Review: Funn's UpDown Dropper Post Eliminates Unwanted Sagging, But Isn't Perfect

May 20, 2019 at 8:10
by Daniel Sapp  


Last year, Funn introduced the stealth version of their dropper post, the UpDown. Available in 125mm and 150mm lengths and in 30.9 and 31.6 sizes, the UpDown foregoes the more traditional IFP (internal floating piston) design, which can sometimes suck in air and develop the dreaded sagging seatpost syndrome.

In its place is Funn's "twin-tube cartridge system" which they say mechanically resets and restores oil and air locations within the cartridge during use. This is said to eliminate the saggy saddle issues and create a more reliable and user-friendly system.
Funn UpDown Details
• Travel: 125 or 150mm options
• Self-bleeding twin tube cartridge
• 30.9 or 31.6mm diameter
• Internal cable routing only
• Adjustable remote lever
• Weight: 550g, remote: 50g
• $259 USD - 125mm, $279 USD - 150mm
www.funnmtb.com

Funn also include their ultra-adjustable lever with the post. The lever is made to be able to be mounted on the top or bottom of the bars, where its position can be rotated to achieve the desired angle. It's also MatchMaker compatible.


The lever for the UpDown can be adjusted however you like. It's also MatchMaker compatible, which is a plus, as less clutter is always better.
From the outside, the post looks more or less like anything else out there, but the internal workings are quite different.


Construction

The UpDown looks similar on the outside, but it uses a different design than many other posts currently on the market. The cartridge has an outer and inner tube which contain compressed air and hydraulic oil. When the actuator is in a closed position, the seatpost is locked out and the hydraulic oil contained in the inner chamber supports the rider's weight.

When the actuator opens and dropper compresses, oil flows from the inner chamber to the outer chamber and compressed air enters the upper part of the inner chamber. At full compression, the piston pushes both hydraulic oil and unwanted air from the inner tube.

When the cartridge rebounds from full compression, compressed air pushes the piston shaft upwards and only the hydraulic oil gets sucked into the inner chamber. This way, the cartridge can effectively reallocate both air and oil back to its proper designated locations in the system. This ability to self-restore and refresh theoretically means lower maintenance and no "bobbing" or "sinking" issues with the dropper.
Flow Chart of Catridge

The post uses a standard two bolt clamp for the saddle.
The lever can be easily rotated to whatever position your thumb prefers.



Performance

Installing the UpDown was simple, due to the fact that the cable head sits in the dropper post itself while the other end is secured on the lever. This is a great trait in that dialing in cable tension doesn't require pulling the post out of the frame or measuring 17mm to where you secure the cable. Run the cable through the lever, put some tension on it, and you're good to go.

The lever itself is ultra adjustable as mentioned above. The thumb paddle is large, similar in size to that of a SRAM shifter. The action on the lever is much lighter than a Fox Transfer or RockShox Reverb. There is a little bit of play in it, but it's not enough to notice when riding.

Even with the parts properly oiled, there is resistance in the actuation of the lever when there is weight on the saddle.

When there is weight on the saddle, actuating the post isn't as smooth as I expected. I experienced increased resistance at the lever when sitting with my full weight on the saddle, and there was an almost 'metal-on-metal' grinding feeling at the lever. Easing off some weight made the post actuate more smoothly and with much less force on the lever.

Despite this harshness at the lever, the performance of the post stayed consistent. It doesn't take much force to get the post down and the return speed of the UpDown is moderate, with no fear of the ejection-seat/shotgun style return some other options have.

I reached out to Funn about the lever feel and they replied saying, "Yes, we are aware of this issue. This is due to the cam mechanism design...To alleviate this issue, we suggest to preload the actuator as far as possible. This would help the actuator pass the sideways moving section."

I did as suggested and it alleviated a lot of the tension, but the lever feel still isn't smooth as some of the competition. At the same time, the force required to actually move the seat down once the lever is depressed is quite light, so it's not as if you're ever fighting to get the seat out of the way.

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The post's ability to self bleed air out of the system works as advertised. I was able to introduce air into the system by pulling the post up with the bike upside down. This gave a very exaggerated amount of sag in the post with it fully extended, as you can see in the video. With a quick up and down of the post, everything firms back up and is perfectly solid once again.

The ability of the post to automatically "reset" itself as you ride is going to be a big selling point for a lot of riders who have found themselves with IFP issues in the past. In this respect, the UpDown comes out ahead of many of the other posts currently available.


Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesThe UpDown's ability to self-bleed is going to be a selling point for a lot of riders who are tired of needing to get their posts rebuilt in order to solve IFP-related issues. The UpDown is solid, and the lever shape and adjustability are great, although the camming issue is tough to overlook. Adding extra preload to the actuator did help, but the overall feel when pushing the lever isn't nearly as smooth as other options.Daniel Sapp







115 Comments

  • + 78
 If the title for the same review of the reverb would be proportional to this one it would go something like:

"It sometimes works, but most of the time it sucks monkey's balls. Hard"
  • - 2
 My grandma had a quick smile.
  • + 6
 Agree, title is a bit harsh. Prefer a neutral title.
  • + 4
 @MTB-Colada:

One could are that every review of every piece of bike equipment could be titled

"Review: ________'s _________ Eliminates Unwanted ______, But Isn't Perfect." Fill in the blank.

I appreciate the reviewer's efforts to review things with an honest/experienced answer so I don't spend $100 to $10,000 on something that sucks.
  • + 14
 We haven't reviewed a Reverb since a group test in 2015, where we specifically called out that it isn't as reliable as some other options, has slow rebound speeds in cold weather, and isn't as easy to work on as a cable operated post.

www.pinkbike.com/news/dropper-post-test-review-six-2015.html
  • + 21
 @brianpark: please never stop being the voice of reason among the shit show that is the Pinkbike comment section!
  • + 3
 I never had a problem with the Reverb. As long as it is bled well, it works well. However, the bleed process is not the easiest to get a quality bleed out of it. There are some tricks though.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: any word on a review of the Rockshox rl 35 in the near future?
  • + 3
 I dont understand everyones issues with the reverb. Yes it goes soft if you abuse it. Then you service it and its all good again. What more do you want?
Im also slightly bemused by the main issue cited in the review above. The lever action is sticky if you try and activate it while sitting your full weight on the saddle? Well why are you even trying to activate it with your full weight already applied? This isnt how droppers get used while riding, only in carpark tests. Its like complaining your fork tops out of you put your foot on the wheel and push. The solution isnt to modify the product, the solution is to use it properly.

Im getting so bored of watching mtb customers shooting themselves in the foot daily, complaining that silly non-issues are a deal breaker, then complaining when the newer modified version that fixes the issue costs more or is too heavy. Or worse loses actual real world functionality in order to rectify a made up problem.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: Because the service interval is so high. I ride far less than I'd like, maybe average 2hrs a week on some pretty mellow XC trails and after a service my reverb sags before halfway through the season. Given the annoyance of servicing, that's too often, in my opinion, to need to bleed the post.

Even if say an annual service rate is all that is needed, I suspect psychology plays a factor in that issues with your seat are so bloody obvious - it's right under your rear, you feel the play in the seat post so it is top of mind. Most riders likely also need their shock, fork and/or bearings serviced, but they aren't in tune with their bike sufficiently to notice... but you'll certainly notice a wobbly seat.

Consumer psychology is generally irrational.

PS - totally agree on your point about intended vs unintended use. Imagine reviewing drivetrain and complaining that it doesn't shift smoothly when jumping 5 gears under heavy load on out of the saddle climbs. Oh wait, people still do that too...
  • + 0
 @robwhynot: well said.

Has your post got the updated ifp? They help quite a lot.
  • + 0
 @gabriel-mission9: I did help, and RS/LBS has been great about servicing and replacing some of the original parts under warranty. but it still needs a bleed at least 1-2x per season. This self-bleed system of Funn has a lot of appeal.
  • + 1
 @tacklingdummy: Hence: better options out there.
  • + 40
 Lets just cut to the chase and you tell us why to buy this over Oneup's proven $199 dropper.
  • + 8
 @thesharkman every review I read I think the same...
  • + 4
 @Robo88 You posted what I was going to say.
  • + 4
 The One up is awesome and I'm really excited for v2 but the dropper is $199 without the lever/cable/housing.
  • + 4
 Cable actuated smooth action air canister powered and lasts so long before you need to service which you can do at home. Why bother with lesser options.
  • + 4
 @manuni88: true, but that means you can pick any aftermarket remote and still end up paying the same or even less than this dropper.
  • + 5
 @manuni88: It's $169 a few places for v1 now, but yeah. Even a cheap starter lever would be nice.
  • + 3
 I've had yet-unsolved rotation issues with mine... If I tension the seat collar enough to prevent rotation of the post, it does't come up without pulling by hand. Reached out to OneUp and they were quick to respond, but issues remains for now. Disclaimer: it's on a relatively cheap bike, and I'm wondering if a different collar would make a difference.
  • + 7
 @thesharkman I'm using a OneUp dropper now and for the money I would recommend it over most everything else out there right now.

