First Ride: Newmen's Advanced SL A.30 Carbon Fiber Wheelset

May 7, 2020 at 10:36
by Dan Roberts  
Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set


Newmen are a small brand from the Allgäu region of Germany, very close to the Alps. And while some of you may not have heard of them, they've been featured on Pinkbike multiple times and received praise for their functional, clever approach to product development. Despite being a small outfit, they design, engineer, and test a hell of a lot in-house; 80% of their hub machining is done across the road from their headquarters. Their aluminum Evolution A.30 wheels received high praise a year ago for their no-nonsense approach with solid performance, and now its the carbon fiber Advanced SL A.30 that we're looking at.

Newmen continued along the path of strong and light aluminum wheels, never really thinking that a carbon fiber rim would make much sense for enduro or DH applications. But customers and fans of Newmen pushed hard for exactly this, and Newmen decided to oblige.

Advanced SL A.30 Details

Intended use: Enduro
Wheel sizes: 27.5" & 29"
Rim material: Carbon fiber
Hub specs: Newmen Fade, 15 x 110mm front & 12 x 148mm rear
Spokes: 28 x Sapim D-Light, 2.0 - 1.65 - 2.0mm
Disc mount: Centre Lock
Weight: 740g front & 877g rear (29” actual, Micro Spline freehub)
Price: €680 front & €770 rear
More info: Newmen Components


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set


Features & Details

Newmen's original plan was to engineer a set of carbon fiber wheels for XC, trail, and light all-mountain use, but what emerged was a rim that was standing up to enduro use. The new Advanced SL A.30 is the carbon fiber rimmed wheelset that came out of this story.

Newmen are happy to say that no mountain bike product is indestructible, with each having its own limits. And their transparency to this must be appreciated, as it's only due to the current pandemic situation that we couldn't do a factory visit to see the limits of their wheelset in their lab and see behind the curtain of how they develop their products. But as soon as the borders open and restrictions lift, we'll be heading to Germany to check that out.

The rims have an inner width of 30mm and use Newman’s flared-out flange design to align the material of the rim wall more in line with the oncoming impacts from the terrain. Rim profile is relatively shallow, at 20mm, which Newmen state helps maintain a good ride quality. Reducing the profile height further would then give them problems with impact resistance. There is also a molded channel in the rim to help keep the tire bead in place and reduce burping issues.


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
Centre Lock rotor mounts for the Newmen Fade hubs.
Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
Straight pull spokes are used, with same length all around the wheelset.


The wheels use Sapim D-Light spokes which go down to 1.65mm in the middle and 2.0mm at either end. Newmen did this to build-in some more compliance compared to the more common 2.0 - 1.8 - 2.0 spokes on the market. They also say that these thinner gauge spokes are strong enough for enduro use, and the wheels use the same spoke length all around: 304mm for the 29" version I have on test.

Newmen like to have durable products and so build their hubs with minimal clearances and tighter seals to ensure a longer lifespan than wheels with minimal friction out of the box. Their bearings are packed with a relatively thick grease, too. This means that out of the box their wheels would give the impression of a little more friction, but with some bedding in they will spin just fine while maintaining that performance for a long time.


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
The carbon fiber rim uses the same flared-out side walls as their aluminum rims for better alignment of the material with the oncoming impacts.
Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
The molded-in channel in the rim aims to keep the tire bead locked in and reduce burping.


The Fade hub now uses a pawl style freehub design with a large diameter driver to reduce the forces seen going through the pawls and ratchet ring. The freehub has 36 points of engagement for two reasons. One is to have a more robust design, bringing durability to normal bikes and e-bikes alike. Newmen say they've seen reduced durability in their testing with higher points of engagement. The second point relates to their consideration of MTB suspension and they become another wheel manufacturer to talk about this, something that shows the level of engineering behind their products.

A hub with higher points of engagement will be more prone to the effects of pedal kickback from chain elongation. Inversely, a hub with low points of engagement will pedal not particularly well. Newmen use 36 points of engagement as a good balance between the two, allowing fast enough pick-up for when you need to engage the freehub and pedal while not having hugely detrimental effects from pedal kickback in the speeds and situations that it may happen. They, as a company, like bikes with a little more anti-squat for an efficient pedaling response, and so the added possibility of kickback that can come with this is something that they took on board when balancing the factors involved in the hub design.


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
A large diameter pawl-style freehub is now used by Newmen, with all pawls engaging at the same time.
Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
The 36-tooth ratchet ring strikes a balance between engagement and interference with the suspension and is shaped to reduce the freehub noise.


