Cove 2012 STD Review

Jan 19, 2012 at 14:07
by Brad Walton  
Cove's STD is a multi-functional, freeride-oriented bike with an emphasis on getting gnarly. While not intended as a quiver-killer, the STD blurs the line between downhill and trail bike, and is a steed to consider for riders looking for a highly maneuverable big bike, park bike, or whose off-road missions include pedal-powered access to the nastiest of descents. This is the ride review follow up to the 2012 STD Preview, where you will find bike specifications and details.

Cove STD dropping in. Self-portrait
  STD at home in the green room

What's in a name? Sticking with Cove's 'sex sells' nomenclature, STD stands for Skinnies, Trannies, and Drops. The original STD excels on all of those things, for sure, but the 2012 re-design kicks it up a notch beyond freeride. While many riders could feel overwhelmed swimming in a physically numbing overload of suspension aboard a standard DH bike, the STD meets the demands of downhill with a capable 7.75" travel and a geometry reflective of it's bigger brother, the Shocker. Revisions found in the 2012 iteration of the STD are a lower ride height (due to lower BB height combined with more sag from more suspension travel) and slacker head angle.

photo by Johnny Smoke Bush Pilot Biking
  Coming off the original version of the bike, we already knew what STD stands for.

Quality Build: Cove's Canadian-made, robust frames hold a high attention to detail, with Easton tubing, oversized aluminum pivot axles, Maxle rear axle, and replaceable dropouts to name a few. It was a mild concern that under stress to the rear derailleur, the beefy, machined dropout hanger would be very expensive to replace once bent or broken. It probably is, but after one hard crash that left the XT 10-speed derailleur at 90 degrees, it was a surprise to find the hanger perfectly intact. Instead, the steel plate at the top of the derailleur had bent. After a few minutes, it was revived when it was bent back into position trailside, where it remains fully functional to this day. Bike industry take note, we would much rather have an expensive hanger like this that doesn't easily bend than those cheap, disposable hangers. Also note that Cove's chainguide mount solution is simply perfect. The Maxle rear axle never creaked or came loose like had been experienced with other Maxle bikes. Matter of fact, after months of torture, not a single bolt had loosened on the frame. Bearing covers on the lower linkage help to keep the muck out of the crucial suspension points. It would be nice to have these available for the top bearings as well, and they would be extra trick available in ano colors to match my gold scheme. That's right, green for the money, gold for the honeys.

  Flimsy alloy hangers are a thing of the past. Bearings caps guard from mud.

The STD features a 1.5 headtube and is specced with a 180mm single crown fork, giving the bike a roomy cockpit. A taper-steerer on the fork provides enough stiffness to inspire confidence on the sketchiest of lines, but those wishing to alleviate the bike from uphill duty for use as a shuttle or park bike may want to consider the additional stiffness that a dual-crown fork provides. Immediately apparent on the STD is the very balanced feel of the front and rear suspension while utilizing a 180mm single crown fork.

Handling & Fit: Due to the incredibly technical nature of the infamous North Shore trails, Cove's bikes are a bit on the small side to allow for maximum maneuverability. Surprisingly, even with a 50mm stem on the size Large STD for my 6'2" height, the cockpit never felt cramped while climbing. The STD is not a lean back and hold on sled. STD riders will need to get low with an aggressive approach on the descents in order to take advantage of the bike's attack-position geometry. From there, a rider is able to appreciate the bike's relatively neutral handling characteristics that allow it to readily adapt between slow-tech shore-style rock cruxes and pinner race-style descents with huge airs. The bike really shines when it comes to precise movements like getting the front end up in a pinch while negotiating technical lines. Here's a sample of some classic North Shore gnar the STD was designed for:

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It almost seems as if the "S" in STD has been changed from "Skinnies" to "Steeps" with the updated geometry. With skinnies on the verge of extinction, it doesn't seem like such a terrible transition for most riders. The bike is slightly floppier at slow speeds than it's predecessor, but it's a trait we would gladly forego in order to bump the shred-o-meter to 11 in a greater variety of terrain. On the steeps, the STD is stable and confident, true-tracking, and nimble. When the terrain turns ugly, the 7.75" travel dual-link rear suspension goes largely unnoticed, working independently underneath as it eats up chunder without ever deflecting from it's intended path. Some riders will complain about the more-than-reasonable frame weight for such a capable big-hit bike, while others will appreciate the solid feel of a sturdily planted chassis on repetitive square-edged hits and harsh landings. The bottom bracket rides at an optimal location above the pedal-strike zone, yet still sits low enough to dig deep in the corners and effectively plow rough terrain. Cornering is intuitive on this bike, and pushing into the corners through the pedals accelerates the flow, even in the rough stuff.

Cove STD on the steeps with Timmy dog. self-portrait
  An attack position maximizes the STD's hard-charging characteristics.

It's ironic that a bike that stays connected to the ground so well feels effortless in the air. When it comes time to leave the ground, the STD feels like an extra appendage, floating along in space underfoot, easily repositioned with the flick of the wrist. You could say that Trannies are the STD's middle name, since flying and returning to earth is the most comfortable part of riding this bike.

Cove STD airing out over the stump. Self-portrait
  STD racking up the frequent flyer...kilometers.

Elka Stage 5: Cove specs the STD with an Elka Stage 5 rear shock in 8.75" x 2.75", which is built to the same spring and hardware fitment specifications as you would find on a Fox shock. The key benefit to the Stage 5 is a two-stage rebound circuit, which allows a rider to have a faster rebound off the top of the stroke to maintain traction over roots and washboard sections of trail, while a progressively slower rebound deep into the stroke works to soak up the big hits without catapulting a rider over the bars. A single rebound knob controls the entire range of rebound, but the shock would be substantially more tunable with an independently adjustable threshold between beginning and ending stroke rebound. For this reason, we found the Elka to be best suited for a DH race environment. For a freeride application, general pedaling is fine and the shock excels at cushioning drops. However, the rebound feels a bit unpredictable when preloading the suspension on new-school technical jump lines. Also, the shock's air-assist reservoir is set from the factory with 150psi of nitrogen, which is non-adjustable. While this setting suits the majority of riders, I found that as a 200 lb rider I would be able to run a softer spring if I was able to increase the bottom-out resistance via air pressure and air volume. This would give the bike a more progressive suspension feel and allow for better initial stroke small bump compliance. Also, minus a point for the distracting slurping sound of the Elka in it's ending stroke rebound.

testing the Cove STD on the steeps

Pedaling: While most riders aren't going to be climbing an 8" travel, 38 lb bike to the top of a 2,000' mountain, there are some out there who consider that to be a warm-up lap. A true freeride bike has the capability to access any terrain, which includes climbing to the top in an efficient manner. When it comes to pedaling a big bike, Cove's dual-link suspension is very impressive. While climbing, every pedal stroke pushes the rear tire into the ground for more traction. The geometry of the STD is such that with the seatpost at full extension, the rider is placed relatively neutral over the bottom bracket. This allows for a semi-aggressive position while climbing that renders the slack front end manageable for most any climb. The STD's seat tube has a partial bend about halfway into it, but it was still enough to allow for full leg extension on the climb and more than enough drop for the descent. Although our test bike specs a 30.0 seat tube, the newest frames off the shelf will spec a 30.9mm seatpost for those interested in running a dropper-style post.

PB's Take: Cove's STD blurs the line between downhill and freeride, offering exceptional performance within each genre of mountain biking. While more playful and versatile than a full-blown DH sled, the STD doesn't hold back in hard-charging downhill and big-air performance. It even exceeds in pedal-ability considering it's classification as a big bike, and a long seat tube with front derailleur compatibility is a huge selling point for those looking to get off the grid. This is definitely a big bike though, so aggressive trailbike buyers beware. Geometry is best suited for experienced riders and works well in areas where technical maneuverability outweighs all-out speed. Rear shock setup could take some extra attention for some users, while for typically technical shore-style shuck and jiving, DH applications, and lighter riders, Elka's Stage 5 seems the obvious choice. Three sizes and a variety of colors and decal options round out the options, but Canadian-made quality comes at a price. For what the STD is designed to do, it is very difficult to fault. -BW




Have you had an STD? Share your experiences below!

