Review: Fox 40 vs RockShox Boxxer vs Ohlins DH38 - DH Bike Week

Feb 17, 2021 at 7:51
by Dan Roberts  








If you’re an avid reader of Pinkbike then you’re probably aware of the outcome of this test. But play along and maybe you’ll learn something on the way there. Just don’t forget to act surprised when you get to the end.

For everyone else, we’re continuing our DH Bike Week with a head-to-head-to-head of three of the biggest DH forks out there at the moment. Over the course of the entire summer and autumn seasons, as well as some choice dry spells in the winter season, we tested these three forks across four different DH bikes to find out which one came out on top.





RockShox Boxxer Ultimate Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate

The Boxxer is a fork that has been around for a very long time, in many different guises. RockShox divides the Boxxer into the Select and Ultimate versions, with the latter and top tier version being the one we tested.

The Boxxer runs on 35mm diameter stanchions and follows the company’s ideals of user friendliness throughout the chassis.
RockShox Boxxer Details

Wheel Sizes: 27.5" & 29"
Travel: 180mm / 190mm / 200mm
Offset: 36mm or 46mm (27.5"), 46mm or 56mm (29")
Weight: 2588g (29” / 56mm offset / flat crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut / 1 token)
Price: €1,890 or $1,699 USD
More info: sram.com

There’s a pinch bolt-less Maxle axle system that bolts the axle into the fork from one side and then uses a wedge system to splay the axle end apart to resist undoing. It’s a 20mm diameter axle with a 110mm width and interestingly doesn’t use the Torque Cap system that the rest of the RockShox range uses.

Sag markings are printed on the stanchions, something that RockShox has patented, and make it a doddle to set up the fork if you’re running something different to the recommended settings. In an effort to reduce the friction in the fork, RockShox used SKF wiper seals along with fresh fluids in the damper.

The Boxxer is available in 29” and 27.5” wheel sizes. There’s a 36mm and 46mm offset available for the small wheel version and 46mm and 56mm available for the big wheel version.

There are a few travel options too – 180mm, 190mm and 200mm, which allow the Boxxer to be applicable to not only DH bikes but also some bigger travel bikes that usually sport a single crown. Our 200mm travel Boxxer has a 602mm axle to crown.

It’s a 200mm post mount for the brake with a max rotor size up at 220mm. But that brake mount is following the Boost DH standard, so you might need a 5mm spacer behind the disc if you have an older, non-Boost DH hub.

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The Boxxer's Maxle system bolts it in from side and uses a wedge system to stop the axle threads from undoing.
RockShox Boxxer Ultimate Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
While not always the starting point for fork setup, the markings on the fork do help when you're setting up via sag rather than suggested pressure.

The Boxxer uses RockShox’s DebonAir air spring system, which is on the face of it a very similar system used in all of RockShox’s forks, with the dual chamber system auto equalising through travel via a moulded dimple on the inside of the stanchion.

The air spring is tunable via screw in volume spacers that use an 8mm hex tool to snug them into one another and the top cap. The max number of tokens is 6 for all the travel options, with only the number of tokens coming installed from the factory changing with travel. Max air pressure is 200psi.

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The air spring in the Boxxer uses screw-in volume spacers to adjust the ramp up characteristics. They all snug together with an 8mm hex tool.
RockShox Boxxer Ultimate Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
The Charger 2.1 damper has externally adjustable high and low speed compression, with low speed rebound adjustable at the bottom of the fork.

The Boxxer Ultimate uses the latest Charger 2.1 sealed damper cartridge that has externally adjustable high and low speed compression at the top of the fork with low speed rebound adjustment at the bottom. There are 4 clicks of high-speed compression, 18 of low-speed compression and 18 of rebound.

Our Boxxer Ultimate came in at 2,588g, the lightest in the test. It’s 2,071g for the fork and 517g for the crowns. Setup was - 29” / 56mm offset / flat crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut / 1 token.

The Boxxer Ultimate costs €1,890 or $1,699 USD, making it the least expensive if you're paying in USD.





Fox 40 Factory Photo Kifact Shaperideshoot

Fox 40 Factory

For 2021 the Fox 40 received quite some tweaks all round, which we’ll go into. The name also got tweaked a little, with the 49 name being dropped and the whole DH fork range, be it for 27.5” or 29” wheels, now called just the 40.

Following the naming of Fox’s forks, it’s easy to understand that it uses 40mm diameter stanchions. And in the case of the Factory version that we tested, they’re Kashima.
Fox 40 Details

Wheel Sizes: 27.5" & 29"
Travel: 190mm and 203mm
Offset: 44mm, 48mm, 52mm or 56mm
Weight: 2,770g (29” / 56mm offset / drop crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut / 2 tokens)
Price: €2,299 or $1,749 USD
More info: ridefox.com

Much like the 38 and 36, the 40 saw a redesigned crown to offset it further forwards and more out of the way of the frame. But it carried over the pinch bolt axle and lower leg bleeders from the previous version, which also found their way onto the 38 and 36. There’s also the lower leg channels that allow the bath oil to circulate up to the upper bushing during fork use, keeping everything well lubricated.

That floating axle system tightens the axle up against the brake side lower leg, pinches it off and then allows the opposite leg to float and find its perfect position to align the lowers and stanchions for smooth movement. It’s then pinched to the axle via two 5mm bolts. There are replaceable threaded pars for the axle pinch bolts too.

It’s a 203mm post mount brake with the max rotor size up at 230mm. It follows the Boost DH standard too. The 40 is available in 203mm travel and 29” and 27.5” dedicated forks. But Fox actually offers four different crown offsets, from 44mm to 56mm, along with a flat and drop top crown in every offset.

There’s actually a 190mm air spring assembly available too, giving an option for a slightly shorter 40, if you so wish. Our 203mm travel 40 has an axle to crown of 601.9mm.

There’s a Fox bolt on mudguard available for the 40, that uses the two bolt holes in the back of the crown and forgoes the spacers behind the back of the air bleeders on the lowers.

Fox 40 Factory Photo Kifact Shaperideshoot
For 2021 the 40's crown got a complete redesign to add clearance tune stiffness.
Fox 40 Factory Photo Kifact Shaperideshoot
The 40 also uses a pinch bolt axle system to securely hold the axle while allowing everything to be aligned. There's a small replaceable threaded part for the 4 pinch bolts too.

The EVOL, or extra volume, air spring is again a familiar system from the previous version of the 40 and still uses the two self-equalising chamber system with the ability to snap in volume spacers to change the air spring characteristics. For 2021 it got updated though to have larger positive and negative chamber volumes.

Max volume spacers are 5 for the 200mm travel fork and 7 for the 190mm version. Max air pressure is up at 120psi.

Fox 40 Factory Photo Kifact Shaperideshoot
Like the Boxxer, the 40 uses plastic volume spacers for ramp adjustment. But these ones snap together without the need for a tool.
Fox 40 Factory Photo Kifact Shaperideshoot
The Grip 2 damper has externally adjustable high and low speed compression and rebound damping, along with a new internal design for the high speed adjustment.

If you’re familiar with Fox, then you’ll recognise the 40 using the company’s latest Grip2 damper, with external adjustments for high and low speed rebound and compression. This latest version of the damper uses a small propeller shaped mechanism to adjust the force on the piston’s shim stack and so adjust the high-speed compression and rebound, dubbed VVC. There are 8 clicks of adjustment on the high-speed circuits and 16 clicks on the low-speed circuits.

Our 40 Factory came in at 2,770g. It’s 2,245g for the forks and 525g for the crowns. Setup was - 29” / 56mm offset / drop crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut / 2 tokens.

The Fox 40 Factory costs a whopping €2,299 or $1,749 USD, making it the most expensive in the test if you're paying in Euros.





 hlins DH38 m.1 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Öhlins DH38 m.1

Like the Boxxer and 40, the DH38 from Öhlins isn’t an “all new” fork. The m.1 suffix indicating the second iteration of DH fork from the Swedish manufacturer. And while from a distance it may look the same as the company’s DH Race fork, it’s a whole different beast, with changes throughout it.

There are no prizes for guessing the stanchion diameter. 38mm if you somehow guessed wrong.
Öhlins DH38 Details

Wheel Sizes: 27.5" & 29"
Travel: 120mm to 200mm
Offset: 46mm, 50mm, 54mm or 58mm
Weight: 2,822g (50mm offset / drop crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut)
Price: €1,759 or $1,950 USD
More info: ohlins.com

The DH38 uses the same lowers for for 29” and 27.5” wheels and when you purchase the fork it’s as two separate parts – the fork and the crowns. The latter having four different offsets from 46mm to 58mm in 4mm increments. Flat and drop crowns are available - the flat is associated with a 27.5” wheel and the drop crown with a 29” wheel.

The axle system on the DH38 is the same as the Fox 40, with only the exception of one bolt per leg instead of two. The principle also being the same in allowing good alignment between the lowers and stanchions no matter the tolerance on the hub width. There are replaceable threaded pars for the axle pinch bolts too.

The DH38 is available in 180mm and 200mm travel full fork versions, but there are air spring options for as little as 120mm meaning you can have that dual crown directness on almost any bike you want. It’s also approved for ebikes.

It’s a 200mm post mount for the brake and uses the Boost DH standard. Our 200mm travel version had a minimum axle to crown of 608mm for 29” and 590mm for 27.5”.

 hlins DH38 m.1 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
There's a bit of separation between the fork and crowns when buying the DH38, alowing you to get exactly the fork offset you're after.
 hlins DH38 m.1 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
It's a similar pinch bolt axle system to the Fox 40, just with two less bolts. It still has small replaceable threaded parts for the pinch bolts, though.

