Silca Releases What It Claims Is the World's Most Effective Tire Sealant Made From Carbon Fiber

Mar 17, 2022 at 9:22
by Alicia Leggett  
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You might remember Silca from last November, when the brand released a pair of $85, 3D-printed, titanium cleats, or from 2019, when Silca released its anodized titanium drinking straws, or from 2016, when we reviewed perhaps the only floor pump ever to be described as "sexy" and "an heirloom quality tool that could be passed down from generation to generation."

Now, the latest Silca creation to hit the market is the Ultimate Tubeless Sealant, which the brand claims is the longest-lasting, most effective tire sealant in the world, and it's made with 6mm, 9mm, and 12mm pieces of carbon fiber that make up 5% of the formula by volume. The carbon is reclaimed from bicycles, carbon wheels, race cars, and aircraft components - along with, I imagine, less glamorous sources - and mixes with the foaming natural latex-based solution, which Silca says helps to disperse the carbon fibers evenly throughout the tire.

Here's an oddly-satisfying but also kind of soul-crushing visual of where the carbon fiber comes from.

Silca says carbon fiber is the best choice, compared to other particles like glitter, glass fiber, and even cornmeal that sometimes show up in other sealants, because carbon fiber is light enough to stay suspended in the liquid - especially if it foams. Other materials tend to get centrifuged out to the tire and aren't remobilized until the wheel stops spinning, often after the tire has lost too much pressure. The stiffness and varying sizes of carbon fiber pieces can, according to Silca, help the fibers stack effectively to seal holes of up to 7.5 mm "not unlike a beaver dam of sticks blocking the flow of a stream."

While some "race-specific" formulas from other brands can seal relatively large holes, Silca claims, they tend to trade longevity because of the higher percentage of particulates and latex compared to solvent and anti-freeze and need to be replaced frequently. Silca believes it's discovered the magic combination: carbon fibers plus a relatively high percentage of anti-freeze, so it continues to work in temperatures down to 10°F / -12°C.

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The hectic calendar of replenishment using other sealants comparing both standard and race formulas, according to Silca. (To be fair, I've never been that diligent with any sealant.)

Carbon fiber isn't exactly known for being recyclable, so we commend that Silca has found a way to repurpose those used parts, even if that does mean breaking the fibers down into smaller and smaller pieces. If floating around on the inside of a tire is the last stop for your broken carbon chainstay, that's better than taking the fast track to the landfill. Since the carbon fiber is pyrolized, or heat treated to remove everything except the basic fiber itself, Silca says it's "environmentally neutral" - safe for human or animal contact and safe in water.

One downside to using a sealant that, uh, seals holes, is that it can't be added to the tire through the valve stem, and instead has to be poured into the tire before the tire is fully mounted on the rim. Don't try to use a syringe injector here. However, once the fibers are inside the tire, Silca recommends replenishing the sealant every quarter with the Replenisher formula, which contains no carbon fiber and instead aims only to compensate for solvent evaporation. Replenisher can be added through the valve stem. The base Ultimate Tubeless Sealant should be replaced every year to 18 months, Silca says.

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If it's replenished (with the Replenisher) quarterly, the sealant's effectiveness stays on par with race-specific formulas from other brands, Silca says, but with a longer effectiveness lifespan.

The Ultimate Tubeless Sealant will be available in 8, 16, 32 oz sizes for $18, $24, and $38 USD, respectively. The Replenisher retails for $12 for 4 oz. More information is available at silca.cc.