The pawl design in the freehub is intended to be a little quieter than some others, as the guys at Newmen are also fans of having as quiet a bike as possible. Shimano Micro Spline, standard Shimano HG, and SRAM XD driver options are available.

Accompanying the Advanced SL A.30 wheelset is Newman’s own tubeless strip and a Milkit tubeless kit, which allows you to keep an eye on your sealant level without taking the tire off. Rim graphics are applied under the clear coat and match the polished aluminum look of the hubs nicely. The front wheel comes in at 740-grams with the rear wheel coming in at 877-grams (Micro Spline freehub). A rear wheel with the XD freehub weighs 871-grams.



Installation & Setup

Unfortunately, the tubeless rim strip and Milkit kit were not available when we received the wheels, so I taped them up with another brand's tubeless tape and valves to get going on them. Taping is really easy but does require a little more concentration than normal. I kept the tape from going into the outer molded channels in the rim, rather than tape over them. We'll give some feedback on the Newmen rim strip and Milkit kit in our full review on the wheels.

Tire fitting was a doddle and they seated with only a few gentle pushes on a track pump. The interface between the rim and a new tire is nice and tight, and even with a set of used tires there were no issues in getting them to seat on the rims.

Newmen did supply a hub end cap removal tool for aiding in swapping the freehub body, but it wasn't needed as the end caps could be swapped by hand. The rest of the setup and installation was a simple process. I ran 6-bolt rotors on the hubs, with a converter down to the Centre Lock fitment on the hubs. All in all, pretty easy and no issues at all in getting the wheels converted to my brake and drivetrain configuration.



Initial Riding Impressions

Out on the trail, the wheels come across as feeling comfortable when you need comfort and supportive enough for when you need the wheels to remain strong and not fold under you. They remind me of a few sets of aluminum DT Swiss 1501 Spline One that I have. This is in no way a bad thing, as they just quietly go about doing their job while you're riding. Speaking of quiet, the freehub is notably a few decibels lower than some other hubs out there, regardless of freehub design. There have been no freehub slips or weird noises when really on the pedals and putting a lot of force through it. It's a personal preference, but I've not been left wanting more than 36-teeth for the enduro riding that I do or that the wheels are aimed at.


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set
The trails surrounding the Newmen offices are prime for component development and testing.


From the riding I've done so far, there they don't exhibit any surprising tendencies to store and suddenly release energy back to you, and despite hearing a couple of rim hits there are no visible signs of any damage. Newman’s claim to have a wheelset burly enough to endure the rigors of enduro riding are so far holding true.

The low weight of the wheels is also a very nice characteristic, coming in at 80-grams less than the DT Swiss EXC 1200s I reviewed at the beginning of the year. There's a noticeable riding effect from this, with less weight at the extremities of the wheels, especially given my love for DH tires and having less unsprung mass for the suspension to react with.


Newmen Advanced SL A.30 Wheel Set


Ridden in the absolute bone dry and sketchy-as-hell wet, the Newmen wheels just keep on quietly going about their job. As yet, there's been zero issues with the rim, spoke tension, and hubs. Our lifts in Champéry are opening in a month so then we'll have more opportunities to push the extremes of the test. It will be interesting to see if that balance of stability and comfort that we've experienced so far continues with repeated runs down the vertical berm downhill tracks and longer, more punishing descents in the area. It will also be interesting to see the performance of the rims, with their flared side walls when the rims will inevitably encounter more impacts.

I'll continue to ride the Newmen Advanced SL A.30 wheels a bunch and report back with a full review on their performance and how they compare to some of the other carbon fiber rimmed enduro wheelsets out there.







117 Comments

  • 43 0
 Newmen should team up with Bikeyoke to get their parts specced as a package at OEM's. Both innovative German companies with with no-nonsense products at an acceptable price. Newmen wheels and cockpit combined with a Bikeyoke Divine dropper will get you a long way towards a very good built.
  • 10 0
 They are on some new german bikes. Cube for example.
  • 4 1
 @TheJD: I know, my wife has one. She's very satisfied with the SL X.A.25 wheels it came with. But I sure as hell would prefer a Bikeyoke Divine (I have a Revive on my bike) over the Fox Transfer factory that came with the bike.

She would prefer a wider version (with her weight it could withstand Enduro level abuse), but I understand they don't want people to safe grams in the wrong place, getting the rims messed up by too aggressive and heavy riders and risking their reputation.

