New Tools, Pumps & Tire Repair Kits From Lezyne - Across the Pond Beaver

Sep 8, 2020 at 9:33
by Daniel Sapp  

RAP II 19 CO2 Tool

Engineered and manufactured in-house by Lezyne, the Rap II series multi-tools feature a number of features including an integrated, machined aluminum CO2 inflator, a generous hex range, and lightweight machined aluminum side plates with improved ergonomics.

Anodized black, they also feature an integrated magnetic holder for an emergency quick-link. The RAP II steel tool bits are now all machined to exacting tolerances and longer shanks for easier access to hard-to-reach fasteners. In addition to the RAP II 19, there are seven available RAP II configurations featuring up-to-date tool combinations for any application.

• Quick link holder
• Hex 2/2.5/3/4/5/6/8mm
• Torx T10/T25
• Phillips
• Chain breaker
• 8/10mm wrench
• 4 spoke wrenches
• Disc brake wedge
• Rotor truing tool
• CO2 inflator
• 29.99 (USD)







CNC Tubeless Drive

The CNC Tubeless drive is a 3-in-1 MTB hand pump designed for high-volume tire repair and inflation. The system combines a tubeless tire repair kit, CO2 inflator, and a high-volume hand pump. All of this is housed in a lightweight machined aluminum tool to allow for quick trailside repair.

The long hose, overlapping handle, and high-volume design provide efficient inflation up to 30-psi. The chuck is tubeless specific and works with Presta valves or flips to work with a Presta valve with the valve core removed to give more airflow when seating a tubeless tire. The CO2 inflator allows for instant inflation and additional tubeless tire sealing power.

It comes with five large tire plugs that are sealant frienly and one replaceable 20-gram CO2 cartridge. The CNC Tubeless Drive is also rebuildable. It sells for $80 USD.








CNC TLR Valves

Lezyne's CNC TLR Valves have a machined aluminum construction and integrated valve core tool. They also have a T25 valve tip to tighten the valve against the rim. The grooved cap inproves grip and the valves are equipped with an o-ring and grooved aluminum locknut for a leak-free seal. Compatible with alll Presta style floor and hand pumps, the valves are sealant friendly and provide maximum airflow. They are available in black, gold, blue, or red. They sell for $20 USD.







Tubeless Insert Kit

The Tubeless Insert Kit is a stealth tubeless tire repair kit that discretely and securely inserts into the opening of a bicycle handlebar. It’s constructed from lightweight, durable machined aluminum and features a hardened stainless steel reamer. The kit is easily accessible for quick tire repairs and comes with five tubeless plugs that can also be stored inside its body. It also doubles as a bar end plug and comes with three o-ring sizes that secure it inside most handlebar openings. It sells for $25 USD.







Multi Chain Pliers

Lezyne's Multi Chain Pliers are made out of machined aluminum and feature an integrated quick-link tool, chain breaker, valve core tool, bottle opener, rotor aligner, and magnetic holders for up to two spare quick links. It is slim for maximum portability and designed for durability. It has an anodized finish and hardened steel chain breaker pin. It is made to be used in the workshop or on the trail and sells for $40 USD.
39.99 (USD)







Across the Pond Beaver 2020






83 Comments

  • 88 3
 meanwhile running dh casing on my down-all-mtn bike, never have problems. i imagine ill put a hole in my tire tmrw because of this comment.
  • 2 0
 don't jinx it
  • 4 0
 The best thing is you have two tyres you can ruin, not just one !!
  • 19 0
 @Waldon83: Seems weird to run a tire inside a tire but maybe that's what i've been missing. Traction inside my traction. Traception
  • 12 0
 @hbar314: yo dawg, i heard you like tires..
  • 5 0
 “The frame only weighs 1.8lbs, but I’ve added the Triple Tyre Pro-traction Protection System so every tyre has a tyre inside two more tyres....... it means I have six tyres on this bike”

So you’ve made a 76lb bike with the worlds lightest frame.... ?
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44: there is no such a thing as a jinx...
  • 3 0
 @Intoxication: My metal work teacher from school was called Mister Jinx...........so there you go!
  • 6 0
 @Intoxication: Jinx knows not to use that toilet and even if he did, he'd never flush it.
  • 27 0
 Finally a masterlink breaker with more than one use. Don't care about the bottle opener, but the rotor slot, chain breaker, and masterlink storage make it worth keeping in the bag in conjunction with compact hex/torx tool.

