First Look: Fox's New Float X2 & DHX2 Shocks - Pond Beaver 2020 (Updated With Video)

Apr 6, 2020 at 12:25
by Dan Roberts  

In a whirlwind of new suspension products from Fox lies the new coil sprung DHX2 and air sprung Float X2 rear shocks.

The arrival of the new shocks is likely not a surprise to anyone avidly following the DH and Enduro race series. While somewhat similar in appearance from the outside, and carrying the same names as their predecessors, the new units have seen extensive changes both externally, and more importantly, internally.

In an effort to improve upon the performance of the previous generation X2s, Fox focussed on having a better range of control of the rebound damping, improved bottom out control and a swathe of other changes all over the shocks to up the performance.

The Float X2 and DHX2 are aimed at DH, Enduro and the heavy hitting end of trail riding applications and are available in a host of metric lengths, with or without trunnion mount, and also some imperial lengths to help with compatibility on slightly older, pre-metric revolution, bikes.


DHX2
Float X2


Spring Changes

The air sprung Float X2 gets updated compression ratios meaning less spacers are needed to achieve same progressivity as the old shock. There’s a 300psi limit.

The coil sprung DHX2 uses the same SLS or standard spring, but now uses a full spring collar held in place with a C-clip. The preload collar now has indexed notches to stop the collar coming undone when using just enough preload to keep the spring snugly in place.

Indented preload collar stops the spring undoing.
A full spring collar and C-clip hold the spring to the shock.

Lots of development has gone into the new bottom out bumpers. Durometer, shape, how the bumper compresses into the given space were all tweaked to give a better transition into the bumper and a nicer bottom out feel. Coil and air shocks each see their own specific bumper.


Damper Changes

The new Float X2 and DHX2 use the same damper. The only difference being the Float X2 usually having a one-step-lighter compression tune to account for the inherent damping effect of compressing the air inside the shock.

The previous X2 damper design used a dished main piston that had a tendency to give a blow-off style characteristic. People were sometimes running excessive spring rates and damping to compensate for this feeling. The damper design also had poppet valves controlling the rebound damping in the head of the shock. This limited the rebound tunes available, although some people tinkered with stiffer springs in the poppet valves.

The new X2 damper design is still a twin tube layout, but uses a more traditional main piston design with a compression and rebound shim stack providing valving on either side of the piston. This means the main piston now does the majority of the rebound damping work and opens up multiple different rebound tunes.

High-speed and low-speed compression and low-speed rebound adjusters are on the neck.
The high-speed rebound adjuster is now on the eyelet.

On the Factory level shocks equipped with high speed rebound adjustment the adjuster was moved to the eyelet. It connects to a ramped plate on top of the main piston rebound shim stack. Turning the high-speed rebound adjuster rotates two propeller shaped leaf springs around the ramps on the plate and so exerts more or less force upon the whole rebound shim stack.

The ramped plate has two hard stops in the ramps to provide the limits for the adjuster and the whole sub assembly is internally adjustable to ensure that every shock off the production line or back from service will have the same rebound feeling.

The high speed rebound design is similar to that of the high-speed compression design found in the new 38. All adjusters for high-speed damping then see the same 8 clicks of adjustment to keep a common language in adjustment between the front and back of your bike. The remainder of adjusters in the neck, controlling low speed rebound and compression and high-speed compression now use smaller shimmed pistons too.

Two position climb switch has open and firm modes that are now on a separate circuit to the other damping circuits.

Located at the rear of the piggy back is the optional climb switch. It operates an independent firm mode circuit, which is separate from the high and low speed circuits. The firm mode now provides more solid resistance when pedalling compared to the previous tune.

There also a new damping oil specific to the newer generation X2 shocks and three stock compression and rebound tunes, plus others available that were developed with some of the Fox sponsored race teams.


Chassis Changes

The Float X2 still uses Kashima for the Factory level shocks but the DHX2 now uses a low friction chrome coating on the shaft with new bushings designed to work hand in hand with the new shaft coating. All metric length shocks see increased bushing overlap.

The outer body on the DHX2 is now made from steel and the inner tube of the twin tube design has been beefed up with fins to increase its stiffness and stop the problem of the older inner tube coming out of its seat in the head of the shock.

Shock stroke adjustments can now be made without taking the shock completely apart.
Low friction chrome coating on the DHX2 shaft. The Float X2 uses the iconic Kashima coating.

Shock stroke is also now adjustable without having to take the shock apart - the spacers are accessible from the end of the shock and are held on with a plate and two small bolts.



Versions, Lengths & Mounting Options

Factory level shocks are available for both the Float X2 and DHX2, with high and low speed compression and rebound damping. The Float having a Kashima coated shaft and the DHX2 having its chrome shaft.

Performance Elite level shocks have low speed compression and rebound adjustment but are only available for the DHX2. With the loss of the high speed rebound it sees a slightly different design at the eyelet and main piston to account for this.

Performance level shocks have low speed rebound adjustment and available only for the Float X2. It sees a black shaft coating too.

Fox still makes imperial length shocks for both the Float X2 and DHX2 with the 7.875” x 2” and 8.5” x 2.5” lengths available with the climb switch. 9.5” x 3” and 10.5” x 3.5” lengths available without the climb switch.

Metric sizes in Float X2 and DHX2 are available with the climb switch in 210 x 50mm, 210 x 55mm strokes, 230 x 57.5mm, 230 x 60mm and 230 x 65mm. Without the climb switch is the 250 x 75mm option.

Trunnion mount options in Float X2 and DHX2 are available with the climb switch in 185 x 50mm, 185 x 55mm, 205 x 60mm and 205 x 65mm. Without the climb switch there is the 225 x 75mm option.

All options are compatible with the 8 x 30mm bearing hardware kits for the eyelet.


Price

Float X2 comes in between $639 and $669, or €849 to €889, depending on model.

DHX2 costs between $619 and $649, or €819 to €859, with the spring sold separately.


We've got a DHX2 with a couple of days riding on it and a Float X2 on its way to give full reviews in the not too distant future. Performance so far is promising, so we're looking forward to getting more riding in on the two different shocks in a good mix of terrain.


