Check Out: Aftermarket Suspension Links to Customize Your Bike's Ride Characteristics

Oct 2, 2019 at 14:16
by Daniel Sapp  
Bikes are designed with a series of compromises that are usually aimed at making them good for typical riders in a given category. But individual riders are rarely typical. World Cup racers are constantly trying new links and different geometries. Which is why a cottage industry has sprung up around a number of bikes to provide aftermarket linkages that can dial bikes in for the terrain and rider on it. Back in the day, this often led to long-travel bikes with longer stroke shocks and poorly thought out kinematics and geometries, but things are more refined now. Often an older bike can be updated to a more modern geometry.

With a different link, some suspension designs can be modified to be more favorable for lighter or heavier riders by allowing the use of a different shock tune, different length shock, or a combination of the two. Let's check out a few of the different options out there, what bikes they work on, and what makes them unique. Keep in mind, not all of these are manufacturer-approved and may void a frame's warranty.

BikeYoke and Cascade Components all make suspension links that can be used in place of a bike's factory suspension link, on specific bikes, in order to allow the use of different shocks and to give the rider greater freedom in manipulating the way their bike rides. Orbea and Raaw also have aftermarket links for some of their bikes, we'll touch on those below as well. It's also worth mentioning Specialized's latest Stumpjumper and Stumpjumper ST use different shock hardware and fork travel to achieve different suspension and geometry numbers with the same frame.





Bike Yoke for Specialized Enduros 2016
BikeYoke's link eliminates Specialized's proprietary shock interface by adapting the linkage to standard eyelets.

BikeYoke
Bike Yoke make a number of different links that can be used with a variety of bikes in the Specialized family. The company was founded by Stefan Sack who had the notion that there were plenty of riders looking to run different shocks on their Specialized Enduro frames other than the shocks that came stock with a proprietary mounting plug. Since then, the company has developed numerous other products including a dropper post.

The CNC-machined aluminum yoke is available for a number of bike models in Specialized's line including models that are several years old. Currently, BikeYoke makes a link for the Specialized Camber, Enduro, Epic, Stumpjumper, SX Trail, Turbo Kenevo, and Turbo Levo. That's right, you can take the proprietary BRAIN system right off of your $10,500 USD S-Works Epic and bolt a standard shock on.

BikeYoke also make the Modefixxer that replaces the Shapeshifter unit on 2015-2017 Canyon Strives. There are two different links, the DH and PRO version. Both versions remove the remote and cable. The DH is available in one fixed geometry, DH. The PRO allows the adjustment of geometry between DH and XC modes. Both links also offer weight savings over the factory link.

All of the products are designed and tested in Germany and are available on their website for sale. Be sure to consult their manuals and PDF's for proper fit on each specific bike.

BikeYoke's Modefixxer replaces the Shapeshifter unit on 2015-2017 Canyon Strives
Bike Yoke for Specialized Enduros 2016
BikeYoke shock extensions include the necessary bushings and bolts to fit standard shock eyelets on certain Specialized bikes.





Cascade Components

Cascade Components manufactures aftermarket links for Santa Cruz's Nomad and Bronson. They also are working on a link for the new Megatower as well, according to their webpage.

Cascade Components' Nomad LT link gives riders a more progressive leverage curve, more travel, and longer chainstays while claiming to maintain stock pedaling characteristics, helpful when running a longer travel fork than stock. This allows for more options with tuning related to bottom-out resistance and small bump sensitivity. The increased progression also helps with bottom-out resistance for more aggressive riding or when running a coil shock.

Nomads can be set up with 190mm of travel via a 230 x 65mm shock or 177mm of travel with the stock 230 x 60mm shock. The link increases chainstay length by 6mm and uses sealed Enduro MAX bearings. It's made of 6061-T6 Aluminum and comes in raw, black, and blue colors.

The Bronson LT link helps manage bottom outs on the bike. The link adds 12% progression over stock and keeps the same pedaling characteristics of the stock Bronson layout while increasing the travel of the bike to 157mm, using the stock 210 x 55mm shock to help balance the bike out when using a 160mm or 170mm fork. The link helps increase small bump sensitivity and drops the bottom bracket height about 2.5mm below the stock low setting on the bike.