Ok, now find a way to combine the pump, masterlinkbreaker, multitool, and tire plug kit...and make it all fit in one of the cavities of my frame I didn't even know existed...all for less than 300g and $80.
  • 3 0
 Yeah, I've been looking forward to their Multi Chain Pliers because all the chain tools are combined right there. No need to carry a Park CT-5 or rely on a chain breaker on a bulky multi-tool. Just an FYI, I emailed Lezyne earlier in August and reportedly the tool won't be in stock until October.
  • 10 0
 I've been using the Wolftooth pliers for a while. Masterlink storage, tire levers and masterlink pliers in one. And they are pretty light. The Lezyne ones look good too!
  • 2 1
 OneUp EDC large pump with tire plug kit. Plenty for most trail-side repairs and I've fixed a dozen flats with the plugs and pump. I stopped carrying a tube 2 years ago except on deep backcountry trips and races
  • 5 0
 @KavuRider: I love the Wolftooth one, I have it as well but having the ability to true a rotor (The wolftooth one can help in a pinch but not ideal) makes the Lezyne one that much better.
  • 1 0
 Maybe a bit heavier and pricier than you asked for, but that's basically the OneUp pump with EDC tool inside.
  • 6 0
 The valve cap serves as valve core remover and T25 tool. Some brake brands already have all bolts in T25 and there are options to replace all remaining bolts on your bike with T25 too. Ideally the chain tool then has a way to properly clamp/slot the wide end of the valve cap to actually be able to apply something like 6Nm torque and you've come a long way. Personally I've just gone back to using Shimano breaker pins. Instead of masterlink pliers, masterlinks AND a chain breaker I can now do with just the chain breaker and a bunch of breaker pins. In this case the One Up EDC tool would be sufficient.

That said, do people ever need a masterlink tool for trailside repairs? You might need a chain breaker to open a chain and remove the broken links, but you'd only install the masterlinks trailside. You won't really remove them, would you?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: @vinay: breaking a derailleur or hanger? I’m grasping at straws here and asking the same question as you. I have a KML Master Link Removal Plier in my tool box. Fitting a chain I just apply the brake and pressure to the crank arm to snap the pins in place.
This is likely usable with the included breaker and quick link holder plus other extras.

I’ve been carrying the same Park chain breaker and Park hex set on Mtn bike rides for a few decades now.
  • 1 0
 @BsampSy: I just need to find a more modern quality hex/torq tool now to go with the pliers.
  • 3 0
 @gonecoastal: Yeah, I'm using the same Park CT-5 for well over a decade too. Good enough for at home, compact enough for on the trail. I once broke an integrated chain breaker from a Specialized multitool and it felt pretty stupid. Trail repair stuff should be at least as good as what you use at home as failure is a good bit more annoying. Allen keys, T25, flat blade and Phillips keys are on a multitool, but everything else is separate. I wouldn't even bother trying to true a wheel with an integrated spoke key (in multiple sizes) when a simple Park Tools spoke key is already so compact (and I use only one size spoke nipple anyway).

Yes I do ride with a backpack (Ergon BE1). But I prefer the integrated back protection and a sweaty back over the fresh breeze and the risk I could break my back any day. The 1.5l water bladder is low and the storage is just enough for the loose tools and pumps I like to carry. Weight is no issue with a compact pack like this, nor are multiple separate tools.
  • 4 0
 Just carry a strong lace with you and no pliers needed - wrap the lace around the links and tighten them together - job done.
  • 1 0
 @gonecoastal: check out the ratchet fixit sticks. Light, low profile, replaceable bits and the ratchet feature is brilliant
  • 1 0
 @Woodpeckar: I've done this in my workshop and every time one of the links flies out and hides itself under the heaviest thing in the shop. I'd be weary of doing this trailside....
  • 1 0
 @jjgoride: Yeah, but it kind of depends on how clumsy you expect to be. When trying to fix your bike, tired, with gloved and/or frozen hands. The ratchet probably helps but I just can see myself drop those bits in the dark/mud/sand.