Author Info:
alicialeggett avatar

Member since Jun 19, 2015
745 articles

139 Comments
  • 222 4
 Why stop there? Asbestos may be an even more effective tire selant additive.
  • 53 0
 I've heard DDT works great as chain lube.
  • 43 1
 This product looks fkn fantastic! I can't wait to slash a sidewall and spew this shit all over my beautiful trails! And maybe one day, many years from now, I'll be riding that same trail with my grandkids and can show them the rock that's still encased in my carbon-reinforced silca sealant.
  • 33 1
 I think all tubeless sealants should be at least 20% arsenic.
  • 51 0
 Perhaps some agent orange seal?
  • 3 0
 Probably would actually work great. Best for use outdoors, and of course hold your breath when applying.
  • 1 0
 @MTBLegend92: Especially for certain SRAM stuff?
  • 2 0
 I’m not into it until it has Bluetooth
  • 97 1
 “The carbon is reclaimed from bicycles, carbon wheels, race cars, and aircraft components”

Contains both F1 and aerospace technology you say….
  • 14 4
 Won’t work without a BMX background.
  • 84 2
 I'm struggling to understand how "the magic combination: carbon fibers plus a relatively high percentage of anti-freeze" is environmentally safe
  • 42 0
 Needs some lead and organic mercury added to really top it off.
  • 8 0
 @DylanH93: or we can just mix glitter into stans...
  • 3 0
 Vs. thrashed tubes.
  • 7 0
 I’m assuming it’s more like RV antifreeze, different than normal antifreeze. Non toxic and biodegradable. You can use it to make your own sealant.
  • 1 0
 @BiNARYBiKE: I love a dab in my morning brew
  • 5 0
 Ethylene glycol vs. Propylene glycol. They definitely should have clarified that though, unless they are using ethylene glycol...
  • 65 0
 I've been working on my own sealant recipe that's 100% natural. Ingredients include powdered black rhino horn, giant panda semen, tiger fur and pangolin scales. I've included some uranium too, as the glowing helps detect leaks.
  • 2 1
 I've heard radium also works pretty well if you can't find any uranium
  • 4 0
 Since you’re still in testing, you might consider asbestos as well. All natural, and can be recycled from existing waste streams!
  • 64 2
 Not entirely sure sealant, even with pyrolized carbon fiber strands, that end up in the watershed are environmentally safe.
  • 20 35
flag JakeEPooh (Mar 17, 2022 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 You're truly concerned about the environmental impact of solid carbon in the environment? I hope nobody tells you the main component of organic matter. Wait, am I missing a joke? Will there be a ''whooshing'' sound as soon as I post this?

Even antifreeze is safe as long as there aren't pools of it lying around to be slurped up by pets and children the stuff is essential harmless.
  • 24 0
 @JakeEPooh: Carbon fiber is a suspected human carcinogen. Carbon as found in organic matter, not so much.
  • 23 0
 @JakeEPooh: You're either trolling or you're the dumbest person on this board lol.

By your logic (which seems to be based entirely on the fact that the word 'carbon' is present) carbon monoxide is great to breathe, because we all have carbon in us right?

Organic carbon is not the same as carbon fibre. Organic carbon biodegrades, carbon fibre does not. Carbon fibre is essentially carbon graphite, and will last for millennia, in the same way that microplastics do.

Whether it's bad for the environment or not is a different debate, I'm just here to tell you that your comment was moronic Wink

Antifreeze is completely irrelevant btw, it's a different material and we're not talking about it. I could say PTFE is extremely harmful to the environment, but that would also be irrelevant.
  • 12 1
 @JakeEPooh: Lol, we're partially made of carbon therefore anything with the word carbon in it is ok. Haha you f*ckin clown
  • 3 1
 @JakeEPooh: Sorry what does antifreeze have to do with anything? It's made of a chemical with very low toxicity, but it's also not what this article is about. You might as well say cheese isn't harmful to the environment.
  • 2 0
 @JakeEPooh: If only your stupidity wouldn’t be so toxic…
  • 4 1
 @Greeta25: @Greeta25: from the article "carbon fibers plus a relatively high percentage of anti-freeze" so antifreeze is in fact in this product and relevant. I have no idea if its environmentally friendly or not but its definitely in there
  • 3 2
 @rbeach: It's quite possible I am the dumbest person on this board. My point, which nobody has bothered to refute, likely because it's so dumb as to be beneath contempt, is that essentially pure carbon solids are produced anytime something containing carbon is burned.