Pinkbike Pond Beaver 2020






289 Comments

  • 217 7
 Let me get this straight. That's an rrp of €850 plus at least €150 for one of their lightweight springs? Making it €50 more expensive for an off the shelf, standard shock and one spring than say an custom built, tuned EXT Storia LOK with hydralic bottom out and 2 lightweight springs? Am I the only one who finds that laughable?
  • 100 7
 Agreed. Fox has gone insane.
  • 98 0
 Yeah but the EXT doesnt have Kashima coating- oh wait.
  • 45 1
 Exactly! More than that, how you justify going from ~650$ to ~850€ when $ = ~0,92€ ?? that's a 275 $ increase for Europe market!
THAT IS NUTS
  • 89 9
 @Aksel31: then do not buy it. It's actually as simple as that, no pitfalls, no BS. FOX engineers hate this trick.
  • 42 12
 @NotNamed: Yeah also Kashima does literally nothing, except look good on some bikes.
  • 15 0
 @Muckal: Don't worry, I will not buy a shock that is worth 1 third of the cost of my bike Wink
  • 14 0
 @Aksel31: keep in mind US prices don't include VAT so that takes some of this big difference away.
  • 26 1
 Does anyone ever buy high end fox shocks at msrp? I thought they are basically only sold on complete bikes, framesets or at huge discounts.
  • 29 2
 For that i'd pay the bit extra and get a Push Elevasix.
  • 3 1
 @Aksel31: They will sell them with 35-45% discounts at European online stores and people will feel great about getting a good deal. Nobody buys anything at these MSRP's anyways. Such is consumerism at this day and age.
  • 11 3
 @jollyXroger: they used to keep the price high for a very long time. Last year they were still so expensive that in price of 36grip 2 you were getting Lyrik and Pike Ultimate
  • 11 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Yep even 2 days ago 2020 36 was 1399 in most german shops. They must be high.
  • 3 3
 @jollyXroger: Fox contractually oblige retailers to keep to MSRP :-l
  • 6 5
 @Mondbiker: if you look around you can get it for 920€. I could pay that, but my Lyriks resale value dropped to max 200€ after few scratches on uppers. As much as I prefer the 36, it is not 700€ better Wink
  • 20 0
 I guess EXT will have a bright future.
  • 3 2
 @Liamcrook: not in the EU they can't.
  • 9 1
 @WAKIdesigns: We are all perfectly aware that you are holding out for that all new Totem Big Grin
  • 37 4
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: Woah woah woah. Kashima does a LOT bud. I'd hate to have to show you how much lighter it makes your wallet. It's an overall weight savings my dude.
  • 4 2
 @Aksel31: i feel bad for your bike!
  • 1 0
 I’m laughing with you, too.
  • 17 23
flag fullendurbro (Apr 7, 2020 at 7:32) (Below Threshold)
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: People who insist that Kashima does nothing are just mad they can't afford it.
  • 7 3
 If it performs better and is more reliable than other options, I’ll spend the cash.
  • 5 0
 I'm starting a new business, I'll buy you a Fox product here in the USA, then ship it to you in Europe and save you hundreds of Euros!
  • 23 27
flag z-man (Apr 7, 2020 at 8:16) (Below Threshold)
 EXT is from Europe and the story is quite reversed in North America. Import duties do have a major effect on price.