While the RockShox and Fox air springs might be somewhat similar in design, the Öhlins one is a little bit different. The two self-equalising chamber design is there, but there’s a third ramp chamber, accessible at the bottom of the fork, that allows the fork’s ramp up characteristics to be changed via air pressure, and so with much more resolution than the fixed volume tokens on the Boxxer and 40. It’s a sealed cartridge too, meaning you can disassemble it from the fork without having to take the air pressure out.

There’s a new ramp chamber tube in the air spring to help with longer service intervals and all three chambers can actually be altered in volume via spacers, but it’s a more involved job to do than on the RockShox and Fox forks and is only something that would need doing if you have some really specific requirements.

 hlins DH38 m.1 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
Adjusting the ramp of the fork is done with air pressure via the valve at the bottom of the fork.
 hlins DH38 m.1 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot
There's externally adjustable high and low speed compression damping with low speed rebound at the bottom of the TTX damper.

The damper in the DH38 takes a lot of inspiration from the RXF36 m.2 trail and enduro fork and benefits from the refinements to the one-way valves that control the oil flow inside the twin tube damper. It also uses the same piston design and low speed damping needle for the compression and rebound circuits to increase adjustability.

There’s externally adjustable high and low speed compression and low speed rebound damping adjustment. Those adjusters now having a bit more of a defined click to them to help identify where you are in the range. There are 3 clicks of high-speed compression, 17 clicks of low-speed compression and 16 clicks of low-speed rebound.

Our DH38 m.1 came in at 2,822g, the heaviest on test. It’s 2,379g for the forks and 443g for the crowns. Setup was - 50mm offset / drop crown / 162mm steerer / no star nut.

The DH38 m.1 retails for €1,443 or $1600 USD for the fork and €316 or $350 USD for the crowns, making it the most expensive in our test if you're paying in USD but the least expensive if you're paying in Euros.





Initial Setup

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate
Boxxer setup is pretty quick and easy. Along with that there’s some very good setup and user manuals from RockShox to help with installation, setup, explaining the different adjustments and providing somewhere to note down your setups.

The wheel bolts in fast and there are recommended air spring pressures printed on the side of the fork. There’s also the TrailHead tool online or via the app which uses the fork’s serial number to output the starting pressure and rebound for your weight.

The sticker suggested 118psi, working from the rider weight ranges that it displays. The TrailHead app directly suggested 118psi with 9 clicks of rebound from fully closed.

Lots of the Boxxers on the DH bikes we tested came with 1 volume spacer installed, and I started like this.


Fox 40 Factory
There’s a few more bolts to turn on the 40 to get the wheel in. But it doesn’t take much longer to do. There’s also recommended settings printed on the fork, with air pressure and settings for the low and high speed rebound.

Fox also provides documentation for 40 setup and adjusting along with technical drawings and all relevant part information and numbers should you need any bits and pieces.

Working from the rider weight ranges again, it suggested 70psi for a 75kg rider, half way between the 68-82kg range. Accompanying that was 7 clicks of low and high speed rebound from fully closed.

The 40 came stock with 2 volume spacers installed and that is where I started.


Öhlins DH38 m.1
The DH38 uses the same axle system as the 40, just with 2 less bolts. And it too has printed recommended settings on the side of the fork for the three air chambers.

It suggested 108psi in the main chamber and 215-230psi in the ramp chamber. I started at 215psi.

Öhlins also has a Performance Suspension Guide that uses your bike brand and model along with your weight and suspension preference to output all the applicable components along with suggested starting points in setup. It suggested 110psi in the main chamber and 215psi in the ramp chamber.

There’s also good documentation along with the fork about installation, setup and adjustment along with instructional videos available through the website.





Performance

Canyon Sender CFR Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate

The Boxxer actually came specced on three of the four bikes in our recent DH bike group test, giving me a lot of time in on it.

Set up to the recommended setting of 115psi it became immediately apparent that something needed to change. There’s really a lot of movement in and out of the travel all the time, and this was the character trait that defined the Boxxer throughout testing. Pressure was quickly upped to 130psi and the total number of tokens to 3 from the stock 1. That also warranted more rebound damping to control the bigger spring.

With this setup the fork performed a lot better. It brought more composure to the front of the bike and really helped when riding fast through rough undulating terrain. But that trait is still there and something that needs more arm movement and more thought to account for. Creeping up the compression damping again helped to calm this erratic movement a little more, but did bring a bit more harshness into the equation.

I experimented with even firmer pressures, up at 140 and 145psi, but this was now beginning to be too much. It pushed the harshness of the fork too high from solely the spring and balancing with less compression damping didn’t do the trick. Each time I experimented, I came back to 130psi and the compression not too far from fully closed as the best balance of spring and damping to reduce the big fork oscillations as much as possible.

Commencal Supreme DH 29 - 27 Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

I’ve received flack in the past from internet comments about too firm settings in suspension. But living in front of a World Cup level race track does demand some meat in the setup, and this over-springing is something that many a friend with a Boxxer has had to do to calm that character trait, along with all the testers that were on the Boxxer equipped DH bikes we tested.

Because it needs that much spring to deal with its main issue, it means that it won’t be the supplest of forks through the impacts. You’re somewhat forced into one of two camps with it. One being to run it softer, in spring and damping, to have a nice supple feel, but then having a lot more fork movement when things get rough and choppy. The other being the camp that I settled in, forgoing that suppleness for some control.

Now the Boxxer is a good fork, it’s easy to adjust, the adjustments result in a noticeable feeling, it’s easy to work on and does perform well. But it’s a fork that requires more of your concentration when riding, to use your arms more in the suspension equation and, if you prefer to run it on the firmer side, grip a little bit harder when you hit through the rough stuff.

Another point to mention is the fork width on the Boxxer. It’s a fair bit narrower than the other forks here and does increase the turning circle on a lot of bikes quite noticeably, especially on bikes with very prominent fork bumpers or wide tubes. For those of you thinking about putting a Boxxer on your enduro bike, god forbid, it might be something to keep in mind. I also had more than one occasion where the whole axle became undone and started to unscrew out of the fork while riding. It never came completely out, and it was pretty quickly recognisable from the wheel rattle at the front, but it prompted me to check the axles on the Boxxers a little more than often.

And while the Boxxer is available in two different offsets for the 29” version, it's only the longest 56mm version that we saw on the bikes and might actually be too long, as we’ll explain more about in the Fox 40 and especially Öhlins DH38.





Cube TWO15 HPC SLT Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Fox 40 Factory

The 40, in comparison to the Boxxer, is a fork that doesn’t force you into a corner of setup. Although, like any fork, its setup does also depend on how the rear suspension of the bike is working and behaving.

Fitted to the Cube TWO15 that we’ve recently reviewed, it needed a slightly softer setup, closer to the recommended settings, to complement the softer feeling from the rear of the Cube that had generally more suspension movement in it. Running the fork firm on this bike pushed the rider weight too far back and resulted in some issues. In its softer setting it did exhibit obviously a bit more movement but that matched the very progressive rear suspension of the Cube.

Running it on a bike with a lot more chassis support in the rear meant that the fork could be run a bit firmer, to then complement the rear suspension feel more. On the likes of the Canyon Sender, I could run more air in the spring and more tokens while still having a fork that maintained an impressive amount of suppleness. There will often be a trade off in support vs suppleness, but on the 40 that gap is a lot smaller and it’s soft and absorbent when you need it to be and then hard and supportive when you need that.

But its ability to adapt to each of those bikes while still having a high level of performance was noticeable and much appreciated when swapping it from one bike to another.

Cube TWO15 HPC SLT Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

As I’ve mentioned, I do prefer a slightly stiffer fork. And with the 40 setup a bit firmer it really starts to disappear underneath you on the more demanding tracks, leaving you with only the faint damping schlurp noise to remind you that it’s working. That trait to disappear meaning that you could put your focus more on the riding and not having to ride around any unfavourable traits in the fork’s working.

That firmer setup did put it further away from the recommended settings and is something echoed by friends and other testers on the 40, who were often up at 90psi and with more tokens in there too. But the fork's suppleness and feel weren’t compromised by this up in pressure.

It is a long fork though, especially in the 29” guise, and this is something true of all the 29” downhill forks we tested. Depending on your rider height, headtube length and bar height preferences it can make getting a low bar height tricky.

There are a lot of adjusters on the 40, but if you’re confident in knowing their purpose you have some wonderful windows of adjustability with the 40 both in compression and rebound. On the flip side, if you’re not familiar with what each dial does then it’s an easy process to bracket each one at a time to understand the difference in feeling and how that affects the ride.

There’s also adjustability in the crowns with the 40. Both our test forks had the longest 56mm and as we’ll go into with the Öhlins, where we had the opportunity to test the different offsets, I’d actually prefer the 52mm offset that Fox offers for its balance of cornering grip versus understeer. But it’s another positive for the 40 to offer this level of adjustability.





Photographer Kifkat Shaperideshoot

Öhlins DH38 m.1

And then we get to the Öhlins. Those loveable traits exhibited by the Fox 40 almost turned up another notch when you rode the DH38. This really is a suspension product that completely vanishes underneath you, so good is its performance, and it often left me speechless at the bottom of the run. I honestly spent a lot of time staring at this fork wondering how it had not only allowed me to just get away with murder, but somewhat incited me to do it.

Out of the box and with exactly the recommended air pressure settings the fork exhibits brilliant sensitivity that really takes the sting off any hits that would definitely be felt more through the likes of the Boxxer. When the ferocity of the trail increases then so does the composure of the fork. You push it harder on a run, it just gives you more back, and you end up in this constant one-up battle with it to see where its limits are. Spoiler, I don’t think it has any. That transition and build from buttery smooth to creamy supportive is class leading and really addictive.