It's a pity though, those lighter riders don't get the wheels they need for that reason.
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: To add to that, I do see now that at least in carbon they also have the Advanced SL X.A.30. At 1325gr. at 30mm inner width that's might be very interesting for her!
  • 8 0
 Propain offers exactly that in their configurator, Newmen wheels and Bikeyoke seatpost. Only the cockpit parts come from Sixpack.
  • 4 0
 Newmen are all over Cube and some Radon bikes. Heard the owners of Cube have some stake in Newmen hence all the spec. I just can’t get over the name though. Brings me back
to Seinfeld....
  • 4 1
 @covekid: NEWMAN!
  • 4 1
 @clink83: Nope, it´s newmen
  • 1 0
 @covekid: not that there is anything wrong with that..
  • 1 0
 Get those companies paired up with Nicolai Bikes! That would be epic
  • 3 0
 @lehott: We offer Newmen and Bikeyoke parts on any Nicolai build and they are very popular choices with our customers.
  • 42 0
 Wonder if they'll make an in-house, Newmen's Own sealant.
  • 11 0
 lets see if anyone outside of USA even understands that.
  • 15 0
 Only if all the profits go to charity
  • 8 0
 I’d only use it if it looks and tastes like Ranch dressing.
  • 5 0
 @mdrrich: That's exactly the image I got. Now, don't go putting ranch dressing in your Minions and Stan's on your chef salad.
  • 1 0
 and call it "seamen"?
  • 1 0
 @thedirtyburritto: Love Newmans own salsa and spaghetti sauce.
  • 2 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: Paul Newman. The man. $500,000,000 and counting.
  • 19 0
 to everyone his own but to read that the pros of a good carbon wheelset is to remind the tester of a great alu wheelset (it's not the first time i read something similar) kinda make me question all the fuss about carbon wheels.
  • 16 3
 carbon wheels are / can be much stronger than aluminum for the same weight. if you can have a carbon rim with decent radial compliance, superior lateral stiffness, no denting or flat spotting or folded rim beads, more even spoke tension and less deformation from occasional broken spoke and so importantly less downtime with destroyed wheels, then great.

(such rims do exist)

im getting 1-2 years riding out of cheap carbon rear rims of less weight and wider internal width compared to a few months from heavier narrower aluminum dh rims. hard to argue with that IMO
  • 22 1
 As described in the article our initial plan was developing XC/trail carbon fiber rims. For that type of use the advantages of carbon fiber is obvious, you simply get lighter, more efficient wheelsets.

During our development process we have been able to improve the strength of the flanges a lot over the time. Due to the layup process being automated we also have a very low chance for mistakes/errors in during the production process.

In the end we have a wheelset which weighs in at 1600g for 29" and is durable enough for the EWS riders from the Cube Action Team. Feel free to check out Zakarias Johansens latest instagram post if you want to see what they have to hold up in the real world: www.instagram.com/p/B_2mCwrnjJj

If you use an aluminium rim for proper enduro racing it will always get small dents und flat spots. With the carbon fiber rim you can always true it to perfect spoke tension and side/height deviation again. They just don't wear the same way alloy wheels do IF they hold up.
  • 1 2
 @getsomesy: @newmencomponents Yeah, i get that mantra every time i entered my lbs for years, and I kinda get it, but then you read reviews of carbon rims on carbon superbikes and, literally, the conclusion is often rather the rims are too stiff or: "they are so compliant they feel quite like good alu rims".
The (higly ineducated) end i came up with is that carbon rims might be great (or al least offer tangible riding advantages) on alu (and more noodley) frames and offer (at best) marginal advantages on carbon (uber stiff) frames.
  • 1 1
 @getsomesy: Agreed!..No denting, and resulting burping/leaking air is enough to pick carbon over Alu. if one can afford it.
  • 2 2
 We are getting brainwashed with carbon wheels. They need to sell more stuff.

The purpose of a carbon wheel would be a lighter and stiffer wheel.
Weight is the same as alu or even more if you add inserts.
Stiffer is good if you race, otherwise it could even be too uncomfortable.

Just put some inner tubes, 2.1 tires, 23ID rim, higher pressure and there you go... stiffer, lighter, more responsive wheel.