For more info, visit www.covebike.com.




147 Comments

  • 94 2
 "Have you had an STD? Share your experiences below!"

Well put..
  • 22 56
flag Dhracer97 (Jan 20, 2012 at 6:52) (Below Threshold)
 Safe to say his std got him wet...
  • 5 5
 You'll have to check for STD's after that second picture...
  • 7 3
 I've had a few Cove's and they are solid bikes.
  • 8 10
 i'd like an std ;D
  • 4 11
flag wheel-addict (Jan 20, 2012 at 10:05) (Below Threshold)
 This review is spot on. I've been riding an STD for 2 years and absolutely love it. His bike is only 38 lbs? I'd like to know how he was able to get it so low. Mine is 49 lbs, but it is not that noticeable even on big climbs. I actually find it easier to climb up really technical sections on my STD than on my much lighter trail bike.
  • 4 3
 i have ridden many std's .... and all of them have been amazing bikes ! great geo over all a great park bike woulnt recommend trying to pedal the set up he had in the video up hill lol .... the hangers are tough but not unbreakable snapped one last year on my shocker wasnt terribly expensive
  • 6 8
 I'd go gay for that STD
  • 4 1
 I have not gotten an STD yet, but enjoyed using the Shocker whenever I got a chance. The only downsides to these frames is the static weight and price. Once the bike is moving though, it is a perfect steed. Stiff frame, plush ride, and a quality build. After 2 years I never found a single bolt loose either... Great review and edit Brad.
  • 8 2
 I was cruising around Craigslist looking for one of these used but all the searches I tried for STD's came up with really nasty results... Maybe it is just my area...
  • 2 7
flag samminett (Jan 20, 2012 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
 I want a STD now lol Big Grin
  • 5 4
 So are you not aloud to were a glove when you ride an std?
  • 6 12
flag mikekazimer Mod Plus (Jan 20, 2012 at 15:23) (Below Threshold)
 Are you asking if you're not allowed to wear gloves when you ride an STD? You might want to reduce the internet time and increase the studying time... Plus, Brad has gloves on in one of the pictures.
  • 17 2
 you have no sense of humour
  • 6 1
 Sure I do - I just don't find poor grammar funny. But jokes about STDs, trannies, shockers...keep 'em coming.
  • 5 1
 49lbs?? Don't wanna sound like a weight weenie but that's a ton for any bike that isn't 8inches... and for one that is!
  • 8 1
 Yeah 49 lbs is kind of retarded. I ride a Haro .357 and that thing is 51 lbs and i even do my AM riding on it. I hate it. I hate it so much
  • 3 0
 www.pinkbike.com/news/Cove-STD-2012-Preview.html where are you getting 49 lbs from?