The DH38 never seems to get flustered, dealing with every impact or scenario just once and then moving on to the next. All the while it providing you with a crystal-clear path of information to what’s going on at the front contact patch. This is something that the Fox 40 also does really well, but on the DH38 it’s like there’s less interference in the phone line. It really is a fork that lifts your gaze when riding, leaving you to focus on nothing but the trail in front of you, which is coming up mightily fast.

Each adjuster definitely does have more of a defined click to it now, to let you know where you are in the range. Each one of those clicks creating a palpable change in fork feel and in the direction that you intended. There’s no second guessing adjustments and even though there are overall less clicks than some of the other forks on test, the range is wonderfully usable.

Specialized Demo Race Photo Kifcat Shaperideshoot

Another favourable part of the DH38 is its ability to adjust the ramp characteristics of the fork. Using air instead of plastic tokens as the main adjustment gives a finer resolution and even running the ramp chamber up at 220, 230 and 240psi, it still maintains the wonderful sensitivity at the beginning of the travel. That up in ramp pressure providing more support for some of the more demanding tracks, like Morgins, and the hugely sculpted jump trails in Chatel.

That adjustability also extends to the fork’s offset. Öhlins being kind enough to send us a bunch of different crowns to experiment with. Down at the shortest of 46mm, there seems to be a bit more tucking of the front wheel when you turn it. You initiate the turn and the bars keep wanting to turn past the point that you need to make it round the corner.

Out at the other end, with 58mm offset, there’s a tendency of the front wheel to understeer in the turns, especially in high-speed flatter turns. It’s not a snap movement, but there’s more push from the front end which isn’t the nicest of feelings for confidence when you’re riding fast.

Coming into the two middle settings, of 50mm and 54mm, it’s the 50mm that I found to be my favourite. That tucking trait was substantially reduced and so too was the understeer feeling in the fast flat turns. Using the 54mm brought a bit of that feeling back and I found myself coming back to the 50mm.





Servicing

RockShox Boxxer Ultimate
The Boxxer is a really easy fork to work on to keep it running well. Lower leg services are a cinch, very similar to every other RockShox fork and advised every 50 hours.

It needs 10ml 0w-30 in both lower legs and 3ml in the air spring, along with a bit of grease around the piston seals.

Every 200 hours RockShox recommends a full fork service, which they do explain how to do in the service manual, but is a little more involved and requires some more specific tools than the lower leg service. You’re directed straight to all relevant service and upgrade parts for your Boxxer through the TrailHead tool.


Fox 40 Factory
Fox says to do a full fork service every 125 hours or yearly, whichever comes first. And if you ride a lot and in extreme conditions a lot then you’re urged to do this earlier.

It’s also not a tricky procedure at all to do a lower leg service, with Fox having online documents for oil volumes for the lower legs along with service manuals for damper and air spring rebuilds.

It needs 35ml of Fox 20wt Gold oil in the air side lower leg and 6ml in the air spring itself. Then 50ml Fox 5wt Teflon Infused oil in the damper side lower leg.


Öhlins DH38 m.1
Öhlins suggest doing a lower leg service every 50 hours and now have the service kits and instructions available to the public. It needs 10ml Renep CGLP 68 fork lube in both lower legs, which is a bit less than the other forks, so it’s advised to stick to that 50-hour service interval to keep it running perfectly.

A full fork rebuild is recommended every 100 hours or yearly, whichever comes first, and this is also something Öhlins now document how to do for the lowers and air spring although it does need some more specific tools. The damper also needs servicing at this interval and this is something that Öhlins still recommends to have done by an official service centre.





Photographer Kifkat Shaperideshoot

Verdict

The RockShox Boxxer is the lightest of the forks we tested by quite a margin. And while it is a good fork that a lot of people can get along with, it does have a glaring character trait that can push you to a corner in setup.

The new Fox 40 is sublime and is another step forward from what already was a great previous fork. Its ability to blend together suppleness and support all while being adaptable to how the rear suspension of your bike, or yourself, is behaving is brilliant and easy to do. Every year it seems hard to see how the big brands can improve upon the last version, but Fox have taken the new 40 to be right up there and battling with the very best in the pack.

But what the 40 does so well, the Öhlins DH38 m.1 does just that little bit better and makes this truly a special fork. If you want a dual crown fork that blends smoothness and support like no other, all the while egging you on to ride faster, push harder and pull further, then look no further than the DH38. It is heavier and more expensive than the competition, if you're paying in USD. If you're paying in Euros then it's actually the least expensive. But any concerns on weight and price metrics are out the window when you ride it. And for these reasons it earned the title of Suspension Product of the Year 2020.






Photos by Kifkat / Shaperideshoot


311 Comments

  • 292 3
 A moment of silence for the Dorado.
  • 32 2
 Rumour is the Dorado got stuck in quarantine. Hopefully they'll be allowed out to party.
  • 58 6
 @Dougal-SC: Dorado - great fork noone cares about since 2012 (?).
  • 11 11
 @Helmchentuned: you can’t be more wrong than that, i’m afraid! Wink
  • 3 1
 @Dougal-SC: heard the same rumor, idea was to release it on Sea Otter...
  • 10 0
 Dorado left chat
  • 71 3
 Dorado been flexing on the competition since 1999
  • 21 21
 @zyoungson: Dorado’s been engineered with built-in flex for the past 10 years, in order to better absorb stuff. I love it when haters start talking about flex when talking about the Dorado... Smile
  • 4 0
 @hitarpotar: So there is a new one coming? Yeah. Hope it gets more attention than the lastt model that, at least over here in Germany, is a rare sight. The old one was great, looking forward to the new one.
  • 25 49
flag wheelsmith (Feb 20, 2021 at 5:34) (Below Threshold)
 Fox for racing, RockShox for jumping, Ohlins for dentists
  • 14 0
 @Helmchentuned: yeah, been told it’s delayed due to Covid-19. Can’t comment on other details as nothing is set in stone, but what i heard was pretty awesome. Nevertheless, can wait for it so i’m waiting on delivery of a 2017/18 current gen at the moment - got it exactly for Germany. Was a pretty hard looking around for a Dorado, a guy selling different forks told me i’m in for a hard time to find one as the owners don’t want to sell: reason is they’re pretty happy with the fork. Smile
  • 16 1
 I haven’t ridden the ohlins - I’m sure it’s good - my dorados feel better than any of the boxxers or 40s I’ve ridden though.
  • 3 2
 @hitarpotar: Shiver...
  • 3 0
 @curendero: what about it?
  • 12 6
 @Helmchentuned: Dougal cares because he's a Manitou salesman.
  • 14 1
 @hitarpotar: What a lot of people don't seem to realize is that inverted forks, generally, are much stiffer for and aft. Something I personally prefer. The twisting motion only helps the fork better track the ground. It is a great fork, I'm patiently waiting for a 200mm 29'er version.
  • 7 6
 @wheelsmith: *boxxer for the trash
  • 5 14
flag msniki (Feb 20, 2021 at 8:33) (Below Threshold)
 Long forgotten Dorado.
It's good to people who are some sort of religious towards Manitou Dorado. Otherwise i see nothing special and nothing like these 3 forks here. Big Grin
  • 7 1
 @wheelsmith: Well no, the Fox is more expensive than the Öhlins
  • 9 2
 @jeremy3220: perhaps it’s also because Manitou can bring something worthy to the party?

Every suspension tuner has their favorite and many suspension shops sell a certain brand.

If I were Dougal, I’d take Manitou over Fox or RS in a minute.
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: I still have the single crown and still running on my old Easton Brodie Holeshot. Super flex laterally...
  • 3 0
 @wheelsmith: Dorado for the working stiff
  • 2 5
 @hitarpotar: They literally have a special axle to stop flex. Usd forks are for motorcycles hence the 3 normal side up forks here.
  • 13 0
 @msniki: The Dorado rides better than any boxxer. That's why people still talk about them.
  • 3 0
 @brassinne: You can run the bigger wheel on the 650b version with a drop crown Wink
  • 4 8
flag msniki (Feb 20, 2021 at 12:28) (Below Threshold)
 @BeerGuzlinFool: It used to ride better . I don't think now a Dorado can beat a 2020 boxxer ultimate.
That's like 5 or more years of technology difference. I also tested a lot of forks, till i find the perfect one for me.Manitou Dorado was one of them. Marzocchi 380 c2r2 TI, Boxxer rc/ team/WC and around 6-7 fox 40's.
Fox was the perfect fork for me.
Well the 2016+ fox 40 kashima fit 4/ float is a faster fork for fast people. Makes me want to push and ride even faster , like there is no limit.
While the Dorado is perfect for people who don't push so much, who are kind-a relaxed while riding.
It just felt slow for me, but the damping was good. Small bumps sensitivity was similar in both forks.
The difference in speed was HUGE thought, the fox just loves speed.
And the fox 40 doesn't flex as much as the dorado.
  • 8 7
 @rivercitycycles: bro, there is a good reason Dorados aren't this popular. I have ridden a Dorado off drops, I did some jumping. Yes, it is quite supple on the terrain, but oh my God, you don't wanna do any drops on it, I swear, it is a scary experience when your wheel goes a bit sideways and you can see it.
  • 5 0
 I still have my Dorado 275. I liked the fork when I was racing DH. Easy to set up and great bottom-out resistance. It was odd how few of them I'd see at other bike parks. I could be at a park with over a 100 other riders and maybe one of them besides myself would be on a Dorado. I still might build up another 27.5" DH bike (fingers crossed for a Tora), so I keep it around.

