First Ride: Mondraker Foxy Carbon

Apr 24, 2014 at 6:55
by Alasdair MacLennan  
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Back at the start of April we were invited by Mondraker to head to the south of Spain, visit their factory in Alicante, and ride a new bike. Nothing was forthcoming on what this would actually be but there were some guesses - definitely enduro, definitely carbon, and we were pretty sure that it would be 27.5”, but what more?

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review Image by Sebas
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Fast forward a few weeks and under the heat of an early season Spanish sun we find out that out first guesses were pretty correct but, instead of being based on the Dune chassis as we had suspected, the Foxy was the bike to receive a carbon makeover. Enter the Foxy Carbon. As ever with a press camp there’s a lot of introduction and talk of design philosophy before you get to the actual bike, but once we did there was an eagerness to look at what Mondraker had come up with. In the flesh it certainly is a looker, with a svelteness and elegance that belies its 140mm rear/160mm front travel. Gone is the hump behind the steerer that was such a feature of earlier bikes, and in its place a sleek piece of carbon sculpture. So at first glance it’s a looker, but what about when you look deeper - is there any substance to back those looks up? We were certainly inclined to believe so after hearing the details, especially after our positive experiences with both the aluminium Foxy and the Dune XR as reviewed here.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Foxy Carbon
Given this is Mondraker’s first foray into the world of Carbon enduro frames, you’d be forgiven for wondering if it was perhaps going to be a bike of function over form. Instead, Mondraker appear to have spent significant time with designers experienced in carbon manufacturing to create a frame that is both sound from an engineering point of view, as well as aesthetically. They have then gone straight to one of the best factory’s for producing bikes from the black stuff. This isn’t necessarily the cheapest way, but it is the way to do it if you want a bike that works, and works for a long time. The frames have had a lot of attention paid to offsetting the forces going through both the headntube when running bigger forks, as well as the linkage and bottom bracket junctions, which are crucial to a stiff bike. The frame utilizes an EPS core which is then wrapped in carbon, layered as necessary to be strong and stiff where required (and provide crash damage protection) while remaining thinner where it’s not needed.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

The Details
• 2.1kg for bare frame excluding shock (medium)
• Stealth Technology Carbon / Optimized swingarm
• 140mm rear travel
• 140mm front travel (160mm on XR)
• 27.5” wheels
• 142mm DT Swiss axle
• 160mm post mount rear
• Removable Direct Mount front derailleur
• BB92
• Forward Geometry
• Zero Suspension System

FOX 2015 changes
FOX Gold Oil – fortified with low friction molybdenum, a key feature in Kashima.
Improved seal head in FIT cartridge to reduce friction between damper shaft and seal.
Updated damping; sensitive low-speed with bulked up mid and high-speed ranges.
Stanchion finish improved to decrease friction further once Kashima has been applied.
Improved and more ergonomic CTD control lever, controlling both fork and shock simultaneously

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

FOX Tuning Program
Picking up on the options offered by many tuning houses, FOX will now be offering an official tuning program for consumers, much along the lines of the RAD athlete program. Granted, the changes available won’t be quite so personal, but it will allow you to get your fork tuned and updated to the latest spec with greater ease than previously. It’s going to be available for all CTD forks, and come in three distinct levels:
Stage 1 – For owners of existing forks looking to update their fork to MY15 spec, in both damper and chassis. This will be available across all Evolution, Performance and Factory forks.
Stage 2 – Full MY15 FIT cartridge installed to allow Evolution owners to upgrade from their open bath damper.
Stage 3 – For all Performance, Factory and Stage 2 Evolution forks, Stage 3 introduces custom valving. It will be available in several levels, including two which increase damping over the original settings, and also a softer valving for those that prefer to use more travel more of the time or for lighter riders not fully utilizing the standard settings.

2015 FOX First impressions
After receiving much criticism for an overly soft standard tune on the MY13 CTD products it’s fair to say that FOX have been hard at work to overcome this. MY14 was a significant improvement but the MY15 seems to be almost the same again and very close to how you, or at least we, would choose to valve a fork. In Climb mode, well it does what it says. Trail mode is the mode we would find ourselves in a lot with the older forks, primarily to overcome the overly soft Descend setting. Our first real taster of the new 34 CTD was in Trail on a rocky mountain path. Damping seemed better controlled, and as a result of this we were able to reduce the air pressure over what we would have previously used, reducing skittishness on the loose surfaces while maintaining support further into the travel. First impression here was good. Flicking the new and more ergonomic (although still not perfect) CTD control lever to the Descend mode was done with a little trepidation, partly because we knew that this was the previous Achilles' heel, and partly because the upcoming trail wasn't really the place to be a test pilot for something you weren't too sure about.

