First Look: DT Swiss' New 1501 & 1700 Spline Wheelsets

Jul 7, 2020 at 2:05
by Dan Roberts  
DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

Among many, DT Swiss are a go-to for components and fully built wheels. A staggering number of complete bikes currently come specced with their wheelsets and they cater to different price points with their 1501 Spline and M1700 wheelsets.

Never one to rest on their laurels, DT Swiss today debut the new versions of these two hugely popular wheelsets with upgrades from hub out to rim while still offering multiple options for riding genre and interfaces.

The biggest change is 1501 Spline ONE wheelsets seeing a step up in rim material from aluminium to carbon fibre. However, DT also looked to what their avid wheel building community was using and lined up their more affordable aluminium wheelsets with exactly what was being used on a day to day basis by the riding community. Their off the shelf 1700 Spline wheels are a no-brainer for many a rider all over the world on more of an aluminium budget.

In addition to these new physical products, and being riders themselves, they also set out to make your life as a customer easier with a new product ID system and carbon fibre rim warranty, making today's news not just as upgrades to the wheelsets themselves but also to the after-sales support.





DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

1501 Spline ONE

1501 Spline ONE Details


XRC 1501 Spline ONE
Wheel Size: 29"
Hub: 240 Ratchet EXP
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: Carbon fibre, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Competition Race spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1544g
Price: From $1,899 or €1,499


XMC 1501 Spline ONE
Wheel Size: 27.5" / 29"
Hub: 240 Ratchet EXP
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: Carbon fibre, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Competition Race spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1639g (29") or 1544g (27.5")
Price: From $1,899 or €1,499


EXC 1501 Spline ONE
Wheel Size: 27.5" / 29"
Hub: 240 Ratchet EXP
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: Carbon fibre, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock / 6-bolt
Spokes & Nipples: Competition Race spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1719g (29") or 1609g (27.5")
Price: From $1,899 or €1,499


The previous versions of 1501 Spline One wheels were a solid mainstay for a lot of riders and brands alike looking for high quality, dependable and reliable aluminium wheels. For their new 1501 Spline wheelsets, DT Swiss looked to upgrade the wheelsets with not only their new 240 hub but also change the rim material to carbon fibre to offer a more affordable, but still high performing wheelset compared to their top tire 1200 Spline wheels.

Freehub options in Shimano HG, Shimano Micro Spline and SRAM XD are available and easily exchanged without tools on the new 240 Ratchet EXP hubs. Maintenance is a doddle too.

DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets
DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

Keeping their existing naming culture for the wheelsets, there are XRC, XMC and EXC versions for cross country, all mountain and enduro respectively.

The XRC rim now grows to a 30mm inner width for better tyre support and possibility to run a little lower pressure. The XMC rim has a focus on low weight but also still being strong and robust for all day adventures and is in ASTM Category 4. Finally, the EXC rim has its main focus on impact resistance, for the upped aggression of enduro riding, but still with one eye on having a low weight with DT Swiss cleverly considering their wheels as part of the whole bike system, knowing the rear wheel's weight impact on the suspension performance.

All the 1501 Spline ONE wheels use their Competition Race spokes, balancing out the stiffer carbon fibre rim with the thinner double butted spokes going from 2.0mm - 1.6mm - 2.0mm. Spokes are straight pull front and rear.

At their centre, all the wheels use the latest 240 Ratchet EXP hubs with 36T as standard. For DT Swiss, this provides the best balance of pickup for the least possible suspension interference. There is, of course, the option to change to 54T with the aftermarket kit, if that is your thing.

An interesting point is that the XRC and XMC wheels are available with centre lock only while the EXC adds a 6-bolt option, acknowledging that the more aggressive riders out there tend to be using larger rotors and hammering the brakes with a little more vigour. Max rotor size is a whopping 230mm.

DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets
DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

The new wheelsets come with the lighter aluminium tubeless valves with the plastic nut and round rubber head that mitigates any need for aligning it in the rim profile.

Compared to the previous versions of the 1501 Spline wheels there is around a 180g drop in weight, depending on the model, and the XMC and EXC virions have 27.5" and 29" options with the cross country XRC version available in only 29".

The new 1501 Spline ONE wheels offer an incredible package of carbon performance, weight and price for the rider wanting a composite set of wheels. And with the new Fair-Share warranty policy there is even some added peace of mind for the riders still a bit on the fence with the composite rim material.





DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

1700 Spline

1700 Spline Details


XR 1700 Spline
Wheel Size: 29"
Hub: 350
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: XR 391 aluminium, 25mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Competition spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1672g
Price: From $885.90 or €698.80


XM 1700 Spline
Wheel Size: 27.5" / 29"
Hub: 350
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: XM 481 aluminium, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Competition spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1748g
Price: From $885.90 or €698.80


EX 1700 Spline
Wheel Size: 27.5" / 29"
Hub: 350
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110mm front & 12 / 148 rear
Rim: EX 511 aluminium, 30mm
Brake Mount: Centre lock / 6-bolt
Spokes & Nipples: Competition spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminium nipples, PHR washers
Weight: From 1878g
Price: From $885.90 or €698.80


With the 1501 Spline ONE wheels moving up a rung in the ladder, so to do the 1700 Spline wheels.

The previous M1700 wheels were also a mainstay on many full built bikes, but in addition to that, many budding wheel builders or riders wanting to spec their own individual components for their wheel build often looked to DT Swiss for their hubs, spokes and rims.

The new 1700 Spline wheels take on the moniker of "What Would You Build?", citing that fact that many riders chose to mate the 350 hubs to one of their wide aluminium rims with Competition spokes. I too am one of those riders, who rarely even posed the question of which components to use for a wheel build, instead going straight for the DT Swiss spoke calculator and ordering everything from the reputable Swiss brand. Call me biased, but there's a method behind my madness.

DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets
DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

So, for the new 1700 Spline wheels, DT Swiss matched exactly their observations and the wheels come with the new 350 hubs front and rear which use a lot of features from the previous generation 240, like the same end caps and ratchet parts. The 1700 Spline wheels come specced with lightweight 36T SL ratchet.