The post I was so stupidly responding to specifically stated that carbon fiber strands in the environment were likely unsafe, or "bad".

As the dumbest person on this board, I humbly accept that my intimation that worrying about the environmental safety of solid carbon might be silly was unforgivably stupid. I'm sure all right-thinking people are justified in fearing the presence of things like charcoal briquets and scorched marshmallows in the environment.
  • 2 0
 @Heidesandnorth: I apologize.
  • 3 2
 @Quartz: I apologize for my unforgivable stupidity. I'm sure you're right and we absolutely do need to fear pure elemental carbon in our watersheds. I've been duped once again by Big Carbon and their lying lobbyists. Just think, I was ignorant enough to actually believe that there was no danger in having water touch carbon in things like charcoal filters and partially burnt wood. I'm such an idiot.
  • 5 2
 @barp: Carbon fiber is a suspected carcinogen? Really? Not chemicals associated with its production, or present in the resin when used in a solid structure? I am, admittedly, the dumbest person on this board, but if I may, who, exactly, is it that suspects solid, elemental, motherf$%king carbon to be a carcinogen?
  • 2 0
 @JakeEPooh: They are considered bad because the carbon fibre chemical structure is so stable that it doesn't break down in the environment. Plastic is also a carbon based structure however it breaks down more readily and is more easily recycled at this point than carbon fibre (although still not very well).

Your posts aren't distinguishing between the various chemical structures of carbon and you are instead just talking about the element itself.
  • 3 0
 @Strath-cona: Speaking of things that never break down, I once saw a kid throw a rock in a river. It might get pummeled into sand eventually, but millions of years from now it will still be in our watersheds!

Ho boy here come the downvotes. I know it’s easier to apply blanket rules and people don’t like being asked to think. But it’s weird how defensive people on here get when someone points out a heterodox environmental fact.
  • 4 0
 @Strath-cona: My brother, there is some evidence that the mechanical properties of carbon fiber and carbon nanotubes mean that, if abraided into fine particulates and breathed in high concentrations over longer-ish periods of time, those so exposed are at risk of lung damage that can result in higher risks of lung disease and even cancer. I don't know enough about the issue to say if particulates composed of mechanically degraded carbon fiber and carbon nanotubes are any worse than other types of carbon particulates, like those from something like campfire smoke. The point is, elemental carbon, no matter its "chemical structures" is always extremely stable in the environment. It doesn't degrade into anything else and is in fact, basically inert. Charred wood and pyrolyzed carbon fiber filaments are the same things. Longevity in the environment is not a proxy measurement for environmental evil, it just isn't.
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: I'll let your downvotes speak for themselves Wink
  • 2 1
 @JakeEPooh: At least you're apologizing for your "unforgivable stupidity" (your words).
  • 42 4
 Wow.. your outrage has basis in fact but is pointed in the completely wrong direction! Has nobody here thought about what's in current sealant? Most every sealant on the market contains ethylene glycol.. a super toxic antifreeze, we use propylene glycol, more expensive, but environmentally safe and even food safe (it's used in ice cream and baked goods). We are also one of the few that DOESN'T contain micro-plastics.. no 'crystals' or glitter or plastic micro-bead. Don't even try to learn about the synthetic sealants, nasty petroleum products with toxic anti-freeze and tons of micro-plastics, all covered up with fancy dies and fragrances to make them appealing.

SILCA sealant is quite literally the opposite of what you are saying: organic latex, food grade anti-freeze, recycled pure carbon fiber, no pthalates, no ammonia, no micro-plastics, no PFAS.

Lastly, carbon fiber safety and toxicity as mentioned above is related to the sizing the fibers are coated in, this is a chemical to promote epoxy adhesion (some epoxy prepregs have health and safety issues also, but related to the epoxy not the carbon), when we recycle the carbon, this sizing and epoxy are pyrolyzed off turning into a liquid that is extracted and converted to jet fuel, the remaining carbon fibers are pure and if heated just a bit higher would become activated charcoal, the world's most common water and air filtration medium. Or, if it were to be heated slightly differently and ground finely, it would become carbon black, the same stuff that makes your tires or your shoe soles black and that you are leaving all over the road or trail when you ride or hike.

