Kenda Releases New Pinner Tire Developed with Aaron Gwin

May 5, 2020 at 12:53
by Daniel Sapp  
Kenda Pinner tire


Kenda have been working on a new dry conditions tire, collaborating with Aaron Gwin in the development process. The tire is made for dry conditions with World Cup tracks like Leogang and Lenzerheide in mind. Cornering predictability and particularly high puncture protection were key in the goals of developing the tire.

It's available with Kenda's AGC or ATC casings to suit gravity riders along with trail riders. The tire is available in both 27.5" and 29" sizes and a 2.4" width.

Weight for the 29" AGC version is a claimed 1297 grams, and the ATC version is 997 grams. The 27.5" AGC model weighs a claimed 1178 grams, and the ATC version comes in at 923 grams.

The Pinner is priced at €57.90 / $79.95 for the ATC casing and €60.90 / $84.95 for the AGC casing. The ACG is now in stock and the ATC will be available on May 18th. A wider 2.6" tire will also be available this fall.

Kenda Pinner tire
Kenda Pinner tire

Kenda Pinner tire
Kenda Pinner tire
There are two casing versions. The AGC is more suited to gravity riders while the ATC is aimed at the trail riding crowd.

This Pinner features a similar compound design found in Kenda's other gravity tires. The Pinner uses a dual-layer set up, with a firmer rubber serving as the base and supporting the knobs, and a soft compound laid on top to maximize grip. The ATC version is a dual tread construction: soft shoulder, firmer center tread. The tire focuses on keeping a minimum rolling resistance, excellent cornering capabilities and braking traction, and predictability. The predictability is achieved from the tread pattern which utilizes a consistent contact patch throughout the lean angle.

After looking at what competitors were doing well, and Kenda's own tire knowledge, they settled on prototypes for the tire. Field testing with Gwin and others provided more feedback to help finalize the Pinner tread design. Gwin‘s input led them to move the shoulder knobs more in-line with the center knobs, as opposed to being perfectly staggered, which increased the predictability during field evaluations.

The tire differentiates itself from Kenda's all-rounder Hellkat tire by being more specifically designed for drier and hardpack conditions. According to project engineer Tony Yandek, "The Hellkat really shines in loose conditions. While the Hellkat tread pattern is made to penetrate the ground, the Pinner is made to be stable, confident and planted over hardpack, rocks and roots. The Pinner is a much quicker tire as well , so if there’s no need to penetrate the soil, you should pick up the Pinner."

Kenda Pinner tire

We have a set of the Pinners on hand, so stay tuned for initial ride impressions in the near future.


255 Comments

  • 311 10
 Gwinnion
  • 36 6
 Certainly missed that boat, and named it after a small penis instead !?

Marketing these days is a few sandwiches short of a picnic.
  • 18 2
 @Waldon83: will pair great with the assegai
  • 7 12
flag Waldon83 (May 5, 2020 at 22:57) (Below Threshold)
 @Minikeum: No homo?
  • 5 2
 haha potentially the perfect pinkbike comment
  • 14 19
flag softsteel (May 6, 2020 at 2:04) (Below Threshold)
 Cool that ``new``Kenda Aquila...

So each time AG moves to another sponsor/brand, they probably have to listen to Master Ginger in order to make him HIS signature tyre, with the help of the Holy Ghost of course.
The UR Polygon team uses regular Kenda tyres, so do you think Tracey Hannah would ride faster with an AG signature rubber, keeping singing of course?!
  • 7 3
 @softsteel: master ginger i.m dead lool
  • 6 2
 @softsteel: Lol "master ginger" Big Grin

Or Kenda knows they can make more money on an AG signature tire that will make people curious?
  • 1 0
 @swenzowski: Kenda making more money out of that? Not sure. Ask Onza... but when I see websites selling the Aquila with a -45% discount, I have a small doubt , even though it`s a good proven tyre ;-)
  • 1 0
 @softsteel: They are probably just clearing all the old inventory. They had plans on doing different sizes, but you can see they are still stuck on 2.4's - probably not even making them anymore.
  • 4 0
 @Waldon83: its says directly in the article, "if you don't need to penetrate" this tire is for you!
  • 3 4
 @Waldon83: it doesn't matter when your marketing crowd are a bunch of tools that think gwinnion is the coolest word ever lmao
  • 2 0
 @mhoshal: Your profile statement checks out:

"Im a dick to most people just cause i can be to those choosen few consider yourselves lucky lol"
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: Best post!!! Small marketing penises get their day in the sun!!!
  • 2 0
 Didn’t even bother reading the article - just came straight to the comments section - did not leave disappointed
  • 2 3
 @endlessblockades: sorry but the whole "looks like a minnion/looks like A session" shit is just annoying at this point. I feel like there is barely any real intelligence here anymore. We used to come here to discuss products and now its just idiots with puns and "it looks like a" comments. It's lame and really shows the intelligence level on here these days.
  • 2 0
 @mhoshal: TIL joking around is not appreciated by some. For me, that's the only reason I read the comments :p
  • 2 1
 @mhoshal: Then kick rocks
  • 1 2
 @endlessblockades: wierd because your unintelligent ass can do the same thing you deadbeat. FUNNY i must have struck a nerve with with your dumb ass. Now go look for the next bike to comment dumb puns on moron!!
  • 95 1
 Missed opportunity to name it Gwinner. Instead they named it after a thin joint? Gwinner Bro sharpie edition coming soon.
  • 11 3
 There's a butcher shop near my house called Gwinners. Looking at my bike would make me think of bacon. Meaty tread. Kendalized Butcher.
  • 8 4
 @Lylat: Where's the down side in thinking of bacon?
  • 13 4
 Kenda releases a new minion
  • 28 2
 Last time he released a tire, he still rode sharpie Minions. Gwinn is sponsorship machine. He's the Shaq of MTB. We'll see him doing Icy Hot soon.
  • 2 1
 Obviously butcher ! Had them for the last 5 seasons and I loved them @Lylat:
  • 2 0
 My Pinner is better than bacon!
  • 7 0
 Gwiener
  • 3 2
 @High-Life: His tyre sponsors must hate the millions (and millions) of high res close up shots that get pumped out at every world cup round.