That said, for people who have chronic IFP issues, this is an interesting option.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: but don't the gas strut cartridge droppers like oneup, giant, brand-x, etc just forgo an IFP all together?

I've only ever used the gas strut type droppers, and i had literally never heard of IFP issues or droppers sagging before today...like, i didn't even know that was an issue that plagued some droppers
  • + 4
 @noapathy: Its $169 because they're about to release their version 2 which will only allow 30mm of change instead of the current 50mm of travel. V2 will have more options in sizes and it will allow you to save a little weight and get a better insertion for frames with bends in the seat tube. The dropper is still one of the best deals out there but my point was more that it costs more then the list price that everybody gets excited about.
  • + 4
 @manuni88: So yer sayin' the new version is better? And they didn't jack the price up, but instead lowered that of the older model so even more people can get one? I'm becoming a fan of this company...oh wait, I already was.
  • + 2
 @manuni88: i don't want a remote included anyway- remotes don't really wear out, so a lot of people already own them. i'd rather pay less for a dropper and not get an unnecessary extra component
  • + 2
 @xeren: gas strut droppers also develop sag. But it is much harder to fix when they do. Often service centers just bin the old strut and put a new one in.
  • + 1
 @joostd: doing up the seat clamp till the post stops having side to side play is soing massive damage to your post. I recommend that you stop doing that and just put up with a small amount of play.
  • + 2
 @joostd: use friction grease in the seat tube.
  • + 2
 @joostd: My OneUp 150 has a few mm of rotational play at the front of the seat, that’s normal once the seat collar is tightened. I wouldn’t torque the collar over 4 N-m but that’s kinda frame dependent. As @ridintrials mentioned, a carbon paste/friction grease would reduce the amount of collar torque required and improve actuation. You can also try more air pressure in the OneUp post, but I’d do that after you’ve eliminated the points above.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: huh, good to know- i've had 4, one of which was 4 years old when i gave it to a friend and had never experienced any sag
  • + 27
 Buy a Bike Yoke a d you won’t need another post ever. Just reset when needed. No other faults. Job done
  • + 3
 This. I got the 180 Bike Yolk a year ago and it's been absolutely flawless since day 1.
  • + 1
 Yes yes and yes
  • + 1
 Never heard of these, but interested. Think in the long run it's wort cost of buying a new $200 post every couple of years?
  • + 5
 The cheap xfusion on my bike works great, reliably, and cost $180 on sale.
  • + 3
 I got the oneup because my stumpy legs couldn't accommodate the reverb that came on my bike. A couple weeks from new the reverb on the wifes bike shat the bed, a bike yoke was the only thing available locally so went for it. The Oneup seems good for the cost and I'm happy enough with it. The bike yoke is so much more refined and precise, much nicer action and absolutely zero play several muddy months in. Having compared them back to back, I reckon it is worth the price difference over the oneup.
  • + 9
 The BikeYoke Revive is the best dropper on the market. When all droppers cost $400+, there was no reason to get any other post - the Revive beat them all in every way.

We now have $200 droppers that actually work and the Revive is no longer the clear winner. Still the best, but the value is questionable.
  • + 2
 @R-M-R:

From a functional standpoint, I agree. But these many of these $200 droppers are air cartridge based, which means that if those air cartridges fail, it's time to get a new one. Not even sure if your LBS has those cartridges in stock. Nothing wrong with them now. They just work, and work well. The Revive is over-engineered with a sealed closed circuit which, for all intents and purposes, is self-'reviving'. I have never read about the Revive's own circuit failing under normal use. I have, however, heard about these air cartridges failing over time. I think their life is about 1-3 years until it's noticeably slower or fails completely. Mileage may vary. The Revive is indefinite unless you smash one in to a rock.
  • + 3
 @Almazing: I've owned three Revives and I agree. The first Revive wouldn't lock in cold weather; the problem was not determined, but Sacki (BikeYoke owner) personally swapped it out. The second worked great ... until it was stolen. Third one is working perfectly. The revive feature has been used only a few times and, by far, the slowest part of the process is getting out the tool. Most of my revives have been demonstrations to people with saggy Reverbs to show what life could be like if they ditch those poor old things!