That skid mark you left on that rock? Essentially identical to any SILCA sealant that might escape, carbon and rubber, no more, no less.
  • 13 1
 This is a lot of consumer education that I wish had made it into the media above instead of a comment below.
  • 5 1
 Welcome to PinkBike Josh! Note that the average IQ around here is 37, (this isn't your podcast crowd) so ease into the lessons
  • 2 0
 Actually, the comparison to be made would be between the strands of carbon fiber and the (naturally occurring) strands of asbestos. I don't believe either are poisonous in the conventional sense, but when ingested into your lungs act as a catalyst for tumors. I believe this to be true for all similar fibrous materials. Fiberglass is another must not breathe item.
  • 3 1
 @Mtmw: That’s because they never imagined that people would twist so far to get their panties in a wad.

Since @joshatsilca may not frequent these comment sections: It’s SOP to find the tiniest concern and blow it completely out of proportion to dunk on the article or product. My favorite is the “how is _____ environmentally friendly?” on an article with no environmental claims whatsoever. Then someone else attempts to reply with context or proportion but they include some poorly worded phrase or claim that the rest of the comment thread argues about. If the thread gets over 20 comments the site automatically adds “stupid” “uneducated” “ignorant” or “reading comprehension” somewhere in every reply. That’s why it’s the best place on the internet.

On a more serious note, this product is the most intelligent, innovative approach to sealant I’ve ever seen. Separating the fluid replenishment from the structural elements is brilliant, and I imagine those short stiff fibers form quite the structure in a puncture.
  • 36 2
 Silica executives at a bar:
"Ok. Carbon fiber bike stuff sells. We need a new product. What's left?"
"Uh, we've done frames, and handlebars. Wheels were a big hit even if they aren't lighter and cost a fortune."
" Yeah and stems, helmets, and saddles."
"Don't forget cranksets, derailleurs, shifters, and even chainrings!"
"and spokes, hubs, brake levers, hell even water bottle cages."
Jim from Marketing knocks back 3 shots of tequila and shouts. "Sealants are the next big thing!"
  • 9 0
 I have my money ready for a carbon fibre chain. Any day now.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: Gates beat you to it with their belt drives
  • 18 3
 The sad truth is that, just like all of their other products, this will prove to be the best sealant on the market, and your shitty mistreatment of your current wheelset is no rebuttal. Then if you do the maths you'll probably find out it's cheaper in the end as well (their £80 chain wax extends the life of your drivetrain so much it basically pays for itself over other lubes).
  • 4 1
 Do you have any sources to those claims? Sounds a lot more like you ate the marketing bullshit.
  • 7 0
 @fred-frod: zerofrictioncycling.com.au/lubetesting

Silca’s hot melt is similar to the MSW in that test.

Not that I expect you to actually read the source you requested.
  • 17 6
 Let me get this straight. They claim that its longer lasting then the competition, but you actually have to top it off multiple times... so it really isn't. Also not that latex is good for the environment but I would imagine its better then shredded carbon fiber and antifreeze.
  • 5 0
 Get this: you have to top off typical sealant... even more!
  • 13 2
 Who is replacing their sealant 6 times a year? Think this could be cool tech, and like the idea of using carbon for something more than a landfill though.
  • 11 1
 Right? As long as I'm not getting a ton of punctures I'm refilling once a year or whenever I change tires.
  • 4 0
 Quarters don’t come in sixes
  • 2 0
 I haven't had a sealant last more than 2 months in Phoenix.
  • 4 0
 @az-shredder3: Covid cutbacks, I don’t use sealant anymore.
  • 3 0
 @schu2470: When I swap tires, if it's still liquid, I reuse as much of the old sealant as I can, only top it off a bit.
  • 12 0
 Assuming this will also auto fix cracks from the inside out on a carbon rim right?
  • 1 0
 That'd be cooooool !!!
  • 1 0
 You gotta slap some epoxy on there with a putty knife. Then you’re golden!
  • 9 0
 They’re really grasping for a sales pitch with that “competition’s sealant schedule”. Drain and clean? I’m pretty sure I just use orange seal and then top it off or swap between tires as needed…
  • 37 1
 I add sealant when I pull a tire off and realize there's no sealant
  • 1 0
 That’s what I do, but the latex builds up over time and adds weight to the wheel. Their method prevents this. Not a big deal, but Silca’s thing is obsessive detail.