I'm pretty sure he used Magic Mary tyres at muddy rounds when he wasn't sponsored by Schwalbe in the past, too.
  • 1 0
 @hangdogr: the abattoirs
  • 56 2
 Not only did they steal the tread pattern, they stole my bike name, too!
  • 11 0
 Just sign Aaron and it will all work out. Don't worry about the money, he rides for tea and cookies. He seems to be a decent rider, he just needs a good bike.
  • 5 1
 Specialized style lawsuit incoming
  • 4 0
 @vinay: he rides for ice cream
  • 51 4
 Came here to read the minion comments!!! Already 3 on 4! haha
  • 7 0
 Yeah, let'em rip! Panaracer just came out with a Minion-like tire too. It's like motocross tires, not much different from a Dunlop compared to a Maxxis.
  • 10 1
 Behold, the latest iteration of the Gwinion!
  • 7 8
 Dammit. Why'd they have to be Kendas?
  • 8 4
 Honestly looks more like a cross between a Dissector and a Mary to me.
  • 7 2
 Looks like a butcher in the front profile
  • 4 0
 @n1ck: Any ol' time WTB wants to start making the Timberwolf again would be AOK with me. Love me a motocross tread pattern!
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: holy crap look at that thing!
  • 18 3
 Seriously! It's like people see a bike tire with knobs and exclaim "looks like a Minion!" Y'all need glasses.
Are Minions the new Session?
  • 1 2
 @Shred-BC: that’s like the people that said WTB tires would be awesome if they said Maxxis on the side.
  • 3 1
 Specifically, the comments should be looks like DHF.
  • 7 0
 @erikkellison: like were your heads at. That tire does look like a session.
  • 2 0
 Look more like a Butcher imho.
  • 2 0
 @Thirty3: It was a pretty badass tire in its day. I had a set on an original Banshee Scream a long time ago. It had a tenacious bite when riding in the steep duff!
  • 33 0
 Everyone who's calling it a minion fair enough, but it looks exactly like the Aquila his signature onza tire.
  • 14 0
 which was his first version of a minion haha
  • 3 0
 Didn't Gwinn had his hands on:

Spec Butcher (not sure)
Bontrager G5
Onza Aquila
and now this one?

Really see "his" tire evolving through different brands. I dig it!
  • 1 0
 @xkriegerx: i think Sam was the guy who had Spesh do the butcher
  • 32 0
 Man, we (PB commentors) need some new jokes. This is getting old.
  • 32 3
 I saw Randy on a bike that looked like a session and he said we are funny.
  • 9 2
 @scjeremy: Randy told me to send it on my grim donut, of which the full review comes out tomorrow.
  • 21 4
 @Trudeez: Dick Pound.
  • 1 2
 What if we recycle some old ones; "looks like a Session"
  • 2 2
 @JaseZ: or "looks like a session"
  • 2 0
 @JaseZ: @ronsauce jeremy already dug that one out.
  • 2 0
 @Trudeez: oh totally didnt see that lol
  • 1 0
 @Trudeez: YOU LOOK LIKE A SESSION!
  • 8 0
 @RonSauce: ur mom looks like a session
  • 4 0
 @kittenjuice: from some angles.
  • 1 0
 Is it getting old or just tired???
  • 29 4
 gwinion dhf
  • 1 0
 PERFECT!
  • 19 3
 By "release" you mean typical MTB product announcement pending release? I notice there are an awful lot of products "released" in this industry that I seem to never be able to get because they aren't available yet.

Product Announcement. It's coming
Product Release, It's available for the consumer to buy now
  • 3 2
 did yuo neglect to read the ACG version is now available and in stock?
  • 7 0
 @5afety3rd: actually I went to the website before I posted. Wasn’t available.
  • 6 0
 The biggest joke of the MTB industry has always been "Two Weeks".
It was patented by a fella at Sun Ringle a long time ago shortly before being absorbed by Hayes and then adopted by folks at Marzocchi before they shuttered their doors.

When the sponsorship coordinator told your team manager those 2 magic words, you knew you were gonna be building your bike in the parking lot of the first National race of the year after pulling your parts right off the UPS truck at the resort's post office.
  • 17 1
 I think people have to realise that there are only so many tread patterns. What makes a tyre is the layer build up. Rubber compound and casing is the most important part. Kenda are one of the few tyre companys that own there own factory.. I'm pretty sure when you dig deep they will only have improved what's already out there otherwise it would be the tyre would have been released on Aaron's rider contract being revealed. For exaple,their Hellkat is very very similer to the schealbe magic Mary. Instead of developing quirky original tread pattern the modified that immensely to iron any creases their rider found. Technology is deeper then the eye can see.
  • 12 0
 I miss the days when tire treads looked like some dropped alphabet soup in the rubber mix.
  • 3 5
 ‘Tyre’?
  • 12 1
 @endlessblockades: the best part about this comment is that it could only have come from the USA.
  • 5 0
 I tire of the misspellings.
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: Tyre no?
  • 3 0
 And then Tioga releases the Edge 22 and you realize there was room for innovation all along.
  • 3 2
 @endlessblockades: Ever heard of a (compound of) country(ies) named Great Britain? (they used to rule the world some time ago)