For the XR and XM version there is the centre lock brake option and then for the EX version you have the choice of centre lock or 6-bolt. Freehub options are available for Shimano HG, Shimano Micro Spline and SRAM XD.

The 1700 Spline wheels see the same designation for the different disciplines, with the cross-country set using the XR 391 aluminium rim, the all-mountain set using the XM 481 rim and the enduro set using the EX 511 rim. The XM 481 and EX 511 rims coming with an inner width of 30mm and the XR 391 rim with 25mm.

DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets
DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

All wheels use Competition spokes that are double butted from 2.0mm - 1.8mm - 2.0mm. These cold forged spokes are definitely a go-to for many wheel builders.

The cherry on the cake is that all the wheelsets from DT, including the new 1700 and 1501 Spline ones, are completely hand-built either in Switzerland, Poland, Asia or America. Having built my own wheels before I can attest to the quality of their build and still chin scratch as to how they get the tensions that little bit higher and much more consistent with the least run out. I guess I need more practice.

The new 1700 Spline wheels then seek to be a no fuss option for the riders looking for a brilliant balance of aluminium performance, weight and cost.





DT Swiss 1501 Spline ONE 1700 Spline Wheelsets

DT Swiss ID

With the ever-growing catalogue of parts, DT Swiss looked to make it easier for their customers with after sales information. DT Swiss ID is a product support tool for shops, riders and everyone who uses DT Swiss products from MY21 onwards.

Live from the today, products now come with a QR code, in the case of the wheelsets it's on the rim. Scanning it through the web page returns all relevant user manuals, spare parts and possible conversion and upgrade parts applicable to your product.

If you don't have a QR code, as your product is a little older, then the system can quickly narrow you down to your product with filters, and return all the same useful information. This works on all products dating back to 2017.





Fair-Share Warranty

From the outside, applying a warranty to a product might seem like an easy task, especially with all the talk of warranty in the carbon fibre wheel market at the moment. But the reality couldn't be further from this.

DT Swiss took the time to ensure a global, straightforward and helpful warranty for all carbon fibre wheels that does more than just shout, but rather has everything in place to help the customer out if they do encounter a problem, getting them back riding as fast as possible wherever they are in the world. Step one was humbly accepting that no product is indestructible and that sometimes crashes, riding errors or punctures can damage your carbon wheel enough to render it in need of more than just some TLC.

The Fair-Share policy really focusses on getting you rolling again if you encounter a serious problem with your carbon fibre rim while out riding, and covers the original owner for 10 year after the date of purchase. Conscious to avoid long-winded product registration for times when you're in need, you only need the original sales receipt to be able to make a claim.

The broken rim will be replaced, the wheel rebuilt at the closest available DT Swiss service centre and shipped for the same 249 price no matter where you are in the world.

This Fair-Share policy is in place for all carbon fibre rims from DT Swiss, be that mountain bike, road or gravel from model year 2020 and later which were purchased after the 1st January 2020.

The new Fair-Share warranty policy is in addition to the standard 2-year warranty on DT Swiss products and also in addition to the lifetime warranty for the original verified owner on all material and workmanship defects.






Both wheelsets see a step up in components compared to the previous versions and given our experience with the individual components so far, this should also translate to a step up in performance.

We've got a set of the EXC 1501 Spline ONE and EX 1700 Spline wheels for test already fitted with a set of control tyres, so look out for a full review on each set and perhaps more interesting a comparison between the two different types of wheel material and build components. But so far the quality out of the box is unmistakably as high as all other DT Swiss wheels, no matter price point and they were as simple as it gets to mount tyres, with no need for tyre levers on the Schwalbe Magic Mary Super Gravity tyres and only a few gentle pushes on a track pump making them seat the beads.

Our set of 29" EXC 1501 Spline ONEs came in at 1729g with the tubeless tape and valve plus the SRAM freehub. The 29" EXC 1700 Splines came in at 2023g with the same setup.

First ride impressions are also just as positive, with both wheels currently performing impeccably, but I'll continue to put in the miles with frequent back to back swaps to learn more about the subtle differences in feel and performance between the two wheelsets.




Visit the 1501 Spline ONE and 1700 Spline landing pages for more infromation.




159 Comments

  • 63 11
 250 for crash replacement? Hard to justify buying this when other companies offer free lifetime crash replacement.
  • 14 0
 What are the other rim manufacturers warranty process? Do they just send you a new rim, or do they cover spokes, nipples and labor too? Genuine question as I have no idea and those extra costs would bring the real warranty replacement cost a lot closer together.
  • 13 0
 Which brands offer the free replacements under crash replacement for life?
  • 18 0
 @falkyn: Santa cruz
  • 18 0
 @falkyn: Santa Cruz and We Are One are the two I'm aware of.