The irony is there was a 29er version of the Dorado before any of the others even had 27.5" forks. This seems to have been a problem for Manitou (and Hayes in general) for the last few years - some good products, but terrible timing.
  • 7 5
 @jeremy3220: Not a salesman. Distribution partner and test rider.
  • 6 2
 @Dougal-SC: "The full range of Manitou forks is available from Shockcraft." ...sure bud.
  • 1 0
 @Ninjanulski: not about price about boutique
  • 3 1
 @rivercitycycles: careful you might get downloaded for having an opinion
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: Ya, I haven't tried it. One of my local suspension guys makes custom cnc'd crowns for just about anything. Several years ago I had them make some flat crowns for a monster T. They were very nice and I had the ability to use direct mount stems as well.
  • 2 1
 Pinkbike really needs to get their euro to USD conversions right, all of these are off and I think thats super important
  • 2 0
 @pinegrove: They’re not currency conversions, they’re the recommended prices in those territories. The Euro prices include ~20% VAT (sales tax).
  • 2 0
 @msniki: an Öhlins’ air chamber design awfully lot sounds like the Dorado’s... at least 5yrs later than Manitou thought about it. And those same 5yrs ago the Boxxer was utter shit in performance compared to others. So yeah, 5yrs have passed - the Boxxer should have caught them already! Big Grin Most weekend warriors are more relaxed behind the bar, they aren’t pushing for every second - by your logic the Dorado’s a better option for them. Smile Plus, it looks very different and more interesting than others due to the usd-design (at least in my view). Smile
  • 3 0
 @brassinne: yeah buddy...and my 29 is working just fine on my 27.5 Dorado. crazy good this fork....
  • 6 1
 @tadgercat: yeah, once a Dorado owner, you become a Manitou fan (that happened to me). And all the Manitou haters usually never owned 1 or if they did, it was a lower-budget model from 15yrs ago... Smile
  • 137 13
 I would love a 120mm Ohlins DH 38 for my Santa Cruz Tallboy Smile
  • 7 2
 my b missed the like button
  • 54 18
 I’d love a 5hp lawn mower motor for my Porsche gt3.
  • 18 21
 lmao why am I getting downvoted for a joke
  • 15 2
 @barbarm: ones perception of humour is different from another.
  • 88 0
 @onemanarmy: I think the correct analogy in this case is "I'd love a Porsche motor on my lawn mower"
  • 5 1
 120mm?
  • 75 7
 @barbarm: because most pb commenters are either 12 and don’t get it or 50 and forgot their fiber pills.
  • 4 3
 @RafaGamas: yeah but who doesn’t?
  • 6 3
 @onemanarmy: lol lol lol there are evidently a bunch of idiots who can't see the humour in this and think you're dissing the fork!
  • 11 1
 @onemanarmy: that is hilarious but I’m 51 and laughed my ass off at that comment. Just sayin’
  • 10 1
 @onemanarmy: ha, thank you for this! I'm gonna go take my fiber now....
  • 5 1
 @onemanarmy: thanks for the reminder. Can you please send me another at 4:30 for supper? Thanks
  • 5 17
flag onemind123 (Feb 20, 2021 at 7:47) (Below Threshold)
 @barbarm: why does anyone care if they are upvoted?


Fwiw I upvoted you so you feel better. Now go ride your bike.
  • 7 4
 Pretty crazy that Rockshox uses the same stanchion size from XC to DH. Just shows how small the DH market is, that they can't be bothered to update it after all these years. Maybe now that the Zeb exists It'll finaly get some love.
  • 1 1
 @onemanarmy: Thanks for the reminder. I’m always forgetting. Now where are my damn glasses so I can read the label...
  • 3 1
 @Glory831Guy: it’ll probably get larger stanchion just because marketing but I don’t think I’d focus too much on stanchion size as the main factor especially not for a dual crown. Just look at the lyrik, stiffness was never really it’s shortcomings.
  • 10 0
 @fatduke: did no one actually read the post and see the dh 38 can go from 120 to 200mm lol
  • 2 1
 @barbarm: I'm going to say no.
  • 4 0
 @Glory831Guy: Do people complain about the boxxer not being stiff enough? If so, how much of that stiffness is actually being lost through the stanchions? Smaller diameter stanchions result in less friction.
  • 3 1
 @RafaGamas: i have a Subaru engine on mine.
  • 4 0
 @MaplePanda:
TBH I've never ridden a Boxxer, I have Fox 40's on my Glory. I have seen some interesting pics online that show quite a bit of flex, in G-out situations.

www.vitalmtb.com/photos/member/G-Out-Project-Snowshoe-World-Cup-Downhill,12615/G-Out-Project-Snowshoe-World-Cup-Downhill-David-Trummer,133106/JackRice,44569
  • 7 0
 @Glory831Guy: would be cool to see huck to flat with dh forks!
  • 1 0
 @MonsterTruck: crap... I missed it. Here’s to a late reminder. Better late than never.
  • 1 0
 @scoon: I got you! Think I’ll do the same.
  • 70 1
 I'll be in the BuySell section ready to buy a like new Boxxer Ultimate for cheap since so many people will suddenly realize that their new boxxer is an unrideable fork.
  • 51 0
 More Downhill weeks please!!!! ????????????????????????
Excellent work, Dan!!!
  • 7 1
 Maybe less poetry. I don't get every idea
  • 16 0
 Every week should be DH week!
  • 1 0
 @Caiokv: Preach
  • 48 1
 So...no more DVO???
  • 22 7
 Kinda frustrating to always read only about Fox, RS and Öhlins on Pinkbike...
  • 17 16
 Have an Onyx on my trail bike, so much better in every way than a 36 or Lyric.
  • 4 7
 or marzocchi
  • 22 0
 @hitarpotar: I'm guessing here, but if DVO provides forks, they'll get tested.
  • 17 0
 @mark3: marz is fox
  • 4 3
 Love dvo, but why are their 27.5 vs 29 forks so different in price? Didn’t think the extra 1.5 inches was an extra $500 for an Onyx DC vs SC
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: I second that.
  • 1 21
flag speedy-fox2 (Feb 20, 2021 at 14:11) (Below Threshold)
 DVO is a small brand without much automation, sales or big athletes roster, they make small amount of forks yearly and only the most dentisty of dentists ride them. Also, as far as I know, they barely even win something, so it is a beautiful, unconventional pile of stuff from a racing standpoint.
  • 3 1
 @guide210: SCis single crown, DC is dual crown. It's not a reference to 27 or 29.
  • 3 1
 @speedy-fox2: DVO was cheaper than a lower end RS or Fox/Marz for me, and I can't even really afford nice MTB stuff. And I'm really happy I went over budget for a very adjustable fork rather than spending $500 for something I would be unhappy with as I enjoy tinkering. Adjustments help keep my ADHD brain happy
  • 8 12
flag SlodownU (Feb 20, 2021 at 16:46) (Below Threshold)
 @ultimatist: You’ve got it all wrong about DVO, if they PAY for their fork to get tested, then it will get tested. You think shit gets tested here for free?
  • 1 4
 @speedy-fox2: dvo is upscaled suntour that let down giant of all companies. They have alot of ground to regain.
  • 4 1
 @makripper: Suntour manufacturers DVO forks but otherwise they are nothing alike. Also pleasing Giant is hard. Just think DVO was too small and didn’t have their manufacturing lead times/processes in order soon enough for the crazy volume. They seem to be coming back though. Nothing but great comments about DVO for the past couple of years.
  • 3 0
 @covekid: it was because they didn't make an xc fork for the race team. nothing about volume lol
  • 2 0
 @SlodownU: Yes, I think shit gets tested here for free.

BMW doesn't pay MotorTrend to review or compare their cars; they just send the car. Do you know how Pinkbike is monetized?
  • 2 0
 I ride a DVO, I have tried Lyrik and 36 and without a doubt it is much better in quality and DVO performance, even when you open the fork the internals are better....
  • 4 0
 @RobertoCBucio Not to mention easy at home service, with instruction videos made by DVO
  • 3 0
 @noone1223: Easy, and no proprietary tools needed. It saves hundreds of dollars and time off the bike being able to service at home. I feel like this needs more mention in reviews if complex components.
  • 1 0
 @CarbonShmarbon: I agree. Service is almost never mentioned in reviews, but yet, as someone on a budget (why did I buy a D1...), that was one of the major things for me. How much a part costs to service makes more of a difference than the actual cost of the part itself. That's why I will probably always buy DVO from now on (unless its an EXT rear shock... Can't beat that look that EXT has)
  • 40 0
 Great work Dan. DH week is the best!
  • 27 3
 I wish Pinkbike would have this guy fact check all the tech articles. Some of the other writers post cringe worthy stuff trying to write way over their heads. This guy just nails it.
  • 18 3
 I was a little disappointed by the lack of depth in the Commencal test yestersay. Bike has a 61° head angle and they didn't even comment on how that extreme geometry affected the handling. That's like testing a bike with 33" wheels and not commenting on the difference between it and and 29er.
  • 14 2
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Although Dan Roberts didn't state anything specifically about the head angle, but his review made it clear that the Supreme is a speed daemon that prefers to take the most direct and fastest line, a trait that can be attributed in part to that extreme head angle. What you're asking is just to comment about a single figure in the geo taken alone : past reviews were specifically criticized for that... Dan's review was just perfect, period !
  • 22 1
 Ohlins - listening to reviewer and customer feedback paying off in spades, their intro into MTB was not best recieved, they learnt fast, using feedback and applying their damping prowess.

Why has it taken RS 5 years to not do this? Their stuff is still to harsh and spiky.
  • 5 0
 It probably helps they have one of the best (and most in tune) DH riders on their books. I'm sure Mr Bruni has had a helping hand in the development of the 38.

