The Final Mega Randoms - Taipei Cycle Show 2024

Mar 9, 2024 at 10:55
by Brian Park  

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
THE FINAL MEGA RANDOMS
Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Lots of wide-eyed excitement from all of us this trip. Hannah (social media manager) and Dario (tech editor) had never been to Taiwan before, and Alvin (Velo tech editor, not pictured) hadn't been back since he was a kid.


After a long week we are wrapping up the final day of the Taipei Cycle Show. We've still got a bunch of stories to publish and a podcast to record before we get on the germ tube home, but in the meantime I've pulled together a final Randoms for your entertainment.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024

XPEDO's slightly more eco-friendly Felix pedals

You may not be able to buy a better future, but it's still nice to see that the market is demanding products that are slightly less environmentally impactful. XPEDO, Wellgo's aftermarket brand, was showing off their new Felix composite flat pedal—including a variant that foregoes the chemicals used to dye the plastic for colorant from tea leaves.

Their silhouette reminds me of Deity Deftraps, but a little less squared up—which is not a slight on XPEDO, there are only so many shapes you can make a pedal. They look like they have a good platform, the pin placement appears reasonable, and the pricing seem fair. We'll try to get some in for testing.

Details:
• Weight: 340g
• Material: Nylon
• Spindle: Chromoly
• Bearings: 1 sealed 1 bushing
• 40 pins
• Size: 109 x 109 x 16mm
• Colors: Black, red, pink, rasta, and tea
• Price: $49 USD (TBD for the tea variant)


Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Their marginally less eco-friendly version is available in Rasta and a bunch of other colours.





2024 Taipei Cycle Show
Clean work at Genio.

2024 Taipei Cycle Show
How Calvin from Genio gets between buildings at one of their factories.
2024 Taipei Cycle Show

2024 Taipei Cycle Show
Robot welding is one of the buzzwords these days. Genio has a lot of them, but they weren't keen on us showing anything beyond this photo.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024

Tiny Rock's full suspension carbon kids bike

Tiny Rock sells carbon kids full suspension frames, and seemed vaguely affiliated with the Hayes Group booth—including the Protaper kids bars. Regardless, their 20" Master S looks absolutely badass. It's got 120mm of travel, and the best brakes I've ever felt on a kids bike. Seriously, anyone recognize these Tiny Rock branded brakes that look vaguely like Trickstuffs?

Details:
• Ages: 5-8 years
• Height: 110-135 cm
• Frame: carbon
• Travel: 120mm travel front and rear
• Claimed weight: 10.9 kg
• Price: $3,199 USD
• More info here


Taipei Cycle Show 2024
These feel great.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
So nice.

Ora's 13° titanium handlebar

It's not new, but I feel the need to validate my impulse buy of an Ora titanium handlebar. Ora is an OEM frame and component factory that is well known for their titanium products. You may recognize this bar as sold under a variety of other brand names, but I got to choose this one unbranded and with a Scotchbrite finish. I don't generally love high backsweep alt-bars, but I do want to experiment with slightly more backsweep than I'm used to, so 13° should be a good starting point.

Details:
• Material: 3Al 2.5V seamless titanium
• Rise: 25mm
• Backsweep: 13°
• Width: 800mm
• Diameter: 31.8
• Weight: no idea


Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Check out Dario's factory visit to Ora here.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Crank parts at Ora.
Taipei Cycle Show 2024

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Unlike the bars, they wouldn't sell me these unfinished eeWings cranks.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Molds.
Taipei Cycle Show 2024
More molds.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
As requested, more Dario fits.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Will these be as polarizing as his normal glasses?
Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Probably not.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Hyperspace-ready.

Prologo's 3D printed saddle

This spaceship-shaped thing is technically a road saddle called the Nago R4 Pas 3DMSS (a very simple and memorable name), but I'm told MTB things are coming. It's 3D printed so of course I'm interested, but it doesn't look all that different from what's been available from Specialized and Fizik the past few years. The crew at Velo (our sister publication, not the parent company of Prologo) will go into more detail when they cover it, but the most interesting part for me is that Prologo has designed in drainage along the sides. It weighs a claimed 149g and should be available in April. Price TBD.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Speedholes everywhere.





photo
Inexpensive wireless drivetrains soon?

L- TWOO's flat bar electronic shifter

L-TWOO is a Chinese drivetrain manufacturer run by some former SRAM factory managers that set up shop when SRAM pulled out of Guangzhou in 2013. Their drivetrains look like (you guessed it) several generations old SRAM. We've played with their derailleurs a few times over the years and still don't believe they're ready for prime time, at least on the mountain bike side—they're hampered by questionable QC, poor materials, and a lot of lateral slop.

That said, they released a very interesting eRX electronic road group last year, and we've heard constant rumours of an MTB version coming soon. While we couldn't talk our way into viewing an MTB version, we were shown what we believe is an electronic flat bar shifter. It's compatible with L-TWOO's wireless derailleurs, 10-12 speed, 80g, and has an 18° angle adjustment.