@maxyedor I know We Are One sends you a rim for the cost of shipping $30 in North America, you're on your own to build it. I believe Santa Cruz is the same, but I'm not sure.
  • 17 0
 I’m not sure about a lifetime crash replacement but Ibis just fully replaced my carbon rim all they wanted was an original receipt and shipped the wheel back at a cost of $45.00 Can. I thinks that’s amazing considering it was my fault That I smashed my rim. I’m sold forever..
  • 2 0
 @maxyedor: Santa Cruz was offering a full build but I think it is now a full build for the first crash replacement, after that they replace the rim but you need to handle the rebuild (including spokes and what not)
  • 1 0
 @tgent: Hunt as well on all their carbon rims, and they’ll do the work on them, you just need to cover shipping both directions
  • 3 1
 @falkyn: e*thirteen. Within 1 year for a new wheel and the first failure will send out a whole new replacement wheel. Beyond 1 year it is a lifetime warranty for the first owner. Even if you do something absent minded like run it over with your car or melt it with your exhaust. It's replaced at no charge.
  • 14 10
 @ckcost: I'd rather have the the owner who runs their car over their wheels pay for the replacement than that the costs is shared over the purchase price. So if all idiots who expect to be stupid but still want a free replacement please by all means get e*thirteen, RaceFace or whoever else caters to those "warranty enthusiasts", it keeps them away from DT. Which is nice. Implies that if you buy DT, you're actually paying for the product.
  • 5 0
 @vinay: But DT Swiss is more expensive than the others...
  • 13 0
 I recently warrantied a Santa Cruz Reserve wheel I cracked and they had a new wheel to me within a few days. No charge for shipping, no rebuilding or anything. I just returned the cracked wheel in their packaging with the included shipping label. Super easy and fast process.
  • 5 1
 @ckcost: Not my from my experience. My son damaged a stock e13 rim on his Capra on the second ride. Neither YT or e13 were interested. Immediately upgraded to Hope Fortus rather than pay what they were asking for a crash replacement (he hadn't even crashed). Big difference in performance as well as durability.
  • 1 2
 @vinay: I think the production cost of carbon rims is quite low. There is the initial investment on the molds, but making each additional rim is probably a little fraction of the selling price. So it doesn't make a big difference.
  • 3 0
 @maxyedor: Reynolds returns entire new wheel, super fast, no fuss.
  • 6 0
 DT Swiss will absolutely be around for all permutations of 'lifetime'.
  • 2 0
 @falkyn: Wheelworks.
  • 4 0
 @maxyedor: I cracked a Santa Cruz rim twice and both times dropped my broken wheel off at my local bike shop, and two days later I had a fully rebuilt wheel for free. Granted I live near Santa Cruz, but they have been really good 0 cost for me personally. Plus they almost challenge you to try and destroy their rims.
  • 13 0
 @Niseach1: Our carbon rim warranty policy is outlined here: support.ethirteen.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000645352 As long as you are the original owner, it is covered. Ill send you a DM to see what is going on.
  • 4 0
 @falkyn: ethirteen. If you have a crash within one year after the purchase they send you a complete new wheel and you send back the old wheel. After one year but for life they will send you a rim and you are responsible for labor.
  • 1 0
 @falkyn: + Trek
  • 4 1
 @falkyn: Santa Cruz, we are one, atomik carbon (is what I run)

E13 is a limited replacement. So a new wheel within the first year, and a new rim after that.

Of course you need to be the original owner.

I think ENVE is still the worst in terms of price and warranty.
  • 2 1
 I just wanted to point out that the rims with lifetime warranties are on the heavier end of the spectrum. This i30 xrc rim is quite a bit lighter than a wr1 union or reserve 30. That's the trade-off
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: Product specific tooling is always relatively expensive compared to the product. Extrusion dies for aluminium extrusion may be relatively cheap (unlike those for plastic extrusion) but molds for injection molding, drop forging etc are definitely expensive and require a good bit of design to do it properly. But the process itself is pretty automatic and requires little manual labour and trained workmanship. In the bicycle scene, Shimano is probably the drop forging expert, Magura the injection molding expert. None of these companies have a "drive your car over our product and we'll replace it for free" policy. The production of carbon rims still requires a good bit of trained manual labour so it can't be that cheap. To offer this kind of replacement policy, they definitely have to raise their prices somewhat.

I recall Planet X (back when they were a hardcore trials, dirt jump and street brand) also had a "wreck it and we'll replace it for free" policy. It turned out some customers clearly intentionally destroyed their frames in ways unrelated to riding bikes (like backing their cars over a component) so they pointed that out and changed their policy to "get a new component for half the price". Still a good deal but at least it keeps the greedy fools away.
  • 2 0
 @falkyn: sixth element
  • 2 0
 @Happypanda1337:

Enve have lifetime warranty, i have always had great turn around on enve rims so no idea why you would think it is bad?
  • 1 0
 @inonyme: i believe trek is lifetime warranty against defects, 2 year you break it we replace it
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: well that's not really comparable. You need to compare wheels with same purpose, which would be exc in case of union and reserve. Idk about reserve, but union with dt 240 will come very close in weight. Since WAO are using 32 holes and sapim race spokes, if you'd have them built exactly like th exc, they might even come lighter
  • 2 1
 @christiaan: I think the fact you elude to having to claim on the warrenty more than once a cause for concern.
  • 1 0
 @netracer-enduro: I always thought warranty against defects being limited was a bit weird. If it is a production defect, a company needs to sort that out. Of course, just like it is currently, within the first short while (a couple of months iirc) it is up to the seller to prove that the product was perfect at the time it was sold. After that, it is up to the consumer to prove that the product was faulty from the start. This could for instance be (outside the context of wheels) because there is a void in the casting where the crack started, a wire simply hasn't been soldered or something else. For a company to say "yeah indeed that's a fault on our part but you're too late reporting it" is just off. I'm only talking about production defects. Of course a design mistake is an error from their side too, but it would simply be impossible for a manufacturer to fix all affected products. They often still do a voluntary recall, but it is not required.

@endorium: Kind of depends on whether it was crash replacement or replacement of a faulty product.
  • 2 0
 @ondreja: fair enough, but we are one does not have a lightweight xc option that is comparable to the xrc1501
  • 1 0
 @falkyn: Trek/Bontrager
  • 1 0
 Gonna throw my hat in here for another no cost, no questions asked full wheel replacement from Santa Cruz. They even sent me a new sticker sheet to maintain the matchy matchy.
  • 1 0
 So it sounds like the actual cost of warranty replacement on a WaO is somewhere between half and the same as DT depending on how bad the failure is (can it be relaced with the existing spokes or not), but Santa Cruz has an absolutely phenomenal warranty. I'd have expected that they take your old wheel back, and lace the hub to a new rim, not that they'd send you a new hub as part of the warranty wheel, that's damn impressive, especially if your wheels are built on i9 or King hubs.
  • 2 0
 @Niseach1: that really surprises me. I've dealt with eThirteen directly in the past over a couple of warranty issues, one of which was a rear wheel and hub, and they went well above and beyond what I expected to ensure I was riding again quickly and at no cost to me whatsoever. They even upgraded a part at no charge. They're also ridiculously friendly.
  • 1 1
 @Niseach1: not the first time I have heard this with eThirteen. Kinda turned me off buying a set of their wheels.
  • 1 0
 @indeedfox: Same here.
  • 35 1
 Queue the We Are One comments in 3... 2... 1...
  • 11 1
 This new is a win for complete bike sales not aftermarket. WAO aren't spec as OEM, DT Swiss are. If you buy a bike with the 1501s then you get killer carbon wheels with a 2 year warranty then the $250 replacement kicks in. If you're shopping for aftermarket carbon then get WAO, Nobel or Reserves.
  • 1 0
 @manuni88: It sounds like even within the first 2 years, you'll still have to pay $250 to have the wheel rebuilt...
  • 7 0
 Its also a win for mountain bikers who don’t live on pinkbike. There are a lot of consumers who know DT Swiss is a good wheel brand (And they aren’t wrong) and they want carbon wheels.