The link allows for more shock options and the use of a coil shock, something Santa Cruz do not recommend on the stock bike and provides more clearance for larger diameter shocks, such as the Fox Float X2 can more easily fit in the frame. The shock adds 5mm of chainstay length, is made of 6061-T6 aluminum and is available in raw, black, or clear anodized colors.

Nomad
Nomad V4 link.
Bronson
Bronson 2018 link.

Nomad
Nomad V4 leverage curve.
Bronson
Bronson 2018 leverage curve.





RAAW


RAAW have confronted the conundrum of tuning the suspension for different rider weights head on by designing multiple links for their Madonna bike. Since bikes are designed for riders within a certain weight limit, the suspension works best in the middle of that range. Riders that are above or below that limit are many times working at the extremes of a shock's tuning window and don't always get the best performance out of a bike.

RAWW's Madonna is a 160mm travel bike with a 60mm stroke shock with 20% of progression throughout its travel. That leaves a leverage ratio of 2.67:1 which is good for riders on the lower end of the spectrum but heavier riders typically have to run a lot more pressure in that scenario.

Instead of dealing with less than ideal ranges for certain riders, RAAW decided to go straight to the point and have developed a second rocker link with different geometry designed for riders over 90kg. That link, the Rocker 65, is designed to generate the same 160mm of travel but with 5mm more shock stroke resulting in a lower average leverage ratio of 2.46:1 with 20% progression. This allows a heavier rider, up to 115kg, to use a lower spring rate or air pressure and keep the same anti-squat and anti-rise values.

The Rocker 60 is designed for riders up to 90kg and the 65 is for riders over 90kg.]

The Rocker 60 (transparent) and Rocker 65 (filled) are visually just a little different and weigh pretty much the same
Leverage curves for the two shocks, both providing 20% progression.

As of now, all Madonna frame-kits and bikes are equipped with the Rocker 60. The Rocker 65 is available separately for 199.95 Euro including VAT (168.03 Euro w/o VAT for non-EU customers).





It's not aftermarket but also worth mentioning is Orbea's "Rally-On" linkage, recently introduced as an optional add-on to their Rallon bike.

Orbea Rallon R5 Linkage

The new link gives the fifth-generation Rallon a 10mm increase in travel to match the 2020 updates for the bike. The increase to 160mm rear travel also comes with a claimed increase in sensitivity and a more progressive leverage curve that some riders were asking for.

Orbea offers the link so that owners of the pre-2020 Rallon can convert their bikes to match the revised 2020 numbers... pretty great for those who aren't looking to drop a few years worth of car payments on a new bike each season.

The kit sells for $299 USD and comes with two new rocker arms, bearings, a new pivot axle, shock clevis, and hardware. It also gives you a bearing preload tool. The only thing missing to make the Rallon 2020-ready is a 170mm-travel fork but Orbea say it isn't required with the new linkage but hey, if you avoided buying a new bike, what's to keep you from just getting a new fork?

Orbea Rallon
The new link is being held in this photo, with the old link still on the bike behind it. The rocker's main pivot (blue) hasn't changed, but the shock yoke pivot (green) has moved down slightly. The seatstay pivot (red) has been moved down even more.
Orbea Rallon R5 Linkage





Aren't we glad we're past the days of longer forks, longer shocks, and the wrong link to hold it together all in the name of dropping off of some retaining walls?
Aren't we glad we're past the days of longer forks, longer shocks, and the wrong link to hold it together all in the name of dropping off of some retaining walls?

So who did we miss? Are there any other linkage manufacturers out there making World Cup level customizations for weekend warriors?