Details:
• 10-12 speed compatible
• Wireless
• Aluminum
• Compatible with L-TWOO's electronic series drivetrains
• 18° angle adjustment range
• 80g
• Designed for flat bar installation
• Price: TBC


photo
Nice to see that they're thinking about flat bars, but...
photo
The eRX group isn't ready for prime time, at least for MTB.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Taiwan has left hand drive Kei trucks and I want one.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Or possibly two.
Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Tomorrow's mission is to find some of these toy trucks for my son.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
We may have found the limits of the short crank phenomenon.

Aerozine's XEON mini A1 crankset

Aerozine is the house brand of G-MA Engineering from Taichung. The first thing I saw at their booth was a blatant SRAM crankset ripoff, so my expectations were low. But I will say that their kids' cranks look great.

Details:
• 9/10/11 speed compatible
• 7075 aluminum
• 30mm B.B. spindle
• Lengths available: 120, 135mm, 140mm, 145mm, 150mm
• Narrow Q-factor is more natural for kids
• Available in 52mm, 48.5mm , 51mm, and 53.5mm chainlines
• Colors: Blast Red / Blast Orange / Blast Gold / Blast Green / Blast cobalt Green / Blast Blue / Blast cobalt Blue / Blast Purple / Blast Black / Blast silver
• Direct mount compatible
• Weight: 556g (135mm/30T)
• Price: $180 USD
• More details on their legitimately incredibly helpful website (seriously, why can't all websites give this much clear detail)


Taipei Cycle Show 2024
They also make an interesting looking riser stem.
Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Looks about 1kg lighter than my old Azonic Hammer stem.

They also make an interesting looking riser stem called the XNC-10. No word on certifications, but it's apparently designed for trail, all mountain, and enduro.

Details:
• Material: AL-6061T6 CNC machined
• Diameter: 31.8mm
• Angle: +15°
• Width: 28.6mm
• Stainless bolts: M5*16 x4 & M5*18 x2
• Length: 10mm
• Colors: Black/ Grey/ Blue/ Red/ Gold/ Green
• Weight: 104g
• Price: $64
• More information


Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Their titanium chainrings look nice but cost over $300.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Out and about.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Taiwan does a lot of light roast pour overs.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
More food photos as requested. This place was great, here's the location. It was nice to meet the crew from Coboc (ultralight city e-bikes) with April and Calvin from Genio.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
The enigmatic Owen Pemberton of Forbidden Bike Company.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Paralyzed by choice.





Taipei Cycle Show 2024

Icetoolz SuperLifter-III hand crank repair stand

It turns out this isn't new at all, but it was news to me. Icetoolz was showing a hand-crank repair stand. It felt pretty easy to operate, and could be a good solution for people who need to raise e-bikes to work on them. That said, at ~3000 euros it's still a shockingly expensive stand.

Details
• E-bike compatible up to 60kg
• Rotatable 25.4mm – 55mm rubber clamp
• Adjustable height from 50cm to 180cm (20"~7')
• 1 turn on the handle = 10cm in height
• Large base for stability
• Includes integrated work tray
• Price: €2,949.95
• More info.






Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Food for smashing machines at KT.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Hub shell forgings.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Goals.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
More ingredients. This maker appears to make stanchions for RockShox as well and lowers and forgings for other fork manufacturers.

Taipei Cycle Show 2024
Time for a nap on the flight home.





We've still got more coverage from Taipei to come in the next few days. A few more products, a podcast, and another "Meet Your Maker" factory tour. Thanks for following along!

Author Info:
brianpark avatar

Member since Dec 29, 2010
216 articles

179 Comments
  • 118 2
 No wonder the bike industry is in trouble, they are all middle men !!!!!
  • 35 7
 Was thinking the same thing. This, plus lack of any kind of vertical integration, along with too many marketing-driven brands selling catalog clone carbon fiber FS bikes is why you can get a brand new 450cc dirt bike or adventure bike from one of the big 4 motorcycle manufacturers for less than the cost most high end FS mtbs.
  • 61 0
 Yup, the consumer has to buy from a retailer, the retailer has to buy from the distributor, the distributor has to buy from the "brand" and the brand is buying form the manufacturer. That's a lot of middle men!
  • 54 4
 Simple, buy Asian brands if possible. Those are starting to up their game after so many years of manufacturing and putting stickers on high end products. Some will whine about supporting bike companies blah blah blah, in the end all you support is a marketing and communication company that sells products 4x more tham what it's actually worth. If you want to keep that system working good for you, I'd rather buy products from those that actually manufacture the products and not get shafted by a sticker company.
  • 69 9
 I’m sure you don’t remember the Push Inverted fork made right here.
No middlemen, lots of bitching about the price, though.
Mountain bikers can whine out of both sides of their mouth.
  • 70 1
 True. I bought my last bike from WeAreOne. Said hi to the woman lying up carbon in the mould as I walked in and rode at the bike park later that day with the guy who built the wheels with the rainbow nipple pattern I asked for. It can be done right.
  • 2 0
 @Balgaroth: I have a set of Elitewheels carbon fiber wheels I got for a whopping total of $307 shipped to my house during their 11-11 sale. They are amazing quality for that price.
  • 7 5
 @scary1: As i have a mentioned before, companies should had unified and bought the REV manufacturing after GG went under. They could have created a well operated MFG plant to bust out some incredible frames; under one umbrella as a conglomerate. Sure it would have taken some time and money but long term would have been a perfect solution, IMO. And consumers would be better off as well.
  • 19 7
 @KellChris: if they had to make that 450cc bike in six different sizes, it'd cost considerably more than the one size fits all model that all motorcycles adhere strictly to....
  • 14 1
 @jokermtb: I just got home from the Toronto bike show and what a disappointment. It used to be big with a lot of the industry there. Only a few bike shops, only one bike manufacture and lots of booths with ebikes with names I had never heard of.
Yamaha was there with their new line of full suspension ebikes, along with a 450 and 700cc adventure bikes. The 450 was listed at $12,000can., and I know there are numerous adventure bikes in the 250-400cc range for way under $10,000can.
Meanwhile there were numerous 105 equipped gravel bikes listed at over $6,000Can where not too long ago 105 were on bikes in the $2,000 range.105 used to be the groupo for the people and if you want Ultegra or Dure Ace for example, I you want those groupo's be prepared to spend over $10,000. Bikes have gone totally bonkers with their prices.
  • 2 0
 @bowser07: they are coming down though. Lot of sales and repricing 20-40% lower. And still not moving a lot. So there is hope. But with deflation comes other financial issues in the market.
  • 4 0
 @likeittacky: agreed,100%
  • 61 3
 @Balgaroth: I work as a Product Manager in the Bike Industry. I don't think you have a fully developed understanding here:

Most of the time the product ideas, the design, the product R&D and real world testing and feedback is done by the Western Brands (and their sponsored athletes). The manufacturing is then outsourced to a select few cities in Asia where they have the materials supply, the volume, the heavy machines and specialist know-how to produce this stuff efficiently on mass. They also have all the equipment in Asia to test to the ISO standards and ensure compliance. We are so lacking in this kind of manufacturing in the US and Europe often it would cost you more to buy the raw Ti material in the US or Europe than to buy a manufactured part from Asia, so there really isn't any point trying to do it all in-house domestically unless you're an artisan interested in super super high end.

(Sometimes factories do have ideas, access to new technologies and do change/improve the designs (particularly for manufacturability) but most of the time the ideas come from the brands.)

Customers do end up paying a multiplied version of the product cost but this is because you're paying for the design, R&D, the sponsored athletes, the distribution (it isn't free or easy to move products between countries and hold them in stock) and also the staffed bike shop/retailer through which you get access to customers service and warranty etc.

This is how it works in all industries - a loaf of bread probably costs like $0.20 to make in an industrial bakery, but by the time it's been packaged and through a massive distribution network and made it to a store and made available to buy in a staffed store it needs to be sold for like $2.00. Same with clothing, a pen, a watch, a smartphone or literally any manufactured item.

If the manufacturer wanted to cut out the Western brand and sell to western consumers directly they would need to hire all the staff from that brand to do the design, R&D, marketing, real world testing etc, they would need to sponsor pro riders to test and promote the product (so take on all the brands expenses). They would then need distributors to distribute and stock the gear in each territory and they would still need a network of retailers with staffed stores all over the world to sell and give warranty/customer service in each country... It would end up no cheaper and instead of buying from majority rider-owned western brands you would be buying from an Asian factory. I don't see how that would be preferrable.
  • 2 1
 @Balgaroth: Or buy a western brand that makes their stuff in house in a western country. Some are not expensive (Lapierre?)

The edge some western companies still have is it's easier for them to make bikes the way we like them.
  • 13 1
 @tom666: Your sentence about the manufacturing being "outsourced to a select few cities in Asia where they have the materials supply, the volume, the heavy machines and specialist know-how to produce this stuff efficiently on mass" is missing AND CHEAP LABOUR.
  • 7 1
 @tom666: Second paragraph "The manufacturing..." : That is entirely the Western industry fault and it's already backfiring at you. Cyclists are begining to vote with their waalets.


There used to be a manufacturing base in Europe It was competitive and it worked fine. You (I don't know if you were in the industry back then, I was) chose to go for a cheaper option.

Time will tell, but it's not looking good for the business model you defend.
  • 1 1
 @jokermtb: Fair point. However, I'd argue that the bigger issue is the lack of vertical integration and the market suffers from a paradox of choice. If you make a range starting with Trek/Specialized/Giant on one side, and the guy building small batch and custom steel/ti frames on the other, I argue that there's a lot of "noise" created in the middle. If that noise went away, the large firms could better control suppliers to drive down costs while the small batch guy is still doing his thing.

Sure, selection for the market is reduced but honestly how many different iterations of a carbon fiber 150mil FS mtb. does the world need?
  • 1 0
 @bowser07: I work at a shop and we sell great road bikes with 105 for under 5000 and Ultegra equipped bikes for much less than 10,000.