"I just picked up my new 2012 STD, it weights in at 37lbs without a Ti ..."
  • 4 1
 So many negative props Frown
  • 39 3
 Makes me wanna get a COVE! Second PIC IS SIIIIIIIIIIIIIIICCCCCKKKK !!! COuld be POD!
  • 12 3
 Second pic, is the landing as narrow as the take off? I would f...ing crap my pants!
  • 2 4
 What tires allow you to ride like that in the wet ???
  • 5 2
 minions...
  • 7 1
 i recommend cove, i have a 2006 shocker and the thing has taken a pretty big beating and still the backend on that thing is is as strong as arnies ass muscles. pretty much one of the most solid bikes i have ever riden, slams rock gardens like a breeze...
  • 13 1
 NotE the XC lid and lack of pads, This is just a standard all mountain ride in canada...
  • 3 1
 @Danny: come to a UK trail centre - it'll make you laugh!!! ;+)
  • 1 2
 Painful! lol
  • 1 2
 mackeroo find me a vid I gotta see this!!!
  • 3 0
 "What tires allow you to ride like that in the wet ???"
I have the answer.
They are called "Being Canadian" Wink
  • 16 3
 Sorry, but surely a rear mech hangers' purpose is to be 'disposable'? So rather than destroy your £100 mech, you bend a £15 piece of metal. I'm not a fan of large hangers that integrate drop outs, defeats the point of a replaceable hanger
  • 2 3
 Fully agree. I have a spare "cheap, disposable hanger" in my pack at all time. It saves your mech, it takes 2 minutes to replace and you're off on your merry way again.
  • 1 4
 Fundamentally i agree with you, if it wasn't for the disposable nature of commencal hangers I would be on my 3rd rear mech, as is, the same old x9 has been on the back of my bike for 2 years (admittedly heavily scared, a bit bent and on its 3rd set of jockey wheels) saving me a good few quid in the process, however integrating the drop outs makes sense as that way you can swap between a 9mm qr and proper 15mm through axle, which can be useful for the 140mm trail bike crowd who might still have an old 9mm wheelset as a spare but have a 15mm as there go to items
  • 1 3
 @MeAlex - I can see your point, and that is possibly the only benefit of such a setup on a trail bike. On a bike like this though ... Also, considering that you probably saved £70-80 every time you did't have to replace a mech, one could easily buy a spare wheel with the right kind of axle for that money and at your own time and not when forced by an expensive breakdown. Then you sell the old wheel and have enough money left over for a couple of pints.

The real issue I have with Brad promoting this kind of setup is that, instead of advocating the use of advancements in technology and manufacturing to make it cheaper to run and repair an already expensive machine, he is doing the opposite.
  • 1 3
 @Kamba6, dont get me wrong, in no way am i agreeing with brad on the issue with hanges, i am a firm advocate of snap tastic hangers after seeing the rear triangle of an old yeti 303 getting written off thanks to an integrated hanger, that doesn't detract from the fact i believe they should integrate dropouts as well considering the little ones on commencal bikes manage to be only to be a few quid a pop, integrate the dropouts and snap long before bits of mech or frame, (not that i am a big fan of commencal any more given that their frames snap in the middle anyway).
For the pro rider solid hangers make sense because no one wants to loose the world champs thanks to a snapped hanger and if the mech gets wrecked mr shimano or whoever will hand over a new one asap. For the rest of us snap tastic hangers make sense
  • 6 1
 you guys are missing the point of having disposable hangers: to save your frame, not the RD or mech. back then, the hangers were part of the frame. if you snap it or bend it beyond repair or lose the threads on it for the mech/RD, then you'll need to replace your frame or have it fixed. nowadays, the hangers are disposable. but those disposable hangers are so easy to bend and break, just as was originally intended. how many of you guys have broken one of these disposable hangers? do you think it served the purpose? probably for some. funny thing about these is that it even snaps while riding on pavement without crashing. fatigue sets it and breaks the darn thing without any crashing done to it.
  • 10 1
 While I expect not everyone will agree on the subject of derailleur hangers, which is apparent after the response to Mike Kazimer's Chromag Aperture test here www.pinkbike.com/news/Chromag-Aperture-Review.html, I stand by my comments. From my experience, in an instance where a "snap tastic hanger saved your derailleur", if you had been using a solid hanger it would not have failed AND your derailleur would probably be fine. Those flimsy hangers bend and break even from using a bike rack, and if they bend or break while riding, usually the derailleur ends up in the spokes and causes far more damage to the whole bike. I have yet to bend the solid hanger or tweak the derailleur on my Chromag TRL hardtail after a year of riding trails just like in the above video. Personally, I would much rather have consistent shifting performance than an opportunity to save a derailleur that most likely will die when it's ready to die. From the standpoint of someone who doesn't pedal very much or who crashes often, perhaps the snap tastic hangers are more economical. I don't mean that to be offensive, just saying.
  • 2 1
 As a rider who has extensive experience with snaptastic hangers, ala Trek, I have to agree whole heartedly with B-Rad. I've spent $75 in a weekend on cheap flimsy hangers, as well as new spokes and mech, because the snaptastic hanger didn't keep it out of the wheel and certainly didn't do sh*t to save the mech.
  • 2 1
 I can second LiveFreeorDies comment. First ride on my Trek Remedy, and that shitty little hanger decided to let go while I was bombing down a chute. Derailleur into rear wheel, lost a few spokes, chain was destroyed, derailleur was MANGLED, lost the derailleur cables, casette damaged, and fresh frame paint chipped... needless to say I was pretty pissed. Luckily I went back to my LBS and they sorted it all out free of charge. However if that were to happen again now, that would not be a "cheap fix". I think stronger is better, to a point of course. I have only once actually bent my hanger, and it was only enough to mess up shifting, bent it back and finished the ride, went to the store to replace it, and guess what? it was like 70 bucks! So much for cheap replaceable hangers.
  • 2 1
 I did two hangers in one weekend on my supreme dh v3... can't they get a compromise by making them just a bit stronger? (aka not so strong as the cove one)
  • 1 2
 I've bent the odd hanger or two while riding/crashing/dropping my bikes. Sometimes it saves the derailleur, sometimes it doesn't. But a derailleur AND a replacement hanger is far cheaper than replacing the frame. If cove is going to use these modular dropouts in lieu of just a replacement hanger, then they should also incorporate a bending fuse into them so that it will actually bend/break in a specific point (much as Avid does with their brake levers) and not ruin the rear swingarm.
  • 4 1
 Cove's STD and Shocker dropout/hanger is $75 to replace if it gets bent/broken, but that's pretty unlikely.
  • 2 1
 re the chromag, i wouldn't expect to see a replaceable rear mech hanger on a steel frame...
  • 2 0
 I've never ever ever............. Ever bent/broke a mech hanger. I've bent a mech cage, but nothing that I can't bend it back.
  • 1 0
 @deeeight, i dont foresee an issue with ruining a swing arm thanks to the hangar/drop out breaking, the rear end is so stiff that even with the wheel and axle out it's not easy to flex the two sides together. so i doubt you would crash hard enough with out really getting hurt or breaking more shit than just a drop out.