142 Comments

  • 111 5
 Ive found that the best fix for Canyon's shapeshifter is the Buy/Sell section of Pinkbike. Works pretty well, cure the problems right up.
  • 7 2
 If someone would design a link to change their frame to accommodate a mullet configuration and hold the same original frame geometry, then they can have my money...
  • 2 0
 Does it suck? Never tried it or know anyone who has
  • 1 0
 @Srfntrf: The SC Nomad is pretty damn close when running 27.5 in the low then switch to mullet and the flip chip to high. Brings the head tube and seat tube back inline to the low setting angles. BB height though is raised about 8mm. This was done switching from the Fox 36 27.5 to a Lyric RCT3 29 so not perfectly scientific.
  • 2 0
 @MattyBoyR6: I did the same to my nomad. 160 fox 36 29er with rear put in high setting. Bike rides amazing.
  • 2 0
 @Srfntrf: New Nicolai frames can do that via their mutators
  • 2 0
 @MattyBoyR6: even easier, just run a fork with 20mm less travel (ie same a2c) when you install the 29 front end and bam, nothing has changed about the geometry, but now you get to benefit from having to run the fork stiffer and carry two tubes hahah
  • 2 0
 @Socket: that sir is a brilliant idea. Nothing like smashing through rocks with less travel and a stiffer fork. My arms would be so fit.
  • 1 0
 @MattyBoyR6: It's just math. The pros on the EWS and DH have it on their bikes. Make the link, make me happy (that I don't have to buy another $2500+ frame), I would gladly pay for this upgrade. Mullets are the next trend and rightfully so, race results don't lie. Not everyone can accommodate a wagon wheel up their tukus.
  • 2 0
 @Srfntrf: Next trend.. again? We did this with 24/26 15+ years ago. flash in the pan.
  • 1 1
 @owlie: yep I remember riding the Specialized big hit back. Felt lie I was perpetually hitting the brakes in rock gardens. Now we have a more refined ride in the 29/27.5. Ever try one? Think MX over the past 40 years. Not a flash in the pan. Nobody won anything on the 26/24 big hit or Arrow...
  • 2 0
 @Srfntrf: So you want the rollie pollie of a 29 front, and the nimble schralp of a 27.5 out back?
Do you really think anyone who wins a race on this combo wouldnt win it on 27.5 or 29 all around?