It's true the cartridges of the new, inexpensive droppers can't be serviced. The question is whether they need to be serviced and what that would require. We're close to a point where the cartridges rarely fail; if they do, the service can be quick and cheap. If shops were to stock a couple, the whole process might take under an hour and cost maybe $100. If the initial price of the post is $200 less, that buys two cartridge replacements before the price breaks even, and not many people will need two cartridge replacements.

I still prefer the Revive and it's nice to now have less expensive, *viable* options.
  • + 1
 Mine is over two years old now. If it feels squishy. Just revive it. It’s not hot any play. It’s just a solid part that works. Maybe $200 will be ok. But you know the revive will be ok. They also show you how to fix it. So they want you to be able to work on it. What more can you want? @JesseE:
  • + 2
 @Intensevp: I think I want a metal spring in a tube for like 150 that isn't as ugly as a gravity dropper.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: E Thirteen's TRS+ Dropper is coil spring powered with a remote and stealth routing. Can't think of any other modern design droppers with a coil spring rather than air nowadays.
  • + 2
 @Almazing: Yeah and in true e13 fashion they managed to ship them out with a fault where many of them were not fully extending back up due to a "bad batch of coil springs". Never change e13.
  • + 1
 @Ferisko: True, e*thirteen ships products in what should be "beta" stage. Everyone I know with an e*thirteen post has had problems. That said, e*thirteen is generally good about fixing problems and these riders have all received new items or repair kits. I expect e*thirteen posts will soon be reliable, if they're not already.
  • + 1
 @R-M-R: This is true. e*Thirteen has taken care of me when I got a defective TRS+ cassette. They sent me a TRS Race cassette to replace my faulty one, which is a slight upgrade over the TRS+. e*Thirteen products are sort of a mixed bag at here and there, but you can bet that they'll take care of you when it comes down to anything warranty related.
  • + 1
 @Almazing: Agreed. They rush to market, but they're good folks.
  • + 14
 This is one component where i would be happy with a spring, out of all the dropper posts i have had (at least 10) my first one, the Gravity Dropper Turbo was the most hassle free and reliable, yeah yeah they aint great looking and only had 3 settings but i never had a problem with it.
  • + 14
 I still have a Gravity Dropper on an old hardtail that's now pulling commuter duty. Almost ten years of use with basically zero maintenance and it's still working perfectly. It's bonkers to me that bikes can be so good now, yet still have issues with the god damn seatpost.
  • + 6
 Had a Gravity Turbo LP on my Pitch, it may look a bit odd but damn it works. Rebuild it once in 5 years for $10 and you are good to go for another 5 years riding.
  • + 3
 I've used an £80 Sorata Pro dropper for the last 5 years. It is a big spring, gear cable actuated with 3 positions. I have pulled it to pieces once in that time to grease everything up again and it is faultless. I'm going to be gutted if it ever gives up!
  • + 6
 My Gravity Dropper from 2011 is still working fine. It is particularly effective in cold, and is now on my fat bike. My best bikes have Bike Yokes, best posts I've ever had (185 mm drop to boot).
  • + 4
 E13. Loving mine.
  • + 1
 I’ve got one on each of my bikes. I don’t know why I’d get anything else. Glad to see some love for them here!
  • + 2
 Yeah, it blows my mind that people are relying on air for this job. It's not suspension!
  • + 16
 This might be a good dropper but every dropper has their downside
  • + 2
 That gave me a rise.
  • + 8
 Droppers have come a long way, and I'm glad to see so many options. However, I haven't seen any of them offer better performance and reliability than the 9point8 Fall Line. Sure, most of them are cheaper, but none of them are built to the same tolerances AND simplicity as the 9point8. 4 years running one, and 3 years the other. They just work.
  • + 3
 I found the 9point8 very finicky with temperature and the original trigger was lame. The company offers good service etc. but over all I never felt like I had vastly superior performance compared to my KSLev, which is about half the price. They're based in my province and wanna love'em, but being in cold-ass Ontario a dropper that gets weird when the temp drops is a no-go for me. I did really like the seat clamp, though. Good design there.
  • + 7
 Pretty sure the Bike Yoke Revive has a similar system, albeit from a bleed valve at the head. It's nothing new though.
  • + 6
 Benefit of this is you just use the post to reset it, don't need to flick I lever, or get a tool out. Lever feel is subjective, doubt it would bother me. What I'm really keen to hear is how these perform longer-term.
  • + 1
 Yeah, but I doubt it is really an issue that the user has to push the revive button every now and then. Lube your chain, push the button, done. Unless maybe if these droppers go sloppy several times within a single ride, of course. Either way, the ability to quickly remove the slop is nice. Be it automatic or with a simple button.
  • + 5
 @moity: I've had my 160mm Revive coming up 2 years. I've needed the "revive" function once and haven't done anything else other than wipe it down.