You also can't compare a mono-tube EXT shock to a twin-tube VVC shock like this from Fox. Completely different ball game. This shock will almost certainly blow the EXT and it's decades old technologies out of the water. The EXT is a great shock, but they have pulled every drop of performance possible out of mono-tube architecture. Twin-tube and its lower levels of cavitation, and higher levels of external adjustments is just a superior design. Just go ask Öhlins.
  • 1 0
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: yep... And i love it!
  • 12 7
 @z-man: Haha, such BS.
  • 6 0
 @squarewheel:
You’re right.
Please don’t forget FAST SUSPENSION with their HOLY GRAIL SHOCK
Very good French company
  • 4 5
 @z-man: Agreed
  • 2 0
 @fullendurbro: nah dude, then why don't you tell us what it does? it sounds like you know everything
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Yeah I know they are now, I would be pretty pissed if I bought them yesterday, thank god I wouldn´t buy anything from fox in the first place.
  • 11 2
 @z-man: I´m sorry, but you have been successfully brain washed.
  • 2 1
 C'mon guys. FOX didn't force you to buy the springs.
  • 1 0
 @ewikpark: I missed the part where I claimed to be omniscient.
  • 4 1
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: Enough reason to buy for most of us in a midlife crisis. Give me kashima and orange.
  • 1 1
 @Aksel31: But a more expensive bike then the cost of the shock won't seem so bad? Hmm... Wait...
  • 9 3
 Why do I have a feeling that if Joe Exotic was into MTB, he'd have a shock from Avalanche?
  • 2 6
flag foggnm (Apr 7, 2020 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 Not to mention the routine cost of servicing your X2 by Fox is around $185 once you factor in shipping. I love my X2, but just decided to switch to something else due to the yearly service fee. I'm more or less done with them from a suspension standpoint, but do like their clothing!
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Except if you buy in a non sales tax state there's not much to take away...
  • 1 6
flag z-man (Apr 7, 2020 at 11:40) (Below Threshold)
 @Mondbiker: Yeah, Öhlins hasn't a clue what they're doing.... (Sarcasm)
  • 7 0
 @z-man: Fox is not ohlins that´s first thing...But, go ask ohlins how´s the fork development going, if they are still terribly overdamped and if their bushing tolerances still suck. Wow, how could that happen to such experts you ask? Well, it might have something to do with them being experts in motorsport not MTB and maybe lacking someone knowledgable to tell them what to do to make it work for MTB instead of 100kg+ motorbikes going twice as fast as elite downhillers most of the time. Just because something is suitable for very different application doesn´t make it right for MTB. But yes, after first fiasco they got better.
  • 6 6
 @foggnm: I had a DHX2 that I used for close to three years without a service. Coil yo, you don't have to service it. They say you do, but you don't.
It's something like this:
Air shock recommended service interval: 100 hours of riding. What you really need to do to keep it sweet: 10-15 hours.
Coil shock recommended service interval: 100 hours of riding.
What you really need to do to keep it sweet: just forget about the term "service interval" because it's pretty much meaningless.
  • 11 1
 @z-man: having owned and ridden the factory dhx2, factory float x2 and ext storia lok v3 on the same frame, I can confirm that in terms of PRACTICAL performance, the ext v3 is superior in every metric. Convincing design based on theory is great, but practical functionality is what really matters.
  • 2 0
 @uribefache: what is a midlife crisis?? Still waiting...
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: The biological clock has been slowed immensely.. Chronological numbers mean very little to me.
  • 1 3
 @bohns1: just keep pumping iron! In a right way!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: and covid zwift bike racing...
  • 2 0
 Dentists ain’t working right now either...
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: their clothing?
  • 9 0
 Nobody with half a brain buys this stuff aftermarket. They just do the same trick other US brandS do... Put on a crazy MSRP to increase OEM sales. OMG! It comes with scram pigeon and fxo 42!!!! These alone cost more than the bike! Such a deal!!!! BUY BUY BUY!!!! If you ever wonder why shimano parts cost less than otherS.... it is because they actually plan to sell them and people buy them.
  • 7 0
 @WAKIdesigns: he could have afforded one...if it wasn't for that damn Carrol Baskin.
  • 2 2
 @fullendurbro: it does nothing actually noticeable, people were fooled, fox is clever!
  • 1 1
 @jaame: wow people don't like the truth! You're right about coil shocks, I raced the Canada cup for years and never serviced the shock, never serviced any coil shocks actually on any bike haha!
  • 1 0
 @markar: I haven't either! Unlike a crappy first gen monarch I had that had to be serviced three times in the first six months.
To be fair, the SD I have at this point is a lot better, but not as good as either of the coil shocks I've had.
  • 1 0
 @foggnm: they are not the same company
  • 1 0
 @squarewheel: Just received mine last week. Ordered from Bandit Bike
  • 1 0
 @CHsurfer:
Can‘t find any shocks on that page?
  • 1 0
 @Liamcrook: Not entirely true. Most vendors have a MAP (Minimum Advertised Price) policy which often times goes right with MSRP. But as soon as the retailer has it they can sell for whatever they want, they just can't advertise the low price.
  • 2 0
 Not the same over here. Retailers can sell products for what every they want and advertise the price. @velovirtue:
  • 1 1
 @jorgeposada: I hope their equipment is more up to date then their website.
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Hmmm. Trust fork with maybe two seats (Bender style).
  • 2 1
 @downcountry: I agree, I just wish we could get Factory Kashima sanctions in black rather than gold.
  • 2 2
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: Sometimes Kashima peels off. That's worse than nothing.
  • 1 1
 @Muckal: OR make your voice heard that we think it's overpriced and maybe FOX will listen to it's customers and lower the price?
  • 1 1
 @Ttimer: I did onceand in Amazon, the seller was a motorcycle store and they contacted me for ask my weight, bike brand and riding style, great guys.
  • 1 3
 Pay to play bitches!!!
  • 2 0
 @z-man: Yeah youre full of shit, go ride the EXT. Spoke to suspension engineers, apparently the ext design blows anythign else out of the water
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: here you get the 36 factory for €800 or less now
  • 1 0
 @donpinpon29: Waki way too cheap for that yo!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Joe Exotic would have a Works Performance shock. Manually turned shocks from the dirty south, straight outta the 80s. I bought one for my crf50 and it is actually legit, weighs like 15 lbs though.
  • 2 1
 @Aksel31: the point is it's for a bicycle. You're clearly conditioned into believing you get value for money for this. You're also oblivious to the fact that this it's pushing mountain bicycles into unattainable territory for the majority. I pity your monkey brain.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: I used to work in a big shop back in the 90s and while what you say is true, I was told that they would never discount certain brands because if the distributor found out, they would be told the bikes were out of stock every time they called to order more. A way of getting around the legal aspect because as you say, price fixing is illegal.
I can’t remember the brands. Cannondale was definitely one, original cannondale that is. Lina I think was another but I could be wrong. GT didn’t care, IIRC. And we sold a ton of GTs.
  • 1 0
 Kona not Lina!
  • 1 1
 So is the coming post-COVID economy. Wink . @pcledrew:
  • 2 0
 @skerby: I think Foes... he could have been a good poster boy for Foes... or just anything on Ellsworth
  • 1 1
 Smartest comment yet ????my Avy tuned Fox VanRC will out perform 99% of shocks mentioned here (and cheap AF) ????. @jorgeposada:
  • 1 0
 I think the website was designed by Joe Exotic haha. Easily the best suspension I’ve every used though ????@WAKIdesigns:
  • 1 0
 @ukr77: This makes zero sense. Even if you're trying to make some sly remark about taxes or something, its still dumb.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: I used to work in a bike shop too and had a letter from cannondale saying exactly that (early 90's) but now with the internet they would be stupid to try that.
  • 2 0
 @mtb-scotland: we never had it in writing as far as I know. It was just a well known fact.
  • 3 0
 @z-man: you’ve never ridden an EXT shock you’re full of sh*t. And EXT shocks are way better than most shocks out there.
  • 1 1
 @CrispyNuggs: I’ve ridden it and all you fanbois are blowing it way out of proportion. Yes it’s a top of the line shock, like CCDB, Öhlins TTX, Fox DHX2.
  • 2 0
 @CrispyNuggs: I would love a Storia or a TTX on my Capra that I paid two grand for... but you don’t put an £800 shock on a bike that cost two grand.
A lightly used or takeoff DHX2 could be found for about £350. That’s about as much as I would be willing to spend. I would go a bit higher for a storia or TTX but they never seem to come up for sale in 230x65. I would try a bomber if it had a climb switch.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: CC coil IL would be the go to shock then.
  • 1 1
 @mtb-scotland: cc IL of any kind is to be avoided. Especially on bikes with yoke driven shock.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: no it isn't. Had one since it came out with no issues and I had the original air version as well with no problems.
  • 1 2
 @mtb-scotland: i know 3 folks who had them and they went to sht. Both of my suspension mechanics confirm it. Glad it turned out ok for you
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: 200x57 by any chance?
  • 1 0
 I would default to a dhx2 because I had one for three years with no issues or servicing. Great shock for the money, as long as you get a good deal.
  • 1 2
 @mtb-scotland: not sure what sits in Enduro and Stumpy
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: lots of 200x57 shocks suffered from issues because it has the shortest bushing overlap. Just wasn't CC offerings. The CC IL has been so good I've no wish to change it.
  • 54 1
 "DHX2 costs between €819 to €859, with the spring sold separately."

HAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAAA!!!
  • 41 0
 If its to expensive even for a Norwegian then you know that there is something wrong with your prices Wink Big Grin .
  • 8 1
 For me not a problem Big Grin i will sell more MRP Hazzard's Smile
  • 5 0
 It's the price you have to pay to have fox deliver a shock without all the problems they acknowledge in this very piece. Reminds me when Yeti went from the original switch to the switch infinity, the same way of reckoning they knew they were selling a sub par product for a shit ton of money. C'mon marketing people, you can do better. Don't throw the company under the bus.
  • 41 10
 No kashima on the coil, no buy
  • 9 28
flag Mondbiker (Apr 7, 2020 at 4:34) (Below Threshold)
 There was no Kashima on coil since 2016...Not that it matters.
  • 15 14
 @Mondbiker: funny you say that, my 2019 dhx2 has kashima.
  • 12 14
 @Mondbiker: my 2020 dhx2 has kashima. might wanna fact check
  • 6 3
 @max252: the original DLC coaing is more expensive. Kashima is for peasants.
  • 50 1
 @doe222: Actually your 2019 DHX2 has a ti-nitrided shaft. You can't Kashima Coat steel.
  • 3 10
flag JDub713 (Apr 7, 2020 at 7:38) (Below Threshold)
 @Mondbiker:
My 2018 DHX2 has a Kashima coated shaft.
  • 3 1
 Don't worry, in its previous iteration, you replace the shaft every service anyway...
  • 4 2
 @max252: No it doesn´t, might want to tak your own advice, not everything gold is Kashima... Ti nitride my firend, not that it makes any difference, just know your shit till you post. Easy.
  • 2 2
 @JDub713: Ehm, no, it doesn´t.
  • 4 4
 @doe222: No it doesn´t, no need to be mad though, it would do jack shit like it does on forks or other shocks that actually do use it.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: always tought it was kashima. My life is a lie
  • 5 0
 @doe222: actually, we used to use a shaft coating called ti-nitride on the DHX because of its low-friction properties and because its gold color matched well with the Genuine Kashima Coat we use on our other shocks. We have never used actual Kashima Coat on the DHX because it is not possible due to the damper shaft being steel and the fact you cannot anodize steel (Kashima Coat is an anodizing process).