Its the whole 29 DH thing. inconclusive. marginal
  • 1 0
 @Jimmy0: probably one of the best things i've ever had on a bike. I've got the 2.0 on the new Strive though, not sure how problematic the original was. Seems to be mixed opinions on how much so
  • 1 0
 Is that with the standard link and what travel forks are you running? @MattyBoyR6:
  • 1 0
 @EDownes47: standard link with 160mm fork. Not sure of the A-C measurement but a different fork manufacturer may have the right measurement to be even closer to stock Hi setting of 65 deg HTA.
I have pictures up on IG mattyboyr6 if you want to see it. Also posting videos on youtube under MattattoMotos of the angles and ride impressions.
  • 1 0
 @MattyBoyR6: I went with a fox 36 160mm 29 fork. It has a lower a-c than RockShox. Super interested in trying the trust shout fork! Lol. Might be even better?
  • 31 2
 I bet rocker links that adds some progressiveness to the the latest batch of Treks would give one of these companies a license to print money.
  • 10 9
 The leverage rate on the new Trek bikes are about the best compromise for rider weight range of any of the bigger brands.
  • 8 0
 The problem with the Treks is really mostly the shock IME. In trail mode reaktiv is kinda rideable.... but the small bump sensitivity leaves a lot to be desired. Just a severe lack of mid stroke support. Also think for people who don't hate pedalling it could use a little more antisag, but with the single pivot for drive lots of compromise there.
  • 2 0
 @jordanaustino: dhx2 on my slash 29 was the best thing I ever did to it
  • 1 0
 It’s my understanding that trek ditched the full floater to do just that. They’re more progressive now, they’re just still specing them with a mediocre proprietary shock in an attempt to have something for the marketing team and employees to show customers and say “but company XYZ doesn’t have this technology”. Swapped a RS Super Deluxe on my 2017 and it helped a lot in the shock department, just got a 2020 frame coming so that will hopefully solve the design issues that were originally intended to make the bike less progressive because old school air shocks were like running an air can full of tokens. Should be a hell of a combination.
  • 30 5
 that specialized is like something from a horror movie.
  • 13 0
 it almost looks like the picture is squeezed via photoshop in order to achieve that short wheelbase and steep ass head angle. it looks like a kids bike
  • 50 0
 The Yoots today have no idea how good they have it...
  • 49 1
 Designed specifically for wheelie drops off loading docks.
  • 16 1
 @cuban-b: For real. I legitimately don't understand why it took bike companies so long to slacked out the head angle and put bigger wheels on. I admit that the thought never really crossed my mind when I was riding my old Specialized Demo, but it also wasn't my job to create the fastest and best bikes on the market.
  • 10 0
 @brianpark: www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0-OhKyqGz0 Witnessed this particular one before driving back home after the Norba National
  • 3 0
 Well the shock is definitely longer than what was originally intended. It has the link for the 6inch travel version. I had one that had the 8 inch link and it definitely did not had that steep of a head angle.
  • 9 5
 @skycripp: it's all about suspension and geometry, Bigger wheels ain't an improvement, just another option with it's trade offs
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I remember those days... -_-
  • 10 5
 @ismasan: keep telling yourself that.
  • 3 0
 Back in my day there was a company that made a replacement seat stay for the BigHit that allowed a 26" rear wheel instead of 24". Loved my '03 with the Shiver.
  • 6 1
 @skycripp: The guy from Push said it on Inside line podcast. Nobody bothered to leverage any personnel or ideas from the moto world. MTB basically followed same path as moto in the suspension world, only they did it a couple decades later; basically solving problems that had already been solved. Same can be said for Geo, when you compare front end of a modern moto bike to an mtb.
  • 2 0
 @tiredsoul: Yep, that was BETD, from the UK. I had their longer travel linkages on two of my FSR bikes and they were very well made.
  • 3 3
 @reverend27: absolutely no one would pick a bike with 69° HA today, but you understand that wheelsize is matter of taste, right?
  • 3 1
 @ismasan: everything is matter of taste, is it not? what is the debate here, speed?
  • 1 0
 @tiredsoul:
Had the same - the seatstay was made by BETD. Great upgrade!!!
  • 2 1
 @ismasan: if you aren't bothered about going fast, have you removed your chain?
  • 1 0
 It's impossible for me to tell what size that bike is. It looks like a 20" wheel kids' bike, which I'm guessing it's not. Can someone fill me in please? I was out of mountain biking between 1999 and 2009. Totally out of it. That bike occurred in the period when I was away from the sport. It really was a different beast when I came back.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: at a guess, I’d say it’s the big hit mullet (26f, 24r) originally, but I think they’ve put a 24 on the front too and then a much longer fork and a longer shock. This was the era when everyone wanted to be josh bender and pretend they were jumping off cliffs. Just looking at it makes me cringe at how horrible it would ride.
  • 1 0
 Those look like 20” wheels.
  • 2 0
 @tiredsoul: BETD... I had a few for a Stumpy and an old Enduro... They made them for Kona's, giants, plus all sorts of other shit.
  • 1 0
 @tiredsoul: I had that BETD kit as well. Took the rear travel to about 9 inches and lifted the BB. I didn't ride it that much like that. Never had an issue with the 24 rear, 3.0 Gazza then 2.5 High Rollers.