In my opinion a custom wheel by a good wheelbuilder - made according to your riding style and weight – it is way better and 1/3 of the price. And it will last much longer.
  • 5 0
 I lost 5 driveside spokes midway through stage 3 of BCBR in 2015 after shifting into the spokes due to a bent hanger in an earlier crash. The wheel stayed true enough to roll without rubbing. I walked up the steeper climbs because I didn't trust the rest of the driveside spokes, and I babied it on the downhills but I finished the stage and the pitcrew rebuilt it overnight. I still have that @lightbicycle wheel 5 years later on my son's bike.
  • 1 0
 @RedRedRe: I was anti carbon wheels as I tried a set once and were too stiff + all the rims broken etc. I wanted those Newmen a30 alu rims so bad (after reading the pinkbike review) but full price in Canada + full price on everything except about 30% off Hope hubs and I was looking at about 1100$! A bit more than I thought... Then I saw the new NOBL rim that is supposed to be more comfortable (like alu rims once again...) but had a deal on these already good prices wheelset so... nearly the same price for the same wheels but with carbon rims! As much as I didn't want carbon, I had to try those for the price! I'll sell the rims and buy some Newmen if I don't like it but just to say that they're not really 1/3 of the price! Wink
  • 1 0
 @newmencomponents: That's great you hit such a durability mark, but an XC race wheelset is going to need to be in the 1300g range.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: maby if you are a feather weight. My race wheel set is 1700 with tape and vales.
  • 1 1
 @clink83: How do you even build a set that heavy? That blows my mind. You must have been trying to build a heavy wheel set. The rest of us try to build light wheelsets - DT240 hubs, Carbonfan T800 rims, DT Aerolight spokes. That's 1200-1300g no problem, not even trying that hard. Go for some Extralight hubs, Berd/Pi rope spokes, and you're looking at about 1000g.
  • 2 0
 @Becciu: I buy carbon rims for about 160-200 a pop. i build my own wheels, and have done so professionally for a well established company, as well as other dh riders, and for myself & anyone who knows me would surely tell you i'm a death sentence for bike parts. If you factor in the labor to build wheels, rim tape, sealant, new spoke nipples and perhaps spokes then paying 200 for a rim that lasts is cheaper than paying 90 usd for a rim that needs to be rebuilt... even more important to me is that my bike keeps on working which is priceless.
And you say marginal advantage at best : / nahh.

i have ridden steel hardtail carbon AM bikes aluminum AM bike and DH bike with carbon rims. yes they are stiffer, many of them to a fault. That is why things are trending toward praising rims that "feel compliant as aluminum" (radially) carbon rims deflect less, causing hard riders to get less plane distortion from their bikes, which throws us off line less. Also carbon rims deform the rim radially less from pedaling forces which makes for a snappier quicker acceleration, in addition to the lighter rotating weight which is well established as important.

@lexdamis ppl spend 100's on flashy riding gear, expensive knicknacks, and 1000's on bikes. wheels are hugely important part of a bicycle and not the place to skimp on getting reasonably reliable component.

@RedRedRe you might want to get your well tested for lead, cause carbons weight is NOT the same as aluminum. carbon is lighter and stronger, without a doubt. aluminum wheels dent without inserts. carbon rims dont dent without inserts. both will cut tires with similar ease without inserts. I use carbon rims with schwalbe procore which is lighter than aluminum rim of same strength and width without an insert, never mind that i can run single ply tires with that setup in harsh terrain, which saves a a lb of rotating weight and 40usd on every set of tires. a good aluminum wheel will not last longer, you are absolutely off your rocker.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: 100%..It's not about skimping..it's can or can't afford..people that can only afford 1-2k ish on a complete bike typically don't have the choice..people spending 3k-6k and more have the option for carbon..that's all.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: check out the Advanced SL X.A.25 and X.A.30 on the newmen-components website. They should be what you are looking for. The 30mm inner width set is claimed to be 150g lighter than the 30mm DT XRC1200.
  • 1 3
 @JohanG: 32 spoke carbon rims, dt350 hubs, Dt swiss comp spokes. Most of the weight is in the hubs.
  • 2 0
 @mirskeinereingefalln: Good point, I see those now. I could build a pretty sweet set of wheels with these.
  • 2 1
 Lol @ being downvoted for a decent wheel set build.
  • 2 1
 @clink83: comp spokes suck. they contribute to harshness, they break easier, break more nipples, and weigh more. the only good thing about them is they are cheaper.
  • 3 2
 @getsomesy: lol wtf are you talking about? DT comps are the standard for double butt spokes. Unless you are going for a weight weenie build they are great. If you are breaking spokes and nipples it's provably because your rim sucks ass.
  • 2 0
 @clink83: you got me there. i confused dt comp for dt champion 2.0 straight gauge. my bad.
  • 1 0
 @clink83: Carbon rims are stiff enough that you can safely go with thinner spokes unless you're on the outlier side of the size scale. I use the Pillar 1423, 60 cents each. But for my next build I ordered some of their "wing" spokes just because they look cool. I'm a shameless wheel dork.
  • 1 3
 Carbon is for kooky keyboard warriors and dentists... "IF they hold up" is a good start, Newmen knows this.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: I dork out on wheels too. I went with 32h J bend comps because 1) I'm 6'4 215ish and 2) rock strikes and chain drop will break thinner spokes easier. Ive broken spokes while on trips before, and getting custom spokes in rural ID is a nogo.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: those pillar spokes look sweet. i might have to use those for my next wheel.
  • 1 0
 @MmmBones: what rims do you use?
  • 15 0
 All I could think about whilst reading this article was Jerry gritting his teeth cursing "Newman"!
  • 4 0
 "A hub with higher points of engagement will be more prone to the effects of pedal kickback from chain elongation. Inversely, a hub with low points of engagement will pedal not particularly well"

