7 of the Best Mountain Bike Lights Ridden & Rated

Jan 25, 2019 at 17:41
by Daniel Sapp  


Just because the days are short and the nights are long doesn't mean that mountain bike season needs to end - there are more light options on the market than ever, many of them with impressive run times and low overall weights.

Choices in how to illuminate the trail range from bare-bones, minimalist set-ups to over-the-top light packs that mimic train lights in brightness. There are helmet mounts, handlebar mounts, and while a lot of lights do double duty, some are better suited for one or the other. I selected seven different set-ups that are versatile, and which cover a wide range of quality levels that are available. There are a range of pricepoints and styles of lights. Each light in this review has something that makes it stand out from the rest, whether it's versatility, power, size, or ease of use.



About This Review

Because lights function differently in varying conditions and a good looking light doesn't always mean it functions well long term, I consulted and collaborated with my friend Tom 'Danger' Place, who has years of light and LED experience. Specifically, for seven years, he ran an R+D department at Cree - the manufacturer of LEDs used for nearly every bike light on the market, including all of the ones in this test. He has multiple LED chip design patents to his name, is also a mountain biker, and rides at night as much as in the day. He has torn apart and analyzed nearly every bike light available so there's no better person to help pick apart a few lights than him.

We did our best to make this easy to understand, but I'm going to guess that a number of people don't know what "Thermal Rollback" is. Thermal Rollback is when a device, in this case, lights, gets hot and then lowers its output in order to decrease the operating temperature, thus preventing damage to the light, causing burns or worse.

The lights are reviewed together for each brand, when applicable. There's a Gloworm option that couples the helmet with the bar mounted unit, one with Niterider, and so-on. By no means do you need to stick with the same brand on the helmet and bars, that's just how I grouped things together.





Gloworm X2 Adventure and XS
The X2 Adventure mounts nicely on the helmet
The XS on the handlebars

Gloworm are known among many riders as "the light people." Their X2 Adventure is a smaller battery version of their X2. Both the X2A and the XS lights tested here have interchangeable lenses making the set-up options incredibly versatile. The lenses are a spot, wide, and flood. Both lights feature a wireless remote that straps right on the handlebar with no adapters. For testing purposes, I used the XS on the handlebars and the X2A on the helmet.

The X2A is light enough, battery included, to run the entire system on the helmet. The XS is minimalistic in and of itself and takes up a negligible amount of space on the bars and produces a ton of light. The ergonomics are solid and the design is robust. The lights both come with everything you could possibly need. There are multiple mounts for bars (sans 35mm) and helmet, extension cables for putting the battery in a pack, spare parts, and even zip ties. You can swap the batteries between the two and they feature a semi-standard 5mm barrel plug that other 7.4V battery packs laying around can work with.


X2 Adventure
• Lumens: 1700
• Runtime: 1:30
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Multiple Options
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Super Dim plus Commute modes
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 262g as tested
• MSRP: $225 USD

XS
• Lumens: 2500
• Runtime: 2:00
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Multiple Options
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Super Dim plus Commute modes
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 364g as tested
• MSRP: $300 USD
glowormlites.co.nz
bigquotesAn excellent choice for a versatile light set-up that works on both handlebars and the helmet.

X2 Adventure
XS

Pros

+ Multiple beam options
+ Multiple mount options
+ Lightweight and good ergonomics
Cons

- Remote connectivity can be spotty
- Velcro on straps is frustrating to use
- Programming the light for custom modes is a very tedious process

The X2 Adventure and the XS at full power





Niterider Pro 2200 Race and Lumina 1200 Boost

Niterider Pro 2200 Race
Niterider Lumina 1200 Boost

Niterider have been in the game of night riding as long as just about anyone. They essentially paved the way in the industry with a great product that was the best out there two decades ago. Their lights have stood the test of time and remain a 'go-to' for a lot of riders. Their beam patterns are good and their batteries work with other Niterider lights from generations past.

The Lumina should be a good light, and it is alright, but its functionality falls short. The programming isn't intuitive, and the OLED screen is a complicated interface to work with until you're used to it. The mount is bulky and would be better served with a quick release rather than a bolt that gets jammed up by the stem when you try to tighten it down. When it is tight, it does a good job of keeping the light in place. The Lumina would be better as a more helmet specific light, but that renders the the OLED screen useless unless you take your helmet off to adjust your light. For a good general use light, the Lumina is solid but may be more complicated than some people are interested in and has a few flaws that would have me looking at other simpler options.

Pro 2200 Race
• Lumens: 2200
• Runtime: 1:30
• Mount: Helmet and Bar
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Dim
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 482g as tested
• MSRP: $350 USD

Lumina 1200 Boost
• Lumens: 1200
• Runtime: 1:00 (claimed)
• Mount: Helmet and Bar
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Walk/Boost, additional flash modes
• Charger: Micro USB
• Weight: 175g as tested
• MSRP: $150 USD
niterider.com

The Pro 2200 Race has a good beam pattern and uses the same design Nightrider have used for years. The size of the light itself and the button on the light is very easy to push when it's on your helmet, even with winter gloves on. The plastic on the light doesn't get too hot to hold either, even at full power. 2,200 lumens seems like a lot, but these days, you can get that from much nicer, sleeker, and more user-friendly lights. The battery pack for the Pro 2200 is bulky, and you're relegated to wearing a pack or putting it on your handlebars as strapping it to your helmet puts far too much weight on your head.

bigquotesNiterider have been in the game of night riding as long as just about anyone. They essentially paved the way in the industry with a great product that was the best out there two decades ago. Unfortunately, aside from the inclusion of LEDs and lithium batteries, they have not advanced their technology or altered their aesthetic enough to really keep up with the new players in the game.