Anyhow, they invented the OG version of your language, and they spell it "tyre".
  • 5 0
 @FloImSchnee: Interestingly, in many cases former colonies generally speak a purer form of the mother language from the time it was brought to that colony than the place of origin, for instance, Quebecois is closer to 17th century French than what they currently speak in France, according to a biography of Champlain that I read. The mother country is then influenced by the myriad of places it has colonized and evolves while the colonies themselves become something of a time capsule to that language at point of introduction. Check this out:

www.bbc.com/culture/story/20180207-how-americans-preserved-british-english
  • 2 0
 @FloImSchnee: My 'tyre' comments are always meant in jest, a friendly jab at my ancestral homeland. I'll have you know that I've traveled the Isle from Lizard to John O'Groats.I'll sod off now.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: Fvkin-A right, chief!
  • 2 0
 @endlessblockades: haha, alright!

@DirtyRider13: interesting indeed
  • 16 2
 I'll buy it when it's on sale for under $30. Then skid and shred it to oblivion as fast as possible to make way for the next on-sale-for-under-$30 tire. Business as usual.
  • 3 1
 That's how I do it too
  • 3 1
 @Rhymer: cheap tire gang!
  • 11 0
 Man, reading the comments you'd think everyone in here has already found the perfect tire. I like Maxxis for the most part, but their current casings are weak and they're a little under-damped (bouncy). The Assegai sticks like glue...if you don't mind adding another 20 watts on every section to keep it rolling as fast.

My Hellkats have been great so far. I've also had great luck with the Specialized tires, but the edge knobs wear a little fast. Vittoria makes some great tires. I guess you could say I don't care who makes the tire, I just want a perfect one. Seems like we have a lot of people here who got sold a Maxxis and never tried anything else. I'll just keep looking until I find the perfect one...no matter who makes it.
  • 1 0
 I change tires a ton. I buy some sets on clearance every year and swap through tires to see what I like in what conditions.
  • 2 1
 Maxxis tyres are really good though! A good balance of weight and performance. Several casings to suit your needs. Solid dependable performance. There might be better performers out there for certain riders or conditions but you know if you put on a set of Minions (not the SS) then you're not going to go far wrong.

Just the graphics have grown and grown over the years. I would like to see them pared down a bit bt that's the only thing I don't eally like.
  • 6 0
 @jaame: hey, hey, hey! The SS is just fine for hard pack, dust, rock slabs/rocks generally and average trail conditions. Also for the fun if throwing the rear around.

Love me a semi-slick!
  • 1 0
 @Ktron: Great for rocks I'll give you that. I bit slidey on dusty hardpack though!
  • 16 2
 I’ll be back tomorrow for the full review.
  • 13 0
 Still running my Dart and Smoke combo.
  • 5 0
 What did you wear out your white onza porcs
  • 1 0
 @TheDerby: what did you wear out your white onza porcs
  • 11 1
 Pinner pinner chicken dinner!!
  • 1 0
 HA!
  • 11 2
 Call me when they are 50% off
  • 9 0
 Only so many ways to arrange square blocks I suppose.
  • 17 0
 Tioga: “hold my beer...”
  • 7 2
 Seems like tires are bordering on becoming a commodity at this point and brands will have to compete much more on price, as opposed to "tech". Been using the specialized tires that came on my bike... They work great. Don't see much reason to pay up for Maxxis'. My $0.02
  • 2 1
 You could also say the same thing about car tires, but a drive on a Michelin Pilot Sport 4S vs. anything else the Max Performance category would tell you that even though they all might look the same, does not mean they perform the same. Rubber compound and casing construction/compliance are huge factors in the "feel" of a tire, as much as tread. Once tread designs start to merge into a best practice, it's the other two things that will separate good from great.
  • 6 1
 I'm a simple man - had Schwalbe, got punctures. Had Maxxis, no punctures. My tires usually last around 3 years, so it's completely irrelevant (to me) if the tire costs $30 or $50.
  • 1 0
 @as-capture: had a friend who bought specialized tires twice and cut right through the sidewall both times. No problems with maxxis. I've only run maxxis and have put 3 significant dents in my rear wheel smashing it off square edge hits and have never cut tires even running basic exo construction. Not having to walk out is worth its weight in gold.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: Do I know you? That was exactly my experience with Specialized tyres a decade ago, cut both both sidewalls within a week. Apart from that they were great, grippy, fast rolling, light weight, large volume.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: maybe I'm your spirit animal? My buddies experience was only 2 years ago.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: I've had dented rims without punctures using Schwalbe Super Grav, Specialized Grid and Maxxis Exo. That's why I use EXO now. As good as any other tyre I've used and hundreds of grams lighter per tyre.