After just a few corners, though, and it was clear that vast improvements had been made. Supple to start with, yet easily reigned in and controlled as you went deeper into the stroke. It was a little disarming to expect the fork to dive where the old model would have been on its knees, only to find it still with a third of the travel left and begging for harder hits. Some big G-outs should have unstuck them but didn't and overall we were left impressed in the improvements. It will be telling to take them to our local trails where we know exactly what each fork will do on any given day but for now, signs are very positive that FOX have got it right.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review Image by Sebas

Foxy First Impressions
When it comes to the full build options of the Foxy Carbon there are several specifications available, including one with an aluminium rear triangle to keep costs down. However, for the purposes of this launch there were two bikes on offer; the 140mm Foxy RR and then the XR which came with a 160mm 34 Talas CTD up front. We spent most of our time on board a medium framed XR with a 30mm stem, and although a large with a 10mm stem would have been an interesting comparison, we felt very comfortable on the medium and instantly felt at home once rolling it onto the trails. The longer front centre might still feel a little alien to some riders, and it's something that will undoubtedly take a little time to get used to if you're usually on shorter bikes, but take that extra time and it will reap rewards. It allows you to increase pressure on the front wheel in turns while keeping your body's balance in check, and that in turn enables finer tuning of your position to balance the available grip more effectively. Combine that theory with the 'tweener wheels and it's a bike which certainly makes a compelling argument for itself. Even in tighter turns, where you might expect the bike to feel a little ungainly, it can easily be moved around once you learn to trust the extra grip available through the front wheel.

One of the most noticeable aspects was the combination of the relatively long front (obviously a key factor in the Forward Geometry) of 635mm and the relatively short 430mm chain stays which allowed for a very 'poppy' bike, especially out of corners. In contrast, the 1193mm wheelbase and 'tweener wheels gave it a confidence inspiring ability to take aggressive riding on blind trails in stride. While that long top tube will leave many thinking that the bike won't climb, that just resolutely isn't a problem as long as you stay seated and keep traction over the back wheel. The front wheel won't lift, and the rear wheel will simply dig in and drive you forwards. This is helped in part by the sub 12kg weight.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review Image by Sebas

On both the ridgeline trail and in the Fanososa bike park the bike felt balanced, sprightly and seemed to feel slightly more insulated than our experience of the aluminium bike produced. That latter point was a minor edge but was definitely tangible, as was the 400g weight saving. The trail information is all still there, it's just the micro frequency, or trail buzz if you will which seems to have been dialled out, and that is definitely no bad thing on harsher and rougher trails.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Cable routing is internal with neat entry and exit, with thought clearly applied to ensuring that the cables are smoothly routed. Mud clearance is now among the best in class too thanks to the new style swingarm which only has a single carbon spar running the distance between chain and seat stays. Even a 2.4" Maxxis Ardent and thick clay on one of our test rides didn't produce any issues, which bodes well for winter riding.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Geometry is such a key factor in a bike's abilities, and the right geometry can really allow a bike to punch above its weight in the strictest sense of the available travel. Get it right and it allows the bike to feel stable, adjustable and confidence inspiring, and on first impressions the Foxy Carbon is one such bike. Just two days of riding on a new bike isn't going to expose every handling trait but it does give you a flavour of what is on offer before being able to put it through its paces on your local hill. Given that the two days offered up natural rocky and loose terrain, followed by smooth and more manicured trails, there was enough breadth to feel that the bike is cohesive without any undue concerns of what it might do in any situation. It's stability and stiffness paid dividends on the rough and rocky descents, while the Zero Loss suspension, so impressive on the Dune XR, also proved more than capable in the shorter travel guise. Descending was sure footed with a progressive curve coming from the floating shock arrangement, and this seemed to resist bottom out very effectively, even on flat landings and G-outs, mirroring our experiences of the aluminium bike. Climbing performance was similarly impressive, to the point that on loose climbs you could leave the shock in Descend and remain seated to gain maximum traction without feeling the bike squirming and bobbing about beneath you. Production bikes will also come fitted with 760mm bars rather than the 740mm on the test examples which will give more scope for riders to get the cockpit feeling just right.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