It sounds crazy to the rest of us, but plenty of riders will just pick the one from the brand they’ve heard of
  • 2 1
 @tgent: From there website "The warranty requires that the product has been used properly and that the maximum system weight has not been exceeded." I'm interpreting that the $250 for a replacement within the first two years would be in forced if more along the lines of gross negligence, not if you hit a rock racing enduro on the EXC.

That being said, with other verbiage from there website, I'd assume they would deny repeat offenders claiming they aren't using the product properly.
  • 15 0
 Overall a bummer that the 1501 is moving to carbon. It was one of the most solid prebuilt aluminum wheel. Burly and reliable. My 1701 on the other hand has made from some kind of horrible ductile aluminum. Even point at a rock with that wheel and it would dent or deform. Even with a DH casing tire and Cush Core.
  • 18 0
 The new 1700 is the new budget ex1501. Same rim just 350 hub vs 240 hub.
  • 8 0
 The new 1700's are getting the same rim as the Ally Spline 1's, same spokes as well so in theory they'll be just a tough, just with 350 hubs.
  • 2 0
 Same with my older set but yeah these new ones are built with either the xm or ex rims which are tough as hell. I wonder what the price will be in Canadian monies as it looks like it will be similar to have your local bike shop build one up from scratch. Benefit of that is not having to deal with straight pull uubs. I just had a 350 rear hub built up with ex rims for 750 bucks.
  • 3 0
 Agreed on the 1700 rim. Mine are heavily dinged. I don't care about the looks but I do care about the ability to hold tubeless which is increasingly degraded
  • 7 0
 @leelau: Correct, the 1700 's are made out of a rare grade of cheesium that has more in common with a Camembert or brie than something hard.
  • 1 0
 is that soft material the one they use for m462 rims?
  • 2 0
 The old 1700 have the E rims the 512 and 532 the 1501 had EX rim.
  • 2 0
 @mfoga: cost is appropriate too. The 1501 were about 1600 for the set. Now you can get just as bonb proof a wheelset for about half the cost and only a small weight penalty.
  • 1 0
 @mfoga: then yes, I guess. Bummer, I thought the only difference were the eyelets and sleeves and was about to buy a pair.
  • 2 0
 @cooperquinn-wy: I'll probably pick up some Flow or Arch MK rims and lace them up to my old DT M1700 wheels as a rainy day thing to do so as to have a spare. I've had good luck with the Stans rims running them with the same PSI riding the same way and they're quite a bit less expensive. Also they're close to the same ERD and the DT spokes are actually quite good so I feel they can be re-used
  • 3 0
 Turning out that hopefully the new EX1700 will be a nice new alloy option then. I'll still lament the demise of the alloy 1501 but the price for the new EX1700 is not bad and with EX511 rim should be durable.
  • 3 0
 @leelau: you could just pick up a set of XM 481 rims and reuse the spokes if there not damaged. They're the same diameter, so use the same spoke length.
  • 2 0
 @drpheta: thanks! Good tip
  • 1 0
 @leelau: EDIT: if they're not damaged.

Another nice thing is the DT rims come with Pro Lock nipples and washers.
  • 3 0
 @leelau: I smashed my ex471 rim hard enough off a triangle shaped rock to put 2 punctures in the tire and pull it right off the bead. Barely a ding in the rim. Highly recommend the ex rims for bomb proof.
  • 1 0
 The new 1700 is essentially the same as the old 1501, for a better price. The only noteworthy difference is the bearings and the star ratchet, both of which can easily be upgraded.
  • 1 0
 My 1501 had to live a hard life as they had been used for multiple Enduro races, Magavalances and park riding. I went through two frames and the wheels are still more than fine (except some scratches).

The 1501 is my best set of wheels I ever had and I am more than glad they offer the same quality for less now - the 350 hubs are in reality quite similar to the 240 hubs ... so I am in for a new set of these.

Carbon ... well I guess it makes sense but please give me matching graphics like enve does otherwise no one will see it when I ride it to my local barista...
  • 2 0
 Yup. My 1700's got dinged a ton as well. Lasted a season before I got rid of them and moved to e13 carbon hoops...Year and a half in with zero issues so I'm happy. Lifetime warranty is nice piece of mind too if anything ever happens to them.
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: have you had issues with the M462? I just built one up but haven't had a chance to use it yet
  • 2 0
 @xeren: I've run the M1700 wheels several times. Purchased them as take off sets. Dented a couple, but nothing catastrophic. Just straighten the dent gently with Knipex or similar pliers.

I put the DT M series rims on par with the Raceface Arc rims in terms of strength.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: interesting, how would you compare them to DT Swiss XM rims? I'm a lighter rider and have never had an issue with XM's, this is my first M rim
  • 1 0
 @xeren: I haven't tried them. I was just considering them to replace my acual rims, but I might go for xm421, they're not that much more expensive.
  • 3 0
 @xeren: The M slightly heavier and softer. XM rims are stronger and lighter. Maybe the E series rims as strong as the XM, but it's savings for the weight penalty to get E series rims.

If you're on a budget and can land a take off set of M1700 rims, go for it. However, I couldn't justify saving 20 bucks per rim and not get an XM or EX wheel (note the EX wheel is gonna be heavier, but burlier).

