd go with the 5 Devs based just on the finish quality.
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Nah brah. Stress risers iz the s3x Wink
  • 6 0
 You should check out the Groovy Cycleworks Hot Rods: www.groovycycleworks.com

They are based on the original Grove Innovations Hot Rods from the 70s or the 80s. Rody (Groovy Cycleworks) who worked for Bill Grove now makes them in steel and titanium. There's an old blog post from when he started the project: groovycycleworks.blogspot.com/2008/06/grove-hot-rodsthe-time-has-come.html
  • 8 0
 the understated style of those White Industries cranks is amazing. I would love a set of those.
  • 5 0
 I have been abusing my WI cranks for years now and they are no worse for wear. Additionally the crew that makes them are all super cool and down to earth. Well worth checking out the shop in Petaluma.
  • 3 0
 Only bummer with them is a proprietary chainring mount.
  • 1 0
 my first proper mtb a marin indian fire trail in 95 had white industries cranks and a front hub...love the brand since back then.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Wolf Tooth CAMO spider. *shrug* there's always options.
  • 6 0
 Soulja boy is doing bikes now?
  • 7 1
 M7100. Super boring, but up there for Performance, no doubt.
  • 2 7
flag Daledenton (Nov 19, 2021 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 If I were buying cranks right now I would not buy hollowtech cranks. More than a few reports of shimano road cranks failing and some of their mountain bike cranks as well.
  • 1 0
 @Daledenton: I've broken two sets of older R6800 Ultegra cranks, both of which broke on the driveside just beyond the spider. I've been running XT-780 and M8000 cranks for years and haven't broke one yet, so I feel like the MTB side of the house is plenty durable. The R8000 Cranks Shimano warrantied replaced my second set of R6800 cranks for have been going strong for a few years too.
  • 5 0
 @Daledenton: The issue has been blown out of proportion. Shimano road cranks have been seeing bonding issues for a while. The mountain side is mostly problem free.
  • 2 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: @m47h13u: I know the road cranks are way more of an issue than the mountain bike ones but a company that doesn't seem to really care that such a vital part of the bike fails often in the same way is not a company I would choose to put on my bike personally.
  • 5 0
 You can drop your bike off a building and those profile cranks will be fine. Your carbon frame won't though.
  • 5 0
 I'd rather have Shimano XT/Ultegra than every one of these except the Profiles.
  • 2 0
 While Shimano are pretty boring its understandable. There is alot to like about Shimano cranks. They are just solid and hassle free, easy to install and remove, cheap bottom brackets, etc. I have a set of the new XTs on backorder. I looked at everything else out there before buying this time around but couldn't convince myself anything else would be much better for the price.
  • 2 0
 Running Profile Elite on my Nomad. Super stiff cranks are a must. After years of flexy light cranks, the Profile stiffness gives the bike a much more stable planted feel as the forces are directed into the shock action and not twisting the frame around the BB.... and they looknsuper bitchin.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn’t stiffer cranks make the frame twist more as less of the force is going into bending the cranks?
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: no, I should have said the profile elite come with a BB and Ti option axle. Because the crank/bb/spindle is so stiff, there is no movement. Flexy cranks/bb/spindle gives the forces something to move before/aswell as the desired shock/pivots etc. Stiffer is better, just ask ya GF Wink
  • 3 0
 Feels like the 90’s are back in full swing. Very nice. I love all this USA made cnc’d goodness! Now we’ve finally got some brakes and geometry to have cool looking bike stuff that doesn’t ride like a slow road bike.
  • 2 0
 I have Lightning cranks in 190mm. I was experimenting with longer crank arms. I ended up going back to 175mm because there was just no consistent improvement in heart rate for a given power. I was also noticing some knee pain with the long cranks. But Lightning as a company was great. The cranks were on a MTB, and the ends got bashed up but never broke. I wore a grove in the arm with heal rub and again, no breakage. Lightning repaired the cranks twice and only charged me once. The bottom bracket bearings did seem to wear out quicker than Shimano Hollowtech 2 bearings, and I don’t think carbon is the best material for MTB cranks or people who pedal pigeon toed, but Lightning is a good example of a domestic, boutique brand producing a unique product and supporting it well. I actually still have the cranks in the part bin if anyone want to be contrary and try LONGER arms…
  • 3 0
 Whatever the science says - 99% of people agree. They prefer their "riding" partners and themselves to have longer cranks......
  • 5 0
 My SLX with garbaruk chainring are 550g and cost around 130$…
  • 1 0
 If a 'local' company could provide a wide range of choice, decent quality and price point I think that would be pretty exciting for most consumers. I mean I guess none of those US manufactures read your 'short cranks' article Wink