Agree that it’s a stretch though.
  • 9 0
 "Silca Releases What It Claims Is the World's Most Effective Tire Sealant Made From Carbon Fiber"

That statement isn't that impressive if it's the world's only sealant made from CF
  • 1 0
 Sadly, there's already at least one other CF-based sealant, and it was also announced with a bunch of marketing nonsense: www.pinkbike.com/news/video-black-ox-test-their-new-bulletproof-tire-sealant-using-a-rifle.html
  • 6 1
 @barp: nothing more American than shooting at things! Merica!!!
  • 4 0
 @prevail: pew pew pew!
  • 13 4
 Can't believe no one did the BMX background thing.
  • 5 1
 Can't believe you didn't. I guess you didn't want to be someone.
  • 8 2
 Silca says it's "environmentally neutral" - safe for human or animal contact and safe in water.

Here's a glass of water with traces of your sealant in it. Please have a drink of it since it's safe.
  • 6 0
 Most Effective Tire Sealant, Made From Carbon Fiber. Or The Most Effective Tire Sealant that is Made From Carbon Fiber Because the second one is a pretty small category.
  • 5 0
 E-bike approved, with non GMO nanotechnology and mixed by virgins then I am in. Help fight trail erosion every time you burp or flat as the carbon fibre residue stays on the trail for generations of riders to enjoy.
  • 4 0
 They missed a couple words on the bottle.
It should read:
Silica Ultimate **DOWNCOUNTRY** Tubeless **ENDURO** Sealant.