If you do like ratchet tools, there are some interesting ones available. The Fabric Chamber may be a nice one too.
  • 1 0
 @phalley: and supplemented with 1-2 proper ATV/ Moto plug strips for that serious hole that the standard MTB brown bacon strips will never plug!
  • 2 0
 @vinay: RAP II 12: HEX 2/2.5/3/4/5/6/8mm, TORX T10/T25/T30, PHILLIPS, FLATHEAD

Plus these quick link pliers, a tyre plug, pump, tyre boot and spare tube would be a great lil kit.
  • 1 0
 @jjgoride: I just ordered the Wera Bicycle 1 Kit
  • 1 0
 @Woodpeckar: yup, and my 5-10 shoes even come with a stealth storage for laces.
  • 2 0
 @KavuRider: I found Wolftooth pliers to be a not great tire lever. Its small, metal and impossible to not scrape up your rim. I'd much rather have a Pedro's lever and no chain pliers.
  • 2 0
 @acali: yeah I agree. Mine are an emergency tool, I primarily use Pedro's levers myself!
  • 3 0
 @zarban: yup I have the wolf tooth as well and it’s nice but the lezyne seems way more useful. The wolf tooth aluminum tire lever isn’t recommended for carbon rims so now it’s just down to a master link carrier/plier and valve core tool and then you still need a chain breaker on your multi tool to remove the broken link. This lezyne one seems very well thought out, one tool for everything chain related plus a rotor tool and bottle opener and the chain breaker actually has leverage! How cool is that.
  • 14 0
 Some very cool tools from Lezyne.
  • 1 2
 Some very cool tools Lezyne copied from Peaty’s, Wolftooth and OneUP.
  • 1 1
 @OrangeGoblin: Companies always using each other's ideas and making their own versions. I think Granite Design may of had the first valve caps with a core tool. Wolftooth was first those pliers. OneUp was first for the EDC stem tool. However, there are other companies that may have been first to have tool that store in the bike like handlebars and crank cavity.
  • 5 0
 Can someone explain the situation where a "pack pliers" is really needed. If a chain breaks, just break the broken link with a chain breaker and put on a master link, seat the master link with your pedal...I just don't understand why it's needed...why would you need to break the master link loose on the trail?...someone enlighten me
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I don't see why you would need to break a Master link trailside, but apparently it happens enough that a half-dozen companies are making these things!
  • 1 0
 It's useful for really long rides, the kind so long you wear out a couple chains.
  • 1 0
 I once thought that too and then one day will come when you have a derailleur failure on the trail and the chain gets jammed in the wheel or front and lucky for you the master link is in an exposed area where you could remove it and remove the derailleur or open the chain up giving you the leverage to unwrap it around the wheel or feed it through where it got jammed up but now your trying your best to squeeze the link together and after trying a bunch it just won’t happen. Sure you could break the chain and then remove one link and use a master link but that’s where having a cheap master link plier that also has other useful tools with it makes it worth it rather than breaking two chain pins with a multi tool breaker that usually have crappy leverage so that becomes a task in frustration on its own.
  • 7 0
 Now I'm wishing that I hadn't bought Wolf tooth's masterlink pliers. this lezyne one looks way more useful
  • 2 2
 It also looks way more uncomfortable. It is painful to pop a master link with the short pliers with a tire lever digging into your palm, imagine squeezing a chain breaker.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: the idea is that you have it but rarely use it, if ever. This isnt meant to be a shop tool but an emergency tool. I have several tools in my pack that ive carried for years but never used. This will be one of those tools, so a little discomfort is worth the trade off extra tools integrated into it.
  • 2 1
 @lognar: yes, and in the event of using them pain isn't usually something you should concern yourself with when it comes to a tool purchase. Topeak made a less comfortable knock off of an uncomfortable, barely useful tool. If they did their own design they could have easily improved ergonomics. As emergency trail side pliers they have a few uses pop up over time, and can have a rightful place in my tool kit.
I've had pack pliers for about 3 years now, its a tool that could be improved upon. Instead let's use the old cheesy "bottle opener as a bonus tool".
  • 5 0
 Their plugs have always worked great for myself and others on trail, also glad they have a refill pack. Can't wait to get my hands on the chain pliers.
  • 5 0
 I've always been impressed with the tools and on-bike carry solutions Lezyne creates. The construction quality is awesome and they stand the test of time.
  • 3 0
 ill just stick with the tried and true bacon strips for all my punctures. never had an issue with them before, no reason to spend so much money on something else.
  • 2 0
 Is the pump really Presta only? I've got an earlier Lezyne pump and the hose is reversible to also be able to inflate through a Schraeder valve. Would be bummer if they'd now limit it's usability to Presta only.
  • 2 0
 I have this pump, and yes it is Presta only. But I also had a Lezyne floor pump that I had upgraded the head at some point and had a flip-chuck head left over and it threaded in no problem. So now I can do both Presta or Schrader. I do have my doubts that this pump could seat a tubeless tire with the included head though. I mean, is anyone really going to try and re-seat a tubeless tire trailside?