I'm 155lbs to 160lbs kitted, and I've dented M1700 rims in the past. Nothing nasty but I'm a pretty fluid rider in the chunk, but still manage to strike a baby head here or there. XMs have held up, but Ms have not.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: dang, good to know. I typically buy XM rims and keep buying them because they never fail me, but the M rim was $50 cheaper so i figured i would give it a shot. we'll see how it holds up!
  • 12 0
 "The broken rim will be replaced, the wheel rebuilt at the closest available DT Swiss service centre and shipped for the same 249 price no matter where you are in the world."

249 what's? USD, Pounds Sterling or 249 bitcoins Smile
  • 63 0
 249 money, obviously
  • 1 1
 Whatever your local currency is
  • 14 0
 @clink83: We'll I'm glad to be a Canadian
  • 43 3
 @Shred-BC: The first time being a Canadian ever paid off. Well except for having affordable universal healthcare, employment insurance, public pensions, affordable education, and public officials who aren't huge pieces of shit...
  • 3 35
flag JDub713 (Jul 7, 2020 at 11:28) (Below Threshold)
 @tgent: Then move there already.
  • 10 0
 @clink83: Seriously? That's awesome. 249HUF is 0.80 USD.
  • 8 0
 Those 1700s look like great wheels. Though I may be biased given that I just built a wheelset of EX511 rims on DT350 hubs. More proof that I'm a basic bitch. Though my one gripe is that I wish DT would stop pushing straight-pull 28-spoke so much. I imagine it's a decision on what works best from an automated building process and not necessarily what's best for the end-user. It's a bit nit-picky, I know, but the lack of 32 spoke J-bend options is what has led me to build my own wheels as opposed to going the pre-built route in the past.
  • 3 0
 Same. But that's okay too if you have a good shop Smile
  • 2 0
 Not sure how much of the wheel building process at DT Swiss is automated (there is definitely a good bit of manual labor involved over there) but J-bent spokes can definitely be used in wheel building machines. Heck, most wheels on cheaper bikes are machine built too and always work with J-bend spokes.
  • 2 0
 I’m a huge fan of DT, been riding the hubs trouble free for 20+ years. The H1700 wheels were a selling point on my new bike. Overall I’ve been satisfied until the alloy spoke nipples started twisting to where I can’t true the wheel. Then I broke a couple spokes at the threads, which meant replacing the spoke and nipple with the broken off threads in it. Which means the mess of taking off the tubeless tire, then removing the taped-on rim strip which is not reusable. Then off to the shop for spokes, but oh wait it’s a special triple butted straight pull spoke that no shop has. The head is larger than normal so not just any straight pull will do. Couldn’t find it on the interwebs either. The shop has been back and forth with DT trying to figure out the right spoke. It’s been two weeks and the wheel still is not rideable. I borrowed my trusty 240 wheel with J-spokes so I can still ride. Turns out the 32-spoke 240 wheel is noticeably stiffer than the H1700’s. It sure would suck to be on a biking vacation and not be able to get a spoke from a shop.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Good call, you're totally right. I went and watched a video on the process at DT and all it really seems to do is simplify the lacing by allowing all spokes to be installed before adding the rim - they don't flop into each other or force you to do one row at a time. So builders can completely separate those two steps. How much that helps is beyond me Smile
  • 1 0
 I am especially surprised they went for straight pull since they are claiming they followed what people would use if they build their own wheels. Quite sure J-bend is still a wheel builder's favorite.
  • 6 0
 One of the most enjoyable areas of bike building that I've taught myself is wheel building. Been building carbon wheelsets for over 6 years now with great results (little secret, they true up easier than aluminum). I just cringe when I see these wheel prices when I can build a set for $800 to $1000. It's not as difficult as people think. Plus, with the money you save, you can buy that Park professional wheel stand.
  • 3 1
 I’m able to do it, but I fvckin’ hate it. I’d just rather be riding. People say it’s meditative, well, riding is too!
  • 2 0
 Just take your time. If you're impatient, just limit it to one hour a day. Who cares if it takes a week to build your first wheel? There is no rush. I think I built my first wheel in probably three hours or so, also to double check my steps and just take small steps. I did ride that rear wheel at the Megavalanche though and it survived, so it wasn't all that bad Wink . I prefer to build with DT Alpine III spokes though. They're a bit thicker at the bend and they just never break. I think for a complete wheel it adds about 9g of weight, near the hub! I've built good wheels with Competition spokes too (because my local bike shop didn't stock Alpine III anymore) but to be honest, never saw the point. So when I discovered I could buy Alpine III spokes over the internet, I'm back building with those.
  • 7 0
 Why should I even get the xr/xm/ex 1700 one when I can have a custom built wheelset with the exact same components for less money?
  • 9 3
 To be fair, their factory built wheels have been impressive compared to most wheel builders. They arrive true and evenly tensioned, and remain that way for thousands of miles.

I've had wheels from Specialized, Santa Cruz, Nobl, and an online custom wheel builder that have either arrived poorly trued/tensioned, or have needed significant work after a few rides.
  • 8 1
 A couple of counter points here. First, ALL DT swiss wheels, OEM & aftermarket are hand built at an very high quality. I think the bigger news for the 1700 is for complete bike sales, not aftermarket.

Second, I'd argue that a DT wheel will be a higher build quality then your local shop unless they have a wheel specialist, and they are the person who actually builds the wheel.

Also, if you look at a custom wheel by Coloradocyclist with a XM481 with a 350 hub its cheaper then the XM 1700 but CC specs it with 20g spokes, brass nipples, and 18T ratchet. If you upgrade it to match the spoke, nipples, and 36T ratchet the custom wheel is just a little bit more expensive. Yes Hope/DT will still be cheaper but not everybody wants hope hubs.
  • 4 3
 @DaneL: Crashtor said "custom" not from a mass-produced factory vendor. I had a set of XM481 + DT350 wheels built for $550 about five years ago and they've been 100% trouble free. DT Swiss is asking $890 for the same thing plus you're saddled with that garbage centerlock hub that weighs more (assuming 6-bolt adapters) and has poorer spoke bracing angles.