The specification
In terms of specification, the Formula T1R brakes have historically been a little hit or miss, but once bedded in they performed suitably well in the warm and dry environment. Crank Brothers' wheels still aren't a favourite but they do seem improved over earlier models, and the SRAM XX1 performed as faultlessly as you would expect it to when new. It is still a joy to experience how quiet a bike can be once you swap to a narrow-wide chain ring and ditch the chain device, and still a little amazing that the chain just won't drop no matter how hard you try to make it do so. The On Off finishing components are all comfortable, and as already mentioned the 740mm bars will be replaced with 760mm for production to give a little more front end control for those with wider shoulders. Ardent tyres from Maxxis are also a good (and light) all rounder, even in 2.4" format, and full marks to Mondraker for electing to fit the proper Tubeless Exo casing, too.

Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review
Mondraker Foxy Carbon - Review

Pricing:
Foxy R Carbon £4,399/€4,599
Foxy RR Carbon £4,999/€5,999
Foxy XR Carbon £5,999/€6,999
Foxy XR Frame £2,699/€2,999

Pinkbike Says:
As far as first impressions go, the Mondraker Foxy Carbon seems to have hit the nail on the head when it comes to being a great enduro style bike. It descends well enough that you'd be forgiven for thinking it has more travel than it does, it deals with fast trails as well as it does with the slower and more technical bits, and the weight gives it an agile nimbleness that belies its physical length that is so key to its stability. That weight is also a real boon when climbing, for it accelerates well, while the supple Zero Loss suspension finds traction easily on loose surfaces. It certainly doesn't come in as a cheap bike by any means, but as the top-end of what is available and coming fitted as it does with some of the best componentry, it never will be a cheap bike. It does move the game on from the already successful and highly competent aluminium Foxy, but only in the subtleties, and you would certainly not suffer should you decide that the Foxy Carbon is out of reach. If you can afford it, then first impressions are of a very capable bike, and one that we can't wait to spend more time on closer to home to see how it stacks up as a long term ownership proposition. – Alasdair MacLennan

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126 Comments

  • + 35
 I nearly had a heart attack when I read 11,940kg on the build chart... Then I remembered that I'm American. Gorgeous bike. I love all the little innovative touches - Crank Brothers wheels, front and rear shock remote, clever cable routing. The effects of clean design are making their way into the mountain biking scene in a big way. NOW GET THAT THING SOLD STATESIDE
  • + 21
 Dude, that's still only 25lb. That's crazy light, no matter how you see it.
  • + 47
 Oh, absolutely. I wouldn't ask for anything lighter from a 140mm platform - actually, like you and everyone else, I'd typically expect much heavier. My comment stemmed from a confusing difference in mathematical notation. I don't know much about math in Scotland, but in the US, we use a comma to separate groups of three digits (e.g. 100,000 grams = 100 kilograms), and a period to indicate a decimal (e.g. 453.592 grams = 1 pound). In Spain and many other European countries, it's vice versa - a comma is used to indicate a decimal, while a period is used to break up long numbers. So while the chart - written, I imagine, at Mondraker's Spanish headquarters - indicates a weight of eleven kilos and 940 grams, I read it from my American perspective, and interpreted it as eleven THOUSAND nine hundred forty KILOGRAMS. A 25-pound bike is easy to stomach - one that weighs as much as Big Ben (13 short tons) is much less so.