I'm not claiming they are all that, but www.mirandabikeparts.com/en/products-solutions/mtb/crank-models has many options in multiple lengths, interfaces and q-factors.
  • 3 0
 I’m here!
  • 3 0
 I always wanted a pair of those Boone Twist cranks. They win the beauty contest for me.
  • 2 0
 Careful what you wish for...I had a pair catastrophically fail. Arm snapped in two, sent me over the bars (I was out of the saddle climbing in a big gear).
Fortunately did not make contact with the sheered end, as it would have sliced through my leg pretty easily.
  • 4 1
 The biggest issue with superboost is that we get no good cranksets. A 165 superboost crankset is a unicorn.
  • 3 0
 Good job 5 dev on using a sram chainring standard. The whole cinch, Shimano, SRAM, white industries, hope, etc is annoying.
  • 5 0
 It's annoying SRAM uses SRAM chainring standard?! lol
  • 2 0
 I have profile cranks on my dirt jump bike and they are incredibly tough. Still waiting for my sprocket I ordered back in April though
  • 4 0
 Haven't done mushroom in 40 years and it's kicking in wow
  • 2 0
 Really surprised there is no mention of RNC cranks. He recently made mountain bike cranks and they look like the coolest cranks out there.
  • 3 0
 They are all very nice and very expensive
  • 2 0
 Good to see that people are still manufacturing with rainbows like in the old days.
  • 2 0
 What is the difference between 5 Dev Ebike cranks and Std. cranks? That is a new one for me.....
  • 1 0
 It is a different spindle interface
  • 3 0
 @salespunk: maybe it's a daft question.....but why?
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Ebike cranks mount to the motor shaft and vary between manufactures on the interface.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know who makes the chainring on the Ignite cranks in the photo? Checked their website to no avail. Really stoked to see a bmx looking ring for mtb! Cheers!
  • 1 0
 I think it's Garbaruk.
  • 3 0
 Gotta love those profiles. So BMX.
  • 3 0
 Cook Brothers Racing Dogbones in 165, please.
  • 2 0
 Those 5 Dev cranks looks like my GX cranks planed down and polished. That gives me a bad idea…
  • 1 0
 The outer skin on NX and GX cranks has got to be like 3mm thick at most. Interesting idea for sure Wink
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: dare me to do it? I’m pretty dumb and few internet strangers could easily push me over the edge.
  • 1 0
 @speed10: I didn’t see nothing
  • 1 0
 The ignites are sram standard, I've got a pair 160s on my ripmo and owner is an avid rider also. I know because I've ridden with him.
  • 1 0
 i dont like the shape of the ignite cranks but the custom colourways are ace..reminded me a lil bit of old kooka cranks.
  • 1 0
 I have a set of profiles in chrome waiting to go on my next bike. The bike after that will have Boone cranks. But I would be just as happy on deore tbh.
  • 3 0
 I'm waiting for 69mm
I can go 69% faster, with 69% more effort
  • 2 1
 Where is Dangerholm? I can see him mouth watering!
Need tight pics before Xmas
  • 15 1
 Zero of these cranksets are light enough for Gustav.
  • 4 0
 Dangerholm should do holiday cards or a calendar.

I'd buy one... for the Mrs. ofc... wait wut?
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: 5Dev will have a solution for Dangerholm soon. There is a LOT of development work going on over there.
  • 1 0
 @salespunk: uh oh, tell me more!
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: think Ti and XC strength instead of DH strength
  • 1 3
 The Boone design is dated. If the 90deg twist is inspired by designs from the 90's, they should have given it one more thought, a modern twist and have designed cranks with a 20deg twist. And no, calling it the Twist! V2.0 isn't just quite the same.
  • 1 0
 Inspired by Grafton?
  • 3 0
 good old 1990s
  • 2 0
 I'm glad I'm not the only one with an irrational love of cranks
  • 2 1
 3 days ago you made article about short cranks and you didn't even mention "Canfieldbikes" in this article.
  • 1 0
 I'm still on my 2017 RaceFace Next SL's! They've taken many hits and are strong af to this day.
  • 1 1
 NOT Made in USA: Good-looking cranks