My current rear 3C DHR2 has 800km on it now according to Strava and at this rate it's going to go to 2000km. That's not bad for the £42 it cost me.
  • 1 0
 But how do you know if you don't try something different out?
  • 2 0
 @Ktron: unless something truly revolutionary comes out (new materials etc) and there's a wide consensus that it's the best thing ever, I have zero reason to change what already works really great for me
  • 2 0
 Tyre tech is converging, true. No real turds out there anymore (unless you do what PB commenters like to do and chose the wrong tyre category for your riding).
But tyres are just as much personal preference as shoes or grips so there is lots of room for manufacturers to cater to specific tastes.
  • 1 0
 Yeah right. Tires are both the most critical and the most compromised component on a bike. How can you be happy with your tires?? But who knows, maybe one day there will be a tire that combines strength, grip, good rolling resistance and light weight. Maybe nano tech will bring us that!
  • 7 2
 Upsetting a few apple carts here ....
Maxxis tires are manufactured by CST.
Be wary who you praise and diss.
The guy who designed the Minion line went onto design tires for Vittoria.
Remember 10 years ago when you couldn’t sell Maxxis tires to anyone? In a few years the herd will be hot for brand “X” - yep. Always loyal to companies that actually make their own stuff.
  • 5 0
 The minion wasn’t the best tire . But I don’t recall nobody not wanting a Maxxis tire .
  • 2 1
 @as-capture: in a few years if a better tire comes along that is reasonably priced it just may become more popular.

People love maxxis tires because they're great
  • 8 4
 @friendlyfoe: Maxxis is so incredibly overhyped.
Riding EXO is like riding a bouncy castle, especially when aired up enough to not smash your rims to bits.
Double Down is pretty decent, but it's too heavy compared to other casings, that are even better at both puncture protection and damping, while also having much grippier compunds than MaxxTerra.
Maxxis has somehow managed to get free advertising from all the people that have only ever ridden Maxxis, and maybe a Schwalbe tire on his buddy's bike 5 years ago.
  • 6 1
 I don't get your point about being loyal to companies that make their own stuff in this context. I agree with you, but I don't see how it applies here. Maxxis is one of CST's brands. Maxxis is owned by CST. They do actually make their own stuff.
  • 4 1
 @Losvar: Tyres are so personal. Performance very much depends on personal preference, rider weight, riding style, terrain etc. It's a pretty subjective business.

Schwalbe tyres in my experience are very grippy but also expensive, heavy and slow rolling. Great puncture protection in SG form. Just not my cup of tea except for perhaps an uplft day, but I'm not changing tyres for three or four days a year.

Interesting how Gwinner has historically used Maxxis even when under contrcat with other companies. The last year or two Bruin and Bieber were using DHF front tyres when Specialized didn't have a DH casing 29er tyre for them to use. I would guess they could have chosen any tyre they wanted. It's not a coincidence that everyone uses Maxxis. There might be better tyres out there but you know what you're getting with a Minion. Not everyone has the time, money or inclination to test sixteen different tyres to find out which one they like best. Buy MAxxis and you don't have to bother, because 80% of the riding public has done that for you.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: I have tried Maxxis DH casings, and I liked them a lot, but I wouldn't run them on my bikes due to the weight and rolling resistance penalties.

Tried Schwalbe SG tires last season, and they worked okay, but felt maybe a touch overdampened.
I guess it's all personal preference though, personally I really like Michelin Wild Enduros, they work really well for my conditions, roll plenty fast with enough grip and puncture protection, all at a decent enough weight.

There's no doubt that minions have some of the best tread patterns out there, especially DHR2 in my opinion, if they had offered it in MaxxGrip with DD casing, that would probably be my go to tire, but MaxxTerra simply lacks some grip on roots and rocks in my experience compared to other offerings.
  • 3 0
 @Losvar: the Michelin Wild Enduro is a tyre I looked into last year but I was put off by the weight. I like the bike to feel snappy on the pedals and my experience of using 1100g tyres before has put me off for life.
I use Maxxis Exo DHR2s now. I rarely get flats and have many dents in my rims that did not result in flats. I'm sure there are better tyres out there for certain conditions and whatnot but for an all round tyre, they are spot on for me.
  • 2 0
 @jaame: That makes sense, and I suppose for loamy conditions the EXO casings are quite durable.
My local conditions are probably not what would be considered normal for most people, as we have a lot of razor sharp slate almost everywhere.
I don't think I've ever pinch flatted since going tubeless, but I have cut and ripped a lot of casings due to the aforementioned rocks, they also tend to wreak havoc on rims if you aren't careful.

Different conditions require different tires, and I suppose most serious tires today are quite good for their intended purposes.
  • 3 0
 But it's MAX. That means the mostest and bestest, plus yellow logo.
  • 2 0
 I don't actually remember anytime when Maxxis wasn't a leading brand in MTB. But, I'm biased, been on them for over 20yrs myself... keep trying others, keep coming back to what feels best under me on trail.
  • 1 0
 @Losvar: I cut a tyre on slate one time in Wales. I'm surprised a tyre exists that can handle that kind of terrain. Not fun replacing new tyres with massive slits in the sidewall. I would have to put up with slow rolling if I lived in such a place.
  • 2 0
 I remember 10 years ago when we were all on Maxxis tyres, and they cost about half as much.
  • 3 1
 Just as a point of clarity, Maxxis and CST are owned by the same company but the factories are completely separate. Their are no tires that Maxxis sells that are made in the CST factory and vice versa. Yes, when Maxxis was introduced into the US it was not the most popular tire, then they had a FEW good designers (not just the one who likes to continually point it out) come up with some great designs and they hit their stride.