@newmencomponents @dan-roberts

Do you have any testing or explanation to how you came to the opinion that less points of engagement results in less pedal kickback?
  • 5 2
 More or less prone to the effects of pedal kickback, not more or less pedal kickback, that would come from the kinematic of the bike.
  • 2 1
 This can be true in some situations, but not all the time: Lets imagine you are coasting down a trail, hit something so that your suspension progresse. Now if your hub doesn't have to many points of engagement, it can happen that the cassette on your backwheel can spin backwards without even being engaget to the chain. But this is just pure coincident. the casette might as well not bea able to rotate backwards without pulling on the chain. Is this understandable?
  • 4 0
 @janickrider: Aiming for a window between pawl engagement is tenuous at best, how repeatable is that going to be, sometimes I dont get pedal kickback, sometimes I do. Pedal kickback is circa 20 degrees (on a good bike, unless you are high pivot, Druid/Commencal/Deviate), and the hub engagement is 5 degrees....

I'm happy to be proved wrong, but if companies are going to make bold claims, there needs to be good quality evidince/science/testing behind it, rather than just a statement.
  • 3 0
 @sir-hc: Yeah I don't buy it either, sure you may reduce kickback in certain hits, but that means it will be less predictable.
  • 5 0
 Yeah, it’s strange how this started popping up in reviews in the last couple months.
  • 4 0
 @skelldify: All aboard the bandwagon!!!
  • 2 0
 @dan-roberts: Its still a statement, please supply evidence in the form of science/analysis/data/testing please.
  • 2 0
 @Saether: DT Swiss: "To describe the effect in more detail, we first make two assumptions. The rear wheel is fixed and can neither turn clockwise nor counterclockwise. The second assumption that is made is that we are in a static situation, which means that we leave the speed of the bike out. "

The trouble is with those two assumptions is that what type of bike riding is it? Is it bouncing in the car park nodding to the marketing person?
  • 2 0
 @sir-hc: Obsiously lower engagement decreases kick back. When your cassettes doesnt engage, it doesnt cause kick back.
When moving at higher speeds, kick back is pretty much a non issue, since the angular velocity of the freehub is usually a lot larger than the angular acceleration due to kick back, so even a hub with infinite engagement points wouldnt engage and therefore not cause kick back.
  • 1 0
 @sir-hc @newmencomponents @dan-roberts:

But based on Steve from Vorspung's video on pedal kickback (linked below)... while a wheel is spinning the freehub is disengaged and so POI has zero effect on pedal kickback. And while you are pedaling, the hub is fully engaged and so no matter the POI you'll feel pedal kickback as the the suspension compresses... and actually with a lower POI, while pedaling, when your suspension rebounds your pedal has farther to drop away from your foot (worse on flat pedals), with a higher POI, this happens to a lesser degree.

Obviously I'm not the sciencetist / engineer / physics nerd and may be misintertrepting this info... and you explain it in more detail please?

Great video on pedal kickback with visual aids - www.youtube.com/watch?v=grNUgu0H9YA
Everyone should watch it all but the most relevant sections are : From the beginning to about 2:46 and at the 10:00 minute mark.
  • 1 1
 @islandforlife: You are misquoting/misinterpreting what he said in that video. He even said that on big fast hits there is still a chance that the freehub will engage and you get some kickback. Having lower POE just means that that hit must be bigger/faster or your wheel must spin slower for that to happen. For some exact numbers example see the dt swiss article.
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: No, notice that when he said big hits... he also said it would only ever make a difference at very slow wheel speeds... if you think about when you get the biggest hits, it's always during very high speeds. So the only time it will make a difference is during some kind of weird really high wheely drop. Which I think he even mentions near the beginning. So, almost never.
  • 1 1
 @islandforlife: The difference between really slow engaging hubs (~18POE) and the really fast ones (~680POE) is huge. The amount of antisquat and hence kick back you can get also varies greatly between frame designs and depends on gear ratio. So making a blanket statement that it can only happen at very big X drop and slow Y speed is not correct. It can happen every time the angular velocity of the freehub generated due to suspension kickback exceeds the angular velocity of the wheel. How much or for how long it needs to exceed it is totally related to number of POE you have.