I still have my Specialized Lightning-licensed carbon cranks on my 2012 Stumpjumper HT. They're bulletproof. Ugly af, but bulletproof.
  • 1 0
 Makes me sad that I can only run one set of cranks on my bike at a time. Also, a little sad to be LOL poor.
  • 1 0
 I thought this was a Canadian run website, where’s the highlight of Canadian made products?!
  • 2 0
 Is there anyone in Canada making mountain bike cranks? I don't think Race Face's carbon cranks are made in BC anymore, and NSB doesn't make cranks anymore either... am I missing anyone?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Are Turbines still made in Canada?
  • 3 0
 Profile is always a GO!
  • 1 0
 I had t-shirts in the 80s that looked like ignite cranks. Oh and MTB paint jobs in the 90s.
  • 2 0
 Coming soon to a dentist near you...
  • 2 0
 Wow look at all the Americans that came out to comment
  • 1 0
 My father and his best friend built their race car chassis at profile racing when they were in Flemington, NJ.
  • 1 0
 love the look of those @ride5dev cranks. shame about the BB interface and price though Frown
  • 1 0
 Ah yes, you short people and your itty bitty cranks. I'll stick with my longer cranks for my long legs.
  • 2 0
 That's pretty bold ripping off the 93-95 Ford Lightning logo so blatantly
  • 1 0
 Been in the market for some cranks for a while. Really like those Ignite cranks!
  • 1 0
 Astonishing looking cranks... And prices
  • 3 1
 Carbon has become boring
  • 1 0
 The carbon in the bike world has
  • 1 0
 Not the best time for "website maintenance" White Industries!
  • 4 3
 Making America expensive again... hello SLX that never failed.
  • 1 0
 Lightning, when you want the old Skool look for a new skool price...
  • 1 0
 I’m still not 100% onboard with profile cranks, at least for bmx.
  • 1 0
 What about eewings????? The best crankset out there!?
  • 2 0
 I love my eeWings but don’t believe they’re MUSA.
  • 2 4
 @brianpark: I think they're made in NC
  • 1 0
 Profile makes good stuff but their customer service is that great.
  • 1 0
 Ughhh... now I have crank envy (again).
  • 1 0
 Thank you for not including those other Boone abominations.
  • 1 0
 Can the 5 Dev be mounted on a fat if you find a long spindle ? 100/120mm ?
  • 2 1
 Cranks only their mother could love...
  • 1 0
 Man, that drip paint job with those 5dev cranks looks hot.
  • 1 0
 BOONE, now do also your famous Titanium chainrings
  • 2 2
 Looks like 5Dev can make 155 and 160 Cranks for Acoustic bikes as well.
  • 5 7
 Why is made in the USA seen as a good thing? US manufacturing is not exactly known for being the bastion of quality…this is coming from a tesla owner.
  • 6 0
 Because 'Murica f*ck yeah!
  • 8 4
 F*ck Teslas! They currently (pun intended) rank at the bottom of auto mfg quality ratings. Elon is the king of the D-bags. Rolling obsolete E-Waste nightmare bricks. Buy a 20 year old Toyota, keep it running on scrapyard parts. Reduce and Reuse is better than Recycle. Made in USA is good for quality (most always), jobs, reduced shipping pollution, general MFG pollution regulation, and mainly F*ck China. Boycott China. Every day.

Pass me a towel - gotta dry my brow now....
  • 4 0
 People completely under estimate the size and breadth of US manufacturing capabilities. Sure alot was sent to China as part of globalisation, but much of the precision manufacturing still remains. These cranks are a perfect example, with mass produced cranks coming out of Asia, here is half a dozen (not just one) word class cranks USA made cranks. You can probably do this with any other part of the bike.
  • 2 0
 Its good for us here because we like supporting US made companies. But what you said is not entirely wrong. The US is no different than anywhere else. There is both very good quality, high end manufacturing, as well as alot of crap. Manufacturing quality has more to do with who is doing in than where its being done. If a company who outsources to Asia pays for good quality manufacturing and quality control the the product will be good, if not it will be shit. Same goes for the US. If a company wants to pay for quality raw materials, skilled labor, etc, then the products will be good.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: but didnt some bloke wrote them a 200 point why your automobile is a pile of shit report , and this led them to make the gigafactory where three parts now make the entire skate? How does that happen
  • 7 0
 There are some benefits to keeping manufacturing "local" - it keeps US dollars circulating in the hands of US middle class workers.

When you buy something from overseas, you sorta spread the same dollars across lots of people and industries. The retailer makes a few cents, the shipper makes a few cents, the cargo company makes a few cents, the manufacturer overseas make a few cents, the material supplier makes a few cents, the brand makes a few cents, the shareholders make a few more cents.

When you buy from a smaller, more local company, more of your dollars are going into the pocket of the guy working the machine, because in a lot of cases, he's also the one who designed the parts, he's also the marketing guy, the shareholder, the brand, etc. That guy, in turn, shops within your economy too - he might buy the products or service you sell. There is more incentive for the owner/machinist to make a good product when he gets your hard earned bucks in his hands vs the whole supply chain getting a few cents each.