source: Current late 2011 new gen shocker owner.
  • 12 2
 That trail is amazing. Brad, you rode it well - it looks hard, but I'm sure in reality it is very, very dfficult. And you filmed it too. Hats off to you sir!
  • 2 0
 I would have no problem riding any of that when it's dry, but he's making it look easy while the whole damn trail appears to be a river. That's insane.
  • 3 0
 i was squirming while watching him tackle the wet section: that means i squirming the whole time.
  • 1 0
 totally, hats off. had to read the filmed AND ridden part twice to be sure. bet he kills it in the dry.
  • 1 0
 That 2nd shot is blowing my mind. It looks crazy for a full on downhill bike and gear, but with an xc lid, no pads, and a single crown? And landing on a wood tranny in the rain? That's ridiculous. Is it as high as it looks?
  • 9 1
 i like seing more vids like these ..technical and steep and aggressive..some DJ and Dh are all the same unelss dh riders are absolutely getting so loose that they get to that braking point of wrecking..lover more all mountain video.
  • 5 0
 The Loam Ranger has struck again. Nice work on the video Brad. Ridiculous to think that you filmed that yourself as a torrential PNW downpour was in full effect. I'm sure you had a fun day, but I bet you were glad to throw on some dry clothes afterwards!
  • 9 0
 Thanks! When it's that dark, wet, and cold on such rugged terrain, solo in the quiet, deep woods, in a place where few have ever been, the level of focus on getting the shots is so incredibly localized that I didn't have an opportunity to perceive discomfort. All the anxiety dissapated after the first shot, but returned ten fold after the last shot. Dry clothes are great, but I was most glad that I had two beers waiting to calm the nerves after realizing what I had done. It's one of the best feelings in the world, and is what keeps me fascinated with mountain biking. I hope to encourage others to get out and get to know themselves in the woods. It's what makes our sport so much different. Man and machine, in the woods.
  • 1 0
 Wow... it looks soooo different from the 2011, 2010 and 2009 STD!!! lol I rode this bike in vegas and man it was not a good experience... glad others have had better times on it but I found that it rode like S%^&. Just my 2c.
  • 1 0
 I love the "Table over the hollow stump" shot. with the camera inside the stump, all the jagged edges look like they converge. pretty cool, and great timing!
Granted, shot #2 wins in the "Balls" category. I was looking at the thickness of the landing zone planks.. that's a helluva drop! great job shooting and ripping in some rough conditions!!
  • 1 0
 holy crap. "shot and ridden by Brad Walton"... so, that stump jump was self triggered? holy hell, that's impressive!
  • 2 0
 I have one piece too, and i totally love this bike, undestructible, stiff, universal (50kms EN or week of FR/DH no problem) and i have it in little tuning Smile www.pinkbike.com/photo/6275389
  • 1 0
 Pretty sick lookin machine Matz!!
  • 1 0
 Amazing review I'm not a racer so my demo is a little to much bike so the STD might be the bike of choice for the future . Good advert for minions too but I guess they already have a sic rep .