Also, the bottle should be covered in fake carbon fibre. Whoops, nevermind, I see it in the bottom left of the bottle!
  • 4 0
 I think Silca need to be more clear about their environmental claims here. Most plastics also break down into smaller and smaller pieces and this makes them more dangerous. They are less detectable and more consumable thus building up in the food chain, they are also highly inert substances, hence why they are so useful. Thus where is the evidence that smaller items of carbon fibre which could enter the food chain would be completely harmless to people and animals (once upon a time people said the same about plastic). Is there peer reviewed research on this or is this just a stupid marketing claim.....i remain unconvinced at this point
  • 2 0
 And there's a LOT of plastic in "carbon fibre" - which isn't actually just carbon fibre, it's plastic resin reinforced with carbon fibre. The name of the material is basically marketing.
  • 5 0
 another amazingly unnecessary chemical wonder to make your ride marginally better, and pollute the environment permanently. nice to see we are heading in the right direction.
  • 8 1
 More microplastics into the environment? Fantastic!
  • 3 6
 Carbon isn’t plastic. Or are you referring to the suspended plastic like substances found in basically every sealant on the market? Maybe you would prefer the stuff that uses glitter instead? Or do you use tubes?
  • 6 0
 @Blackhat: Actually plastic is made of carbon, and can also be comprised of hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur and chlorine. And almost all plastic comprises carbon-based natural material (i.e. oil).
  • 5 1
 @Blackhat: That didn't go the way you expected did it? Should've paid more attention in chemistry class.
  • 5 0
 @Blackhat: Plastic is a generic term for a large number of materials produced from a range of different ingredients, but they are nearly (not entirely, e.g. silicone, which is generally considered a plastic) include carbon.
  • 2 6
flag Blackhat (Mar 19, 2022 at 12:01) (Below Threshold)
 @redrook: So because plastic contains carbon - along with a bunch of other things - anything that contains carbon can be called plastic?
  • 1 6
flag Blackhat (Mar 19, 2022 at 12:03) (Below Threshold)
 @rbeach: The class I failed to pay attention to was pinkbike logic. In chemistry class I paid attention enough to know the difference between a pure element and a polymer.
  • 1 6
flag AlanT-NZ (Mar 19, 2022 at 12:16) (Below Threshold)
 @redrook: So are trees. Oh shit so are animals inc us. Is it safe to go into the woods?
  • 5 0
 @Blackhat: As I said above, carbon fibre (as manufactured) isn't just carbon fibres. It's a composite of pure carbon fibre (useless on its own) held together with quite a lot of plastic. The material we all know as "carbon fibre" is actually plastic reinforced with carbon fibres. If we extend your "it isn't plastic" logic then "it isn't carbon fibre" would be equally true, since it isn't entirely carbon fibres. As carbon fibre (the material we're talking about not the pure carbon fibres within it) degrades it will release a lot of microplastics as redrook said. Whether other sealants have plastics in them too is irrelevant whataboutery.
  • 6 0
 @AlanT-NZ: Er, no. It's the significant part of the material we know as "carbon fibre" but, as Quartz says, isn't actually just carbon fibre, which is plastic that I was talking about. Also, not all carbon is the same - theecologist.org/2009/nov/17/all-carbon-not-born-equal
  • 6 0
 @Blackhat: No, the plastic parts are plastic Wink
  • 6 0
 @AlanT-NZ: By your logic we could make petrol from grass cuttings. Carbon is a fundamental element in our universe, it's in everything. In the case of the product "carbon fibre" the name is misleading, as it's actually a lot more than just the carbon part. Pure carbon fibre is, as someone else has said, completely useless without being just one ingredient in something else. It's like calling cake "flour". The flour is just one important part, but there's also eggs, sugar and other stuff.
  • 1 6
flag AlanT-NZ (Mar 19, 2022 at 19:15) (Below Threshold)
 @Greeta25: you're all taking my comment way too seriously.
However if being so anal about some fibres that probably won't be released into the environment (e.g. you have to flat first) as they have to escape the tire, not sure how you reconsile all the more significant environmental impacts your MTB hobby has
  • 6 0
 @AlanT-NZ: Nobody cares about the fibres, it's the mircoplastics, but presumably you haven't actually read any of the above.
  • 2 0
 @AlanT-NZ: Yeah it sucks when you're a f*cking idiot and people point it out huh
  • 3 0
 "Silca says it's "environmentally neutral" - safe for human or animal contact and safe in water."

Not safe in water. I guess it all depends by what they mean by this. If this ends up in rivers, lakes and in our oceans this is just another plastic polluting our water ways.

Animal contact is different from animal digestion.

Sorry, I won't be buying this product.
  • 3 0
 I swap tyres probably about 4/5 times a year (more when i put the tyre on the wrong direction) I dont mind if my sealant doesnt last longer than 3 months, ill stick with my stans.
  • 6 0
 Next is a collaboration with Trojan for recycled latex.
  • 5 0
 I don't understand how it is so cheap when they have to buy all those carbon frames to crush up.
  • 5 0
 Nice busines model, dispatching the carbon-garbage. A bit everywhere.
  • 4 0
 The magic combo: Add carbon, make it hard to put into the tire, and charge more!
  • 6 1
 We recommend two shots. After that a BOOSTER and so on annually.
  • 4 0
 All those roadies dreams smashed in a second
  • 3 0
 The cycling industry just can't help itself with gimmicks...pick pocketing stupid consumer right and left.
  • 2 1
 Or... Maybe it works? If it doesn't, or its price is unsustainable, it'll die, and never be able to hurt you again.
  • 2 0
 So you run tubes?