Just thought I'd share that.....
  • 3 1
 @jason-99: that's interesting because I was always under the impression that CST was the name of the actual manufacturing company (Well, Cheng Shin anyway) and Maxxis was merely a brand name of that company. Kind of like Toyota and Lexus.
  • 7 0
 Can we get a top view of the tread in focus with the lights on?
  • 2 0
 Exactly my thoughts. Is it square? Is it round? How big is the channel between center and side knobs?
  • 9 1
 Looks like an Onza.
  • 5 0
 i remember when Kenda did a big push in the early- mid 2000’s signed many pro’s . Sharpie sales also went up form the number of rider blacking out Maxxis logos
  • 5 0
 I had Maxxis tyres once, they were fine. Then I had some Specialized tyres, they were fine too. Now I use WTB tyres, they are also fine.
  • 4 1
 Can someone please explain to me two things. Why do down hill guys run narrower tires? And why do you see a lot of downhill guys on dt swiss ex471’s with 2.5” WT tires? Maxxis discourages running WT tires under 30mm id.
  • 2 0
 Hype I guess for wider rims, and since 27.5+ didn't work out, they gotta push 2.6 to sell more tires.
  • 1 0
 On Loïc Bruni's recent bike check Youtube video he explains that he likes the feel of the tyre shape that way(how its round and less flat or something like that).
  • 9 1
 Loic Bruni is simply running what works, which may or may not correlate with whatever shiny new MTB trend is being pushed. Based on the fact that (basically) no one on the circuit runs rims wider than 30mm or tires wider than 2.5", I would conclude that ultra-wide rims and tractor tires do not work for World Cup speeds and tracks.
  • 13 2
 Pretty easy actually.
First and foremost there are physical limitations. We´ve gone up to 29" wheels which inherently makes for a much heavier tire in and of itself. That paired with heavy duty casings gets us to a point where we just don´t wanna push any further as far as weight goes.
As for the more rounded profile and the "narrow" rims, that´s just down to the way a downhill bike is ridden, especially by a pro. You wanna be able to properly engage those sideknobs. If you have a rounder profile, there´s more of a "sideprofile" so to speak, while with a wider rim and therefore more flat tread section, you run out of sidetread earlier. The wide approach enables a less skilled rider to utilize the sideknobs, which is a good thing for many, but becomes problematic when you´re going for more aggressive lean angles.
Wide tires are made for riders who are a little timid and need lots of braking traction and/or ride slower with less abrupt direction changes. They keep their bike upright and therefore engage most of the wide tread at all times. DH racers in comparison live on the edge, so to speak, hence why they prefer a rounder tire profile.
Narrower tires are also way better in deep mud or deep loose soil where a wide tire kinda swims and squirms on top while a narrower tire penetrates the surface to engage the underlying firm soil. It´s also much better to not constantly change too many variables on your bike. As they have to adapt to new conditions often from day to day, switching between two vastly different tire widths would become problematic for most i guess.

EDIT:
Manufacturers often discourage consumers from doing things they deem a bad idea for most of their customer base. Most mountainbikers are recreational athletes who do not utilize their euipment to its fullest potential. Not even close. Manufacturers cater to these people with their product. Now said product may have limitations for a very skilled rider or the product may even work better when utilized in a way the manufacturer did not inted it to, but they´re obviously not going to tell you that as that would defeat the purpose of all their marketing and confuse the hell out of their customer base. And a confused customer is very likely going to switch to a brand with a more clear cut approach in their marketing.
  • 3 3
 @hamncheez: To be honest, the + tire idea isn't new. Reality is, most people don't want a slow rolling sluggish bike. Didn't work is 2000, and I won't work 20 years later. Google Nokian Gazzaloddi, and you will see what I'm talking about.
  • 2 0
 Cause you will not feel marginal benefits of wt since thouse benefits will be neglected by tire / rim added weight

At least from my point of view 2,3 on 26mm not that bad comparing to 2,6 on 30mm, i would even say i do prefer smaller size since it holds better on the rim and i do not have damaged sidewalls (all comparison made base on maxxis exo lightweight minions) On 180mm bike

I imagine for the hard tail it will make difference
  • 1 1
 2.5" tires work well for well run in, packed courses like they ride. The looser and more raw the terrain, the wider plus tires give a wider footprint for traction.
  • 2 1
 @JohanG: I have to disagree with you, as a wider tired does not always provide more traction. Tire compound and tread play a massive roll here, as well as tire pressures. I would also say when dealing with loam, or fresh cut sections, I've had much better luck with a narrower tire than a wider one. The only place I see a benefit to wider tires is over wet roots, as this increases the contact patch. I think overall wider tires are seen to increase traction, but I can't say that's really a black and white scenario.
  • 2 1
 @jomacba:
Spot on.
Again a wider tire mostly provides its benefits to a slow rider. When the tire has time to really conform to the terrain, say a root, it will generate more grip. However a fast rider (let´s imagine for arguments sake every dh rider is decently fast) will hit stuff so fast that this isn´t really relevant anymore as the time of contact with that root will be so briefly that the tire has long hit the grippy dirt patch behind the root before any sliding off will occur. That´s why once you´ve progressed past a certain skill and speed level, your riding will become much safer as the speed will allow you to in essence generate more grip in treacherous conditions. In this scenario the wide tire only provides diminishing returns.
Also, we need to remember that tyres are not a damped system. They are basically an air spring without rebound control. Running a wider tire with less pressure will result in theoretically increased grip, but practically under a fast rider it will also bottom out much more. So a fast rider needs to increase pressure in that kind of tire in which case he ends up with a huge bouncy undamped balloon between himself and the ground. The fact that casings usually get lighter (with therefore reduced damping) for wider tyres in order to safe weight doesn´t help this behaviour either.

All these things interact and result in an overall less capable tire with exorbitant width. Simply looking at the size of the contact patch isn´t doing it justice at all.