(I hope I didn't misunderstand your comment and spout all that number nonsense for nothing. If so, I bow in shame and offer my sincerest apologies for my presumptuousness.)
  • + 3
 I think most places in the world use a coma for decimals and a point for separation of digits.
  • + 2
 My dj is only 1 pound lighter :/
  • + 1
 wow
  • + 20
 No worries, 11,940kg is only 13.16 tons. As long as you have low rolling resistance tires and are the Incredible Hulk you can climb anything. Seriously. Sweet bike.
  • + 1
 now theyr eteaching us to not use any commas in numbers just decimals
  • + 3
 earlier mondraker frames had a noble smooth curve near the head tube, that told that this frame is from pureblood breed. but now they look like humpbacked ass with a hole. that's sad for me as for Summum 2012 owner
  • + 10
 I'm pretty sure Israel Romero's hair is carbon fiber
  • + 1
 Great looking frame, some questionable spec choices. Honestly I wouldn't spend that much cash on a bike that I didn't like a few parts on. Frameset all the way...
  • + 0
 11.940kg is 26.268 lb. a decimal point is used because the .940 is less than 1. 11,940 would be eleven thousand nine hundred and 40 kg, PB got it wrong
  • + 1
 Hell, thats quite decent for xc.even. Id ride the hell out of it
  • + 1
 yea man i hate the buld on it xtr all the way bro
  • - 1
 Crazy light yes - at top spec and with 2.25 tyres. Put some decent tough tyres on there and you add at least half a kg maybe more. More interested in the Fox upgrades mentioned...
  • + 1
 Ive never heard that many European countries use the . and , in reverse order to separate numbers. Maybe thats just an Americanism that no one else knows about. I was have been lead to believe that maths is a universal langauge so the . and , would mean the same in any language. Ive checked the Mondraker website in Spanish and the weight of the bike is separated by a . or period as you call it.
  • + 2
 @headshot: Ardent 2,4 EXO Protection ARE decent tough tyres. They're ridden at EWS and they're surely tough enough for any all-mountain riding. In fact, Mondraker could have put Schwalbe HansDampf tyres on as well and it would be another 300-350g lighter. But in the end, it's the frame weight, that tells you if the manufacturer has done his homework. And that seems spot on.
Btw, loving the gap next to the steering tube and how the seat tube evolves from the down tube. Guess I've fallen in love Wink
  • + 3
 @zer0c00I44: nope, in Germany (and other German speaking countries, don't know about other neighbours) you use a "," to separate fractions from values greater than 1. Does not defeat your point about mathematics being a universal language though, as this is about concepts, not specific notation.
Btw "reverse order" is a definition, too Wink

Bike looks really good, hope they fix the visual crippling of the summum prototype, too.
  • + 3
 I really think pinkbike should do the conversions for us with the specs on foreign bikes. I came to this site to be lazy
  • + 4
 maths not math.
  • + 2
 @jts-nemo, yes I understand this I dont think I explained myself correctly. I know when you say a number like 10,000 a comma is used, we do this in the Uk. But if I were saying 9.473 kg I wouldnt write it like this 9,473 kg, the latter is 1000 times bigger. Surely you dont do this in Germany and you use a . and not a , .
  • + 2
 Bluefire & Diegobustillos: being a European who currently lives in the States i can assure you that I caused more than enough confusion with comas and points.
I do take the freedom to say that most parts of Europe (except the UK) from mid 20th century on do not separate any digits with whatever symbols and therefore could not care less if its a point or a coma and will on first glace take any symbol hidden in between numbers to be a decimal break but will tend towards using a coma.
The digit separation was dropped a long time ago to avoid that kind of confusion.
  • + 2
 What's impressive about the weight of this bike though is that it's not an anorexic looking thing full of compromises. It has a dropper, remote lockout, chunky 2.4 tires and respectable, solid spec throughout. When my mate linked me to this and told me the weight I was expected to see a carbon seatpost, sub 500g tires, Ti bolts throughout. But no, it's 26lbs with all the bells and whistles. If somebody were to go to the trouble of weight-weenie-ing the shit out of this bike by using a carbon post instead of a dropper, rocket ron tires, ti bolts etc they could get it below 11kg I'm quite sure.
  • + 1
 Shut up and take my money... I'll buy one for sure! ... When I can Big Grin
  • + 20
 Holy hell that's a nice bike.
  • - 11
flag maxlombardy (Apr 24, 2014 at 21:21) (Below Threshold)
 And slightly less ugly than every other Mondraker.
  • + 10
 OH this will be the perfect bike for those smooth trails inside an office building that i ride all the time... all kidding aside, it is a sick looking bike, with a unique suspension design that doesn't seem too ridiculous
  • + 6
 I just noticed something. At 3:48, Mondraker covertly revealed that they've created a new composite material - they're calling it "carbon fibber".
  • + 6
 its really painted aluminum ahhahahahahahaha
  • + 4
 I give props to the European manufacturers who thought of longer head tubes with super short stems first. Then I have to take away props for a frame design that requires a mud flap. My Nomad is perfect. Dirt never gets on the shock.
  • + 7
 At least they GAVE it a mud flap. Not every manufacturer would go that far, simple as it seems.
  • + 4
 At least the suspension works though.
  • + 9
 Get in my belly!!!
  • + 4
 you is a fat boy
  • + 0
 25lbs is pre small amount of bike in comparison ...
  • + 4
 How sad is it when the author feels the need to devote 2 full paragraphs in the middle of a bike review, dragging Fox Shocks arse out of the fire. I wonder what the motivations are? I wonder.
  • + 5
 so a complete build w/o pedals is 25 pounds.. i remember when i was happy my bmx was even close to that.
  • + 1
 mines 23........ why wont a bmx company step it up a little
  • + 1
 Its a beautiful bike, very clean frame design, especially with all the internal cables.
Speaking of cables... doesn't it bother anyone else that with all those loose cables crossing over each other the front looks more chaotic than in your average bowl of spaghetti carbonara???