That said, we went away from the Ti-Nitride because while it was low-friction and it did look amazing, it was not consistently holding up to our durability standards in the field and the last thing we want to do is leave a rider high and dry with a blown shock. The new hard chrome finish is a more durable surface treatment and when combined with our new seal, we get reduced friction and increased durability. Our goal is to provide the maximum possible performance and durability we can. We want all FOX riders to be able to spend more time riding and less time waiting to a shock to be serviced.
  • 5 0
 @Mondbiker: Kashima Coat actually does decrease friction in the high single digits as a percentage, and it also aids seal longevity due to the decreased friction.
  • 1 0
 @foxfactory: in dry application. Is that recommended? To run lower legs, wiper seals or air chambers on shocks dry? Because if it isn´t, Kashima is worse than standard anodisation because it doesn´t hold oil film well(lack of porosity), but you should know this better than me right?
  • 1 0
 @foxfactory: Source? Compared to what?
  • 2 0
 @pcmxa: Buddy its 2020. You don't need sources anymore. Just say stuff and tell anyone who opposes your statement they're a terrible reporter.
  • 17 0
 At this point I think the most noticeable difference from last year is gonna be the price. In my experience, most mountain bikers just aren't so fussy that they notice these small changes. Many of my customers don't even seem to know the difference between compression and rebound damping and which knob controls which. When you start talking about high speed vs. low speed damping their eyes lose focus. At the end of the day, I don't care one way or the other. People will buy and ride whatever Fox and RockShox make and I'll service them. Dogs bark, caravan moves on.
  • 2 4
 I think that a fair amount of riders will notice high and low-speed compression but not high and low-speed rebound. I think it's just for marketing to be able to say we have a four-way damper.
  • 3 1
 I'm with you, it's amazing how few mtn bikers, many of whom are very good riders, have absolutely no idea how to setup their suspension properly. They can't be bothered to set sag correctly, forget 4 different compression/rebound adjustments.
  • 3 0
 Most customers can't tell when their shock has lost half (or all) of its oil, other than maybe the telltale residue.
  • 2 10
flag TheSlayer99 (Apr 7, 2020 at 9:33) (Below Threshold)
 @tgent: sag isn’t important for suspension setup though...
  • 1 1
 @nathan999x: I have to disagree with you on this. However, I feel that this usually would benefit mostly racers.
High speed rebound is typically only engages when the fork gets deeper into the travel. It allows the fork to recover quicker. Whereas low speed rebound is there to keep the forks composure over extended hits, to help eliminate the "pogo" effect. Once you have an understanding of what it does, and when it does it, you then know how to apply it. I learned this by talking to alot of elite DH racers over the years, where I would see their setup and think it was weird.
Thing is, just because it feels good in the parking lot, doesnt mean it feels weird on the trail.
If you currently have it, I suggest trying it out.
  • 1 0
 @nathan999x: sorry I meant to say, just because it feels good in the parking lot, doesnt mean it feels good on the trail. My bad.
  • 3 0
 I'm not sure that anyone really knows the difference between high speed damping and low speed damping.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: Fair point, similar to the beginning and end stroke on the vidid shock. I also guess I can't really make judgements without trying it, which is something I would love to do.
  • 2 0
 @nathan999x: Both Fox and Ohlins are 4 way adjustable. However, ohlins does specific tunes based of rider preference and weight (spring rate). Ohlins HSR is done through shims, while their LSR is external. Their range of adjustment is very small, and requires preset tunes from the factory.
Fox goes about it differently, but aims to have the same effect. One thing I feel ohlins does much better (performance wise) is their air spring in the DH38. It is as close to coil feeling as I've ever felt. You can tune the spring rate and the bottom out separately, so you can essentially run a more linear spring rate to prevent the fork from packing out, while still keeping the fork from bottoming. Their compression stack does a great job of keeping the fork high in the travel. Something I felt was a little better than the Grip 2. In theory though, the VVC should allow for a more supportive tune without the harshness.
  • 2 0
 @tgent: There is definitely a time component to it at least for me, I have "x" time to ride in a week. Which means I don't have the time to screw around with the adjustments. I set it on the first ride and honestly never touch again. My enjoyment of being out riding trumps making adjustments to gain x% of performance out of my fork/shock.
  • 1 0
 @WhatToBuy: That's totally reasonable and IMO represents the situation the majority of bikers are in. In that case, you're likely better off with more simple suspension components so the setup is easier to dial in and then just leave it as is. However a lot of people who have no idea what they're doing with suspension setup will buy top end suspension with all the crazy adjustments, the X2 shock is a prime example, when they would be better served by a simpler setup.
  • 1 0
 The current generation of the X2 has terrible damping, and people will 100% notice the completely redesigned damper.
  • 1 0
 @Mntneer: Its terrible without a proper tune. It lacks on the mid stroke support, and bottoms easily. The progressive endstroke will be a welcome addition
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: I would really like to try out both dampers. I've heard mixed opinions on the ohlins stuff but I think that it is just hard to set up and at world cups it looks like it works better than everything else.
  • 1 0
 @nathan999x: Most of the mixed opinions were because of the older stuff. There were structural issues where the shock eyelets were cracking, the ect, and they require specific tunes. The tubes provided were based off of WC racing data. 99% of riders can put a pace down to actually get the benefit of this. At the world cup level I'd say it would be hard to say that the Ohlins stuff works better than everything else, because most of the world cup guys are running suspention that's either prototype, or it's literally set up specifically for them. They usually all have suspention techs with them setting up their suspention for each track. Fox is a prime example of this. Ohlins on the other hand, has a long colorful history with the twin tube damper, and has a laundry list of collected data from motocross, to automotive racing ect. They understand cause and effect. Fox on the other hand has more data in the mountainbiking industry. Its very cool to see the innovation from ohlins, and the application from fox.
  • 1 0
 @nathan999x: rebound damping is far more important the compression adjustment imo. Most stock compression tunes are pretty much dialled from factory. However rebound is spring dependent so this changes greatly between riders.
  • 1 0
 @mikelee: I definitely agree that rebound is more important but is high and low-speed necessary?
  • 1 0
 @nathan999x: Yes 100% because one is responsible for the recovery of the fork under heavy compressions, and the other is responsible for the forks behavior over small bumps. Most forks have both, only typically one is adjustable. Which given that there are a wide variety of rider weights, and rebound is directly related to spring rate, having externally adjustable high and low speed is favorable. Its typically not offerred, because shims are not ideal under preload, so having the VVC makes it possible.
  • 16 0
 Best part of reading new reviews is finding out what was wrong with the previous ones, lol
  • 13 3
 And here we are : let's comme back to the "old" classic chrome coating for the shaft. This part doesn't deserve the bling bling Kashima coat anymore ?
  • 23 2
 it kinda screams "we only want kashima where people can actually see it." which kinda means its nothing more than a marketing gimmick
  • 6 4
 @vemegen: Wait What you mean Kashima is not as good as chrome, used on every shock in every car Motorcycle, and piece of heavy industrial equipment in the world..