The pump itself is very well-machined and feels very high quality. Everything unscrews apart and you can see several points where standard o-rings are used for seals, so I believe their claims of repair. It measures exactly 7" tall if you also include the tube which attaches onto the end of the pump handle.

As I'm not a fan of CO2 (had several occasions in the past with failed usage attempts), I removed it from the internal shaft. The included plugs are giant-size compared to the ones I normally carry (which have always worked fine for me). Removing the CO2 canister and attached inflation head leaves a lot of room in the shaft afterwards, so you could get creative with stuffing more items inside of it: easily fits extra chain links, patch kit, or even a Gerber Dime multitool. Without the CO2, the pump and plugs (along with my smaller plugs) only weighs 200g. TBH, I don't really get the need to have both a pump and also CO2...

Also, if anyone is interested in a super light multi-tool for emergency repairs, check out the Topeak Ninja 16+. It has almost every tool I could think of needing, including a chain tool! And the best part is is only weighs 93g, which is easily half the weight of any other tool out there that also includes a chain tool. With this pump and the Ninja tool, I think I'm all set for trailside repairs. Bonus: It all fits with room to spare in my hippack.
  • 1 1
 @bryanus: Yeah, I think CO2 cartridges are specific for racing. Many types of tire sealant freeze and clog when you use it, so you don't want to use it on a regular ride. They aren't for me either.
  • 1 0
 As it stands, the pump is Presta only, but as @bryanus said you can use the ABS Flip Chuck if you absolutely need both Presta and Schrader capability.

Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @Lezyne: Alright, thanks. I've got the HV tire pump in my backpack and am happy with it. I trust this is the same hose that goes into this new pump. I never liked Presta though I currently use both (Presta and Schraeder) on my bike. I'm using Schwalbe ProCore. It comes stock with a Presta valve but never got along with it. So I'm using a regular tube now (with Schraeder) but I need a Pepi (or similar) valve for the tire (as it needs drills in the side of the stem, not at the butt end). I couldn't find Schaeder valves that have that and my attempts at drilling side holes in a Schaeder valve (without them clogging up with sealant) haven't been successful so far. So yeah, I currently still need one pump that does both Schraeder (for the tube) and Presta (for the tire). If I could ditch Presta I'd be happy. My BMX, my mountain unicycle (MUni) and my air suspension all take Schraeder, it is just mountainbikes which seem to have shifted to this other valve standard. For my tire pressure meter this implies I need to rebuild the valve head every time I want to use that for sensing the pressure in the tire.

