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allballz nr22's article
Jun 18, 2018 at 10:55
2 days
Bike Check: Fabio Wibmer's Specialized S-Works Demo 8 - Crankworx Innsbruck 2018
You could see everything you love burn up before your eyes, sooner rather than later. Know these threats are real, they are not currently being reported in MSM, so 'little people' like me have to step up. We all have to step up. It takes big balls and big vagina! ;) https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201805 https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/201805 US NATIONAL REGION For May, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was record warm at 65.4°F, 5.2°F above the 20th century average. This surpassed the previous May record of 64.7°F set in 1934. Above-average May temperatures stretched from coast to coast with every state having an above-average temperature. Record warmth was observed in parts of the Northwest and stretching from the Southern Plains through the Midwest and into the Mid-Atlantic. Forty-two states had monthly temperatures that were much above average with eight of those states – Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma and Virginia – being record warm. The nationally averaged minimum temperature (overnight lows) was exceptionally warm during May at 52.5°F, 5.1°F above average and 2.0°F warmer than the previous record set in 1987. During May there were 8,596 record warm daily high (3,789) and low (4,807) temperature records, which was more than 18 times the 457 record cold daily high (313) and low (144) temperature records. Several of the daily records were noteworthy, including 100°F on May 28 in Minneapolis, Minnesota – the earliest such occurrence on record. EUROPEAN REGION May 2018 marked the second consecutive month that Germany's monthly national average temperature set a new temperature record. Germany's May 2018 temperature of 16.0°C (60.8°F) was 3.9°C (7.0°F) above the 1961–1990 average—the highest May temperature since national records began in 1881. The United Kingdom had its second warmest May (tied with 2017) since national records began in 1910. The May 2018 temperature of 12.1°C (53.8°F) was 1.7°C (3.1°F) above the 1981–2010 average. Provisionally, England and Scotland had their highest May temperature (England: tied with 1992 and 2008; Scotland: tied with 2008) in the 109-year record. Stockholm, Sweden set a new maximum May temperature of 16.1°C (61.0°F), which is 2.2°C (4.0°F) greater than the previous record set in 1993. Stockholm's data records began in 1756. On May 30th, the maximum temperature soared to 31.1°C (88.0°F) in Göteborg. Warmer-than-average conditions engulfed much of Norway during May 2018, with a national average temperature that was 4.4°C (7.9°F) above average and the warmest May since national records began in 1900. The previous record was set in 2013 (+2.7°C / +4.9°F). According to Meteorologisk Institutt, several stations across southern Norway had temperatures that were 5.0°C–7.0°C (9.0°F–12.6°F) above average. Of note, Blindern, Oslo, had a monthly temperature of 16.1°C (61.0°F) or 5.3°C (9.5°F) above average, Norway's highest May temperature on record. According to Meteorologisk Institutt, five Arctic stations (Bjørnøya, Hopen, Svalbard airport, Ny-Ålesund, and Jan Mayen) had a record warm May. Of note, the Svalbard airport May 2018 average temperature was 1.8°C (35.2°F), which is 6.0°C (10.8°F) above average and marks the 90th consecutive month with temperatures above average. Finland had its warmest May on record at 11.6°C (52.9°F), surpassing the previous record set in 1963 by +0.5°C (+0.9°F). Several stations across Finland observed their warmest May on record. Of interest, Kumpula, Helsinki, had an average May temperature of 15.5°C (59.9°F), setting a new Finnish record. Denmark's May 2018 mean temperature of 15.0°C (59.0°F) was 4.2°C (7.6°F) above the 1961–1990 average—this was the highest May temperature since national records began in 1874. This value was 1.2°C (2.2°F) higher than the previous record set in 1889. Austria had its warmest May since 1868 and the fourth warmest since national records began in 1767, falling behind 1811, 1868, and 1797. Austria's national May 2018 temperature was 2.6°C (4.7°F) above average. Austria's spring 2018 temperature was 2.0°C (3.6°F) above average—the second warmest such period since national records began in 1767, trailing behind 2007 by 0.1°C (0.2°F). Several stations across Austria set new records for the most number of summer days (maximum temperature ≥ 25.0°C (77.0°F)) observed during the March–May period. Of note, Vienna Hohe Warte had a total of 24 summer days during spring 2018, exceeding the previous record set in 1969 (18 summer days). New South Wales had its highest maximum March–May temperature on record (+2.66°C / +4.79°F), surpassing the previous record of +2.41°C (+4.34°F) set in 2016. YEAR TO DATE JAN-MAY 2018 The first five months of the year were characterized by warmer-than-average temperatures engulfing much of the globe's land and ocean surfaces. Record warm January–May temperatures were observed scattered across South America, southeastern Europe, northeastern Africa, Asia, New Zealand, Australia, and Mexico, as well as across