What bikes were you looking? at I'm genuinely curious what company was that far out to lunch.
  • 1 0
 @bowser07: TBS has been a disappointment for nearly 20yrs
  • 1 0
 @Vindiu: the business model doesn't need to be defended nor is it 100% broken. It needs a recalibration and every company is currently sorting out what the means for them and that will lead to the Asian manufacturers having to recalibrate as well.
  • 10 1
 @Vindiu: I wasn't in the industry when production started to move to Asia. I would love to see more brands manufacturing in the US and EU and great if customers vote with their wallets with regards to this.

Many brands assemble bikes in Europe but the frames, suspension, brakes and drivetrain etc all come from Asia. You need to buy an EU fabricated frame (e.g. Hope, Pole) and then parts from Hope/Trickstuff/Garbaruk/Intend and similar brands. This will not be a cheap bike but if you want to vote with your wallet you should. Support those great companies.

@Mi-bike: It's not only cheap labour. Most full suspension bikes (the type of thing we pinkbikers are into) are produced in Taiwan where the wages are similar to most western countries

GDP per capita in Taiwan is higher than Australia for example (or Germany, the UK, Canada etc). The production is focused in Taiwan because of manufacturing capability, access to materials and equipment etc.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_GDP_(PPP)_per_capitaPPP

Cheaper bikes sub $2000 are generally made in China, Vietnam, Bangladesh etc and they're made in those countries for the same reason most of your clothes are.
  • 3 0
 @Vindiu: Both my frames are custom made steel, coming from Italy and Uk, designed and welded in France. So when i think it is worth it and when it is actually possible I try to buy EU made products. Also Lapierre is owned by a big consortium (Winora I think ?) and are definitely not made in France. Maybe a very small fraction of their frames are but that's all.

@tom666 that's one way to defend your brand strategy but keep in mind that if the whole industry didn't decide to send production to China, then we would still have the machinery, know how and tools to produce and certify stuff, maybe not all in France but at least on a EU scale. Also you only address a small faction of the reality, yes some brands try to actually develop products, prototype and test but many (dare I say most ?) simply buy their products off of a Chinese manufacturer catalog and stick they sticker on it. When you have clothing companies deciding to release a full line up of helmets and body protection without doubling their head count do you really want me to believe they designed that by themselves ? And once you start looking at the products on the markets and see glaring similitudes it just reinforce that feeling. I worked for 6 years in the industry until last September in Marketing, it only reinforced my position as a consumer.
  • 3 0
 @traildamo: That's only one side of the equation. Each of these entities is access to another markets. Many "middle men" services are actually necessary to get the Manufacturer's product to your market. In fact, nearly the entire business of the manufacturing sector is B2B, not B2C... They exist to make things for brands, that's their customer, not you or I. It's the "middle men" that make a product accessible.

All the bureaucracy and red-tape when it comes to trade. Duties' and tariffs, etc. Freight is a legitimate business killer unless it's supported by scale. A manufacturer would go bankrupt pretty quickly of they had to service the consumer market directly on a piece by piece basis. They ultimately need the volume afforded by Brands, distributors, and retailers. Or they would only really be able to operate in their own regional markets. It can't be really economically feasible for a manufacture to get to the mass market on their own....
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I know there are bikes with 105 selling for well under the $6,000 dollar I had quoted. There were a few bikes there that had $6,000 price tags and then were reduced in an attempt to sell. But then that is what is done with all the bikes that are for sale at the bike show..
  • 1 2
 @Balgaroth: You're continued instances of pointing all production to "China" comes off quite xenophobic, perhaps an ulterior motive to your statements is you don't believe non-EU/north Americans are capable of producing high-quality work. You are aware that many factories are outside of China I'm sure.

The industrial revolution was far from driven by the bicycle industry.
  • 2 0
 @tom666: You just described e.g. Giant and Merida, big factories with their own brands and distribution networks. With the not so unimportant detail that these are not D2C brands, so they still have middlemen, and they still need to buy drivetrains and suspension products from others. Either Giant is ran by business morons (unlikely given their track record) or the middlemen don't actually earn that big of a % after deduction of costs. If it wasn't the latter, Giant could corner the market by selling bikes at half the price of equivalents from the companies whose frames they make.
  • 3 0
 @tom666: First rule of being a product manager in the bike industry...never say you are a product manger in the bike industry. Second rule...I'll let you figure that one out one your own.
  • 1 2
 @weeblewob: he never said he is a product manger
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: what companys?
  • 4 1
 @joebiden: Endura a fews years back comes to mind, I think Rapha more recently, and I think few month back a clothing company released a helmet line up that was also out of nowhere. Ekoi is also coming out with a full helmet line up. So that's just a few of the top of my head, you can probably add Crank Brother line up of shoes, Fox too and Fizik.