It´s a little like driving a formula one car. You better drive that thing fast to generate downforce or there will be no grip at all. In our case you better ride your wide tire slow or there will be some unwanted behaviour.
  • 1 1
 @JohanG: I don't think it has anything to do with weight and I don't think it has anything to do with loose vs. packed trails. I think Loki87 hit the nail on the head. Plus-sized tires smooth rough terrain for slower riders but they don't work for fast riders due to higher speeds and more aggressive lean angles.
  • 1 1
 @Loki87: Your theories seem sound to me, excpt the bit about tyre pressure. Please consider casing tension, how hard or soft a tyre feels is a relationship between the cross sectional area and the internal pressure. These are inversly proportional, so as the cross section area increases (a wider tyre with more volume) the pressure MUST decrease to result in the same casing tension.

"Running a wider tire with less pressure will result in theoretically increased grip" - Any change in grip is likely a result of the different contact patch, not the reduced pressure - casing tension should be roughly the same.

"huge bouncy undamped balloon" this I believe, is the sensation of a taller sidewall, rather than just the width of the tyre. If you've ever changed stock van tyres for low profile ones (which are usually wider too) you will feel the difference in the ride, the stock ones with a taller sidewall are bouncy, vague and comfortable!

There's way more to all this in a dynamic situation of course. And a tyre's charachteristics and grip determined by height, width, profile, construction and materials as well as tread pattern. Then there is rim width, terrain, riding style and the riders preferred casing tension for that tyre (adjusted by adding or removing air from the tyre!).
  • 1 0
 @Braindrain:
Well, that's what I was trying to say basically. Of course there's differences in tyres, however as a rule of thumb with a bigger tire the aspects like sidewall height do usually increase as it's usually not only width that increases but overall circumference. Especially as many guys just keep buying larger size tires and not some wide trail product which tries to minimize sidewall height. At least for most tyres. And as I said, sidewalls play a part in this equation, they do however tend to be less effective the bigger the tyre gets, as the manufacturers usually start reducing material to safe weight.
Also agree that the increased contact patch is what causes increased grip with reduced pressure due to the tyres ability to conform more to the ground. Again I was coming from the premise of a wider tyre usually being a taller tyre as well and maybe my wording made it sound like it was due to the decreased pressure and/or damping. Shouldn't have put those two into the same paragraph.
So yes, if you were to optimize the tyre system in regards to all those aspects you can absolutely get away with a wider Tyre to a degree. When we put sponsoring obligations, weight, rider experience etc into perspective though, it often becomes a hard thing to do for pros as well as recreational riders as there are a myriad of variables to get right as you correctly stated.
In general though, with most products available to us, a too wide tyre will feel more bouncy, have detrimental effects on flat resistance and contribute to a vague feeling tyre as the effects will all be felt increasingly at higher speeds.
Of course without specific measurements and/or products to discuss, this is too theoretical anyway. I was just trying to provide some reasoning for people blindly buying into some of the bicycle industry marketing BS which often seems to perpetuate the impression that wider tires are what is universally better for all rider types, which is not true. They have different advantages and disadvantages depending on skill level and we should all be mindful of when our ability level crosses that threshold so we can adjust our equipment accordingly.
  • 1 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: I agree with all of these statements. I drank the marketing kool-aid and bought 30mm and 35mm rims loaded up with 2.6 and 2.8 tires. Never liked the way they felt and found that I was damaging back rims at a furious pace. Went back to 2.4s and 25-29mm rims and have been really happy with the performance. Right now on a ex471 rear and 29mm generic carbon rim up front with 2.4s and it feels great. When I destroy the carbon rim I may go 471 up front or opt for the 511. I'm 220lbs and run 28-30psi rear and 24-27psi front depending on the terrain and speeds.
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: I'm also 220. I ran a set of EX511's (With cushcore of course) with no issues whatsoever. Had them laced to Hadleys with DT Champion spokes in the rear and DT competetition up front. The EX511s fight lateral flex a bit better than the 471s. This was also on a 27.5 setup, and I was running super gravity Magic Mary's (which are designed around a 25-29 inner rim width).
The idea behind a wider rim is really to combat the lateral flex of the rim profile. Ultimately a tradeoff is the decrease in vertical strength. This really comes down to the way they design rims. The goal is really a rim that holds a line but is compliant while tracking that line. With this comes certain drawbacks.
Moving over to 29" wheels only magnifies these issues. Here's where I feel carbon is superior.
Any WT tire is designed to give the same profile on a 30mm + rim as a standard tire on a 25-29 rim.
My current rims are Race Face Arc 30HD (29) with Assegai 2.5 WT DH casing, and cushcore. I'm still destroying rims with this setup. Its not the tire thats the issue. Its a combination of the Alloy, with profile, and rim diameter.
If your concerned about the weight of cushcore, don't be. You won't notice it. What you will notice, is the ability to push the bike into corners much harder than before, and decreased small bump feedback.... And likely some catastrophic failures.
I will be going over to the Reserve DH wheels, to see if they perform better on this wheel size.
When it all comes down to it, there are way too many variables to try and simplify. Its a precise combination of many things, so to say its a tire or a rim is only part of the equation. I think we can all agree though, that 2.6 or larger tires are pointless.
  • 2 0
 @NotSorry: I should also be clear. When I say "Here is where I feel carbon is superior" I'm speaking in regards to 29" wheels. 27.5, I would stay alloy for sure.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: Sounds like you're hard on equipment! FWIW those RaceFace/Easton ARC rims are infamously soft and bendy. DT 471's and 511's are a whole 'nother animal compared to the ARC rims- much stronger, much stiffer, much more reliable.
  • 1 1
 @jomacba: You're still talking loam and cut trails. Go ride cross country, like the actual ground that isn't a trail. Also, the whole point of larger tires IS lower pressure. Of course it plays a role. That is the whole role.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: Once again, I can't speak to cross country as I don't ride that. However, I've yet to see many cross country tires past a 2.2 tire. Either way, just to be clear, everything i say is exempt from cross country. I'm speaking merely to gravity riding.
  • 2 0
 I’ve been running the Hellkat pro ATC 27.5x2.6 for the last 8 months. As a front tire, it has impressive grip and wear qualities. I recently put on an Assegai 2.6 to test that out against the Hellkat. Assegai was not quite as grippy for my local trails ( hard pack to loose over hard pack to just loose)
  • 6 1
 Those look like welds on the Intense front triangle in the last picture.
  • 5 1
 Gwin has been on aluminum prototypes for a while. The Pinner was visible in this article (www.pinkbike.com/news/intense-factory-racing-announces-2020-world-cup-dh-team.html) and in a Fox video more than a year ago (youtu.be/XFAGvhZPpyY?t=87).
  • 1 0
 No secrets there
  • 1 4
 Looks like Lake Elsinor in the background.
  • 1 0
 Most (all?) companies use aluminum for prototyping, and its safe to say that the intense needed some development to run at WC pace.
  • 3 0
 The more I read other forum member's 'tire reviews' the more I realize most have no idea what they are talking about when it comes to tires.
  • 1 0
 The what... "you pinner"!!!