I count 7 lines and hoses.. too much or is this the new Enduro cool???
Or might it be a safety feature like an bumper or airbag in front of the bars when you need to run over your photographer buddy pekoll-style??
  • + 4
 That is a sick bike. mondraker makes one of the nicest looking bikes out there,
  • + 1
 question pinkbike. can anyone explain to me why lots of companies are still using bb92/steel spindled cranksets? this bike looks freaking sweet, lately ive been seriously contemplating going all out and getting a 2014 genius 700 (I know, ridiculously vain especially for a guy who doesn't make 6 figures, but what can I say). same deal there though. what ever happened to all the BB30 rage? better q-factor, bigger stiffer bearings, aluminum spindle etc etc
  • + 1
 BB30 died the death it deserved, PF30 persists but isn't exactly popular with those creaky plastic BBs the manufacturers love to fit. Those 30mm alloy spindles are great too, right up until a crank arm works loose and eats the spline. In fact, BB/PF30 always strike me as a way to bring back all the advantages of ISIS cranks in handily expensive package.
  • + 1
 'creaky plastic BBs' - isn't bb92 the same plastic?
  • + 1
 It is, but they seem to be less creaky. Why is anyone's guess, I think the wider spaced bearings and stiffer bb shell help, there's less scope for movement than the PF30.
  • + 1
 The reason most carbon frames use a pressfit bb is that when forming the tubes they don't have to have an aluminium insert for the bb to thread into. I have seen countless frames from Specialised, Scott, Merida among others where the aluminium shell seperates from the carbon frame and moves around creating creaking sounds. Also if it's done correctly can save a fair bit of weight, stiffen up the frame considerably and works really well.
  • + 3
 Please forgive us for the TOROS and SEVILLANAS, and accept a FOXY XR as an offering.
  • + 3
 Sweet love of heavens that is one of the best looking bikes ever, geo chart is also beatiful. Bella Bella!!!
  • + 1
 A lot of people dieing inocently and a bunch of guys discusting about the wheight and specs of a bike...get a brain fellas!! and , i just want all to know that awesome things are hapenning right now!! Smile
  • + 3
 Not that it really matters, but "Foxy", really? It just cheapens the image of the bike for me.
  • + 1
 Presumably the XR model has a slacker head angle than the rest of the range if the travel goes from 140mm to 160mm. Anyone know if that is the case?
  • + 2
 Wow, at 6'1.5" I think I'd run a med, which is still longer reach/tt than kona large (which is spot on).
  • + 1
 so will i be able to add the remote hardware to my current fox ctd rear shock that does not have the remote hardware currently
  • + 1
 For that kind of money I want to see Hope 4 piston brakes with ventilated discs on that bike!
  • + 1
 Too heavy.
  • + 1
 Mondraker are on the money with a bike that looks that nice kitted out with that spec as long as it costs under 7k its worth every penny
  • + 3
 Why on earth would you showcase your product with Crank Bros components?
  • + 3
 I certainly like the looks of the bike, not that I would actually get those wheels if others are available, but for looks only, the bike looks sweet.
  • + 3
 As far as i can tell the only CB components they put on were the wheels and i'd say its pretty safe to say that they may have chosen them because they are very nice looking wheels.
  • + 10
 There wheels have greatly been improved over the first generation most people have there minds stuck on. Ive been running mine for years problem free for years.
  • + 2
 I'm running CB Cobalt 3's on my Spesh Epic, they are a winner in my books... company definitely went 360 on design and construction (had to more or less). The way I ride, the iodine are probably better suited since cobalts are really taking a hammering, but still, they're holding up nicely.
  • + 1
 Running Cobalt 2s right now and love the hell out of them. I would rather have the engagement of the first gen, but I love the reliability of the new design. Are these not i9 made?
  • + 1
 I've been running Iodines on my bike for about a year, and have zero issues with them.
  • + 2
 Ouch that is like $4k US for a frame,
no, no, no
  • + 1
 just wandering, where in the video is the dirt, or the bike is designed to run indors????
  • + 3
 TOO MUCH WIRES!
  • + 1
 Nice bike. But the rear suspension will be battered by rocks, dust and mud.
  • + 2
 That's a seriously beautiful bike.
  • + 1
 Typo in the paragraph titled "Foxy Carbon."