Plus they have a ton of experience from other motor sports that they can feed into the mix.
  • 17 1
 Rock shox doesn't care. They get spec.d on alot of bikes and honestly most people can't tell the difference between a good fork and a bad one.
  • 3 7
flag thenotoriousmic (Feb 20, 2021 at 16:43) (Below Threshold)
 @BeerGuzlinFool: do you think it might be because this review is a bit shit and the boxer isn’t actually a bad fork and it’s actually capable of winning multiple world cups? lol
  • 3 1
 @thenotoriousmic: It's not a bad fork, but that doesn't mean there aren't better ones. A better rider can often beat a worse rider even if the worse rider has better equipment. Although one fork may be better than another the difference in the three is not too big to prevent people from winning on it entirely.
  • 1 0
 I really want to like the boxxer. Its lightweight lends itself to use on bikes with sort of 170-180mm of travel that come with SC. I just can’t love it though. My friends forks might need some attention, but they do feel a bit harsh/sharp. I am always happy to return to my dorado. If I owned boxxers I would probably buy the ohlins upgrade for them.
  • 3 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Winning world cups really doesn't prove anything for the boxxer . The pros are not using the same internals that you and I are able to purchase. They are custom tuned to each bike and rider per their preference. The pros also set their bikes up way stiffer than an average rider. I have personally owned 2 Boxxer forks. I was never happy with the way either one ride. Pretty much for the same reasons this arrival mentioned.
  • 2 2
 @BeerGuzlinFool: it literally proves they can perform at the absolute highest level and achieve its sole purpose of winning world cups. What are you talking about?
  • 1 1
 @thenotoriousmic: whatever dude. Ride what you like or what you have. Was just trying to say that you aren't riding the same fork as the pros.
  • 3 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: Definitely are. There’s nothing the pro’s get that you couldn’t get for a couple of hundred dollars. Honestly why would rockshox not sell the secret World Cup winning forks to the public? If they have a better product they’re going to sell it. They’re not hoarding the good stuff. Doesnt make sense.
  • 2 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: No, he is right. The pros have the same springs and dampers, they just set them up differently from the way you and I set them up, and they put hours upon hours into setting them up and changing that setup with every track. Not to mention they are just better riders than you and me in every way. The most custom things the pros have is possibly custom HSR shimming, which if you're technically inclined enough you can change yourself. What are the upgrades that the pros have access to that you don't?
  • 2 1
 @DAN-ROCKS: exactly everyone’s riding the stock spring just with custom compression and rebound tunes and custom weight oils and that’s pretty much it. Literally something everyone should do with a 8 inch travel fork and you could do yourself or get someone like tftuned to do for about £150.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Right?? When you spend as much as one does on a DH fork, 150 is not a lot of money to pay to get it to feel eexxxactly how you want if youre serious about tuning your fork like the pros. I feel like some people try to make excuses like this to make them feel like the pros aren't really that much better than them.
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: Wrong. When you spend that type of money on a fork it should work out of the box. Tuning should be just that fine tuning how it feels. You shouldn't have to spend hundreds of dollars to have it perform correctly. DVO will custom shim your fork for very little if for anything at all .
  • 2 2
 @DAN-ROCKS: Bottom line is. Rock shox has been around forever and still delivers less than top tier products for top tier prices.
  • 2 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: You’re not listening are you? It’s already the best of not the best fork straight out of the box. There’s nothing you need to do to it. All pros tune the fork to their weight and to the conditions regardless of what brand they use.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: lol. Definitely not the best fork out of the box. Not even close. Either you are a rock shox fanboy or you haven't ridden other dual crown forks.
  • 3 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: well unfortunately the countless World Cup wins and podiums say different. It’s been proven to perform at the highest level by the best racers time after time.
  • 2 2
 @thenotoriousmic: wow.. ok it's the greatest fork ever produced . Nothing has and ever match it. Except for the ones I have owned. Both boxxers I owned didn't make it through a single season without major rebuilds or failures. And they never worked properly. If you honestly think the reason the pros won races was because of the boxxer you really are a fanboy. They won their races and just happened to be using a boxxer.
  • 3 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: Your the fool I you think you can win a World Cup on anything less than an amazing fork. You can actually watch it performing to the highest level with your own eye.
  • 1 4
 @thenotoriousmic: . No. You're a fanboy.
I've had nothing but bad experiences with this brand and I refuse to support them. I don't give a sh! T what pros ride them. Marzocchi, Manitou and DVO have all performed better and lasted way longer than any boxxer I have owned. I hope you have better luck with yours.
  • 1 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: You should know: servicing suspension is a thing. I can't think of an actual reason you've had so many bad experiences with the boxxer which have every time made it basically unridable. If people who pay consistent attention to their suspension and treat it the way they should can win DH world cups on them, they are good enough for you. I agree RS is not as good as FOX or Ohlins, but they are also considerably cheaper! On top of that, neither of those forks are good out of the box. You have to put air in them, right?? You have to adjust the damper, right?? Rockshox has great tuning guides for starting points as seen in this article. I am saving for a 38 rn, I know that FOX is better. But the idea that Rockshox tuning is bad out of the box is just a hater attitude. RS comes with plenty of adjustments for a rider who knows what the dials they're turning do.
  • 2 1
 @BeerGuzlinFool: Definitely not a fanboy for mentioning that I’d seen the boxxer work really really well on red bull tv.

380s were the best forks marzocchi ever made. Definitely not as good as the boxxer. Still really good though I broke mine three times in 18 months.
My mattocs are nice forks but not as nice as my pikes. It’s not a coincidence that everyone sponsored or not all ride fox or rockshox.
  • 1 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: You are assuming I don't know how to set up and tune a fork. Wrong. I also do periodic maintenance. Heavier and aggressive riders that I ride with have all had problems with seals and internal parts. I personally had to have the lowers replaced on my first boxxer twice in less than 2 years. I could never get them to feel balanced either. I could either have the fork feel supportive with bad small bump compliance or good small bump compliance with no support. I'm just not a fan.
  • 2 0
 I think the takeaway here is that any fork can be setup to run well within reason / design limitations.

The problem is the window in which to hit certain forks sweet spot is very small, OR the adjustment range supplied out-of-the-box is not sufficient to hit that sweet spot.

Ohlins had this issue with the HSC on their first gen RXF for example.
Which brings me full circle back to my original comment.
Rockshox’s top line forks just don’t cut it without going deep inside for a pro tune.
  • 1 0
 @DG370: and which forks do cut it without a pro tune? lol. There’s probably more people running rockshox forks than every other manufacturer combined are they all wrong?
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: BeerGuzlinFool (Feb 20, 2021 at 11:36)
Rock shox doesn't care. They get spec.d on alot of bikes and honestly most people can't tell the difference between a good fork and a bad one.

In no order the latest top line Fox, Ohlins and Manitou are all excellent.
I cannot speak for DVO and others i have not personally used them in the last 5 years.
Older than 5 years ago, the likes of BOS and Marzocchi had sublime damping, pretty much before all this bladder crap came along - KISS
Some have mastered the bladder setups (Manitou for example) but its all unnecersary and im sure mostly driven by weight.

'Most people' are not wrong, they just dont know any different, I mean most people base a forks performance on how well it bounces in the car park Smile
  • 1 1
 @DG370: Most people include all the best riders in the world who ether want to be on sram or fox or actually buy their products out of their own race budgets. They’re not using manitou or DVO they all exclusively use fox or rockshox unless paid to use other products and then they all go back to sram or fox the very moment that deal end. Says it all really.
  • 18 1
 Really like your in depth approach of all parameters, so everybody can draw their own conclusions.
But boy, when will RS be able to bring good damping into the mass market? I really like their first gen vivid damping to this day, but almost everything else has very weird base setup. I mean preload in the rebound stack, for real? That is one of the worst ideas ever. Couple years ago the obsession with super big flow areas and according stacks. It‘s like almost every reputable tuner runs a different approach compared to RS and everybody likes those approaches way more than the RS one.
Btw: Comparing the main pistons and stacks in a review would be super interesting. Would also be nice to know, what you can get out of the stock RS pistons via reshimming. Normally it can raise performance significantly at literally no invest. Fiddling for the win :-).
  • 6 0
 Dyno charts for stock and revalved would be cool. We would need someone to interpret those BTW. Do the spring side too.
  • 3 0
 Novyparts just announced that they have a custom piston and shims for the latest charger dampers for lyrik, boxxer and pike
  • 1 0
 Yes, agreed
  • 3 0
 I have an old 2013-2014 (?) Boxxer, it has a coil and a very nice damper with a few adjustments, something like R2C2, , too many letters for me.. but ....butter smooth..just saying... oh, of course its obsolete, it fits 26 inch wheels.., my banshee darkside loves it.
  • 18 0
 I never really understood how a company can patent what is basically ‘putting the instructions on the side’
  • 8 0
 It is a simple idea (Rockshox does claim its difficult to do but I have my doubts) but it really is a differentiator. Setting sag by yourself on shocks/forks without it is certainly a bit more difficult.