@dmrluc nothing like a good ol' woke lefty to put words in your mouth right ? I literally advocate to buy Chinese (or Asian in general) products to cut the sticker companies and you tell me that I don't believe China can produce quality products, quite a thought process you had there to come to this conclusion. I use French custom made frames along side direct to consumer AliExpress parts like hubs, some cranks and some carbon rims too for instance and do so considering it is as good as any other products I ever got from sticker companies. Which isn't surprising as it probably comes out the same factories. And while I'd rather have my countrymen or fellow EU citizens produce and get a living out of this, it is mostly non existent right now so I'd rather pay whichever Chinese or Asian company directly so they can earn more money that when they sell to a sticker company and I will save a few bucks by not paying marketing companies. But yeah I am a bigot that believes those xeno chinese lads are up to no good lol gtfo
  • 1 0
 @jokermtb: Not really, youd have to change a few pieces of steel or aluminum tubing on the frame, same for bicycle frames its not that much more expensive, but carbon fiber mold costs for each size are very expensive.

90% of the parts on a motorcycle are made by the motorcycle company or are being made for them directly by other manufactures there is not nearly the amount of hands on each part like there is a bicycle.

Plus for some reason we need 8 options of cranks/wheels/drivetrain/handlebars on each size of each bicycle frame so many SKUs.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: that’s a cute idea
  • 1 0
 they always have been...
  • 2 0
 @nastynate711: Itchy Boots
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: The bike show give away to be won was a Winspace Agile listed at $9,605 with a 105 groupo.
  • 1 0
 @Vindiu: If your vote is a domestically made frame that is likely 40% more, along with domestically produced suspension, brakes, wheels, and tires for another 40% increase over normal offerings, then go for it. I'll keep riding my "made in Asia" bike and be happy about it.
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: true. This is why a Santa Cruz, made in Asia with XO parts is $9000. Add 40%, ($3600) and you get $12,600. Add 40% again, ($3600 or $5040?) and you get the price of my WeAreOne Arrival. $17,640?

Nope. All made here, but $9000 Canadian.
  • 2 0
 @Balgaroth: Ah yes I see you're very capable of controlling your emotions in casual conversation as well. Glad you know China is not all of Asia. I'd consider myself a socialist, I don't believe in left/right division, but if no calling all of Asia China makes me a woke lefty, I'll take the label in stride.
  • 1 1
 @s100: depends on the bike you are pricing and whatnot. There will always be exceptions, GG was that for a long time, but by and large, you are paying more for bespoke parts and frames.
  • 1 0
 @dmackyaheard: I think I eliminated the “depends” and “whatnot” by specifying XO drivetrain level.
  • 1 0
 @KellChris: That's essentially true (downcountry gravel, anyone?) - one look at any big bike brand's website and you'll see that they essentially make a bike for every possible scenario and personality type (motorcycle companies don't do that anymore). That can only occur if their wholesale costs are so freakishly lower than retail pricing, that they can afford to spread themselves so thinly across every single demographic. The problem is, inflation is here to stay (we just have to get used to this new 'normal' level of prices). One only has to look at the infinity of motorcycle marques that existed decades ago, and how many survived to today, and you won't even need a crystal ball to see where the bicycle biz is headed.
  • 2 0
 @dmrluc: low production costs are like water - it always settles in the low spots......no matter what the country is named.
  • 1 0
 @Aem221: I'd imagine a CRF450R in X-Small would present some engineering challenges, that would involve more than 'change a few pieces of steel or aluminum'......and, the same thing would apply for the remaining S2 - S6 (sorry spesh) sizes....now, extrapolate that across the entire range of motorcycles (street, cruiser, superbike, dual sport, ATV, side by side, etc) and you'll quickly realize just how schizophrenic the bike biz is by offering a size range for every 2" difference in human height....
  • 1 1
 @s100: Why the high cost? probably because Santa Cruz wants to pay their employees a wage so they can have less than 4 roomates, in order to afford a small walk-up efficency flat in Santa Cruz California......
  • 1 0
 @jokermtb: have you compared housing costs there to Vancouver area where WeAreOne makes their frames? I’ve lived in both areas. I’d say it is comparable, (Kamloops/vs Santa Cruz).
  • 2 0
 @s100: 2023:Income needed to buy average Vancouver home: $322,245. Ain't gonna get that selling affordable $1500.00 complete bikes.....You might be able to scrape up a down payment (with a friend), after a decade or two of saving up, while making and selling $10k dentist bikes..... I feel sorry for the young people growing up in this impossible economy
  • 1 0
 @jokermtb: Most of the young people you speak of know that whilst the price of an average full suspension mountain bike is a bit over $3,000 the range goes from over $15,000 for the fanciest grass-is-greener-than-your-neighbour machines down to $1,500 or $2,000 for a fully functional entry-level option. Of course a bike can (and should) be purchased with cash, and the same can't be said of a home.

But, some of the young people growing up in this economy know that, although lenders will gladly tell you the maximum amount you can borrow, it is smarter to buy below your means, make smart financial choices, and pay off the debt before the end of the loan term.

An even smaller number of young people growing up in this terrible economy have heard of the saying "you can't change the wind, but you can adjust your sails". The ones that have, tend to do well for themselves.
  • 43 1
 I don't think XPEDO means whatever they think it means.
  • 12 2
 I wonder who came up with that name whenever I see it. It also makes me wonder if it was achieved through rehabilitation or chemical castration.
  • 8 0
 >Fezzari enters the chat
  • 4 0
 Hi I’m Felix, I’m a brand new Xpedo. I come in fun colors!