"...through both the headntube [sic] when running..."
  • + 1
 please let me test it, We see for how long it lasts in one piece. Sweet ride though
  • + 1
 Is this bike going to be available in the USA anytime soon or is this Euro only?
  • + 2
 Few too many cables coming out the front
  • - 2
 Wouch, £2699 for a frame only???

We expect high pricing from the likes of Santa Cruz, but this is the same as the new Nomad.

Mondraker are anything but a perceived premium brand, yet they want to complete on pricing? Good luck with that.
  • + 1
 They're both made in Taiwan.
  • + 2
 Doesn't really matter where they are made, or who makes them - it's all about brand value perception.

Mondraker is fairly turd in the UK, hence why you see them being given away second hand, and spunked away every year by dealers. They can't sell them. SC by comparison because they are perceived as a premium, desirable brand go for a lot of money.

I might be somewhat biased anyway - the Dune I had was an utter piece of sh*t of a bike, and the distributor offered no help either. Lets hope they have made this bike so when it bottoms out the seat stay bridge doesn't smash into the seat tube, wrecking it. Still, I got to become an expert in changing bearings in the 12 months I owned the bike. It went through them like a fat bird goes through cake.
  • - 3
 Fairy muff. The marketing grates me but I find it interesting how easliy people are swayed by it. Like with Santa Cruz bikes and Audi cars. Both well made but shite to ride/drive.
  • + 1
 "they cant sell them" Definitely not true. Last year at the SDA's after Demo's the Summum was one of the commonest bikes being ridden they definitely sell.
  • + 0
 A DH bike isn't exactly a good representation of a brands sales. The DH market is a tiny percentage of the overall performance of the brand. But I guess that settles it, the shop I helped manage tried Mondraker for 3 years, and we were one of the better ones, but the warranty return rates were so high for such a small volume of sales, it wasn't worth the hassle in the end. The volume of discounted stock tells you all you need to know.
  • + 2
 I know they had a bad rep for falling apart at one stage but since they revised the bolts they don't seem to have an issues. My Summum (yeah I'm biased) is a year old and no loose or stuck bolts as of yet. Commencal had the same sort of rep at the same sort of time and the warranty claims we dealt with where silly for the percentage of sales we got from them and we dropped them but I would take any of Commencals current bikes now.
  • + 1
 The bolt issue was a good one back in the day,m, the fact it was all custom too made it a bit of a headache. I know they sorted that out, but they were still plagued with issues. We also did Yeti and they made them look reliable by comparison, which is no mean feat!

A lot of the Euro brands do/did seem to be plagued by similar issues, Commencal, well, they were a basket case at one point, Lapierre went through similar, yet they still managed to maintain fairly decent sales on a couple of the platforms (Zesty/Spicy). Mondraker never really got going though, I think it's a perception thing, people would rather buy a Commencal or Lapierre over them. Plus there arn't many places selling them these days.