I dont think I would specifically buy a shock because it has a sag marker, but I certainly appreciate it.
  • 3 1
 @mtmc99: agreed. It's a great idea. I think his point is, how can that be patentable? I guess it's more about the patent office getting paid than anything else. Split Pivot anyone? Fox should perhaps find some diagrams in their design office and write 2008 on them, then claim they invented the idea at the same time as RS.
  • 2 0
 I don’t see it as too much of an vantage on forks where repeatable sag is difficult, however for rear shocks it is so nice to have.
  • 2 0
 Its a tricky subject to categorize inventions. This is one of them. It comes down to the written details in the patent. Making sure its distinguishably different contains originality. For instance, maybe they did not patent the numbers being there but the process of putting text and design on that section of the fork. Or the idea that an O-Ring in conjunction with the numbers makes it an unmistakably effective sag reading tool. Just depends. Personally I find them to be valuable when I do get a bike with them. My girlfriend has a fox shock in a medium Juliana Joplin frame and I can hardly see where the O-Ring is because of the tubing cage around the shock. If I had numbers it would be much easier to tune.
  • 2 1
 @mtmc99: For my OCD it's a disadvantage. I get nervous when i am in 41 mm sag not 39. On my other Fox I just use the rule of thumb and I am happy all the time.
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: It is indeed difficult, you need to maintain the anodization thickness while also making the notes readable. You cannot just laser cut it on the stanction, that will destroy seals.
  • 4 0
 @CustardCountry & @jaame: Patents are tested against acceptance criteria. If nobody was doing it before Rockshox/SRAM thought of it, then it's probably non-obvious and novel. It's definitely useful.

@chillrider199: If you're interested, the relevant patent (or one of them, at least) is US 6,708,999:

A bicycle suspension system that includes an indicator for displaying the travel of a bicycle suspension system in response to an applied load. The system includes an inner tube telescopically engaging with the outer tube along an axis. A biasing mechanism biases the inner and outer tube apart from each other along the axis. The indicator is disposed along a length of the inner and outer tubes. The indicator may include a plurality of markings on the inner tube and a pointer on the outer tube. Each marking corresponds to a distance that the inner and outer tubes may be displaced relative to each other. The suspension system may include an adjustment mechanism that adjusts the distance the inner and outer tubes may be displaced relative to each other in response to an applied load. The rider may select the desired travel by actuating the adjustment mechanism to align the marking corresponding to the desired travel with the pointer. The indicator allows the rider to easily determine and select the travel of the suspension system without having to use a separate measuring device.
  • 1 1
 @boozed: Wow. That patent is worded _very_ broadly. I imagined that maybe they patented a novel way of printing on the stanchion so that the print doesn't protrude from the surface (even if only by a hundredth of a mm) and maintains the same hardness as the rest of the anodizing; as the sag indicator is in a high usage area. But, nope...gave those capitalist corporate bastards too much credit.
  • 3 0
 @Aleven: I'm not an IP lawyer but I play one on the internet... Isn't writing the description as broadly as possible while remaining novel the first lesson of patent-writing 101? If they'd described only the physical manufacturing process rather than the overall concept, it could potentially be circumvented by inventing a different process.
  • 2 0
 @boozed: Thank you for linking it. I was curious. This one is definitely more broad and simple than I thought it would be, given how some can be the exact opposite, just to get around one another design. Its fun to look back at old patents or simple ones like this. To just say “Why didnt I think of that?”
  • 3 0
 @boozed: you are 100% correct that it is standard practice to write the patent as broad as possible while still be able to defend it.

In college I had an engineering ethics class where the professor started most classes by reading us the description in a patent and then would have us guess what it was. It was rare that we got it correct.
  • 1 0
 @mtmc99: That sounds like a lot of fun. Haha
  • 1 0
 @boozed: I'm sure it is--which is unfortunate for the consumer--is what I was getting at. So the only reason why sag indicators aren't found on other OEM's forks/shocks is because they probably see it as too much hassle to challenge SRAM's absurdly broad patent. THANKS, SRAM!
  • 1 0
 It's not really necessary on forks, I never use it anyway. On shocks though it's gold. Really useful. I'd still rather have a Fox shock without the markers though.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I had a class on IP back in my uni days and proffesor said there are huge differences in what can be patented in EU compared to US... Like horst link suspension which was never granted EU patent so likes of Canyon and YT have been using it long before patent expired in US, they were not able to sell it there untill it expired tho'... Similarly I don't think this would ever pass in the old world but doubt anyone would manufacture different parts for two markets...
  • 1 0
 @winko: oh yeah I forgot about the Horst link one. I remember thinking the narrow wide one was questionable though, given that they admitted copying from an agricultural conveyor belt or something.
  • 20 2
 No Marzocchi? or is PB saving it for............. FREERIDE week??
  • 14 4
 Marzocchi is basically dead...Fox bough it, used the semi-sealed cartridge idea of the 380 to upgrade the 40 with grip2 and now Marzocchi is just the cheaper version of the 40 (like the performance series).
The old 380C2R2 is still the best fork I ever had (now I have a Fox...)
  • 8 0
 I hope so. I wanna see the mikes doing skinnies and wheelie drops.
  • 4 0
 @flowisforpussies: not to one up you but, Wink my 380C2R2 Ti is the plushest fork I've ever ridden. The thing is amazing but, trying to get somewhere to service it locally is impossible as finding spare parts. Dreading the day I need spares for it an have to sell it for spare or repairs. Frown So FKed off with Fox for that!!!
  • 12 0
 @brianpark make FREERIDE week happen!

Feels like 2005 again
  • 2 0
 @Caiokv: mtb has definitely been going thru a surge like it did in the early-mid 00's
  • 2 0
 @flowisforpussies: I have a 380 C2R2 and it is so tunable and way better than the new 40.
.
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: Agree. Very supple until the seals started to leak oil. Very expensive replacement parts with suspect tolerances resulting in continual oil loss. Called a top notch suspension place and they wouldn’t touch it. Too bad.
  • 1 0
 @ismellfish: what happen to Marz with the tennaco buy out makes me dubious of buying ohlins too.......
  • 1 0
 @ismellfish: had a top of range 55 that went the same. Got one rebound cartridge replacement out of warranty but, when it went the second time I just sold it spares or repairs. Lost a lot of £
  • 2 0
 @nojzilla: loved my 380 as well, sold mine though for a good price while you could still get parts for it, i also had a 55 ti top of the range fork and it was fantastic, so much more grip and better than my 2018 factory fox 36, it was funny listening to all the oil squelching as you rode along, i think you ride a decent marzocchi to know what plush is
  • 13 0
 @pinkbike would really like to see some other brands involved here too, including more budget focused options; DVO, Manitou, Formula, Suntour, Marzocchi. Possibly even a Push HC97 in a Boxxer to compare to the Charger; as with supply issues people are choosing upgrading/tuning their existing bikes/components more economically. I understand companies supply these and it's not likely to happen... but it'd be awesome.

Would also love to see a shock comparison test! So hopefully there's one on its way... very EXT Arma curious.
  • 12 0
 Great review @dan-roberts. Glad to see someone finally calling out RS for their lack of damping and support. Squishiest fork in the carpark test by miles, but basically runs on the bottom out stops when pointed down a hill. I had to put a coil in mine at about 10% sag AND firm up the shim stack just to make it work. Which wasn't great seeing as it's the most expensive fork I've ever paid for.
  • 1 0
 So you did a coil conversion and a revalve for more compression damping? Did it make it on par with other forks or better? I'm looking for solutions on this problem as well.
  • 1 0
 It made it better. The damping still leaves a little to be desired though. I prefer the dh38m1
  • 1 0
 @gabriel-mission9: That's a lot of useful information, thanks!
  • 9 6
 You’re literally using a fork that wins world cups as an excuse to why you suck at riding a bike?
  • 11 2
 @thenotoriousmic: I sincerely doubt WC racers are riding an off the shelf fork.