The KS I have on my other bike also has only needed to be "revived" once in about 5 years but that involved completely dismantling it to bleed out the air. It also needs to be cleaned and greased a couple times a year or it gets extremely sticky.
  • + 7
 @vinay: Except that the new Revive basically don't even need the reset button anymore.

I have the first model on my full susser, it tends to suck air when the bike is inverted. Press of a button and it's good again. But, i have a newer one (where they updated the internals) on my hardtail and i have not touched the reset button in the 1.5 years i had it. Older one i've had for 2.5 years, zero maintenance required so far on either one.

In my books it's the perfect dropper.
  • + 1
 @hirvi:my first and only dropper I guess I'm lucky to have experienced nothing else.
  • + 2
 Yea the Revive is dead reliable.
  • + 2
 @moity: I've had a Bike Yoke Revive for almost three years and never needed to use the revive feature once, so the "benefit" of it happening automatically is pretty much non-existent.
  • + 2
 Reminder to self- check out bikeyoke revive
  • + 2
 I've had two KS LEVs and two Fox Transfers, and I've never had a squishy, boingy, sagging or anything else, saddle. I don't really even know what it is. Still, a lot of companies seem to have solved this problem I've never experienced! Bravo!
  • + 1
 Had some sagging on reverbs but been on the fox transfer totally flawless, first rebuild just over 2years use untouched didn’t need it internals like new still.
  • + 2
 @enduroFactory: the fox transfer is a truly set and forget item. The remote could do with work but I can forgive them about that.
  • + 1
 I'm actually a big fan of the Transfer. It came stock on of my bikes and it's been flawless. I don't foresee replacing it. But it did replace the god-awful Fox lever with a Wolf Tooth. On my other bikes, I use a Revive.
  • + 1
 Some time my Levs seem to drop like half a cm into their travel, but that's the worst of it. The Levs' mechanism on the bottom can get stuck, which is tedious, but over all they have been pretty good to me (I've had 3)
  • + 1
 My 2 Transfers I've had, both since the day they were released have also been flawless. I laugh every time I hear about people having sagging droppers, or if they're simply running a reverb. Only reason I see with anything else is price, and considering that I'd be picking up the OneUp. And yes, the lever sucks, but luckily they sell them separately and I use Wolftooth's awesome lever.
  • + 1
 @tgent: i have the wolf tooth lever but use the fox vertical lever
Find the vertical push down more natural then push away, personal preference
  • + 3
 Never had any problems with either Specialized Command, X-Fusion or e13 droppers. Current bike came with a RF Turbine dropper. No issues with it so far either. Non dropper seat posts I have also found very reliable.
  • + 1
 I prefer mechanical, indexed droppers like the Command Post. Too bad they don't make it longer.
  • + 2
 I had a ks lev do the dredded sag, just turn the bike upside down and extend the post a couple of times and it will fix it. Pritty shit that such an expensive part should even have these problems, just buy an rsp plummet or brand x assend never seen one of the cheap post's have the problem!!!
  • + 3
 Is there any way to have a RS reverb not get stuck when it’s cold outside? (Obviously it’s warm now but it sucked in the cold weather)
  • + 1
 Yeah, turn the speed dial completely in one direction (forgot if it was slower or faster)... worked for my old reverb (now happy owner of a bikeyoke)
  • + 2
 @Stokedonthis: faster! the poppet valve is opened wider, more oil can flow -> Works better when its cold and the oil has a higher viscosity.
  • + 2
 Change the hydraulic remote and cable against the Bikeyoke DeHy and it will never be slow again, even if it's cold.
  • + 11
 The best fix and modification for a Reverb is to throw it in the trash and replace it with a Bikeyoke Revive.
  • + 1
 @Almazing: I agree, if money does not matter.
  • + 3
 @JoeHigashi80: You're gonna save that money anyway in servicingSmile
  • + 1
 The best option in my experience is to replace it with a cheap $200 xfusion, $200 oneup, or get the fancier bike yoke if you have extra money.