Commencal's range looks great now, and the bikes ride really well, but it's going to be pretty suicidal to take them on, Living on the edge of whether Decade are going to dump stock into CRC and sell it at stocking prices is a big gamble. Plus Commencal selling direct at heavily discounted pricing on current stock. LBS's need to protect themselves as much as they can from this kind of market if they are to survive.
  • + 0
 If i payed that much for a bike i would kind of like it to look cool or at least a bit special and that bike is just boring buy a capra
  • + 0
 "Zero suspension system". Very enduro. Zero suspension is the new thing. Every pro racer needs 650b and zero travel lol
  • + 0
 Extremely nice bike, and quite normal prices. There will be one more , the Foxy Carbon, 12,490 kg at 3,699 euros.
  • + 1
 beautiful frame, but that mess off cables takes away from it.
  • + 1
 Alacant és important, pero no tant.
  • + 1
 Neat looking frame. Beautiful indeed. Well done Mondraker- at least once?
  • - 1
 It is possible to sell a bike for around $9.700 dollars with a frame and shock costing $4.000 thousands dollars thats is not a perfect bike?
  • + 2
 Very Beautiful I like
  • - 3
 Enduro bike with all that lockouts??? The frame should bob a lot when charging on the pedals. The photos of a person riding the bike are the worst ever. Shity moments and trail and light so bad... looks like hes riding a Huffy
  • + 1
 anyone knows if that stem is available in the US?
  • + 2
 If you're after a 30mm the Syntace Megaforce 2 is IMO even nicer than the Mondraker and crazy light. Niagra Cycle (no affiliation) is where I got mine.
  • + 1
 This is without doubt the best looking 2014 bike so far!
  • + 1
 Certainly the FIRST BIKE for ENDURO/AM that I would like to buy
  • + 1
 Dayum
  • - 2
 I think you meant to say 11,490g and 11,990g....if its 11,490kg and 11,900kg....this would be a record breaking weight for heaviest bike alive LOL Smile
  • + 10
 I thought the same thing at first, but Mondraker is Spanish. They use a comma instead of a period to indicate a decimal.
  • + 2
 In Europe there is a different way to refer to the number 1 tousand (1000). We use the point: one tousand is 1.000
In England and Usa the number one tousand is written with the comma: 1,000
So if you read 11,90kg that is equivalent to 11900g Wink
  • + 1
 aswell as if you know how the metric system works .....
  • + 1
 Hubba fkin Bubba
  • + 0
 the shox is gonna be covered with mud from where i'm riding...
  • + 0
 I guess you could say its pretty... Foxy
  • + 0
 Wow... just when I decided the s works enduro 29 was my dream bike.....
  • + 0
 Lowest standover height ever! And a hell of a sexy bike!
  • + 1
 Wow look at those reach numbers! An XL that is actually going to fit guys above 6'2"!
  • + 0
 What is the standover #? Btw, kona is 26"
  • + 0
 must be the first Mondraker that looks good...
  • - 2
 not even that one
  • + 0
 that extra large truly is extra large with that 6.67m top tube
  • + 1
 Looks foxy
  • + 0
 WHAT A NICEEEEEEE LOOKING BIKE!!!! HOPE IT RIDES AS IT LOOKS
  • - 1
 1173mm wheelbase on a size small?
As long as you don't have to do a switchback you should be OK, i think.....
  • - 3
 it is really sad, all the new bikes look the same. That is a perfect copy of a cayon bike. can someone come up with new bikes and I mean new bikes. Commencal canyon this all look the same
  • + 1
 You are not wrong (coming from an owner of a Canyon Spectral).... the common denominator is perhaps Fabian Barel... he worked for Mondraker before going to Canyon to help design bikes.......
  • + 2
 Looks aside, the bikes you are comparing all have totally different suspension systems.
  • - 1
 Suspension system is actually not that different. As an engineer I can tell it's the same. They just like to call it different names and what not. Marketing
  • + 3
 Apart from large differences in anti-squat, instant centres, and leverage rates...
  • + 2
 I guess it depends what you call "not that different". Personally I think a commencal's single pivot versus mondrakers short link pivot (zero suspension system, not a title I would pick) is significantly different, and I guarantee the suspension characteristics are quite different. But, they look similar so they must be, right?
  • + 2
 the mondrakers have looked like this for years though, the spectral only this year
  • + 1
 Formula 1
  • + 0
 This bike is hot sex.
  • + 0
 Looks flexy!
  • - 1
 a mondraker that looks nice?!
  • - 2
 Hello sexy. but why you no 26 inches?
  • + 9
 cus 26 ain't enduro any more...
  • + 2
 Neither is a 67.5 degree head angle.
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