all oceans. Averaged as a whole, the January–May 2018 temperature over the land and ocean surfaces tied with 2010 as the fourth warmest such period in the 139-year record, with an average temperature that was 0.77°C (1.39°F) above the 20th century average of 13.1°C (55.5°F). PRECIPITATION (OR LACK THEREOF) Below-average precipitation was observed across much of the Southwest, Great Plains and Upper Midwest. Spring 2018 was drier-than-average across much of Austria, with some locations experiencing their driest spring since 2003. Drier-than-average conditions plagued much of Australia during May 2018, resulting in the driest May since 2008 and the third driest May since national precipitation records began in 1900 at 8.7 mm (0.3 inch) or 69% below average. Drier-than-average conditions affected much of Sweden during May 2018. Several locations had record or near-record dry conditions. Visby, Gotland, had its driest May since records began in 1859, with a precipitation total of 1.7 mm (0.07 inch) for May 2018. This value is 1.1 mm (0.04 inch) less than the previous record set in 1866. Also of note, Öland's Northern Cape had 0.2 mm (0.01 inch) and the driest May since 1947.
allballz RichardCunningham's article
Jun 15, 2018 at 15:58
Jun 15, 2018
Bike Check: Brett Tippie's Glow-in-the Dark YT Capra 27 - Crankworx Innsbruck 2018
@winko: Do you know anything about Inerters? I've been trying to build one for a bike since college. I'm seriously broke, and it would take some investment. Not totally sure if it is patented in the US or not (I think it's patented in the UK.) But, there's not a lot of low hanging fruit in the bike industry left. If you want to know more, check my profile out, and feel free to send me any questions personally. Thanks.
allballz TCExcursions's article
Jun 14, 2018 at 16:37
Jun 14, 2018
Trans-Cascadia Excursions Wants To Be On Your Bucket List
Censored for telling people the truth...pathetic.
allballz RichardCunningham's article
Jun 14, 2018 at 16:31
Jun 14, 2018
Bike Check: Brett Tippie's Glow-in-the Dark YT Capra 27 - Crankworx Innsbruck 2018
@Ynotgorilla: That's true, in a sense, but magnetic monopoles would function like a charged particle, and functionally be equivalent. Although, they have only been created in a lab, that does suggest that they exist under unique conditions in the greater universe, we just haven't found them yet. "However, a monopole, i.e. a north pole without a south pole or a south pole without a north pole has not yet been discovered. In the current edition of the journal Science, researchers from Cologne, Munich and Dresden describe the discovery of new type of artificial monopole in a solid, i.e. particles, which have similar characteristics to monopoles, but which only exist within materials. Over the last few years, materials in which magnetic whirls, so-called skyrmions, are formed, have been examined intensively. These whirls influence the movements of the electrons in exactly the same manner as magnetic fields. For this reason, artificial magnet fields are used to describe these whirls as well as their influence on the electrons. Dirac, however, argued that the existence of a single magnetic monopole would be enough to explain that the charges of all fundamental particles have to be quantized, i.e. exactly an integer multiple of an elementary charge. The newly discovered artificial monopoles fulfil exactly this quantization requirement. "It is fascinating that something as fundamental as a magnetic monopole can be realized in a piece of material," describes Stefan Buhrandt. Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2013-05-artificial-magnetic-monopoles.html#jCp ValeriaT 1.8 / 5 (5) Jun 02, 2013 The word "artificial" doesn't imply "relative" or "virtual" (even "artificial" diamonds can be "real"). But the magnetic monopoles aren't true monopoles. It's the similar trick, like the massive bosons for example, which is an oxymoron with respect to general relativity theory. In context of atom nuclei the mesons are behaving like the bosons, albeit they're massive. But inside of dense nuclear fluid even the massive bosons behave like massless particles. The vortex rings in air are massive bosons too (they cannot stay at rest) - but they cannot propagate anywhere outside the massive Earth atmosphere. The scope of skyrmion monopoles is therefore limited to their layer and they could not exist outside of it. Just in the scope of this dense layer their magnetic lines of force don't connect each other, but the magnetic lines of force are still connected outside the skyrmion layer just in the way, which the Maxwells theory requires. The true monopoles may not exist in vacuum, but in more dense environment you can realize the geometries which you like (for example with metamaterials). BTW In dense aether model the black holes with asymmetric jets are monopoles. The existence of scalar waves in vacuum enables magnetic fields to dissipate/gain their energy in sourceless way, which will lead into monopolist behavior. In dense materials the phonons may serve as such a scalar waves, for example. Even if these are not "real" magnetic fields, it is possible to measure them experimentally in the same manner as normal magnet fields as they deflect electrons."