The frame is designed for single crown or can you put triple crown forks on it ?
  • 1 0
 triple-crowns?
  • 1 0
 As soon as the weather clears, I will go to find places to ride similar to the ones in this video, I love the drops and of course the surrounding nature which brings that wild feeling and freedom inside you. Not too sure about the bike, as solid as it looks, I am Spesh fan, and the Enduro Evo which I would imagine is direct competition to this bike, is the one I decided to own. Awesome Edit nonetheless, the beats in the song is close to the sound of the Berimbau which is an instrument to produce Capoeira Music.
  • 1 0
 I've been riding a beefed up Heckler for a number of years and found it handled all the blue runs @ Whistler with ease. This bike taught me finesse rather than bashing down a run. But who wants to be bothered with smoothness and well maintained trails.I demoed Spec, R.M., Giant, the works. Bought a 2012 STD, Elka, Totem 1.5, 40MM, XO drive a month ago. The bike is an absolute blast 39.7 lb. I can throw it around like the Heckler and who cares about finding the best line to ride. Set your suspension, point downhill, hold on for the 2nd biggest thrill in your life.
  • 1 0
 Wow, excellent movie. Really sums up alot about the shore, wet, technically unforgiving, misterious, local bikes. The realationship between the rider and the trail is amazing. Please make more.
  • 2 0
 Okay I know my question is a bit stupid but as I'm a french I don't know what "trannie" mean ! I searched on the net but didn't find. Could somenone explain ?
  • 2 0
 It is the short version of "transition" which is the sloped landing for a jump. Transition because it makes the "transition" from the air back to the ground easier because of the slope of the landing so it's not a flat landing. At least that's what I have always known it as. Cheers.
  • 2 0
 Thanks !
  • 1 0
 Any thoughts on the rear to front travel balance? looks like it's not slowing you down but maybe some feedback? Normally I've tried to balance the travel and go bigger on front rather than rear if I change up. Comments?
  • 3 0
 The bike is designed around a 180mm single crown. Considering that Fox's 40 fork is 6mm higher in axle-to-crown than the 36 180 fork I had on the STD, and that a 200mm fork gets considerably more than 6mm of sag over a 180mm fork, the ride height of the single crown feels like it puts the rider in the ideal body position. In theory, the longer fork would put the rider further over the front of the bike, and I had already noted the bike's aggressive geometry. Less travel by nature is more progressive than more travel, so it is largely shock setup that achieves that balanced feel. Much of the description of my rear shock setup is based on getting the rear suspension to ramp up at the middle/end of stroke to be as progressive as the front. Having more travel in the rear than front allows the bike to have extra rear sag, and offers that 'in the bike' feel that is balanced, lively, and nimble for negotiating technical terrain and jumps, while the added negative travel (sag) in the rear takes care of rough terrain, thoughtlessly working beneath you. I think this is what Cove intended with the redesign of the STD- to make it more comfortable on rough DH trails while maintaining it's nimble trailbike feel. It's my guess that a 200mm fork really wouldn't change the balance all that much, but would perhaps match the stock settings of the relatively linear Elka shock better. There are so many ways to set up the shocks that you could achieve a number of configurations that would feel balanced.
  • 1 0
 my 2012 std feels amazing with a boxxer on it... perfect geo as far as i'm concerned. same axle to crown as totem... mine has a fox shock and feels amazing! last two bikes had elkas, might try one out on this bike just to compare. although, i like the fox for the boostvalve. its a tough choice. great bike no matter how its setup- single crown or not. perfect for our local trails. good job cove!
  • 1 0
 I like how you describe the "in the bike" feel. I demo'd a TR450 this past season and felt that as well. Glad to see it's achievable as you've described. Do you know of any technical write ups of the dual link suspension? Looks similar to a VPP. Awesome comments man. Thanks a lot.
  • 2 0
 Dual link does appear similar to VPP, but somehow doesn't emit the pedal kickback that I've experienced with long-travel VPP's when the rebound stroke pulls on the chain.
For the armchair engineerds out there, there is this that includes suspension action for several popular designs, including the generation 1 STD. Scroll to the bottom of the page: forums.mtbr.com/turner/turner-aqcuiring-use-dwl-592046.html
  • 1 0
 Nice vid! loving that NS riding wet and gnarly you made it look like a walk in the park. Great review these frames are faultless go buy one!
  • 3 2
 The chainguide system is "simply perfect" - what is it? Always found it odd that Coves come without ISCG mounts - what do they use instead?
  • 2 0
 Widgets that bolt to your chain guide, the widgets have notches that slide over matching notches on your bottom bracket shell hard to explain but they work a treat and are impossible to move once fitted
  • 2 1
 Its also impossible to obtain one..
  • 2 0
 Information on the chainguide mount is found here bradwalton.pinkbike.com/blog/Cove-20115-STD-Preview.html
  • 3 0
 aparently if i get an STD i get a divorce!!! i'm off to the LBS!
  • 3 0
 Cove rule!! I have the Shocker, and now I want an STD.
  • 1 0
 I have a STD ready to be build up in the next couple of days. I'll post a video of the build up soon. Smile
  • 1 0
 Great write up, and photos Brad! Also have always liked the look of the STD, but always thought it a bit chunky. Might have to give the '12 version a spin.
  • 1 0
 Looks sick, would love it.... but it costs $$$$$$..... even more then the morewood kalula or intense uzzi in the same class... is it worth the extra bucks?
  • 1 0
 Yes it is worth it. My buddy snapped his new Uzzi in just three weeks of riding. The Cove STD is indestructible.
  • 3 0
 Not had an std ever but oh so want one,trip to thailand might be in order.
  • 2 0
 Is it me or on the video at 1:07 you can see the bars flexing? Pretty cool if it is Love a bit of slow Mo.
  • 4 0
 Could be, but more likely the Twixtor software since it uses pixel morphing to get the slomo that slow. You can see some of these effects in the brake lines moving around at 1:07. Usually this isn't an issue except when the camera can't shoot fast enough, such as in the dark woods that day. You could be right though!
  • 2 0
 Its "only" a 2010 STD ... just build up: heiko-munich.pinkbike.com/album/Cove-STD
  • 1 0
 I have a 2010 and my buddy has a 2012 and they are different quite a bit actually, and lighter.
  • 2 0
 His brakes are squealing like justin bieber stuck in an elevator with michael jackson.
  • 6 0
 Thankfully the Saints hook up as quickly as MJ would with Bieber as well.
  • 1 0
 hahaha..
Hey Brad, how'd you trigger the shot over the hollow stump? Killer shot with great timing!!.. Bar trigger or buddy with a remote? great edit, sweet riding, yo. very impressive, especially considering how wet it was! well done, sir.
  • 1 0
 I think to keep it fair Canadians should review the Orange Patriot and someone from England should review the STD.......I'd be more than willing to be the Englishman
  • 1 0
 first time i had sex i got the clap and then i gave it to my sisters babysister and had to tell me sister to tell the baby sitter
  • 1 0
 I have one too, and im totally satisfied, it's undestructable, universal and uphill able, excelent geometry and etc... www.pinkbike.com/photo/6275389
  • 1 0
 I have one too, and im totally satisfied, it's undestructable, universal and uphill able, excelent geometry and etc... www.pinkbike.com/photo/6275389
  • 4 2
 I dont think my mom would be happy if i got an std...
  • 19 2
 [Must... resist... temptation... to write... a smart a$$ remark... aaarrrggghhh...]
  • 1 0
 Surely if you got an STD you would want to get rid of it! Love the dog chasing him too
  • 1 0
 i am considerig your sentense but if i had a cove SDT i'd keep it Wink
  • 3 1
 do they make a SDT?