No thank you.
  • 8 9
 @rrolly: it's trans now........ARI
  • 15 0
 There is no such thing as an xpedo. Once a pedo, always a pedo.
  • 2 0
 It was named by Mr. File, Mr. Peter File.
  • 3 0
 It's not much better in Spanish either....
  • 1 0
 @st-alfie: word for word what was about to type...!
  • 4 0
 @j-t-g: Dude I actually saw a manicure shop yesterday signed "Pedi File"
  • 2 0
 I was wondering if I was the only person catching this. I don't think I would want anything to do with anything "Expedo". Trying to go through customs or at your kids school could lead to some uncomfortable questions/conversations..
  • 1 1
 I've been pronouncing it like torpedo. I'm also about as fast as a torpedo on land.
  • 2 0
 Hmmmm they might also need to rethink their Minor Attracted Pedals campaign for their kids bike line.
  • 29 1
 Teenage Mutant Ninja Dario.
  • 24 0
 Dariotello
  • 12 0
 Fun fact his middle name is literally one of the ninja turtles.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Can we just pretend it's "Mutant"? Wink
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: dario michelangelo digiulio just sorta rolls off the tongue
  • 1 0
 @mattmatthew: Nah, gotta be Donatello.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: Dario one of the ninja turtles DiGiulio
  • 26 1
 XPEDO - The pedal of choice by rehabilitated sex offenders…
  • 12 0
 they now only make adult pedals
  • 2 0
 Available exclusively from an old van with few windows
  • 22 0
 Can y'all stop posting Dario photos? In catching my wife looking over my shoulder when I'm browsing pinkbike. Yesterday, she asked if there were any articles by "that DiSquiglio guy"
  • 13 1
 So, the "eco-friendly" option is still a plastic pedal, but the dye is replaced with tea? Sure sounds like greenwashing to me.
  • 9 0
 But guess it will appeal to the Brits? I want a coffee pedal
  • 13 2
 It’s not going to save the planet but I’m not going to shit on small steps in the right direction.
  • 12 0
 Carbon full suspension bike for the 8 year old that also needs that 300 dollar composite hockey stick.
  • 4 0
 Maybe its because I am not a dentist, but I don't see this as good value. I am fairly sure a 5-8 year old isn't heavy enough to activate the suspension and they will outgrow it in a year or two at the most.
  • 6 0
 I've been using the SQ Lab 13' backsweep bars for ages. They're great. Not sure I need to go to 16' though.The SQ Lab are only 780mm wide though and I'm convinced the rise isn't as tall as claimed. The Salso Rustler bar has 11' of backsweep and comes in a full 800 and I seem to like it as well as 13'.
  • 5 0
 I have the 30x in 16deg, I think the "medium rise" (or whatever the next not-flat option was). My wrist angle is very happy, and I've cut them to 760; more my liking and I run Ergon GP3 grips (with the mini alt bar ends). Not a cheap experiment but I think everyone could benefit from more than standard 9deg backsweep. The 30x bar still looks like a "normal" bar also, even in 16deg so not much worry for the fashion folks.
  • 7 0
 So many people could definitely benefit from more sweep. 12° has been enough for me. I don't get wrist pain anymore!

SQlab measures rise differently than everyone else. Some creative squinting going on over there. I actually did want some rise, so I went with the creatively named Ergotec Riser Bar 50.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: I'm running the same Ergotec bars on both of my bikes. Awesome bars
  • 2 1
 I run the 16 degree SQLabs on my hardtail, and 12 degree on my enduro bike. I'm even tempted to try the Answer 20/20s. Would never go back. I think everyone needs to try more sweep on their bars.
  • 3 0
 @AndrewHornor: +1 for 12° Ergotec Riser

And on my ht I have a Farr Supa-Rise alloy for 12° sweep and that old-school crossbar look.
  • 3 0
 @stephenthesquirrel: Ergotecs are great and not super expensive. I've got 50s and 70s. 12 degrees is a nice backsweep
  • 3 0
 I also want to experiment with more backsweep than the standard 8-9°, but all of the options are just so expensive. I can get a good standard bar for AU$50 but an SQLab bar is almost three times that. I shudder to think how much the Ora costs.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: salsa salt flat bar in aluminum retails for $40 USD and has 11 degrees of sweep.
  • 2 0
 I have an SQlab bar as well, at claimed 45mm rise. I think that number might work out if you measure the center of the bar at the clamp to the center line of the bar in the middle of the grips. But it's definitely way less rise than other manufacturers would call 45mm.