I am shocked that Fox would stoop so low as to sell fluff.

P.T Barnum said it best, A sucker every minute and a fool and his money.
  • 7 0
 It was never kashima to begin with as kashima cannot be applied to steel. Just looked like it.
  • 5 1
 @lake-st: well to be fair.. they use chrome on heavy equipment because generally the shaft is steel. And usually it's not competitive. You see coatings on most of the high end stuff whether its ti-ni, ano, or dlc. I'm not saying kashima is better than say black. But to think that polished steel is the epitome of performance is laughable.
  • 2 0
 It was never Kashima (ti nitride) and this shaft is still treated.
  • 2 4
 Kashima is 100% just for curb appeal for the superficial folks.
  • 4 1
 @AverageAdventurer:l Coil shocks use chrome plated or polished steel shafts.

Still lots of performance parts that are steel and will likely be steel for a very long time, like crankshafts, camshafts and valves.

Its the surface Ra or roughness that matters more than the material, although some materials can achieve a better finish than others.
  • 6 3
 @stumphumper92: DHX2 never had Kashima. And you're also wrong. It's not just the MTB industry that uses molybdenum disulfide coatings. It's a real thing that certainly improves durability and performance.


Come by Dunbar Cycles one day and.ill pop an anodized shock and a Kashima shock in my hand dyno and you can feel for yourself.
  • 2 0
 @z-man: Agreed. Also one main benefit to the Kashima coating is durability. I have yet to see any stanchion coating last as long.
  • 1 2
 @z-man: regardless, there's something about seeing it on every single bike that makes it so monotonous
  • 4 1
 @stumphumper92: That is definitely subjective. If the situation was reversed and all we saw was black stanchions, I'm certain you would feel the same about that. Reality is that Kashima is functionality based, not cosmetic. There is a real world application based on performance and longevity. Black stanchions dont have the same lifespan. Fortunately for you however, nobody has a gun to your head, so you have all the freedom to choose whatever your heart desires.
  • 1 5
flag stumphumper92 (Apr 8, 2020 at 7:29) (Below Threshold)
 @jomacba: it's cosmetic. End of story.
  • 1 0
 @AverageAdventurer: @AverageAdventurer: actually chrome on steel is one of the hardest coating you can have (1000Hv vs 600 for hard coating), one of the lowest friction paired with most "mechanical" materials (better than ka$hima), one of the most durable, not the most expensive, and so on.
Other coatings only offers marginal gains, if any, and always with big losses elsewhere.
  • 10 0
 Can we install it on a hardtail now?
  • 6 0
 Fox will find a way to market a rigid shock for hardtails. And people will buy them
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: ... with Kashima coating they can sell anything.
  • 8 2
 "The only difference being the Float X2 usually having a one-step-lighter compression tune to account for the inherent damping effect of compressing the air inside the shock."