I think it also helps during times of disruption too. Like right now with all our parts shortages and logistical issue, buying local can get you the parts you want without the wait. In some of these cases, the parts are pretty competitively priced, too. Yea, it might come with some compromises, they might not be perfect, but in my opinion there are a lot of benefits to keeping it more local.
  • 1 1
 I know they keep trying to outsource parts my factory makes, but every time they do they run into quality control problems. They seem to be doing a better job with quality with the production they sent to Mexico, but we have a revolving door of people from Mexico working at our factory and taking the knowledge back, so that might be why.

So, we can produce crap in America, but we can also produce good stuff at competitive prices. Why we build parts for Airbus AND Boeing (and others).
  • 3 1
 @PHeller: Yep', and if that guy didn't have that job, maybe he would sell drug, or break into your house and maybe kill you or whatever.

If baffles me that people don't get this.
I'm not for isolating ourselves inside our borders, but like every time the "get cheap stuff made overseas" has gone too far.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: All good points, and the climate guys will appreciate limiting transportation emissions.
  • 2 0
 RIght now we have massive supply chain issues and can't get parts. the made in the USA solves this issue. Obviously with a country our size, we will have crap and quality products. But again, the point is we need parts and when they are stuck in Taiwan, China or on a boat we can't get them.
  • 1 0
 @DigRideParty: probably more actuate you say it helps the issue. Saying it solves the supply chain issue would be over simplifying things. Like in the case of bike parts which are largely made of aluminum, we can producing the aluminum here and make the parts here, but most of the raw materials are mined in other countries. We mine only a fraction of what we use here.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: cmon man smdespite having to stop making things due to material supply issues and materials costing 5 times what they did if you can get them , i mean you could argue if you cant get the materials or enough its easier to buy a finished item from anyone who can , remeber as the planets resources dwindle the next wars will be fought over those not oil
  • 1 1
 @suspended-flesh: "Made in USA is good..."
Also @suspended-flesh: "Buy a 20yo Toyota"
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: the most popular Toyota models in the US are actually made here. The Camery, Tacoma, Tundra, Corrolla, RAV4, etc are all made in US plants.
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: Because the environmental cost of manufacturing in Japan has already been paid. Toyota began building is the USA in 1999 I believe, but not the 4Runner
  • 2 3
 Aren't eewings made in North Carolina?
  • 3 1
 Is North Carolina the part of Taiwan they are made in?
  • 1 0
 Maybe just the designing..
  • 7 9
 No wonder why people choose oversea production
  • 6 0
 Kind of my reaction too (although I have a soft spot for my hometown company, White Ind.).
  • 7 0
 Have you priced out a set of XX1 or XTR cranks? High end Asia stuff isn’t less expensive.
  • 4 0
 @salespunk: most of these cranks are heavier than 500 grams for insane prices, an slx crank is around that weight for 5 times less money
  • 2 4
 @Noeserd: Easy with the logic there homie. We have to over compensate for our shortcomings as people somehow. Smile
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: the 5Dev's are 475 now after some additional development. Slightly heavier than carbon, but you don't have to worry about the ends busting out after a rock strike.

Either way all good!
  • 3 0
 @Noeserd: and the 5DEV is a enduro crank. it's not supposed to be light. Guys running 35 pound bikes ride these. Wait for them to make an XC/Gravel Crank, a Race Stock Crank, Ti cranks. And most likely a price point crank for those who can't swing the $$.
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: cranks on my bike are 600g. Cheaper, sure, but still over 600g.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: slx? m7100 crank arms are 523 grams
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: Agreed... They are all on par with XT and GX, but are 4-5 times the cost. I think we could all stomach 1.5-2 times the cost for made in the USA, but these companies and these products will never get a foot hold at these prices.
  • 2 0
 Have you seen how many EeWings have been sold? They are one of the most expensive cranks on the market and they sell plenty of them, despite not being made in USA.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: Because EEWings are Ti... these are just plain old AL... at 4-5 times the cost of similar cranks from SRAM, Shimano, Race Face, etc.
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: Race Face Turbine.
  • 1 4
 EEWings are the best cranks by a country mile.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. Those Taiwanese welders really know what they are doing.
  • 1 0
 Cane Creek themselves told me there is no real performance benefit to ewings, they're just rad and boutique. What performance or any other benefits do you see that makes you consider them the best?
  • 2 0
 @dirtmcleod: They are as light or lighter than carbon… they are stronger than any other crank material… scratches and scuffs can be buffed out… virtually indestructible… also boutique and rarely seen in the wild.

If I wasn’t worried about another change in crank standards, I would “invest” in a set for long term.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: They also don't break whereas CF cranks do, the Eewings have notably better ground clearance because there is less metal below the pedal lug, and they feel very rigid.
I bought them because they were on sale (pre-pandemic) but they ended up 3 bikes and years later being probably my best upgrade ever.
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