It's a valid question.
  • 4 0
 Because some people don’t know how to or don’t want to deal with the hassle of picking compatible hub/spoke/rim combinations, don’t know a good builder or don’t want to try themselves. I built my 350/XM481/EX511 three years ago; it’s been solid and I enjoyed the building and money saved, but I’m not everyone. €700 for the EX1700 prebuilt is a fair price compared to other brands and you’d be very happy if that came specced on a bike build.
  • 5 10
flag deadhorse13 Plus (Jul 7, 2020 at 11:32) (Below Threshold)
 @Fuzzylog1c: centerlock sucks!
  • 6 0
 @Fuzzylog1c: prices of everything have gone up significantly in the last 5 years. Might want to check those prices again now.
  • 1 0
 @manuni88: at least you can hope for a better hub when you have hope... not saying that hope hubs are bad... but they are not as stressfree as DTs
  • 5 0
 So 200,- for a set of (old) 350 hubs, 140,- for the rims.. that leaves 358,- for spokes, nipples and lacing them + the 36 ratchet upgrade..
You can build the same wheels with 240 EXP hubs and still be cheaper.. hmm, I don't get those wheelset pricings.
  • 1 0
 Bought an E1700 29boost wheelset at RCZ for 180€, changed the rims for EX (100€), sold the old rims for 50€ - brand new EX1700 for 230€ and some work.

These wheelsets are way overpriced for a product that comes from "somewhere" in the world, and has to be replaced every other year (yes EX rims do wear out, at least in the rear).
  • 3 0
 I realize this release is more about the rims, but I recently had a wheel built up with the new style ratchet 350 hub and have been quite impressed. I run it on a mountain cargo bike that carries two kids and two bikes up the hill! I have beaten the hell out of it running a 28T front and 46T rear so running it under lots of torque for long durations up ~300m climbs. I stripped the ratchet ring on my old 350 pawled hub but this one's still ticking. Only complaint I have is that the POE is a bit crummy... and I'm used to my Hope on my mountain bike. But this hub can take a real beating! Good job DT Swiss.
  • 1 0
 The 350 has never been a pawled hub (are you thinking 370?) and I don't think there is a new style (exp) ratchet 350 hub yet... hopefully never
  • 1 0
 I think you can now use different ratchet rings inside DT hubs. Finer for more POE and shorter service intervals, coarser for the opposite. I bought the 350 hybrid hub recently, will find time to lace it in the next few weeks. I went for the hybrid (E-bike specific) not because I ride an e-bike, but because it is supposedly stronger and I wanted a steel freehub body. I mostly used hubs with steel freehub bodies and the few times I had one with an aluminium body, I got annoyed that it is so hard to swap cassette parts as they eat into the body. Never had this issue with steel freehubs. So I think I'll be happy with the "hybrid" hub. It is slightly heavier than the regular 350 but not by much. And I ride a hardtail so unsprung weight isn't that much of an issue.

But yeah, if you want more POE you can probably swap out the ratchet. Service interval would increase slightly but I can't imagine that being too much of an issue considering how easy these are to service.
  • 1 0
 You can change the ratchet rings for a 32 (DT 240 and Hope equivalent) or a 54 (angry bees).
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: Maybe it was a 370. it didn't last very long after I built up the bike. And yes the new one is a ratchet style. It says right on the website and this was the only reason I agreed to put another DT on this build. Why are you so against the ratchet system?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Thanks for the tips. I wasn't aware of the hybrid version. Yes I'll swap out the ratchet ring and freehub on my next cassette change... I too have the same issue with cassettes digging into the freehub body. Super expensive to change out drivetrains. With the cost of cassettes and freehub bodies these days I'm saving my coin for a pinion hardtail with belt drive for my mountain bike... then I can run a single speed hub and get away from ridiculously expensive dinner plates on my rear wheel!
  • 1 0
 @derekr: I'm not against the ratchet system at all. I own 7 DT star ratchet rear hubs. They've been using that ratchet system in 180/240/350/440 hubs for nearly 2 decades and it's great. Yes, it's much more durable than the 370 pawled hubs. I think the confusion is coming from your u saying the newer ratchet system... they just released a newer "exp" version of the 180 and 240 hubs which have some supposed weight and stiffness benefits but I'm skeptical about the long-term serviceability, so until that concern is alleviated I would prefer that they don't update the 350 series to the exp internals so that we still have the option of purchasing hubs with the older style internals. And there's no reason to swap the freehub for steel if you're using XD or microspline cassettes, and even with hg I can deal with the gouging but I'm not super heavy.
  • 1 1
 @thegoodflow: Thanks for educating me on DT hubs! Sounds like you have a lot of experience with them. Have you used other hubs for comparison? ie, I9, Hope, Onyx etc.

As far as shimano style freehub bodies, the cost of the freehub plus the Shimano drive cassette is the same as a microspline or XD drive cassette so I choose to get a new freehub and cassette. I've also had issues with steel freehub bodies. The prices really frustrate me and chains and derailleurs are fragile and have left me stranded many times.

Now that I ride a lot with my young family and am getting into bikepacking, I see a lot of benefits to a pinion system; the cost of a pinion alone is equivalent to ~4 drivetrain swap-outs if you don't include all the other broken stuff along the way. That added with the reliability (hopefully) and significant reduced maintenance seems like a good choice for me.

Thanks!
  • 1 1
 @derekr: My current wheelset is from Syntace so runs on Syntace MX hubs. Hubs are good but as the cassette eats into the body it annoys me a little when I want to swap rings. I use 10sp Shimano Deore XT cassettes and typically only replace the sprockets that are worn. They aren't that expensive individually and the smaller rings get the heaviest beating. My frame doesn't accept a bigger front ring and even though I'm not particularly heavy, I usually stand when I ride so I apply a lot of torque at a lower cadence. Standing just feels more fun to me but this is the consequence. Syntace does have a body with steel splines so I may get one of these eventually. Syntace actually works with a kind of star ratchet too, similar to what DT uses. It is pretty noisy but works well. Unlike DT, you'll need oil to lube these though, still have to do that someday. Not particularly difficult but it feels odd that you have to buy individual syringes for a single service whereas for DT you just buy a jar of grease. So servicing a DT hub is probably much cheaper and as such, the cost of ownership is lower.