Or do you just think current sealant is so awesome and trouble free that it could never be improved?
  • 2 0
 I like when they promote less filling and have to offer another fluid to fill it up because it does what every other sealant does.
  • 1 0
 They are probably being paid to take them
  • 1 0
 I live where the summers are very hot (95-105F). I’m for any sealant that actually lasts. Looking forward to seeing areal world test. So far I’ve found Stan’s and Orange Seal to be the only ones that actually work.
  • 2 1
 f***ing antifreeze?! Cause yeah, you want that all over yourself and the shop when a tire blows off a rim (it happens occasionally) not to mention what others have said about it leaking out on the trails. Good grief.
  • 2 0
 Most sealants use antifreeze.

Instead of doing your research you’re attacking the people who tell you the truth about their product.

Good grief.
  • 3 1
 @Blackhat: Like you researched what was and wasn't in plastic? Wink
  • 1 1
 @Quartz: If you can find where I said there was no carbon in plastic feel free to quote it here.

Water contains oxygen but oxygen is not water.
  • 1 0
 @Blackhat: And carbon fibre (as manufactured) isn't just carbon fibres. It's a composite of pure carbon fibre (useless on its own) held together with quite a lot of plastic. The material we all know as "carbon fibre" is actually plastic reinforced with carbon fibres. If we extend your "it isn't plastic" logic then "it isn't carbon fibre" would be equally true, since it isn't entirely carbon fibres. As carbon fibre (the material we're talking about not the pure carbon fibres within it) degrades it will release a lot of microplastics as redrook said. Whether other sealants have plastics in them too is irrelevant whataboutery.
  • 3 0
 ah yes, love me some fne carbon fibres all over my bike, hands and trail when I slash a tire on a ride
  • 2 0
 carbon/resin dust sounds greatttt. no MSDS on their website. im out.

o, wait, the resin is pyrolized into the atmosphere! even better!
  • 3 2
 Love when the self righteous environmentalists encompassing the cycling community come up with a brilliant idea like this one.
  • 1 1
 And then self righteous environmentalists dunk on it in the comments despite knowing nothing whatsoever about what’s in their current sealant.
  • 3 0
 who refills their tubeless sealant that often ?
  • 4 1
 seals holes of up to7.5mm. my valve stems and cores stand no chance.
  • 1 0
 My usual method for larger holes is sticking a pine needle on it, it even works on road tires. This might be a good product for places with no pine trees.
  • 1 1
 Personally I like my tires to seal without needing to stop and pump the tire back up. But you do you.
  • 1 0
 @Blackhat: Well... who doesn't? Sort of a redundant comment. And it wouldn't be necessary if sealant manufacturer claims were true.. Not huge holes, too small to justify the use of a plug but apparently too big for the sealant. I did use pepper once and it worked.
  • 3 1
 pushing micro plastics pollution to another level when you flat your tubeless tire next time.
  • 1 0
 Carbon isn’t plastic. Or are you referring to the plastic like substances suspended in every sealant on the market?
  • 3 0
 I’m waiting on the aluminum version.
  • 4 1
 Pick a sealant and be a dic* about it now comes to a new level.
  • 1 0
 Diy recipe 2 shots vodka, 1 shot Elmer's glue and a beard shaver full of trimmings. Swizzle together then the your good to go
  • 2 1
 just need to know the impact in the field and if it is "greener" than other liquid overthere.
  • 2 0
 so carbon frames can be recycled after all?
  • 3 1
 Nice way to spread the carbon waste around
  • 2 0
 Can we confirm how many grams this will cut from my bikes weight?
  • 2 0
 I only ever change my sealant when I write off my tyre... keep it stans
  • 2 0
 Carbon, you say? Shut up and take my money.
  • 2 0
 Can’t believe the editorial team didn’t see this coming
  • 1 0
 Looking forward to seeing some testing of this stuff. The marketing spiel is quite convincing.
  • 2 0
 Gross. That shit gonna be all over trails now?
  • 3 3
 Comparing price per ounce triggers my fear of paying for gasoline right now. Poor timing PB, c'mon!
  • 1 0
 If it's not 3D printed, it can't be any good.
  • 2 0
 Is it April 1st already?
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