Nevermind that WC riders are...well... pretty good riders.
  • 2 0
 Oh you again. I had no issues with boxxer. I liked the volume spacers. Used 4 and 100 psi. Great small bump and bottomless feel. All about setup. Dan has a hard on for ohlins. Which is fine but you have to learn rs. It speaks a different language
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: absolutely true! No factory teams run a stock boxxer. Some of them got a Raceonly coil spring and the damper is obviously heavily modified
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: yeah most of them are. Rockshox, fox etc are all at the races they will give them custom tunes for the tracks etc but it’s all of the shelf parts. They don’t go giving them the secret good dampers that nobody else is allowed to have. ????
  • 4 0
 Quite a few of them run coil conversions with raceonlysprings in.
  • 4 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I heared Fox teams/riders pretty much use stock product with custom shimstacks, different oil and so on. Also heared that this isn't quite enough for some riders tho.
Rockshox teams modify their product way more than that, seems like they are allowed to do quite a lot.
With Öhlins being a racing company obviously not much at all will be production stuff, I would assume
  • 1 1
 @NicoOfner: they use custom tunes and oil weights. You can do it yourself if you know how to or get someone like tftuned to do if for around £150 which is something I’d recommend doing with a 8 inch travel forks other than that they’re all on stock components or prototypes which are probably going to be next years products.
  • 16 3
 Oh come on, nearly €2000 for a mountain bike fork is taking the absolute piss. We're a bunch of fools in this sport.
  • 9 0
 I've Fitted a progressive coil spring (from race only springs) to my Boxxer, I would really recommend it, holds you up on big hits and still buttery smooth, win win. It cuts out the air spring compromise of support vs plush (not cheap mind)
  • 4 0
 i fitted one about 3 years ago, ad its a great improvement, i have also recently fitted a progressive shock spring to match, anyway i am very interested in swapping out the charger damper but don't know what to swap to, or has any one tried the andreani upgrade piston kit on the standard charger damper
  • 1 0
 @mark3: I saw one with push damper, had to grind the damper a little bit to fit in. But that's an option
  • 1 0
 Did they provide the hardware to accommodate spring or there's only a spring?
  • 1 0
 @knightmarerider: just a spring, no hard ware needed
  • 2 0
 @mark3: Thanks, so how does this work? Remove air spring then drop in the coil?
  • 2 0
 Errrr. Just dropping a coil on top of your air piston really isn't a very good idea... You ideally want a coil conversion kit. As far as I know there aren't currently any on the market. I've made some in the past for new shape boxxers using parts from a coil assy from an older boxxer and bits from the air spring taken from the newer fork cut down on a lathe.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel-mission9: so they only sell springs hmmmm..... And I need to source a conversion kit by myself which isn't out on the market yet? Niche product things..…....
  • 3 0
 Older boxxers ran coils, so this didn't use to be an issue. It's only since the new shape chassis came out a year or two ago that the older coil conversion kits stopped being compatible. It's actually not that hard to convert an old coil assy with parts from the newer air assy, but I don't think anyone sells a kit off the shelf no.
  • 1 0
 @knightmarerider: Mines a 2018 Boxxer Team (so yes, previous chassis). I would contact Race Only Springs as I'm sure they are working on a spring/conv for the new Boxxer.
  • 1 0
 @Smokey79: Yes they are, will soon be done
  • 3 0
 @knightmarerider: Raceonlysprings will have one very soon
  • 5 0
 @knightmarerider: We have one finished and currently being put out to production, full coil conversion kit including our progressive spring, all CNC parts in 7075 aluminium. Feedback from test riders has all been fantastic!
  • 2 0
 @NicoOfner: Thanks Nico!
  • 2 0
 @Smokey79: Kit is finally finished and going out for production, new fork really behaves well with the progressive spring in it!
  • 3 0
 @RaceOnlySprings: Is there any possibility to fit the Öhlins DH38 with your progressive spring?
  • 2 0
 @PsychoTheRapist: That would be pretty much the ultimate in suspension.. There is plans to do this in the short term, hopefully before summer!
  • 12 3
 Dan Roberts is currently the standard bearer for bike and component reviews. Thank you for doing such a thorough and comprehensive job.
  • 8 1
 Ohlins is new to the MTB game, but they've been doing MotoGP suspension for longer than most people have been riding and they know their stuff. Which is why they came into the game and from the get-go managed to make a fork that doesn't crack and creak, something that Fox still can't get right. I'm excited to try the new iterations, because they're a company that actually try to innovate and not pretend a problem doesn't exist.
  • 3 0
 I'm liking the cÖils on my bike.
  • 5 0
 I think their most relevant experience comes from motocross, where they started, not MotoGP
  • 4 0
 They may not creak but had a steerer twist in the crown and 2 csu's with worn stanchions within 6 months on a spesh ohlins form
  • 10 0
 Are we going to pretend that Fox doesn't make suspension for literally every ground based vehicle you can imagine?
  • 4 0
 @lukeisdumb: Hovercrafts?
  • 14 9
 Rockshox Charger 2.1 dampers are ridiculously soft and lack support. Increasing the damping makes them harsh. I have no idea why they went from way too firm with the Charger 1 to soft in the 2 and super soft in the 2.1.
Will 3.0 give us the range people need?
  • 29 7
 Ähm - hitting at RS but not mentioning that FOX did the same (from RC2 to Grip VVC) is kind of a cheap shot from a suspension guy perspective. You know better. The factory damping settings of your favourite suspension brand, yeah the guys with the missing QC, are broadly comparable when the forks are stock (only dynoed the Mezzer, no Dorado for that matter).

As a professional from the Industry - if you throw shit at suspension manufacturers, at least try to hit everyone equally if they deserve it and from my experience they all are well deserving sometimes. Wink
  • 12 0
 Don’t bother with top models, just get a motion control boxxer for cheap and throw in your favorite tuning cartridge ;-)
  • 5 5
 @Helmchentuned: I haven't commented on the current Fox because I haven't had that one under the knife yet. Fox did indeed do bizarre things with the FIT4-RC2. Great damper design, came with either a jump tune in it (insanely stiff) or a really soft tune.
2018-20 GRIP2 had a mid-valve that choked badly on sharp impacts. I much prefer FIT4-RC2.

I haven't seen an ohlins in the flesh since their specialized experiments went wrong. It's a little concerning they're now owned by the same corporation that took Marzocchi down.
  • 3 0
 @Dougal-SC: Tenneco only bought Marzocchi go get their motorbike department and did not care at all for the MTB stuff. However, they seem to be far more committed to the Ohlins brand, at least for now.
  • 5 0
 I guess the pro athletes are running a custom shim stack on the Boxxer?
  • 4 3
 Odd, I found the Charger 2.1 to be a nice upgrade. It's supple off the top with more ramp up in the mid stroke.
  • 12 2
 @WoS: Pro athletes are running custom tunes regardless of what brand they're on
  • 4 0
 @chriskneeland: Damper reacts on shaft speed only therefore it doesn't provide more support in specific area. External bypass shock can do that but that's not on bikes anyway.
  • 5 0
 @knightmarerider: Odd, I always found my Fox 36 never had mid stroke support. It was supple off the top, but completely collapsed when it got halfway into its travel. Then when I added spacers or air pressure it became too harsh. The Boxxer is supple off the top, supportive in the mid travel, and ramps up at the end. I definitely have it working the way I like it.
  • 3 0
 @chriskneeland: might have something to do with the left stanchion.
  • 1 0
 @chriskneeland: I don't know how much you weigh but I have found that boxxers work better for people under 170 pounds or so. The heavier you are the harder they are to set up. I'm 225 and could never find a good set-up with a boxxer.
  • 2 0
 @BeerGuzlinFool: I'm running around 200 right now Probably 210-212 geared up. I always felt like the Fox would have worked better for me if I dropped 10-15lbs.
  • 1 8
flag speedy-fox2 (Feb 20, 2021 at 14:19) (Below Threshold)
 @knightmarerider: there are analogically built systems. Manitou Mattoc and probably Mezzer and Dorado, being all in all terrible (trust me, rode them) have a hydraulic bottom out control with adjustable flow, so you get something like a bypass, but in the end of the stroke. Push Industries have that in their rear shocks and I think EXT fiddled with something like that, but yes would be nice to have it more often.
  • 2 0
 @chriskneeland: i think you are conflating damper support and spring support. Plenty of people would say that Rockshox has had a superior air spring for some years. Possibly changed now, the new debonair seems like a regression and Fox are fully on the big negative chamber bandwagon.
  • 1 0
 @chriskneeland: I feel the same about boxxer. Strange dan doesn't get it.
  • 1 0
 @WoS: not only that. Even custom pistons and Coil springs or hybrid systems. Not much stock stuff in there
  • 11 2
 I would like to see how would Formula Nero fork behave in this test.
  • 8 0
 I forking love this downhill week.
  • 5 0
 20 mm axles . All my single crown forks have them. They can be done. They work . And just like looking down at massive 40 mm stantions they give me a good feeling of confidence.
  • 2 5
 How many 15mm axles have you snapped yet?
  • 1 0
 @mate1998: what's boost for son? Stiffness? Maybe?
  • 4 0
 @mate1998: You don't have to break them. Stiffer at the hub interface is useful. That's why torque caps on 15mm axles seem to work.
  • 11 4
 Can we have Downcountry week next week?
  • 8 1
 Fork off!
  • 3 1
 Fork you forking forkface motherforker!
  • 8 4
 Is it just me, or are the Öhlins’ air chambers solutions awfully lot sounding like the Dorado’s design together with the IRT?
  • 2 0
 Ohlins for the win 100%, best feeling fork I’ve ever ridden. I’ve ridden a 2020 Fox 40 Factory and a Boxxer and the Ohlins simply is better in my opinion. It workers far better for my riding style. Having the second air chamber was also super nice. It’s also super sensitive!
  • 6 2
 Looking at the weight of a Boxxer Vs a 38, one has to wonder if the Boxxer might be a good shout on an enduro bike. I would quite like to give it a go.
  • 1 11
flag onemanarmy Plus (Feb 20, 2021 at 13:04) (Below Threshold)
 Why? Just get the 38 if you need burly. Or the zeb. Dh forks on trail bikes is stupid. And this is from a guy that put a jrt on his hardtail.
  • 11 1
 @onemanarmy: Why is it stupid if the frame can handle it? Dual crowns are a far better solution to the fork flex problem than increasing the stanchion diameter, the A2C length of a 190mm Boxxer is less than a 180mm Zeb, no CSU creak, and the stanchions are held parallel better, reducing bushing bind.
  • 2 0
 @onemanarmy: or MRP Bartlett. I must admit though- I got a 38 to try out si ce my NE USA trails can be too tight for a
DC. I'd be like Austin Powers soi g infinite K-turns on a cart in a right hallway.
  • 2 7
flag onemanarmy Plus (Feb 20, 2021 at 20:33) (Below Threshold)
 @getonyourbike: lol. Honestly if I have to clarify I question that you’re serious.

I like to be able to turn that’s why.

I have zero creak in my 38 and zero bushing bind. It’s the better fork for an enduro/trail bike... period. Absolutely no reason to run a dc fork on. Trail bike. Park or dh bike... sure. Absolutely.
  • 5 1
 @onemanarmy: I'm serious.

A vapid argument and an assertion with no clout. I'm done here.
  • 1 0
 @Staktup: That's pretty much my point. A DC fork doesn't make sense outside of a bike park or in places that most of the trails are straights. Where I ride there's a lot of switch backs and a DC I'd have a hard time making those turns. When forks like the ZEB, 38 and similar are available I see very limited purpose of a DC on a trail/enduro bike. And I spend many years riding one. It's still in my garage.