Before I got this frame I also heavily considered Pinion. Initially the Portus Krowd Karl, later the Olsen bike, later asked BTR if they could do it, eventually ended up with a BTR with a regular drivetrain Wink . But for bikepacking, internal gearing definitely takes away the headaches. Back in the days I worked in a bikeshop and we built loads of bike for people traveling to far away places, crossing the Himalaya etc. Pinion wasn't a thing back then but they almost exclusively used Rohloff hubs. If you're not too worried about unsprung weight, this may be an option for you too. Advantage may be that you have more frames you can choose from. Disadvantage may be that if you break a rim, you'll need to lace up a new one before you can continue. If you've practiced this a little, it really isn't too much of a deal. You more likely snap a spoke at worst and there are some good tricks to fix that on the fly without having to take the wheel apart or even detension the other spokes to squeeze the new one in (and then true it again). Both Pinion and Rohloff can work with both chain as well as belt. Belt surely must be amazing when it works, I just wouldn't know how to fix it should it ever break whereas a chain is easily "patched" (if you carry the cut-offs from when you initially installed it).

But I digress Wink . Cheers!
  • 5 0
 Loving the new stealth decals. Had a hard time liking the old red and white ones.
  • 6 0
 I'm sure the execs at DT Swiss are like "We are Who?" carry on..
  • 9 0
 well, since DT Swiss is a European company and "We are One" has pretty much zero presence in the EU market, they are kinda right... for now
  • 11 5
 "Maintenance is a doddle too."

WTF does that mean?
  • 21 0
 dod·dle
/ˈdädl/
Learn to pronounce
noun INFORMAL•BRITISH
a very easy task.
"this printer is a doddle to set up and use"
  • 12 0
 @jeremiahwas: Never heard this term in my life. I will be sprinkling it into my vocabulary very doddley from now on
  • 7 0
 @stumphumper92: I don't think that word means what you think it means.
  • 2 0
 Sad to see the aluminum 1501 series go, but the switching to 350 hubs and dropping the price ~$320 isn't a bad trade-off. Also, I'm not sure how I feel about the EXP hubs; I don't want to (attempt to) remove that drive ring just to switch ratchets.
  • 5 0
 DT may not have the best in class engagement but it’s my go to for its durability, light weight and ease of maintenance.
  • 1 0
 I honestly can't even ride without 6.6 degree engagement
  • 7 1
 at least they brought back 6 bolts
  • 9 7
 only on some of them. Centerlock sucks!
  • 6 3
 @deadhorse13: Can you elaborate on the statement "Centerlock sucks"?
Full time bike mechanic here and i haven't heard anyone complain about the Centerlock rotor system.
I would like to know why you have such a harsh opinion.
thanks
  • 5 0
 @eightysix: because there is not much option for discs and you can't do anything if something happens on the trail
  • 3 2
 @deadhorse13: I much prefer Centrelock.
  • 2 1
 @Noeserd: you can still run 6 bolt via the supplied adaptors, and if you break a rotor on a ride, unless you’ve packed a spare you’re screwed regardless of mounting type. Plenty CL rotor options from the bigger brands, but you’re not limited to them - you can run your 6 bolt rotors but mount them in a more sensible way.
  • 4 1
 @eightysix: Most of the Centerlock interfaces I've ever seen have developed a play.
  • 1 0
 I also am confused why they decided to go with centerlock only.. doesnt that limit they access to oem builds which are mostly SRAM? Is it something they promissed in return for microspline licence? Hmmm...
  • 3 1
 @eightysix: Im a full time bike mechanic that also happens to own a bike store, haha. i have dt swiss wheels with 350 centerlock hubs that came on a bike that i am currently riding, the bike has 12 rides on it. there is probably 10mm,i didnt get digital calipersout and measure, of play front to rear in the centerlock hub shell. i see it in tons of centerlock wheels. if i had a dollar for everytime someone came in with a centerlock wheel thinking their brake or hub had gone bad because of the amount of play front to rear that centerlock hubs have in them that 6bolt hubs dont have, then i could almost afford to sell Yeti in our store!

2. also a lot of bikes that come with centerlock rotors with come with different caps front to rear wheel, i.e. the front wheel uses a bb tool to tighten the cap and the rear uses a freewheel/cassette tool. making the customer have to buy two more tools if they want to do something like change their rotors themselves. also i have seen ppl break a rotor before when riding, super rarely, but still i and pretty much everyone i know has a t25 on their multi-tool and can take a 6b rotor off on a trail if they need too. I know of no one that rides with tools to take off centerlock rotors.
3. A lot of two piece 6bolt rotors cannot be used with centerlock to 6b adapters. It happened to me with some trp two piece rotors this year.
Sucks big time when someone comes in that ordered some badA#$! hope brakes and colored hope rotors only to discover they are incompatible with centerlock wheels and if they want to use their cool new rotors they have to buy new wheels.
4. ever wheel set that i have weighed personally that is available in CL and 6B both is heavier than its 6bolt counterpart when you include rotors in the weight.
  • 1 0
 I'm confused by the 1500 Spline ONE Details box. The XRC, XMC, and EXC all have the same hub, and all have the same 30mm-wide carbon rim. So what explains the difference in weight? Is it spoke count (not provided)? Is it rim layup (no details given)?
  • 1 0
 They're not the same rims. Yes, different layup.
  • 1 0
 I don’t really understand all the negative comments about warranty, I do understand them about the price. I’ve had 3 sets of complete wheels, two OEM and upgraded to XMC on one bike. Although pricey, I have never had a more reliable and positive experience using their complete sets. I was able to buy two bikes for incredibly reasonable prices in part because of the OEM spec’d wheels so kudos to DT Swiss for offering so many options at different price points. When you have good wheels from the start that hold up after years of abuse you tend to have some loyalty to what you already know vs. something you don’t.
  • 1 0
 Became a fan of these wheels when I got my Jeffsy pro and they came on the bike for that year. Darn things are bullet proof, Best wheelset I've ever had. Not one spoke has come loose and they hold their true very well, really made me a fan of carbon... well at least theirs.
  • 6 5
 So DT Swiss will charge riders who have Carbon rims break while riding due to manufacturing defects? That’s, uh, cool I guess.