Riding the Hellcat out back on my trail bike, leaks like a sieve for tubeless but gives some good predictable grip in most conditions and rolls not too bad.
This tread pattern doesnt look as good for here.
  • 3 1
 Kinda reminds me of the Pin it , Specialized's old/ discontinued DH tire. Loved that tire on dry hard pack and rocky terrain, it was a lot like a moto trials tread.
  • 4 0
 Can you run it chainless?
  • 1 0
 The way they’ve named these tyres is upsetting my OCD,

AGC = Aaron Gravity (not Gwin!) Compound?
ATC = Aaron Trail Compound?

Surely it should be:

AGD = Aaron Gwin Downhill?
AGT = Aaron Gwin Trail?
  • 1 0
 I believe they stand for:
Advanced Gravity Casing
Advanced Trail Casing

DTC and RSR are the compounds.
  • 2 0
 Absolutely love my hellkats but I got noticably slower in the park. Seems like this would be perfect on the rear with a hellkat up front.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk What casing/compound hellkat are you running? I have the ATC DTC Hellkat up front and the ATC DTC Nevegal 2 in back. A great trail/enduro combo that are holding up really well under my 220lb weight and I've been smashing them. I have the AEC RSR Hellkats as well and would only ride them in a lift/shuttle setting, they roll insanely slow, like trying to pedal through 3" deep hot tar. The DTC Hellkat has amazing and predictable grip in a variety of conditions and the Nevegal 2 has been a great rear tire.
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: what’s up man, I’m running AGCs and honestly going faster than I was before. I think I run more pressure than most though from talking to people.
  • 1 0
 @ryankxf: AGC on trail rides? I run 28r 25f with ATC.
  • 1 0
 Also, which compound?
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: yea I run AGC Hellkats on my DH and trail bike, I weigh 208 in my birthday suit. I found 30r 26/27f perfect for my riding, I can’t stand tire squirm/roll.
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: dual layer
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: I have the AGC with RSR rubber front and back. I don't think they make a DH casing with the harder compound or else I'd run it on the rear. Insane amounts of grip even in winter in below freezing. Very slow rolling but I think the grip is a good trade off
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: I agree, I think I’m faster because the traction is so much better. I was actually running an assegai in the front and I think the Hellkats have better grip. They are definitely softer though and I’ve already tore off knobs but for racing performance, definitely my new favorite.
  • 1 0
 @ryankxf: yes I've torn off knobs. The tires barely last half a season but they are cheap as they always go on sale. I got them for $40 cad each
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: I had the AEC RSR compound Hellkats that I used for a couple enduro races and the knobs tore off before the center tread was significantly worn. The ATC DTC haven't suffered the same fate. The trend is wearing evenly and the knobs are hanging in there.

A number of local riders have switched to the Hellkat and love it. So consistent and predictable. I'd really love to see the AGC in the DTC compound someday! I will also be trying the Pinner F&R and just rear with HK front in ATC DTC soon.
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: Yikes, I can't imagine the rsr compound on the rear likes pedaling! I only run them on my dh so descending only. Usually the side knobs start tearing off after about 3 months of riding. I'm also planning to run the pinner on the rear but will stick to the hellkat up front.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: It's horrible in the rear unless the trail is all downhill. It's like pedaling with the brakes on.
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: have you tried e13 TRS tires? I feel they have just as much grip as the hellkat but are better for pedaling. Lighter too. I run them on my Enduro. Very durable, no side knobs tearing off or even cracking.
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: I have the older ones and they are also insanely slow. Are you referring to the newest version?
  • 1 0
 @NotSorry: yes I'm talking about the older ones. I know they're slow on the climb but I really liked them on the descent and they last a long time. The new design is just as grippy but faster. I'm gonna try them next time I need tires
  • 1 0
 @ThunderChunk: My bike sees too much pedaling to deal with their drag. They are insanely grippy on descents though, can't deny that!
  • 3 1
 Not sure putting Gwins name on anything proves its good. That boy could win on a frickin pogo stick!
  • 2 0
 he certainly doesn't need a chain sponsor
  • 2 0
 @as-capture: gwin is one of the greatest riders ever but there wasn't an awful lot of winning last season.
  • 3 0
 And if you can ride like gwin you can take it down MSA after a rainstorm!
  • 1 0
 A proven tread design is a proven tread design...
If it works, why change it?