If you must keep your reverb, Rockshox can replce an O ring with a smaller one made of a material thats less temperature sensitive. Its like $80 or something though.
  • + 3
 @Almazing: BikeYoke Revive, Fox Transfer, or OneUp choose the one that best fits your budget, they are all nearly perfect.
  • + 1
 I had success with conversion to a cable actuation with the WolfTooth system ReMote Sustain. Costs $100 and takes an hour of time to convert. Fixed temp instability problems I've had in the past. I used this because I had a fairly new Reverb that otherwise works well and now I have a cable and lever in place to replace with OneUp post when the Reverb dies.
  • + 1
 You can improve the speed of a reverb by doing the following -

While extended, let out all the air from the post.
Bleed the remote system with the bleeding edge tool, speed dial out.
With the threaded syringe out and post end port plugged, push a little more fluid in the lever with the bleeding edge syringe (hold it in with your hand, not over or near a rotor or brake).
Disconnect bleeding edge tool and adjust like normal.
Air post to 250psi.

Now you have the maximum amount of fluid in the system and it will work better, especially in the cold.
  • + 4
 @romeoblue: Sounds like a lot of work compared to do nothing for many other quality posts...
  • + 1
 SO my reverb of course never worked in the cold. It was also too long for my frame, so I always had to sag it down about a cm to ride because its stroke to length ratio sucks. It also developed that cm of sag/suspension. That last part I actually liked; it was nice to have a little mini suspension in the seat post. The newest bikeyoke XC dropper has this as an actual feature.
  • + 1
 Isn't it just a speedball/joplin with an internal frame routing?
It looks like there is the "issue" the IFP solves, meaning when the post is in compressed position, you can extend it manually...
  • + 3
 Why does anyone else even bother to make droppers anymore when the Bikeyoke Revive out?
  • + 4
 price
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: Troof. But you do get what you pay for. It comes with a really good remote already. It's now sold without a remote in their official site for a bit less. The Revive is incredibly easy to service. Any and all spare parts are available on their official site. There are no special tools required to service, unless you count lockring pliers special. There's no oil or a bunch of seals to replace when servicing. And you can change the lower to fit a 31.6 or 30.9 seat tube when moving from bike to bike.

Yea it's expensive. But it's a dropper that will outlast many, many bikes.
  • + 3
 Read the headline, straight to the comments.
  • + 1
 Why is it that £50 pneumatic office chairs can operate perfectly (at least mine has, for four years now) yet dropper posts costing £££ can't?
  • + 2
 None of my dropper posts have ever had that kind of problem. Giant, Specialized and a local brand, Lyne.
  • + 1
 Lyne is the same as Brand X in the UK if I'm not mistaken. On my 3rd one now - love it. For the price nothing else comes close.
  • + 1
 Lyne dropper the same as Brand X dropper is what I meant to say.... not Lyne = Brand X.
  • + 2
 Its amazing that a product is brought to market with a known fault/issue and we're supposed to accept it.
Ballcrap.
  • + 4
 You obviously don't work with product development, do you?
  • + 4
 @Happymtbfr:
Please don't tell me that if we all buy a crap product the company can then afford to make version 2 which will be better and then we can all buy that to replace the first one....
  • + 1
 @spl75: I only buy what i think are good products, if they aren't I move on to a better product, example reverb replaced with cheaper & better Brand X, wanted a Fox Transfer but is stupid money and doesn't even include the lever. Like buying a car and being told wheels are extra!!
  • + 2
 @jimmythehat:
When developing a product, a team is given a certain amount of money to reach a certain level of performance/quality/price target under a constrained period of time. Usually one of these three parameters is more loose. But without going deep into details, you will almost never have a unlimited amount of time and money to reach top quality...
  • + 2
 All it takes to get rid of unwanted sagging is a dropper post? Hot damn!
  • + 2
 Heavy expensive and will fail. I see why everyone has a dropper post.
  • + 2
 Just like suspension.
  • + 0
 Setback option? I need 25mm of setback to compensate for the retarded steep sta that are coming out.
  • + 0
 I love my e13... Naaa just kidding!
  • + 1
 200mm option PLEASE!!!
  • + 2
 Dont bloody encouage them to make a larger version of it! The reviewer said the lever felt inferior and the company said
"Yeah we know"
  • + 1
 W A N T

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