In the end, there is a reason why those fancy high pivot DH bikes use idler pulleys Wink
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: What we really need to see is a power meter and a full telemetry system. then proper testing. Different wheels with different points of engagement and a couple of different frame designs.
Can have all the theories and calculations, but the data shows you what is really happening.

Fairly sure I've seen Pierrons bike with a power meter last season. Cecile has had a Quarq brake disc:
www.pinkbike.com/news/cecile-ravanels-quarq-electronic-brake-monitor-val-de-sole-dh-world-cup-2017.html
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: watch the video again... as long as the wheel is spinning at a relatively good speed, it has no effect. Unless, and only unless, you are going extremely slow (crawling) and experience a large and fast impact. Cheers and take care!
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: the reason some DH and trail bikes have idler pulleys has nothing to do with engagement. I’m not going to get into here, but those reasons are easily google-able.
  • 3 0
 Now i'm scratching me head... First a boutique british steel mtb for under $3500 usd. Next a new budget 11/12 speed drivetrain from Shimano. And now a custom, boutique german made carbon wheels, with "inhouse" custom made hubs, all for under 1500 euros...
It's certainly the best time to be alive as a mtber, even with the lockdown in place. Well done Newman, I will certainly be looking into these wheels for my next set Smile .
  • 1 0
 The price seems quite competitive for a wheelset made in Germany, and the molded-in channel in the rims is a neat idea! The new men on the block seem to know what they're doing in that department. I don't see much of a seal between the freehub body and the hub though.
  • 4 0
 I think that only the hubs are made in house(ish). Rims might come from overseas
  • 1 1
 @Becciu: Oh, that's kinda disappointing then.
  • 5 0
 @Rodeodave: The hubs are machined and assembled across the street of our office in Germany and the wheels are built and trued to very even spoke tensions also in Germany.
  • 1 1
 @Rodeodave: why? As prone as I am to buy local, tons of great parts come from the far east.
  • 3 0
 overseas to one is local to another
  • 4 0
 I think pinkbike just reviews carbon rims to drive the carbon haters into hysterics.
  • 2 0
 Also 26" riders.
  • 1 0
 @Kramz: those still exist?????
  • 4 0
 Send a pair to Paul Aston to try in Finale! Then you will get a decent thrashing/ review
  • 7 0
 He is riding them since last fall, check his IG Smile
  • 3 0
 Aston is sponsored by Newmen.
  • 4 0
 Where can you get this Newmen stuff in north america?
  • 2 0
 CANADA
EU-CAN Distribution Inc.
10-1566 Clarkson Road North ONL5J 2W9 Mississauga
TEL: +1 888 997 2885
info@cube-bikes.ca
  • 1 0
 @sk4dri: Hopefully you have better luck getting in touch with them than I have. Have not replied to my emails or phone calls.
  • 1 0
 @cornichons: Wanted a stem -my LBS just told me order from Europe. Cube would not get it.
  • 1 1
 @newmencomponents why didn't you call it Neumann? Newmen sounds like a cheap no-name brand name - embrace your German heritage? ;p

Also, can you share a noise demo? Considering buying the FADE hubs next week, not been happy with DT ratchet hubs, especially their noise.
  • 1 0
 after two wheel-sets with straight spokes, I'm not a fan. No noticeable benefit on the trail, very noticeable hassle in the repair stand, nightmare to find replacement for out in the real world.
  • 1 0
 So, whats better Straight pull or J-bend? As i knew, Newmen trusts in straightpull. Any Infos about that? Im riding j-bend and never had any problems or something.
  • 4 3
 I can say that I break spokes extremely rarely, no more than 10 j-bends over 20 years and in most cases I can easily point to the origin of the failure - branch in the wheel or too much tension. Then I had my first straight pull spoke wheel from DT and broke at least 10 spokes in 2 years. Had it been 28 vs 32? Maybe, but no major brand makes 32 straight pull hubs so it is irrelevant. I have 350 sp hubs laced to ex471 and break 1-2 spokes for every visit to the bike park. That includes even the front wheel. So I won’t be buying SP wheel anytime soon. The theoretical benefit is there, in my personal experience, it doesn't stand the test of reality of home wheel builder. If they come as completes they may be fine. I build all my wheels myself to save 30-50% off a factory build and cannot fault a single wheel I built with 32 J-bends. They stay true and spokes don't get whacked unless a branch comes in.
  • 4 0
 Straight pull spokes are faster to build in factories.
You could argue that by design, they're stronger (they do not have that weak spot created by the bend) and can on paper deal with a higher tension.
There might be a thing with energy transfer although it's going to be ridiculously negligible on a mtb in my opinion.
They are slightly easier to replace when broken, if saving a couple seconds is a big deal.