Mine never looked that janky either, but mine was the DH version with the bigger linkage.
And Super Ts...
  • 1 0
 @Jstodd555: i was there,too! (Shaking my head)
  • 2 0
 @tiredsoul: hell yeah I had an 03 Bighit too. Came with Marz DJ II and swapped those out for Marz 66s. I left my 24" wheel but changed the dog bone to 8" of travel. Loved that bike. At one time threw a Kenda 3.0 Nevagal on before marketing told us those were Plus size tires.
  • 2 0
 @tobiusmaximum: No, no, no.... I had a 2003 Specialized big hit DH. This one here is a big hit comp, which had 6 inches of rear travel. The DH had 8 inches. The difference between the two being the shock link. The DH had a much bigger link on it increasing the leverage ratio in order to achieve more suspension travel. On this one, someone simply put a longer strock shock on it and instead of running a 24" rear wheel and 26" front, they just ran a 24" up front as well. The fork is actually only a 175mm travel marzocchi monster T. Basically the first generation. The big hit DH came with either a marzocchi shiver (190mm travel) or a boxxer. I had the DH with either a shiver or the 200mm monster T, which is a lot bigger than whats pictured, 24x3.0 tires front and rear it looked nothing like this thing. The shock had several mounting positions to change the ride height, head angle and suspension progressivity. I alsways ran mine in the low progressive mode. If I remember correctly, setup the way it was it had a 66 degree head angle. Wich really isn't that steep. Clearly by today's standards, but it isn't a 90 degree angle like this monstrosity. And let me tell you, today's bikes a definitely faster, but I'm not convinced they are more fun to ride than my old big hit was. That thing was a real plow bike and an urban stair gap king.
  • 1 0
 @brassinne: it's the seat that's bending my eyes if they are 24" wheels. It must be a foot long.
  • 1 0
 @Jstodd555: hahahahahaha - thanks for posting that. I was there too, watched it all happen. It was like a train wreck. No one thought it was going to go well, and when it didn't, no one could look away.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: the azonic lounge. A true downhill classic lol.
  • 1 0
 @skycripp: sequential upgrades equal more money. just ask apple.
  • 24 6
 It'd be awesome if someone would make aftermarket rear triangles/chainstays like YT and Trek does for their pro athletes to run 26 inch wheels.
  • 8 1
 I totally agree that would be my ideal setup! I'm just curious how many other people would actually want to run that.
  • 9 0
 @J-Gordon: It's a dwindling crowd. But those for those who know, it would be rad.
  • 6 1
 im curious as to why anyone would give this the thumbs down? #longlive26 #lotsoftrendfollowers
  • 9 0
 I’ve been running the Nomad LT link for a couple of months now and love it! Bumped up the fork to 180mm and it’s like a whole new bike. Everything I loved about the Nomad but better and no loss in climbing efficiency. Awesome when a product performs as advertised and in this case exceeds expectations. Only regret is not making the upgrade sooner!
  • 11 0
 This is what we like to hear! Glad you're enjoying the link. I'm an engineer that rides a lot so if the product doesn't live up to what it's supposed to do that just doesn't sit well.
  • 3 0
 @CascadeComponents: Good Job on these
  • 2 0
 Did you bump the fork up before or at the same time as adding the link? I'm thinking of upping mine to 180mm but wondering what you thought of ride characteristics and thoughts in general if you did it before the Cascade link.
I just put a 29er up front to play with but have to give the borrowed fork & wheel set up back. It was cool & I'm thinking bumping my fork to 180 may be just what this Nomad needs. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 @CascadeComponents: can you make a link with a flip chip for my 2019 patrol. Would love a higher bb and steeper ha for trail riding. Thanks in advance.
  • 9 0
 Guerilla gravity has some geo changing options too. They call them seatstay tuning kits.
  • 1 0
 Also have 10mm spacer option to run at the bottom of the head tube so you can ran mullet setup without upsetting the geo too - pretty rad modular frames
  • 6 1
 ******************Bike yoke!!!! if you read this, please make a link for the new Stumpjumper Evo. Raise up the BB and steepen the head tube it to 64.5 / 65 degrees. While your at it, can you make it a little more progressive . Then it would be the trail weapon the regular Stumpjumper should have been.
  • 2 0
 @bikeyoke I'll also take a tuned geometry link for a Stumpy Evo like my friend above
  • 1 0
 My patrol aswell. With a flip chip.
  • 6 0
 Somebody make one for my sentinel! 25% progression sounds good.
  • 13 0
 "25/26 is dead, what you really want is 27.5% or 29%" -Bike Industry
  • 10 2
 @captainspaulding: or 28.99% if sram made the linkage
  • 3 0
 @ Grosey. In an attempt to cheaply rekindle my enjoyment, in riding my Sentinel. I just went full mullett on the wknd. New geo is sooo much fun!! Low & slack for the win. No new bike needed for me ( this year at least)
  • 2 1
 Randy's rocking a coil on his! Would love a bike check! Custom valving? Progressive coil spring?
  • 2 0
 @up-left-down-right: Agreed! Did this and its fun! Try 8.5x2.5 shock w/ trunion adapter & offset bushing lower. Really good setup!
  • 4 0
 Ordered my bronson link today and I can’t be more excited to pair it up with the new dvo jade X. Should make for an animal of a trail bike!
  • 1 0
 how it says that its sold out? i have a jade on my v3 bronson with the stock link atm.
  • 4 0
 Come on, this site was built on dropping off retaining walls! "Dude, what's your biggest drop?"