But what do I know.. I mean clearly the industry is full of DC equipped trail bikes for sale from OE's.
  • 4 0
 Which has more WC podiums and wins- Boxxer or 40? Does a noodley Boxxer hinder Amaury or Myriam, or champions who ran SRAM in the past?
  • 1 0
 I’d be interested to see those stats... even if you just talk about the last 5 years.
  • 2 0
 I have a 2020 Ohlins 36 single crown on my Enduro. Boxxer WC on my DH. Even though my Ohlins is 170mm it still put performs the boxxer. Unreal fork, you can really dial in the feel with the 2 seperate air chambers. Lots of mid stroke support, stays high in its travel on steeps and through rock gardens all while still being supple and only bottoming out on the biggest hits I ride. I can only imagine how asking the DH 38 is.
  • 6 0
 BUT HOW ARE THEY STANDING UP?
  • 8 3
 Great review - more from Dan Roberts please!
  • 5 0
 $1749 = €1443
€1443 + 20% VAT is about €1732 not €2299
Wtf!
  • 1 0
 shipping, vat, custom duty, bc they can... lot of factors
  • 6 1
 None will fit a water bottle
  • 4 1
 Too bad the Dorado, shiver, 888 etc bit the dust. Would have been cool to see a gamut of forks in there
Wonder how the DVO and suntour stack up?
  • 5 4
 The onyx dc is far more adjustable, serviceable, tune able (they will tune it for you for a small fee) and better preforming. It’s so much better than the boxxer in every way. It is heavier tho
  • 3 1
 @freeridejerk888: Tuned suspension from DVO is about as good as it gets. I have an emerald that they tuned for me and couldn't be happier with how it performs.
  • 3 1
 Dorado isn't actually dead. The current model is out of stock due to the current worldwide supply issues. It'll be back but not sure when.
  • 5 0
 How does a suntour Rux compare to the field.?
  • 3 3
 It doesn't.
  • 2 0
 @z-man: I'm honestly curious. Like is it good enough for park duty or complete crap?
  • 1 0
 It's won World Cups so it can't be too shabby
  • 1 0
 @boozed: when?
  • 3 0
 @Ds1234: Tracy Hannah won the overall in 2019 on Suntour suspension and Fayolle was riding a Rux when he won at Lourdes in 2017.
  • 1 0
 @Ds1234: Tracey Hannah won a few WC races (and plenty at Crankworx) since UR Team switched to Suntour suspension in 2017
  • 1 0
 @boozed: oh right, didn't realise, thought they rode rockshox
  • 1 0
 Cant comment on rux but I ride auron almost daily and its probably the best bang for the bucks I've ever had... Needs some regular maintanance but considering it was roughly half the price of competition I can't really complain!
  • 2 1
 No mention of sometimes the most crucial aspect of any fork- mud clearance. Too many times saw my Boxxer block up and the front wheel totally jammed in muddy, clay conditions. The higher brace on Fox 40s was much better for keeping the front wheel rolling. This was a 4-5 years ago, is it still an issue?
  • 1 0
 "There’s really a lot of movement in and out of the travel all time,"

"something that needs more arm movement ... to account for."

Can you explain this more? If the suspension moves freely, how would that translate into more arm movement to account for?

"You’re somewhat forced into one of two camps with it. One being to run it softer, in spring and damping, to have a nice supple feel, but then having a lot more fork movement when things get rough and choppy. The other being the camp that I settled in, forgoing that suppleness for some control."

What about softer in spring and firmer in damping? Isn't that what you're looking for: less movement in rough (damping) for control, but added forgiveness from a softer spring? You imply the choices are both firm or both soft, which is weird.
  • 6 4
 Fox look like they've used boxxer lowers from the early 2000's. As good as they may be, looks count too. Ohlins if I was a dentist, to match the 911.
  • 4 1
 Ok now compare the Ohlins to the Super Monster please. Can’t decide between the two since they are so similar...
  • 4 1
 I'm confused why the fox 40's price is described as "whopping" when it's 3% more than the boxxer?
  • 3 0
 I’m assuming it’s comparing the prices in euros?
  • 1 0
 @pumpjumpnflow: Oh yeah you're totally right. Thanks.
  • 3 1
 Bit scary that I'm getting so old I still consider this to be the "new" boxxer while it's probably been around for longer than the "old" one by now...
  • 1 0
 This generation was introduced in 2019
  • 4 2
 I knew I wanted the Öhlins from the beginning but oh man. Thanks for this review.
  • 4 1
 Why has some absolute bell end down voted this comment??
  • 3 1
 Can you do a review of a K2 funky monkey with some Boxxers on them? Super modern setup
  • 4 2
 There is noting better than Avalanche cartridge in, either 888 or Boxxers chassis.... no more words required....!!!!
  • 1 1
 The coil conversion in a 40 is even better
  • 5 3
 If you have a lot of money it’s great. But I’d rather spend half on a dvo onyx and get it tuned for me as well and be able to rebuild it in an hour or so at home. Without shitty attitude from Craig is nice too.
  • 3 0
 Wow Avalanche is still a thing.
  • 1 2
 @freeridejerk888: I have received some of the attitude too!
  • 3 0
 This! Boxxer CS chassis + Avy internals outperforms most high end forks at a fraction of the price.
  • 1 1
 Really? Casue the avy internals plus a boxxer are over 2k and you can’t rebuild it The full avy kit is over 850. That’s crazy. @skidrumr:
  • 1 2
 Yeah when I questioned him about why it’s better he told be cause I know more and am better. Plus didn’t wanna answer any of the questions I had. Won’t ever be buying anything with that @oldnw:
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: it’s always interesting hearing that stuff.. seems 50/50 on what you get with Craig but I’ve always had absolute top notch customer service. He has spent hours and hours out of his day to just chat. He’s always been utmost kind to me on the phone...

And for me when it comes to Avy... I’m not concerned about rebuild, cost, or anything else. In it for pure performance and it has been the absolute best I’m ridden so far compared to a lot of other stuff
  • 3 1
 @freeridejerk888: I bought a used Boxxer chassis, Craig did a full rebuild and upgraded the internals for $550, and rode the crap out of that setup for years without any drop in performance. If you can handle an oil & seal refresh it doesn't need much else. This will be my M.O. until Boxxers disappear (not in my lifetime) or Craig goes out of business.. I may have spent what one new fork costs in total, but it has got me 3 great forks over the last 10 years
  • 1 2
 That’s funny. So when I’m talking to Craig he called me dumb when I said oh I can prolly just do a few lower leg services through out the year. No thanks I’ll stay far away from
Him @skidrumr:
  • 2 1
 @freeridejerk888: I had a lot of chats, with Craig and i've never been a disappointed... Craig is very helpful and very kindly replied to all my questions, personally i gained a lot of knowledge from him, as well he provides a full PDF documentation about set up's and maintenance + extra shims to fiddle with...
Avalanche products have been long time on the market and they already won their share...in fact i recommended their products to others and they ware not disappointed as well...easy to service and performance is outrageous, haven't tried their new stuff, as my Ava cartridge was first in my 888 than i moved to Boxxer chassis...but its worth checking their new Hybrid stuff (very hot product)...apart of fork cartridges they also have a (ssd) shock upgrades for most of the known brands...also outrageous performance....
  • 4 1
 1 measurement is worth a 1000 guesses. Why weren't these put on a dyno?
  • 1 0
 A dyno can help but can also mislead and is only as good as the person operating it and knowing what to search for.
Trust me, I have one of those damned machines Wink
  • 1 1
 Because a dyno is a tool that can only measure certain things. The Fox and Ohlins dampers are also not ones that can be easily removed and run on a dyno due to fluid leakage.
  • 2 0
 Glad you covered servicing, because that is critical in a decision-that being said, I love my boxer ultimate I got.
  • 4 2
 Dorado, emerald and Bos Obsys would be nice to see compared
  • 2 3
 Dorado, and emerald not offered in 29", pretty much everyone is running a 29" front wheel now.
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: Dorado has had 29" options since 2012 and the 2018 update made them all 27-29" capable just by sliding the crowns up and down.
  • 1 0
 @Dougal-SC: oh, I thought they never made a 29" version. I know the emerald is 26 or 27.5 only, with the onyx dc in 29
  • 1 0
 @Dan Roberts, where did you get the ohlins prices from? As online fork no crowns is over eur 1600 here in Europr
  • 1 0
 Did you really tried different forks on different bikes but in the same match?
  • 3 1
 That was really hard to read. Who's editing these monstrous tomes?
  • 1 0
 Bos :“When will i come”
Formula:“you can‘t”
Bos:“I can”
Dvo:“you can‘t”
  • 1 0
 So, lets see this 3 forks in 20 years time, if they are as sharp as my 99 MonsterT...
  • 2 2
 Cannot imagin the size of the stem and bar rise to ride the fox with that pivot lenght.




(Joke)
  • 2 2
 “replaceable thread parts” is much better than just saying “nuts” ;-)
  • 1 0
 Where is the Suntour dh fork? Only kidding
  • 1 0
 BRAPADDICT! BRAP BRAP BRAP!!!!
  • 2 0
 Oh great, Boost DH.
  • 1 0
 Finally a dh bike group test!!!!!
  • 1 0
 Awesome reviews.. I want a commencal with ohlins boingers!!
  • 1 0
 How about the dvo DH fork
  • 1 0
 no dorado, no bober, no rux... sad
  • 1 1
 How is the DH38 different from the DH race?
  • 1 0
 Fantastic.. Thank you.
  • 2 2
 No Dyno? ha
  • 5 6
 so one week a year where pinkbike acknowledges that dh bikes exist
  • 1 2
 Sounds like it's time for a 38mm Bezzer...
  • 1 2
 That 40 is last on the look good list, inmo.
  • 1 3
 MEGAN FOX OLIVI all the way!
  • 2 5
 RockShox Boxxer 的确很棒
  • 1 4
 Öhlins DH38 m.1 The most rigid cross country fork.
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