Anyway, where could I find such a 13dep riser ORA titanium bar for sale? Branded or not?
  • 2 0
 Have the carbon SQLab bars, 12 degree back sweep, (31.8, clamp, 35mm rise I think?) – and they are definitely 800mm wide. But yeah, going from 7 degrees to 12 was more of a game-changer than I had thought... for the better.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Ergotec as note by others. Not sure in AUD, but usually about 30EUR...
  • 2 0
 @boozed: XLC HB-M19 gets you into 12° sweep for about 25€. Good way to test the waters (that's exactly what I did) but not a bar I'd trust forever.
  • 1 0
 Thanks all for the suggestions and recommendations, now to find these things in Australia!
  • 1 0
 @boozed: go for Ergotec Level6. Half the price of SQlab.
I first tried a SQlab 12° high rise. My experience has been very positive on the wrist test, but as others have noted the claimed rise compared to other brands is overshot by 2cm. Since I needed more rise my next purchase was an Ergotec 70mm riser, which was around 40€.
Now, for a new bike I am eyeing a 50mm riser from Ergotec, 12° obviously.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: SQ do have a nicer flex than Ergotec but as noted the rise isn't great. I have a 16 degree SQ and you have to roll it forward quite a way (Rulezman style) to get it close to the 50 Ergotec but then you end up with less backsweep.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: I went with the PNW loam carbon 38mm rise and 10°backsweep.
feels really good compared to the 7-8° I was running before
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Farr is an Australian brand.
  • 2 0
 I'm loving the 16 degree sweep bars on all my bikes now. I have no idea how those guys measure their bars because my low 15mm rise bars are completely flat with no rise and my high 45mm rise bars are like 30mm rise. I'm glad I'm not the only one who noticed that. Hudski also has some cheaper options with more sweep and more rise for anyone trying to experiment.
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: SQ aluminum bars are such thin tubing (which I'm good with), I have to wrap tape around my bar plugs for them to stay put.
  • 1 0
 @Steezeman: They are. I managed to dent the end of a 30X and was surprised how thin it was. They do have a lovely flex though. If they weren't certified there is no way I would test them. Also they get the Aston seal of approval which means a lot given how much stuff he breaks.
  • 6 0
 Thanks Dario and the others for all these spicy news from Taipei. It seems that you reaaaally enjoyed that trip to Taiwan Wink
Cheers!
  • 5 1
 I believe those brakes are the same as clarks crs either in c4 or c2 flavour……tidy looking brakes and remarkably cheap too. Think they’re also available of aliexpress under a different guise and in a variety of colours.
  • 1 0
 Don't fall for them... Loads of brands... E4 IiiPro, oniri. Not bad but not special.. Zoom hb-910's on the other hand!!! They punch their weight! First hand experience with all, so no bs.
  • 1 0
 Yep, look exactly like the Clarks brakes. I fitted some to my daughter's MTB, and they do a very good job of stopping her.
  • 1 0
 I bought a set for $100 on AliExpress and honestly they worked pretty dang well. I ultimately went back to my Saints for the extra power but I would have happily used the other ones. They actually had one design feature that I think Shimano could benefit from, which is a seal around the rod that pushes the piston in the lever. I've had multiple Saint levers start leaking at the lever because the backside of the piston is unprotected...
  • 6 0
 Hope you folks got to take the High Speed Rail somewhere (like Taichung).
That thing is pretty cool.
  • 6 1
 We did. Love the HSR.
  • 7 0
 Dario in a halfshell!
  • 2 0
 Xpedo, name aside, has been great for me. Bought a pair of their Trident pedals off ebay. Couldn't find any replacement pins on their website, sent them an inquiry. They just asked how many I needed and sent them right over free. Lost the end cap a few months later, sent a new one free as well. Excellent customer service and the pedals have held up to almost a year of abuse.
  • 4 0
 Genio is the factory building the Knollys? Is PB free to say what other brands get there frames made there?
  • 7 1
 A friend of mine is a bike manufacturer in Taiwan. Just because certain bikes are made by the same company or in the same place does not make them the same bike. They are made to the designer's specs,
  • 3 0
 RAAW. YT used to make their bikes there. Don't think hey still do. My 1st gen Jeffsy was made there (I'm 90% sure)
  • 2 0
 Yep RAAW, Knolly, I think some Privateer (or they did?), some Intense, Pivot back when they did alloy, Coboc, and a bunch of other brands I probably don’t know about.
  • 3 0
 Am I the only one that found this show very lacking in interesting new stuff?
Tools and prototypes are cool,but I get the feeling that there were few inovations.
  • 2 0
 I feel like these shows have been that way for quite a while now.
  • 4 0
 Last year had a ton, this year is quiet on the product side. Tons of people have things to sell before they show what’s new, and there are a bunch of things coming at sea otter.
  • 2 0
 The Trickstuff lookalike brake in the kid's bike is a rebranded Chinese knockoff on Amazon: "JFOYH Upgraded E4 MTB 4 Pistons Hydraulic Disc Brake Set with Cooling Metal Pads for Mountain Bike".
  • 1 0
 Immediately bought the XNC-10 Stem for my Rove. The Discord Creemee, while cool, is hard to stomach the price, so I've been waiting for a stem this short and not terrible looking, for a while now. Aiming to add stack and reduce reach to save my lower back. I'm already at 32mm stem with carbon corner bars...
  • 2 0
 3K Euros for that crank stand thing seems actually reasonable for a bike shop to use if they're working on ebikes all day. I think it's more focused on that market than the home mechanic.
  • 3 0
 I wonder how long it will take for these kiddies' cranks to make it on to big bikes
  • 3 0
 140mm cranks is the new 820mm handlebars.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: The riding position of 2044 will just be a T pose
  • 4 0
 Rock Shox and Ohlunds lowers come from same factory?
  • 22 0
 Everything comes from the same factory. Somethings go right on the conveyor belt and some go left.
  • 2 0
 DVO lowers are made by Suntour (if I recall correctly). Not sure who makes Manitou, but very few brands make their own lowers.
  • 6 0
 When I was bike shopping about 10 years back I had an industry affiliated acquaintance tell me that Giant price points are great because they actually owned their frame production in Taiwan and were also making frames for Specialized out of their factory. I’m sure he name dropped a few other frame companies coming out of the Giant plant as well but my memory fails me.
So yeah, the bike industry has always been that way.
  • 3 0
 @gmiller720: I think you mean Trek. Specialized frames are made by Merida.
  • 2 0
 @gmiller720: I think it was Giant, Trek, Scott and a couple of others. Not Specialized.
  • 2 0
 @JamesR2026: many years of spec produced at giant, i don't know about current contracts, but from the very beginning many Spec were built 100% into the spec box in giant facility.
  • 2 0
 @lifted-d: Merida owns 49% of Specialized since 2001 and builds their frames.
  • 1 0
 When I was residing in TW starting from about 20 years ago, Specialized was not made by Giant’s parent company.
  • 1 0
 @JamesR2026: true but incomplete, Merida used to contract out many of the hydroformed fancy stuff to Giant. I have seen it, its just how it was.
  • 1 0
 @smith888: did you spend any time in the Giant factories? If you had you would know.
  • 1 0
 @lifted-d: I did not. It was just a known thing in the community. I’ve never set foot inside either factory.
  • 1 0
 Kei truck ownership is on my bucket list. I didn't know they existed in LHD, but I'd still settle for a RHD one. It's probably narrow enough to reach across in a drive-thru, and overtaking... isn't going to be a problem.
  • 2 1
 Kei Truck is just other words for Traffic Obstruction Smile