allballz mikelevy's article
Jun 13, 2018 at 15:16
Jun 13, 2018
Review: Crankbrothers' Klic Digital Floor Pump + Burst Tank
@tbev: If you haven't yet noticed, WAKI likes to talk first and think later. WAKI, dude, just slow your roll. Everything comes out better that way. And, the ladies, like a man, with a 'slow hand.' Just sayin'.
allballz TCExcursions's article
Jun 13, 2018 at 15:01
Jun 13, 2018
Trans-Cascadia Excursions Wants To Be On Your Bucket List
HOTTEST MAY IN US RECORDED HISTORY. Go early, because you might get burned, if you wait. There's always 'Maine'....amiright? For May, the average contiguous U.S. temperature was record warm at 65.4°F, 5.2°F above the 20th century average. This surpassed the previous May record of 64.7°F set in 1934. The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during May was 78.3°F, 5.4°F above the 20th century average, marking the second warmest value on record. Only May 1934 had a warmer maximum temperature at 79.3°F. Above-average maximum temperatures spanned the nation with four states from Oklahoma to Indiana being record warm. The contiguous U.S. average maximum (daytime) temperature during May was 78.3°F, 5.4°F above the 20th century average, marking the second warmest value on record. Only May 1934 had a warmer maximum temperature at 79.3°F. Above-average maximum temperatures spanned the nation with four states from Oklahoma to Indiana being record warm. During May there were 8,596 record warm daily high (3,789) and low (4,807) temperature records, which was more than 18 times the 457 record cold daily high (313) and low (144) temperature records. Several of the daily records were noteworthy, including 100°F on May 28 in Minneapolis, Minnesota – the earliest such occurrence on record. *Think I pulled this out my butt???" Read it and weep. The Western US needs the moisture. https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/national/201805
allballz RichardCunningham's article
Jun 10, 2018 at 2:20
Jun 10, 2018
The One Tool That World Cup Mechanics Can't Live Without?
This is truly a 'World Cup' issue, unless you ride a road bike. But, most MTB don't need their wheels to be balanced because we rarely go over 20-30mph. I guess, maybe a World Cup DH bike could get up over that, I don't think it is something average riders need at all.
allballz RichardCunningham's article
Jun 8, 2018 at 15:37
Jun 8, 2018
Review: Milkit Booster - Tubeless Tire Inflation Reservoir
I'm an ME and I fully agree with your comment. I'm certain this is a known issue and they rushed it to market anyway....any competent engineer would have safety factor of 2, and that thing should be rated to 320psi, which I am absolutely sure, it is not.
allballz RichardCunningham's article
Jun 8, 2018 at 15:31
Jun 8, 2018
Review: Milkit Booster - Tubeless Tire Inflation Reservoir
Any decent engineer knows that Aluminum is the WORST MATERIAL EVER for a pressure vessel. Steel is real, infinite fatigue limit FTW! *Edit* Just read that the cap blew off, but still aluminum is a bad material for this thing, but that's good that the cap failed first. I'm certain this is a known issue and they rushed it to market anyway....any competent engineer would have safety factor of 2, and that thing should be rated to 320psi, which I am absolutely sure, it is not.
allballz mikelevy's article
Jun 1, 2018 at 3:21
Jun 1, 2018
Rémi Thirion & Amaury Pierron's Race Bikes - Fort William DH World Cup 2018
"Literally, that's what she said, man. I swear."
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