In reality, many premium hub brands do not even consider the straight pull option.
J-bend spokes do not unwind themselves that much under compression. Or during tensioning, as they simply cannot spin on themselves (thus allowing to tension them more if possible). They also offer more lacing options.
J-bends are way more common and therefore way easier to find in bike shops.

It depends on personal preference and the type of riding. For proper gravity riding, J-bend and the obvious brass nipples are in my opinion the way to go.
  • 1 0
 my wheel builder told me, straight pull are stiffer an seen as more PRO an efficient by riders (roadies) that want/care aboot that sort of thing.

as for strength.. the bend in the J bend spokes flexes to add compliance to the wheel as a whole.

so the debate goes, is a stiffer wheel or a more compliant wheel stronger?

my wheel builder hates straight pull an I trust his opinion.

as mentioned above, there's a lot of high end hub/wheel manufacturers that don't use straight pull.........

make of that what you will as plenty of peeps will argue for both sides
  • 2 0
 A guy from Newmen wrote in this german forum that straight pull are more durable. www.mtb-news.de/forum/f/newmen-components.293 But durability shouldn't be a problem if you use triple butted spokes with bigger diameter at the bend.
  • 2 3
 @Saether - I read that too. Just like they need to be as evenly tensioned as possible. The reality is all of our stuff gets out of shape, and we need quickly available replacement parts. I personally cannot be arsed with such precision. I fully acknowledge the fact that some folks like coolish parts and expensive wheels. I honestly do! It's a matter of feeling great from stuff we buy and different parameters, achieving different goals make us achieve that state. Some feel they just need wheels, some feel they need reliable wheels some want to reward themselves by buying fancy stuff. All cool. But for the most part J-bend.just.works.

Building wheels on DT or Hope hubs with DT Comps or Sapims DB, brass prolocks and any quality alu rim (i.e. Spank Race, DT ??1 series, Newmen or 600 - 800 Mavics) does the job god damn well without breaking the bank, carrying too much weight and risking frequent failures. 500-650€ and you’re damn well off. Superstar wheels have bad reputation and I acknowledge that, but my switches just refuse to die. I am lucky I know. Many want to have even fancier hubs, fine, but they cannot expect any reliable above that 500-650 range. It is unrealistic. So is experiencing 100-200g weight drop by using carbon rims and aero spokes. You buy feeling of having cool stuff and I fully respect that.
  • 1 0
 Straightpull is a pitta when dealing with bladed spoke because nothing prevents them from turning. When you have a rim with internal nipple you're stucked. What straightpull spokes lack is square or Hexagonal head with rounded edges to allow some give over different hubs. My 2cents for what it's worth But they look the business!
  • 1 0
 @freebikeur: I prefer bladed when building straight pull because you just slip a tool over the blade and they are held firm. Super easy.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: indeed it is easier to hold a bladed one, but with some technique and a cars mechanics thicker rubber gloves it's easy. I built and trued my daughters SP wheels in 1.5h total and I am not a bike mechanic. Bummer to have learned it after building 3 wheels in the past and swearing like a pig. Pricing of aero spokes feels like a robbery. Get the right gloves and bend the spoke while playing with the nipple.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: It is indeed, building bladed spoke is a blessing for that reason. But as you cycle and/or hit stuffs on the bike tension of the spokes slightly drop then go back to normal at the local point of impact, or when you put down insane whattage. In this detension phase a straightpull spoke is allowed to turn. My dad's old Roval's have at least 3 to 4 bladed spokes that twist slightly at the end of each year (DT New Aero + bloody internal nipples). Luckily they're not tubeless so removing tape is easy, but every time you're in for a full strip down...
  • 3 4
 What's up with 3 pawl hub... It's disappointing to see it after universally liked Evolution SL A30 that comes with ratchet mechanism and it's very close in weight. Evolution SL costs half as much and comes with nicer freehub. These wheels are just for the people who want carbon and don't know better.
  • 5 4
 i thought everyone outside XC and road racing who buys a carbon rim doesn’t know any better.
  • 1 2
 Rachet system broke too often. mine was gone after less than 6 month. was so disappointed that i bought chris kings
  • 3 1
 @Korbi777: good luck with king rubs.
been on that road before and they are like boats.
You have 2 great days in life.
the day you buy and the day you sell them.
  • 1 5
flag WAKIdesigns (May 8, 2020 at 2:01) (Below Threshold)
 @komondor: I will be watching this space as a social experiment. We’ll see if CK has an aggressive fanboi club like Hope or just a fanclub like Industry 9.
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: King fans are pretty chilled I guess, I have no problems so far with my ISO hubs.
  • 6 0
 @Korbi777: My Evolution broke in the first 100 km (ratchet teeth slipped and got destroyed), and after 6 months of use the slits in hub body were noticeably worn out and caused the ratchet to seize. In their design a steel ratchet moves in an aluminum hub body, while DTswiss have steel against steel there.