There a few around here, and they always seem to be in the way! lol
  • 3 0
 I enjoyed the pictures of the plant tours and the Taipei food scene more than the bike parts
  • 2 0
 Looking at those pedals at the top, it's good that they no longer touch children.
  • 3 0
 So where would one buy an Ora ti bar, seeing as I'm not an OEM...?
  • 3 0
 Look for any ti bar that doesn’t scream about being made in USA or Europe, and I’d say there’s a good chance it’s made by Ora.
  • 2 0
 Love my xpedo epstein model pedals but for some reason I get a lot of weird looks...
  • 2 0
 Did I miss the Trust damper follow up?
  • 8 1
 No follow up, other than we have a sneaking suspicion that the company that bought the IP will be doing something with the tech in the future.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Does Specialized still own the patent?
  • 3 0
 @jwa9681: yes as far as I know.
  • 1 0
 Can we get xpedi start white labeling? I'd use these pedals if they didn't have such a creeper name
  • 2 0
 I like their Spry pedal, and the branding paint wears off pretty quickly.
  • 3 0
 Ugh I know. They ARE the house brand for Wellgo, I have mentioned before that I’d rather just have Wellgo branding.
  • 2 0
 Toy trucks ‘for my son’. Sure they are Wink
  • 1 0
 Those who know, "...light roast pour overs..." Organic Chiapas Light Roast, Ohori's Coffee Roasters, Santa Fe, NM
  • 1 0
 Sorry to be a pendant, but I'm pretty sure those are not molds up there in the photos. They are jigs, or fixtures.
  • 1 0
 Both.
  • 7 0
 From a pedant to a pendant, how's it hanging?
  • 2 0
 @barp: lol. Shamefully low. Laid out by autocorrect.
  • 2 0
 I'll take one of those toy trucks for my "son" too.
  • 1 0
 I dont think you can ever be an x pedo. Not a brand Id want to ride around on
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know the longevity of these 3d printed saddles? My assumption is they dont last long.
  • 2 0
 I wanna try that stem
  • 1 0
 I almost ordered it, but $40 shipping on a $64 part was a dealbreaker.
  • 6 0
 @lookseasyfromhere: Tell yourself it's $5 shipping on a $59 part!
  • 5 0
 @lookseasyfromhere: On a second glance, I guess I fecked up the math pretty badly there... please disregard
  • 5 0
 @barp: Maybe I'll call it $104 shipping but I get the part for free! XD
  • 1 0
 @lookseasyfromhere: It's a deal!
  • 1 0
 Tiny Rock -> TR -> Transition Bikes….. hmmm….
  • 2 0
 Crocs and Socks!
  • 1 0
 Wow, Great photos.
  • 2 2
 I dont wanna be personal but... Crocs? We gotta talk about It!
  • 1 4
 That 'interesting riser stem' is another 'homage', isn't it? Rulezman stem?
  • 4 0
 The Rulezman is an homage as well.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: what is the rulezman based on?
  • 1 0
 @haen: I said in the post, Azonic Hammer. I even had one back in the day (on a Giant XCX for some reason).
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: I missed image caption. Thanks for the response!
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