Onza Aquilla
Specialized Butcher
Maxxis Minion DHF
Kenda Pinner
  • 2 1
 So you could it's the 4th incarnation of the DHF?
  • 1 0
 I've had my issues with Kenda tires for years. However, the new rubber on the latest models has changed my opinion. great value and feel.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully it doesn’t have a terrible wobble in it like my 6 Hellkats did. Sad it was such an awesome tire. Good luck Kenda.
  • 1 1
 I really think that unless someone comes up with a significantly better compound or is significantly cheaper, there is no reason to stray away from you’re Minions, Magic Mary’s etc
  • 1 0
 Actually, looks like a good tread pattern. Like a motocross... Dirt Bikers don't have it wrong at 60 mph and flyin 65' thru the triples. Just sayin
  • 5 2
 Pinnion
  • 2 1
 I wonder if the side knobs will rip off as easily an the ones on my hellkats Frown
  • 4 2
 EASIER.
  • 1 0
 @RayDolor: I laughed. You get a +1
  • 2 0
 Official tire of noodle arms
  • 2 0
 Do they still come with the Kenda surprise like the rest of their tires?
  • 2 0
 Another missed opportunity to call a tyre 'Gru', boss of the minions
  • 1 0
 Does anyone remember the Blue Groove? I loved those and i think i was the only one. 2.35 ust please.
  • 1 0
 #hutchinsonCOYOTE back! I would love to give them a try in a modern 29er bike.
  • 2 0
 "penetrate the soil" -sounds dirty
  • 2 0
 For Sale: 1 Case of unused Sharpies.

Contact: J. Hall
  • 3 1
 Pinner to win 'er!
  • 5 4
 Assegai DHR II love child.
  • 2 1
 Looks like a M... Butcher
  • 1 0
 Literally scrolled to here to find the first mention of a butcher. Y’all be idiots except @lyzyrdskynyrd
  • 1 1
 " The predictability is achieved from the tread pattern which utilizes a consistent..." Rip off of a DHF
  • 4 0
 Which was a RIP off of a michelin....
  • 1 0
 @fruitsd79:
...Michelin DH32.
  • 2 0
 @jonus216: and still the minion is not the most predictable tire out there, magic mary and assegai are way more predictable due to more "transition knobs"
  • 1 2
 I understand that the pros need a good set of tires for specific courses but how about designing some tires around us average Joes needs. LOL
  • 3 1
 Looks like a session
  • 2 1
 Will most likely last half a day.
  • 1 0
 Bontrager SE5 all day long
  • 1 0
 Looks alot like the old school bmx chin-shin tires from the early 90's.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a nice tire, but seems on the pricey side.
  • 1 0
 How come nobody does slicks? Guess they cant ride that good
  • 2 1
 kenda casing > maxxis casing
  • 1 0
 This has been my experience as well.
  • 1 0
 looks like MTB tire!!!111!!1!11
  • 1 0
 Sheesh many tyre collaborations does he want?
  • 1 0
 How can he not win with knobs like these ?
  • 1 0
 New tire: has knobs. PB: DHF ripoff (grumble grumble).
  • 2 2
 Looks like a session.....ahem I mean minion ....
  • 1 0
 Hi Mary!
  • 1 0
 I'm tired
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Trek
  • 3 3
 Looks like a tyre, yawn
  • 2 2
 Look's like a Minion
  • 1 0
 In terms of longevity, Kendas' SB8's wore visibly with each 2 hour or longer ride. Minions in DHF EXO casing lived through 3 lifespans of Kenda's. And new, I LIKED SB8's. They just have an extremely short lifespan.
Especially on the rear wheel........and susceptible to sidewall tears? Don't even ask..........
  • 1 0
 @RayDolor: kenda also weights more, sb8 probably their the best tire so far;

I do like more options, however currently only e13 came closer to maxxis in terms of performance
  • 1 2
 looks like a magic mary more than a minion
  • 1 2
 Gwin - Good! Kenda - Bad! That is all,
  • 3 4
 looks like a minion
  • 4 7
 So now there’s the Kenda Nevergrip and the Kenda Pine-sitter. Nice. (Ride the best, ride Maxxis)
  • 1 0
 Maxxis ?????
  • 1 0
 @ATV25: Yeah! ONLY FOX AND ONLY MAXXIS! You have to buy these blindly even though there are better products out there. If Maxxis did a collaboration with Fox for kashima sidewall DHF and DHR the fanboiz heads would explode!
  • 2 5
 Wonder if kenda made a tire that does suck ass yet. Maybe this is it!
  • 1 0
 It's not like they don't have experience. They make some great dual sport/ mx/ desert tires for motorcycles. . . .and generally cheaper than mtb tires. Man we get screwed in this sport!
  • 2 1
 @fodermonk: Because moto tires are usually single compound and cost less to make due to economies of scale and sales volume. The tires we get for MTB are in most cases identical to what the pros use on race day. Actual racing MX tires do cost more than MTB tires, and single compound wire bead long life MTB tires can be had for quite cheap, with the high end being like 40 dollars from Continental.
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