Now that you seem to be into creating your own valves, would you consider making an insert (Pepi, Cush Core etc) Schraeder valve? I'd buy it!
  • 4 0
 Is it me or does that valve look really long?
  • 3 0
 Looks like they are coming in different lengths. Just depends on your rim depth
  • 1 0
 Looks like it’s deep dish ready for all the road folks getting a sweet slice of tubeless action.
  • 1 0
 Yeah and the threads to hold it on the rim don’t go all the way to base??
  • 1 0
 that's what she said
  • 3 0
 If you have to tubeless tool in one side, what do I have in the other?! Non-matching bar plugs doesn’t compute!
  • 1 0
 Just shove it full with tubeless strips. For just in case.
  • 2 0
 There might be something coming soon to match the other side Cool
  • 2 0
 I find the weight imbalance actually helps with with Cork 360s
  • 6 6
 What's that Lezyne? Did you realise that your hand pumps have a habit of unthreading traditional valve cores, leaving you stranded miles from the car and with sore arms from pumping up your spare tube, so you decided to sell us proprietary ones?

Eat a bowl of willies.
  • 16 1
 If you ate your portion of willies instead of passing it to others you might have had more grunt to tighten the valve core properly.. Wink
  • 2 5
 @i-am-lp: Yes, because everyone tightens valve cores in their spare tubes before they put them in their bags. It's not an issue with any other pump that uses a camlock mechanism instead of threading onto the valve body. Stupid solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 6 0
 @hairybarnyard: I have multiple Lenyze pumps and never had this happen.
Use the pressure release button on the hose before unthreading the pump hose
  • 2 1
 Upvotes for both of you because 1) I've totally had that same issue with my Lenzyne pump, commented on it, and gotten trashed by other PB commenters, and B) cuz i-am-lp's comeback was pretty spot on
  • 3 0
 @hairybarnyard: I'm glad there are choices. I really like the thread on style. It's a bit slower, and I have backed the valve core out before, but it just seems like a simpler, more robust solution. I admit I've never used a really nice pump with a camlock, but all of the traditional style pumps I've used have had their own issues with either leaking, or popping off the valve, or just being a pain to push down and pull the lever up at the same time.
  • 7 0
 We actually realized a long time ago that a thread-on connection provides a much more secure and long-lasting connection than a press fit or clamp connection. With a hose, there's also less potential to bend or break a valve stem.

It's also worth noting that our new tubeless valves aren't proprietary, and they have removable cores too. As long they are properly tightened and the pump isn’t white-knuckled onto the valve you shouldn’t have any problem. As @gonecoastal said, when you’re finished pumping, the ABS button will relieve the backpressure within the pump system and release the valve.

If you're still having trouble with our pumps after putting these tips to work, our customer service team would be happy to help you out further with your specific setup via Support.Lezyne.com Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Very cool. I use the Dynaplug nd it works great...will give this a short down the road.
  • 2 0
 That multi tool is insane. I wonder how much bigger it is than the crank bros m19
  • 1 1
 If you are interested in something crazy light for trailside repairs, with most if not all of the tools you need including a chain breaker, check out the Topeak Ninja 16+. The amazing part to me at least, is that it weighs 93g, which is less than half the weight of other tools with chain breakers.
  • 2 0
 So is the pump a pump, Co2 inflator, or both? I need a new pump and that doesn't look to be terrible.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like both.
  • 1 0
 It's both, I have this pump. TBH I don't see why you would need both a pump and CO2 either. I removed the CO2 part of mine.
  • 1 2
 Have the floor pumps stopped exploding when pumping tyres? Had one do that to me, and a few around me aswell ... Quite stunned when you get the plastic cover on the dial poping up hard at you because it's leaking internally ...
  • 4 0
 Hi Ploutre,

Were you ever able to get ahold of our tech support? We test 100% of the pumps that leave our factory to make sure everything is working properly, so in the off-chance something happens, the pump can usually be fixed with a small replaceable part.

If you still have the pump, please submit a request to Support.Lezyne.com and our customer service team will be happy to help you out! tup
  • 1 0
 Someone point on a single benefit for Presta on mountain bikes?
The fact that we opted for the clearly inferior type of valve really says a lot about this sport Smile
  • 2 0
 Dat multi chain plier!
  • 5 6
 Can someone explain the purpose of the valve stem caps? I have always chucked them and never had an issue
  • 7 0
 Keeps the mud out, also the integrated valve core tool is a handy thing to have
  • 3 1
 Agreed. Never use them.
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