That being said, Newmen are EXCEPTIONAL to deal with, in both cases the issues were sorted out in the same day I reported the problem and I got replacements in the same week. WOW.

The new Fade hub looks _extremely_ beefy in the freehub area, and the main bearings are nice and big 6903.
  • 3 0
 @likehell: it as my personal experience with an iso rear hub.

So far with dt start ratchet no problem with the same set of hubs for over 5 years.
  • 2 0
 @komondor: that is interesting to hear. Almost everyone I’ve heard of with King’s loves them. I’ve got a buddy who’s parents built him a decked out rocky mtn element for high school graduation in 1999 with King’s. He still has it and they still roll smooth.
  • 1 0
 @komondor: That's totally ok, I certainly hope I won't make that experience, but I got wheels with 350s as backup (since my racing days I always have backup - at times I could rebuild the whole bike out of my van lol).
I also can state that since 2009 no DT star ratchet ever made problems for me, just thinking if the 54T is any good..
  • 2 0
 Ratchet hubs are not automatically better than pawl hubs, you've been brainwashed by DT..
  • 2 0
 Will we ever see a Pinkbike review of the Newmen/Pi-Rope wheels?
  • 3 2
 what about oldmen? do they make wheels for them?
  • 1 0
 Why did they ditch the ratchet freehub and went back to pawls ?
  • 16 0
 There are various reasons for this decision. When developing our new hub we had three design targets in mind:
- further improved reliability
- less noise
- strong enough for e-bike use

Evaluating our options with in house lab testing of various prototypes and also competitor hubs we have come to the conclusion that a large designed pawl system is the only way to combine all of the above for us. for once star ratchet drivers are inherently noise and also we believe that a well designed pawl system is more reliable. With a star ratchet system it CAN happen that the ratchets don't fully engage and then when you only put down slight power the ratchets will be damaged. With a pawl system when only one pawl engages (you always have to expect that something CAN go wrong), if you dont have a peak force right at the time where not all pawls were engaging (very slim chance) nothing will be damaged. Especially after doing a lot of testing with e-bikes (yes we know not everyone likes them) we figure that the more reliable option is a large and well designed pawl system.
  • 1 0
 @newmencomponents: What's the weight on the new hubs? I'm using a pair of your ratchet hubs on a custom wheelset and I'm very happy with them so far. They are very light.
  • 1 0
 @ACMI54: 201 grams for the rear, 96g for the front! (for the road ones at least)
  • 1 1
 @newmencomponents: THANK you, you should also mention that DT Swiss hubs have a terrible oscillating sound which makes it sounds like your wheel is broken, this is nearly never an issue with pawl hubs.

The fade hubs are now an easy choice over Carbon Ti, Hope RS4 and all of DT's offerings.
  • 1 0
 @newmencomponents: If you make quality pawl systems then all will engage at once; I9 accomplishes this. White Ind is not perfect but has a steel axle so if only one pawl engages, then the system is stiff enough to survive. I like that you are putting a value on noise, because this is the reason I ride Onyx and sold my Syntace Straight MX hubs. Can you put up a Youtube video of your hub sound compared to DT?
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: Also want to see a noise video, on a wheel, not in a truing stand as they change the noise for the worse.
  • 1 0
 What’s the warranty like? And please, don’t just say “lifetime.”
  • 1 1
 ... because 1 ride is all you need to test the integrity of carbon fiber rims.
  • 1 1
 Seem like some sweet wheels but I’ll have Alu wheels for life

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