Are you sure on this one? Compressing the air is actually compressing the spring. Isn't the difference rather here to compensate for the friction of the seals on the air shock? Just asking and challenging what sounds like a press release argument rather than science.
  • 25 1
 There is a genuine difference between air springs and coil springs ignoring friction in the seals and other than the progression - the thermodynamics of an air spring mean that it heats up when compressed and before it extends some of this temperature is lost to the shock body and ultimately the environment. This loss of heat means that the pressure will reduce slightly for the return stroke, so the return force is less than the compression force.
This is a hysteresis effect and is much greater in an air spring than a metallic coil spring (it is also bigger at low frequencies in an air spring than at high frequencies). The effect is approximately like increased damping with an air spring compared to a coil spring. Therefore it does make sense that an air spring needs less damping for a given nominal stiffness.
As you say there also tends to be increased friction which adds further damping effect.
  • 3 0
 @tempmeister: Very interesting! Tanks a lot! But then is the lower damping on the rebound circuit only? Or mainly? Just curious.
  • 14 2
 Your 50% correct.
Air has an inevitable progression to it, so generally speaking, it would require less damping in order to keep it riding higher in the travel. Given that this progression is adjustable too, it gives a broader range of adjustability. The one pitfall (performance wise) to the previous generation DHX2 was the lack of mid stroke support and bottom out control. Last season (If you watched Dialed) Loris Vergier kept going back and forth between the DHX2 and the Float X2. This is likely because the Float X2 had better mid stroke support, but lacked the small bump compliance of the DHX2. Also keep in mind that this was Fox's first attempt at a twin tube damper.
They took alot from cane creek who felt some serious pain in the development of this chassis for MTB.
Ohlins then came to the game being pioneers of this design, and having extensive knowledge, and understanding of the dynamics for this design; Improved the chassis for MTB. One issue I had consistantly was blowing the seal head on bug compressions. Now, consider that most people think about durability in design under heavy compression... The seal head only sees this under rebound load. Given that tracks are getting faster and faster, and architecture of dampers are getting better and better; Shocks are getting relatively good at isolating high speed and low speed movements.
On a heavy rebound, the old model went through the tubes (putting pressure between the underside of the piston, and the rebound valves. In between these is the seal head.
Fox have now relocated the high speed rebound to the main piston, allowing more room to build a proper HSR valve.
In turn that frees move space at the upper part of the shock to produce a larger and more effective HSC valve. This should allow you to essentially run a harder LSC setting to increase your mid stroke support, and maintain better small bump compliance.
They seem to have also narrowed the adjustability to a more effective range.
The new shaft is also a likely improvement, as I broke 2 and 1 was damaged trying to rebuild the shock. This was very common too.
Take a look at the newer Ohlins dampers, and compare them to this one. I'm certain you will find a lot more similarities than you would between this DHX2 and the old one.
These are very welcome changes.
Sorry... Coronavirus = no social interaction... Verbal diarrhea.. sorta.
  • 2 5
 @jomacba: Do you mean then that this X2 may be the first MTB air shock on the market that will be able to coe with spike of the spring force at the bottom out and feel glued o the ground on G-outs like a decent coil shock? I must say I experienced satisfactory mid/end stroke composure from X2, but it was still kicking back on bottom outs compared to DHX2 or my CCDB Coil. The CCDBAir is quite aerage for my likes not much better if any better than Vivid Air. The rest of the air field is pogo sticks.
  • 1 0
 @EnduroManiac: to say it’s like damping is something of an approximation, but if we accept that then yes it has more effect on the rebound, but it will have some effect on compression.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I cant say it is, but I can say from the architecture, it seems to be their intent. Also, my comment was referring to the compression side of things, whereas you are referring to rebound. That being said, the X2 was notorious for getting air into the damper, which could have been a result of what you were experiencing. Personally I didnt find the lifespan of the Float X2 to be great. Mind you I had an early generation. In terms of mid stroke support, this is also correlated to the suspention kinematics of your frame, and therefore is subjective, much like the spring rate associated with leverage rates. Just because your using X rated spring on this frame doesnt mean you will be using X rated spring on that frame. So compression tunes will be differant as well. The factory setup guide from fox is generally a great starting point, but is again a generalization. Typically I set my LSR wide open to start, and then set the HSR fairly quick so it recovers from big compressions, but not some quick that the bike bounces of bucks (factory setup guide is a good start here). On the LSR side however, I generally set this fairly slow to allow the bike to keep composure over small repeated hits. To keep the bike riding higher in the travel I usually set my sag a little higher (12% front 23%-25% rear).
  • 1 0
 @tempmeister: thanks. Somebody knows what he is talking about
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: great read mate
  • 9 0
 If you're going to buy a near $1000 rear shock, might as well buy an EXT Storia or Push elevensix.
  • 2 0
 Amen, the new pricing seems very, very high.
  • 1 0
 or a fast fenix, or 7 second hand Bos Stoys rare from 2010
  • 1 0
 Lmao bos is traaaaaaash @faul:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: And you are talking out your aaaaaaasssss
  • 1 1
 Lol so why aren’t they a big player? Hmmmmm@Mondbiker:
  • 8 0
 The HSR adjuster is gonna be a pain in the ass to use on most bikes, in my opinion, isn't it ?
  • 1 1
 not if looks like a session
  • 15 7
 Look like some shocking differences.......
  • 2 2
 Oldies are the best, eh?!
  • 8 0
 Hopefully this one doesn’t blow up
  • 7 0
 Seriously. I had so many problems with my Float X2 not holding air
  • 5 0
 Stacks mean tunable now? Whilst twin tube is great and all, if you are not in the bell curve of the shock tune you are at a compromised. Looking forward to a long term review tomorrow
  • 5 0
 furthermore... wasn't the whole thing with poppet valves the reason the X2 was "far superior" to the CCDB and now it's basically the same layout?
  • 2 0
 @jzPV: actually, now its the same layout as Ohlins. CCDB is still a fully recirculating shock.
  • 2 0
 @jzPV: They were basically the same. Steve on his Tuesday tune did a comparison

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2CPEWfkyvX8
  • 5 0
 Makes the marzocchi coil shock at $300 sound like a steal. Think about it. Could have marzochi coil front and rear suspension for half the price vs these and a fox 36....and definetly not half the performance
  • 1 0
 Cheers, Pareto
  • 8 4
 So fox went from copying cane creek to copy ohlins and nothing new just marketing gimmicks. Dhx2 wasn't kashima was TiNi coated...
  • 4 1
 somebody gets it!
  • 2 0
 Is it me or is anyone else struggling to see the point of having Two versions of the X2 float when the price difference is $30 (5%)?? Who is going to buy one of these as an upgrade and say “oh I can’t afford the high-speed compression, I really need to save that $30 on my $600 shock”.
Even if I thought I didn’t want or need HSC adjustment, for that price difference on a shock this pricey, I’d just get it anyway.
  • 2 0
 OEM spec do they can gouge customers for the extra $1k+
  • 2 0
 I dunno about that c-clip spring retaining system, ±500lbs is a huge amount of force, fox is telling us that all that is being retained by a 2$ zink plated clip ,i hope they did the tests of reliability and that they will sell the clip apart because many users will lose the clip at least once lol.
  • 2 0
 That's what is used in most dirtbike shocks to retain the spring
  • 2 0
 A 230lb dirtbike that hits things for hours at a time much harder than any rampage rider is doing on a bicycle has the same system, I'm sure it will work just fine.
  • 1 0
 These same clips are used to hold bigger loads, its the geometry of the whole thing that makes it work, that clip is strong as hell.
  • 5 0
 The Art of Rearranging - "Upside Down Knob you turn me!!!"
  • 4 1
 To everybody surprized by the chrome instead of Kashima, the Floax X2 from 2018 I believe already had a chrome shaft, it was just hidden inside the air can.
  • 8 1
 Exactly waiting for 2022 Supreme x Fox collab with red kashima
  • 3 1
 Meanwhile Cane Creek is as good and almost half the price... I have a CCDB and a DHX2, can't tell the difference between them but they're both much better than the stock shock they replaced.
  • 6 3
 Lmao cane creek was never nearly as good
  • 5 1
 @freeridejerk888: You mean never nearly as bad? Agreed.
  • 2 0
 Actually, since cane creeks blow up twice a season, it works out to the same price.
  • 3 0
 Climb switch now on a separate circuit to the other damping circuits is the big one for me. Rock hard pedalling platform here I come. Thank you!
  • 1 0
 Is the air can a smaller diameter on the new X2? I was wondering if they made any body modifications that may conveniently allowed it to fit with a little more clearance on certain frames...not intentionally, just coincidentally.
  • 1 0
 - Went to PB buy and sell.
- Found a Fox RC4 Kashima 8.5" that fits on my "old" DMR Sled 2019.
- Found a Push Hypercoil that fits on that RC4.
- Bring the RC4 to a friend who is a expert in moto / car suspensions and now MTB too. Let him to do magic with that "obsolete shock".
Total spent : Equivalent to $ 300 USD, best purschase made in the recent time for my bike. Smile
  • 1 0
 Can anyone help with how much more the new Fox X2 progression compared to the old one? I have a 2017 Pivot Phoenix and ever since updating the 2019 Fox X2 which has less room for volume spacers it doesn't provide enough progression for the frame?
  • 4 0
 Can’t see the kashima wearing off if it’s not there to begin with
  • 2 0
 FOX bike fork with Kashima - look what i can do.