Sorry mate, had to ask.
  • 1 0
 That dog was in attack position! haha..
Saso- a nuance of English is that STD stands for Sexually Transmitted Disease.. in this case, the STD (cove) is worth keeping though, as you point out. =)
  • 2 0
 That vid would make an awesome tire ad....
  • 2 0
 the dog face in one of the pics is so awesome Big Grin
  • 1 0
 totally, looks like they are making almost the same face!
  • 1 0
 Good to see my 2011 Scott FR 20 won't be the only alien green machine out there!
  • 2 0
 on the second picture dude of high-durable alloy with steel balls...
  • 1 0
 That video is one of the best ones I've seen on Pinkbike, the music suited the video so well!
  • 1 0
 hahaha the title of this article looks like the Company (Cove) was tested for STDs. perverted... but funny as heck haha
  • 1 0
 The gnarly thing about this is all the photos are self portraits... holy shit!
  • 1 0
 side profile looks a lot like the Voltage FR. Guess the 'tweener bikes are really gaining popularity, and for good reason.
  • 1 0
 In some of the pics it was running fox and in others the Ellka Wink either way anything cove is dope
  • 1 0
 Excellent video, well done!
  • 1 0
 Nice one man production!
What camera was used?
  • 2 1
 click on each photo and check the details on the right
  • 1 0
 That's for the pics, but what about the video?
  • 2 0
 Click on video. Specs are below.
  • 1 0
 Looks pretty sexy. And that drop is f**king awesome!
  • 1 0
 is that the trail shandro rode on his session 10 in seasons?
  • 1 0
 Nice vid + article! Like the quality of cove frames.
  • 1 0
 Where's the trail from the second picture? Exist a video from the trail?
  • 1 0
 pinkbike.com/photo/7027044