Fortunately the content has greatly improved!
  • 2 0
 HA HA ha. The old days of PB conversion of stated feet to actual feet for every drop or gap.
  • 2 0
 I'd love a yoke for my stumpy evo with which I could bump the travel up to 160 with a more progressive leverage ratio. I've heard of people overstroking theirs, but that seems too squishy with the stock yoke.
  • 2 1
 "overstroking" FTW
  • 3 0
 That last picture reminds me of on entire decade I wish to forget. Or... re-live over and over again, depending on how drunk I am.
  • 1 0
 3 out of 4 optional linkages add progression.
At least 2 out of every 4 new bike models have added progression.
Aftermarket pushing OEM in the correct direction? Yes, please.
Air shocks that are so linear they work better with more progression? Thank you very much!
  • 4 0
 Pair that nomad link with a 29 front end and run it mullet!
  • 2 0
 In theory that sounds like a real nice time!
  • 8 0
 We've had some one run it already with good results! @pau11y care to comment?
  • 3 0
 @CascadeComponents: Anyone running your Bronson link with a 29 front end?

I think that would be the perfect bike for me...if it worked.
  • 2 0
 @zarban: I've had a few people say they might give it a go, but no one officially yet. the axle to crown with a 150 is fairly similar to a 170 27.5 fork.
  • 2 0
 I'm on a Mullet Nomad, knocked the fork down to 160mm and the geo is good now. Would love to try the link but don't think the rear needs more travel with this setup, the extra leverage and chainstay length would prob benefit i recon Smile
  • 1 0
 I'm running mine mullet now with a 160 front and the rear set to low. It feels good and the geo isn't much slacker, about 1/2 a deg. Putting the link back to high setting would put the bike closer to stock low setting. It is definitely fun but not sure I would go and spend $600 plus kind of fun for a fork & wheel. I borrowed a fork and wheel to try it out. If I was racing and seconds counted I would run mullet. *Adding that the BB raised up about 6-8mm.
  • 3 0
 @danielsapp @brianpark Is the Outsider Missing Link (for the Hightower) still available/manufactured?
  • 1 0
 Yeah I was looking for them, but it looks like their website is down, possibly no longer in business?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: unfortunately not in business anymore yes.
  • 3 0
 Bring it on with the linkages that modify the kinematics. Far more affordable than a new frame.
  • 2 0
 bf bought the cascade components part for a SC Nomad and it's made the bike an absolute machine with a dual crown, he loves it
  • 2 1
 i think it‘s funny that everyone fuzzes about mullet bikes and wants to convert their bike to one... what stopped you guys before the pros where seen on it??!
serious question.
  • 1 0
 Bird have LT linkages for their Aeris 120 (LT: 130) and 145 (LT: 160) that also make the curve more progressive. Think they might be working on an alternate linkage for the AM9 as well.
  • 1 0
 Bird Aeris 145 has an option to up travel to 160mm with a replacement link also. It adds progression and makes for a much poppier feel, at the cost of a lower BB. Highly rated IMHO.
  • 3 1
 "not all of these are manufacturer-approved and may void a frame's warranty" sigh. :-(
  • 35 2
 So, swap back to the OG link if you have an issue.
  • 2 0
 @drpheta: I was just riding along and...
  • 1 0
 @theredbike: on a flat paved trail...
  • 2 0
 That big got is awesome! If your books BB is lower than 15 inches, your bike sucks!!!
  • 2 0
 " The PRO allows the adjustment of geometry between DH and XC modes."