Any car shock or heavy machinery hydraulic strut.( chrome shaft) - hold my beer.
  • 4 1
 Kashima seems to be increasing in popularity in motorsports too, like snowmobiles etc. It's a gimmick there also.
  • 1 0
 Lmao only from fox @pcledrew:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: Not true. KYB is selling Kashima coated shocks now too.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: Where? I know they were using it in Moto years ago. Still using it now?
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: Skidoo released Kashima front shocks on the Summit and other sleds in 2018. Their shocks are made by KYB.
  • 1 0
 @pcledrew: Interesting. Thanks. I know they were doing Moto stuff with it but that was back in like pre 2015.

Interesting. Looks like the 2020 upper end sleds are coming with that. Wonder what that's all about. Thanks for that. Gave me something to get side tracked in and read up on. LOL!
  • 3 0
 think i will stick with my dvo jade its been an absolute beast of a coil shock
  • 1 0
 Yup, very happy with mine. Best of all it's very easy to rebuild/service at home, with no special tools required.
  • 1 1
 Yes, Fox is expensive. Yes, a lot of people don’t like to mess with multiple adjustment knobs on a shock or fork.

However, if you take care of the maintenance on Fox and learn how the low and high speed adjustments affect performance then the suspension is a long term value and is actually very easy to tune.

When you can isolate the adjustments down to one specific effect, then you can tell exactly what your changes to rebound and compression are doing.
  • 1 0
 except that they moved the rebound back to a shim stack in the main piston, so if your weight is outside the peak of the bell curve, you're going to have a sub-optimal tune. As a rider weighing more than 160 pounds, thats why I switched to Cane Creek back in the day.
  • 2 1
 "The air sprung Float X2 gets updated compression ratios meaning less spacers are needed to achieve same progressivity as the old shock."

Isn't that really just "the air spring is smaller overall"? Lots of words...
  • 3 0
 where have I seen the C-clip spring retainer system ?? hmm...
  • 4 1
 I suppose my 2020 Float X2 belongs in the bin now
  • 7 2
 Isn´t it where it always belonged?
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: I like it.
  • 2 1
 @nhp890: Then why the question? It´s subpar damper with good air spring but as long as it works for you...
  • 3 2
 @Mondbiker: X2 is The only air damper with decent mid/end stroke support. The rest is blowing through travel back and forth. Sorry haven't tried the latest Deluxe Utimate, but I seriously doubt it has anything to offer. Pro riders must have some really dialed tunes to be able to race World Cups on them. For long travel applications , compared to CCDB Coil or DHX2 or EXT, all air shocks are silly. They have to be run slightly underdamped or they get woody on medium hits (we have just baby heads and big rocks in general in Scanidanvia). And then they fly through travel. Then they spike at the end of travel, so you want to push loads of HSR to keep any stability on big holes. And not all air shocks have seprate HSR so yo have choice between good midstroke action or stability. Sorry... air shocks have some way to go. A least on bikes with highly variable curve like VPP.
  • 3 1
 @WAKIdesigns: when will you people learn that mid stroke support is what spring does and not damper? And that is any damper, not just X2. With X2 all you can get out of using clickers is either digressive or painfully digressive damping, neither of those helps mid/endstroke behavior in any way, it can only mess up the only thing it´s pretty good at-small bump compliance because of solid air spring design and obviously as with any big neg volume air can it uses more pressure so that´s where it gets more stable mid stroke. It´s awesome it took them only 4 years to realize that midvalve is actually helpful when it comes to damping.
  • 1 3
 @Mondbiker: what is good with rear wheel blowing back and forth no matter what it rolls onto?! Not only it can be felt on the bike, it can even be observed when riding behind someone with a shitty shock. They will ride through chunk and their rear wheel will be in their ass half of the time whie decent setup stays in travel and skims over most of the stuff. Not sure what characteristics you are after.mate but more I read from you the more feelin I have that you are into a mother of five and it makes me curious to see you ride through stuff like VDS or the lower section of Kouty, even though it still lacks repetitive big compressions. Czarna Gora in Poland is a much better example of a proper test of suspension, rather than regular chatter found in vast majority of places in Karpaty.

X2 is the best air shock out there unless latest TTX Air gives it a run for it's money. Still not worth it over a good coil
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Kouty is my most favourite bike park Smile I find quite interesting how someone who seems to be pretty knowledgable in this whole mtb scene has yet to find out how X2 dampers suck at damping... I mean you don´t even have to be an engineer to understand that it just cannot work as well as something with either shimmed midvalve or at least stiffer spring in the adjusters (Like CC dampers use). Don´t take my word for it, read more, learn more...AVA page sums up fairly well what´s going on inside in few sentences, no need to read diploma thesis to find out why these dampers suck and why there is quite a few people tuning them with new shimmed midvalve pistons/stiffer springs etc.
  • 1 2
 @Mondbiker: Kouty was more blown out last year than X2 after 6 months without service. That red track on the right with tables is a death trap for anyone with basic jumping and cornering skill. Jesus Christ. Almost killed my ankles form sending to flat and I can't even ride. Fricking jumped into the forest above retaining edge, flying sideways on one of those tables mid corner. And I am good at hipped jumps. DH track, save the bloody gutter after crossing the lift where I haven't managed to find a good line is super tits. Shame, It kills my brakes and arms and I'd love to come fresher to the last woods.