My next wheel set will be carbon. It won’t be a DT Swiss one.
  • 4 1
 I think that's only after the first 2 years..? Still, doesn't compete with what WAO/SC are offering.
  • 4 0
 To quote the article the Fair share Chargable rim replacement is "In addition to the lifetime warranty for the original verified owner on all material and workmanship defects."

So failures due to materials and worksmanship will be sorted. It's only crash replacement they're charging for.
  • 2 0
 They need to write a more straight-forward summary of all these warranty policies. DT Swiss wheels have a standard 2 year warranty, as well as a lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects with free rim replacement. This "Fair Share Policy" is effectively a crash replacement plan with a commitment to have the right parts available for the next 10 years. And it includes the parts and labor to rebuild the wheel, versus WAO just shipping a replacement rim.

In the end, I think I would still rather deal with WAO or SC's system
  • 3 0
 @hatter: When has a warranty rep ever admitted that the crack that formed after an impact was due to defective carbon layup and not because you rode it wrong? Warranties for defects arent warranties at all, a defect in a wheel is impossible to prove.
  • 3 2
 Unacceptable warranty at that price. Plenty of options out there that offer no-charge crash replacement, which for me is the only reason that makes carbon worth the extra cost. Get with the times DT.
  • 1 1
 So they have basically doubled the 1501 price, made 1700 the price of old 1501 but without it's tech so the upper mid range bikes now are going to cost 500 euro more and high end 1000 more sporting 1501. Great just what we needed.
  • 3 0
 I love DT's hubs and spokes. The rims are solid, but wow are they spendy.
  • 4 0
 Aluminium ain't dead!
  • 2 1
 If anything, it's become increasingly more popular. A lot of people starting to realize carbon isn't necessary for most riders, especially for those who don't wanna fork over a ton of money. At $1000 per lb saved, I'd rather take the lb. Just my opinion, yours may vary. And no, I am not poor. I've owned plenty of carbon in the past. I truthfully prefer the feel of alu. Others will probably say the opposite so it really comes down to preference and the size of your wallet.
  • 1 0
 I've never ridden my higher engagement hubs and thought that my suspension was compromised. Maybe I just don't know anything?
  • 4 3
 Why should you buy the DT 1500 when you get a Newmen SLA30 Wheelset in 27.5 with 1.660g for half the price?
  • 2 0
 what is up with centre lock love
  • 2 0
 Is it me or have you completely omitted spoke counts @dan-roberts?
  • 1 0
 I just got a DT swiss 533d rear rim and I'm quite impressed on how it feels so far
  • 1 0
 When is an EXP version of the 350 coming?
  • 1 0
 might as well buy the "old" non-EXP DT 240s instead
  • 2 0
 Hopefully never
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: why's that?
  • 1 0
 @Jshemuel: have you ever removed the drive ring in a used star ratchet hub? I'm skeptical about even being able to remove it in a well used hub with the new tool interface, and also would rather not have to remove the drive ring in order to swap ratchets. And I already have the tools and spare parts. It'd be nice if they kept the 350 as a more basic option for those of us that would prefer to stick with the old style internals.
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: good point. I do like the simplicity of the current design. As it turns out I have removed the drive ring but holy hell it was a pain in the ass, so point taken.
  • 6 8
 So, DT took the XR/XM/EX 1501s and renamed them to XR/XM/EX 1700s. Downgraded the hubs in the process but kept the 1501 price? OK...
  • 8 0
 Not sure where you're getting your pricing info. The old 1501s were >$300 more.
  • 3 1
 @DaneL: This 100%. The best part of this article is that the EX511s are coming as part of the 1700s for a much lower price than before, but the news is disappointingly overshadowed by the 1501’s move to carbon.
  • 2 0
 €698.80 for the 1700's. Current Ex1501s are available for around €765. You'd be nuts to pay full price on those 1700s.
  • 1 0
 @Dobbs59: Where are the last gen. 1501s selling for 765?
  • 1 0
 No, it's the opposite. They upgraded the X/M/E 1700 and 1501 to something closer to the old 1501, and 1200 wheels, but with better pricing and updated technology.
  • 2 0
 Hubs are not really downgraded.......the 'old' 350 hubs had 18t ratchet, the new ones have 36t. If anything, a slight weight difference of hub, but otherwise the same performance as 240 hubs for less $$$$
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: I bought my EX 1501 for around 777 euro, including 20% tax. It was 3 seasons ago though. I suppose DT stuff is more expensive in North America, judging by the comments.

//edit: plus the old 1501's had another advantage in being offered in multiple rim widths as well as multiple axle standards for those who still roll non-boost. You could get EX 1501 with 25mm ID EX471 rim or 30mm ID EX511 rim. And I think a 35mm version was also available. That seems to be a thing of the past now as well.
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: I mean... I bought a pair of E1700 wheels ~3 years ago for $200 USD when MSRP was ~$700. MSRP and what you actually pay aren't necessarily the same thing.

I don't disagree with them getting rid of the 25mm option for the M and E series; even XC bikes are moving to 30mm rims. It is interesting that they're not offering 27.5" x 35mm, though. Maybe they just weren't selling well. Or maybe they didn't want to make carbon 35mm rims and didn't want to offer something in the 1700 series that they can't offer in the 1501 series.
  • 2 0
 @AvidTrailRider: In Europe. I got my XM1501s just before DT blocked some of those sites from shipping DT to USA. I paid like $675 shipped for XM1501 wheelset from one of those sites which made the whole $100 less than just the front wheel.
  • 3 3
 Well I guess now even DT has drunk the carbon Kool Aid. RIP Ally 1501's.
  • 2 1
 I'm guessing they will still make the ex471 rim and the 1700s come with the ex511 rim. I had 26 inch ex1501s and just swapped the rim to a 27.5 ex471 when I changed bike.
  • 1 1
 Sixth Element

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