The pic right under this says "DH" and "TR"...
  • 3 0
 Dropping retaining walls is still awesome!
  • 2 0
 That link is exactly how SC should have done the Bronson. Can't wait to get it.
  • 1 0
 Loving the bikeyoke on my sx trail 2009 for almost 2 years now! Feels like a new bike to me with air shock and the ability to customize is worth every penny for me.
  • 1 0
 Just to clarify the Bronson link is for Bronson v3 - the latest bronson which was launched in 2018 and is unchanged apart from colour scheme change this year.
  • 3 1
 I wonder what the friggin head angle is on that last bike pictured. Jesus.
  • 6 0
 90deg
  • 3 0
 It looks pretty close to my 2002 Turner DHR - so, Terrible.
  • 5 0
 @endlessblockades: to think that we used to drool over the DHR, i wonder how we'll see today's bikes in the year 2035.
  • 1 0
 @cuban-b: In 5 years, our bikes today will look "so 2019."
  • 2 1
 @cuban-b: pre 2020 era bikes sucks.
  • 2 0
 @faul: "If you aint riding a 39er with 686mm reach in size medium then you aint with the times. everything less is unrideable. And I dont know how those hosers in 2019 rode without E-steering. Can you imagine people used to ride while actually looking at the trail while not surfing the neuroweb on our brain-implanted mobile devices? UGH how did people live?!?"
  • 1 0
 @TheR: you may be kidding, hard to tell, but I don’t think bikes are going to change that drastically anymore. Yes, we have gone through a steep curve in the last few years but you can tell we are already reaching the limits of how long, slack and low a bike can reasonably be on most terrain. Unless we turn bike parks into no turn, flat out, motorways.. where can we really go from here? Or maybe I’m wrong, maybe everyone will be riding XL geometrons?! Smile
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: I'm not kidding, but let me explain. I agree with you -- not sure how much more we can play with long and slack and different geometries, but they will continue to design bikes with different curves and different looks, and refine this and that. They'll find something to do -- even if it's just color trends -- and the design of bikes now will just look dated. It happens to everything under the sun.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: yeah I totally agree with that, I was actually saying something similar the other day. Albeit it was actually ‘it’s hard to imagine these present bikes will look dated one day’. My concern is that non e-bikes will end up going the same way that 26 inch wheels went!
  • 1 0
 This is all great and I’m for new stuff, but no I miss hucking my carcass.
  • 1 0
 Glad I ordered the Bronson Link before the Pinkbike review. I hope it arrives before Kernville Shuttle Fest. Oct 18th
  • 1 0
 If your on the same batch as my they said October 18th before they ship out
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp
Think you got the orbea links labelled back to front in the direct comparison picture dude
  • 1 0
 Can one of you make me long 465-475mm chainstay links for a bike like the nomad or firebird? @CascadeComponents
  • 5 3
 Genius. Take that spesh
  • 7 0
 pretty sure they got rid of the proprietary yoke on recent models
  • 2 0
 @MCMbiker: yeah not everyone’s got new stuff tho. At least they realized that was a dumb move
  • 1 0
 How do you have clear aluminum?
  • 4 0
 they just painted it clear
  • 1 0
 It's clear anodized which comes out looking silver
  • 1 0
 When you anodize aluminum you put an oxide layer on the surface to protect it from other types of oxide, or rust.

To get the pretty colours you see on anodized parts they have to dye them after the first part of the anodizing process then seal it after that.

Just don’t dye it and it’s a “clear” anodizing aluminum or raw/polished.
  • 1 0
 Is it better or different?
  • 1 0
 Bigger, heavier bearings please!
  • 1 0
 Specialized makes a progressive link for the demo.
  • 1 0
 I think there were a bunch of Kona rocker arm replacements out there.
  • 1 0
 That headtube angle is steeper than a Rampage drop.
  • 1 0
 Hold Tight The BigHit
  • 1 2
 Feels like not worth it if it causes warranty issues
  • 1 3
 What’s wrong with the factory link again?
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