Try Czarna Gora. You have to cross the threshold. Find the amplitude where you start gapping everything out of raw speed and it turns into Star Wars. I like it more than Hafjell World Cup track.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Last year I was there before it was even officially opened and it was a dream, for my group of riders it was the best day of riding in our lives, literally, there was still bit of snow on the top part of the trail you have described (stara medvedica I believe)so it was closed and you have to ride upper part of DH line (the blown out and very rooty section) but other than that there was just heaven dirt with most of braking bumps in upper half completely sorted. And heh, DH track should be like that shouldn´t it? Like there isn´t a good line at all? Still, I found Semmering DH track much worse than black one in Kouty, not because it was harder but way more sketchy with so many blind drops where left side is OK and the other side is 100% crash, one of those tracks you should walk before riding, but who does that in a bikepark? There is a lot of tracks not too far from where I live, thanks for Czarna gora tip! If only this covid BS would go away now so I could ride something more than just trail where I can pedal myself ( but I know some people cannot do even that so I´m thankful, just not too much lol).
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: my CCDBair gave me plenty of mid support.
  • 3 2
 That high speed rebound knob placement is going to confuse like 98% of riders. Nothing is in it's usual place on this shock.
  • 17 0
 98% of riders are confused by tuning any shock, I don't think the knob placement changes that.
  • 3 0
 @thegoodflow: Couldn't agree more. Most of my customers don't know which switch is compression and which controls rebound, or what they actually do.
  • 2 1
 Older versions were confusing to a lot of people too
  • 2 0
 Please don’t forget FAST SUSPENSION with their HOLY GRAIL Coil SHOCK. Excellent product
Very good French company
  • 5 1
 Fuck off Fox
  • 1 0
 This one's my favorite
  • 3 0
 Fox should low friction chrome there stancion!!
  • 2 2
 That feeling when you just bought an 2020 bikes with 2020 36 and X2... Hey Fox I also upgraded the post to a Transfer... Could you release a new dropper post please? My coffin need one last nail...
  • 1 0
 So sorry for your troubles. I hope you can make do with your 2020 bike, but the road ahead will surely bring more challenges. Stay strong. Keep your head up.
  • 3 0
 Chrome Kashima?
  • 2 1
 chrome chrome.
  • 5 0
 @onemanarmy: like rock shox domain chrome?
  • 2 0
 @Stokedonthis: more like Marz 888 TI kind of chrome. Factory chrome.
  • 5 0
 Chroshima
  • 3 0
 Heroshima
  • 2 3
 @endlessblockades: I will report you to the same people who wanted me banned for Chinese Flu. They almost jacked me but then I explained moderators that I'm from "Free Tibet"
  • 2 3
 @WAKIdesigns: They are already asking for me to be banned. I am only here to help, and I think Radek knows that. I'm not a Han Chinese mole trying to harvest frozen Falun Gong organs at Everest base camp 3.
  • 4 1
 DHX RC2/4 still winnin
  • 5 0
 fox should bring these back as marzocchi shocks and print money
  • 3 0
 @dovbvsh66: I would purchase
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: damn looks very similar, probably way more reliable than the new dhx2 which seems to always be pissin oil
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: oh shit I forgot it existed. I vaguely remember it releasing but it didn;t have dh bike sizes but now it does. sweet.
  • 1 0
 Where do I buy the performance version of the float x2 as mentioned in the video?
  • 1 0
 @C0yotekid: ight numb nut, tell me where you see it on this page www.ridefox.com/family.php?m=bike&family=floatx2
  • 1 0
 @C0yotekid: yeah sure, but there is no tab for the performance line of float x2s, whereas on the 36 and 38 there are tabs for performance and performance elite. Does this mean the performance x2 is an OEM only like the 2020 and prior models? That was my question
  • 2 3
 I could do without the teenage innuendo jokes when I'm trying to learn about a product. The more crass pinkbike gets, the less likely i am to come back I know I'll get downvoted to oblivion, but it needs to be said.
  • 1 0
 so again, for YT Capra riders there is no Climb-Switch option :/
  • 2 1
 why are you saying that?
i have a capra with a flat x2 and ride with it open all the time
  • 2 0
 for V3 Banshee riders, there is no HSR adjustment...
  • 1 0
 Jak to myslis Baba-Ji?
  • 1 1
 why would the climb switch only matter for capra riders???
  • 1 0
 Capra (and couple of other non-DH bikes too) is using 250×75 mm shock, basically almost all shocks in that lenght doesnt have "ClimbSwitch" Frown
  • 2 0
 @Baba-Ji: I got my my DHX2 direct from Fox - they'll add a Firm switch to just about any model you want. They don't put them on the longer length models like a Capra uses because they feel that size shock is probably going on a DH bike and nobody would need one. I think I have a picture of it in my photos.
  • 2 0
 However, I wouldn't bother if I had to do it again. My Capra climbs anything I can handle climbing and I forget to flip the switch on the regular. The Capra is such a solid forgiving bike I often finish a ripping descent and find the climb switch engaged.....¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 1 0
 @Baba-Ji: Really? I upgraded YT Capra with DHX2 with climb switch 250x70...it is basically 250x75 with 5 mm spacer I found on Bike24.de. Maybe, I was just lucky...
  • 1 0
 yes, ofcourse there are some ways how to get CS on DHX2 shock, but it costs extra money or personal effort. What i wanted to say in my first post is, that new shox, not custom made, dont have CS in 250 lenght. If you need CS or not its another question, which i dont want to open right now.
  • 1 0
 @Baba-Ji: Right, I missed that piece of info in the article about 250 without CS.
  • 1 0
 @endlessblockades: I would only put a coil shock on my capra for bike parks and use the air shock for trail riding. No need for the switch
  • 1 0
 @Neumaier: i like the coil for all types of riding. i got the switch because I was afraid a coil would kill the climb but it didn't. I also put 165 cranks on it
  • 1 2
 I think the external stroke adjustment is a really good idea. It does mean you can take the shock with you if you swap frames (in a lot of cases).
  • 2 0
 Cascade Components showed something similar on an Instagram-Post:

www.instagram.com/p/B8KtthcHElU
  • 1 1
 Does this mean that the rear shock kashima will match the fork and seat post?
  • 1 0
 wish they would come up with a MegNeg option for the DPX2
  • 1 0
 yeah fuck those poppet valves!
  • 2 1
 Does it still require a complete disassembly to service the air can?
  • 1 0
 Kashima out????!!!NooooooooooFrown (((
  • 1 0
 Anything that sounds like ‘Cash’.......is gonna make me weep
  • 1 0
 Toilet paper for the win!
  • 1 3
 Does anyone get the feeling that Fox has been ripping everyone off with their extremely high prices on their shocks???? The bulk manufacturing cost is probably about $80. Come on Fox stop ripping us off
  • 1 0
 Don´t buy it?
  • 1 0
 Is the bumper a possible upgrade (opportunity) for my "old" dhx2?
  • 1 1
 Think I'm going to get into motocross, mountain bicycles are getting way to expensive.
  • 1 0
 I like that that fox now use elastomer for extra bottom out control ?
  • 1 1
 Shock stroke adjustments? Now we can change shaft lenght?
  • 6 0
 something my wife wishes I had Frown
  • 3 4
 Suddenly that $549 derailleur piece doesn't seem so over-priced... just kidding Fox, your prices are absolutely insane
  • 1 0
 Sohai design.
  • 2 3
 that coil would look / feel great on my bike
  • 6 7
 Still desperately trying to catch up with an Ohlins TTX22
  • 1 0
 Riiggghtt????
  • 1 2
 And half the knob still don't do anyting...
  • 1 4
 No chrome on the DHX2? No buy

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