My STD. Absolutely love this bike
  • 2 0
 mmmm i wish i had an STD
  • 1 1
 Keep hanging out with those cove peeps and you find out what a std all about.
  • 1 0
 nice,true north shore ride.
  • 1 0
 thats the only std i ever want
  • 1 0
 nah, already have enough STD's. Dont need anymore.
  • 1 0
 Cove Rocks! What else can I say... tup Fab
  • 1 0
 do you really want to ride an STD???
lol
  • 2 0
 STI not STD
  • 1 0
 Killer review Brad! Thank you.
  • 1 0
 The write up sounds like a description for an intense Uzzi vpx
  • 1 0
 Agreed!
  • 1 0
 No doubt bro !!! VOD !!!!
  • 2 0
 great vid, nasty
  • 1 0
 Great review - and terrific video. Video should be part of every review!!!
  • 1 0
 ahhh finaly a bike with AIDS!
  • 1 0
 What mtn/trail would Brad be riding? Looks uber challenging!
  • 1 0
 Demoed this bike a Trestle and it was unbelievably sick!
  • 1 0
 I´ve got one! Man It´s bike with attitude and soul.
  • 1 1
 Why the fox stickers aren´t?
  • 1 0
 SWWEEETTTT video !!!
  • 1 1
 dont drop the soap!
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