Niterider Pro 2200 Race
Niterider Lumina 1200 Boost

Pros

+ OLED screen on the Lumina is great for monitoring run time and mode selection - all lights should have this
+ Lumina is a good value
+ Good beam pattern on both lights
Cons

- Programming and interfaces on the Lumina is not intuitive
- Mounting system is antiquated and difficult to use on both lights
- Bulky battery on the Pro 2200, needs to be updated






Light & Motion Trail 1000 FC and SECA 2000 Race

Light & Motion Trail 1000 FC
Light & Motion SECA 2000 Race

Light & Motion is another well-known player in the business of bicycle lights. They make a variety of commuter and trail lights. The Trail 1000FC is a good 'get out of the woods in a bad situation' light because it weighs next to nothing and puts out a decent amount of light. There is a short runtime on high - only 1:30 because it has a lot of thermal rollback, so after about 20 minutes the light is operating at a lower output due to the smooth case and poor cooling. That said, I've been using versions of this light for several years and have been very happy with the results for the money.

The SECA 2000 Race has the best beam pattern of all the lights tested and probably one of the best in the industry. The front face is angled to prevent blinding the rider when standing and although the silicone strap is a little unwieldy, it's effective. The light has a good amount of battery life and works well on the handlebars or helmet - all mounts included. The button on the helmet is easy to use
Trail 1000 FC
• Lumens: 1000
• Runtime: 1:30
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Multiple Options
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Pulse
• Charger: Micro USB
• Weight: 148g as tested
• MSRP: $130 USD

SECA 2000 Race
• Lumens: 2000
• Runtime: 1:30
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Multiple Options
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Pulse
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 340g as tested
• MSRP: $280 USD
lightandmotion.com
and toggle between modes. Like the Trail 1000, the construction is on the cheap side of things so it's not overly robust, but I'll take that since it's easy to use and has a good beam spread.

bigquotesIf you want a simple light set-up that works with no frills, Light & Motion is hard to beat.

Light & Motion Trail 1000 FC
Light & Motion SECA 2000 Race

Pros

+ SECA 2000 beam pattern
+ Multiple mount options - included
+ Decent battery life on both lights
Cons

- Minimalist construction - cheap
- Proprietary charger on the SECA 2000
- Battery indicator on the SECA 2000 only has three levels, "Good, Meh, and Screwed."






Lupine Wilma R14 and Alpha

Lupine Wilma R14
Lupine Alpha

Lupine make a number of practical lights such as their Piko, Neo, and Blika series but the Alpha and Wilma aren't practical, they're some of the brightest and nicest you can buy. These lights are neither cheap, nor weak, and are pretty much more than almost anyone, except the rider who does DH laps at night, or someone on an extreme expedition of sorts would ever need. The Alpha puts out a whopping 7,200 lumens - plenty to piss off all of your riding buddies and offset the sleep cycle of wildlife, or in the case of the Alpha, start a fire if you leave it on high in dry leaves. The Wilma R14 is a bit more conservative at 3,200 lumens, but has a long run time and is an excellent choice for someone looking for something versatile and well made.

Let's be honest, you don't need the 7,200 lumens that the Alpha puts off, and there's just about no one that would know what to do with that much light on a bicycle, especially combined with the 3,200 lumens of the Wilma. That said, they're a blast to ride with
Wilma R14
• Lumens: 3200
• Runtime: 3:10
• Mount: Helmet and Bar
• Modes: Fully programmable via Bluetooth
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 664g as tested
• MSRP: $775 USD

Alpha
• Lumens: 7200
• Runtime: 1:20
• Mount: Helmet and Bar
• Modes: Fully programmable via Bluetooth
• Charger: Proprietary
• Weight: 683g as tested
• MSRP: $1,285 USD
lupinenorthamerica.com
and put out so much light that you may need to wear sunglasses at night while looking down the trail.

The built-in heat management system will reduce the output of the light when it gets too hot. The head size of the Alpha means that it can't dump that much heat, so unless you're averaging a high speed in cool temperatures, the output is going to drop quickly. On a ride in Western NC, with temperatures well below freezing, the light was still unable to push full power except towards the end of sustained descents after a half hour climb.

The Wilma is the more practical but still costly of the two. It's well-made and the head is lightweight for the power it puts off. The large 8-cell battery we tested with is a little much for head use, but the four or two cell batteries would be a good way to make it a bit more functional unless you needed an ultra-long run time. Both the Alpha and Wilma are programmable via a Bluetooth app on the phone and there are included remotes that easily attach to the handlebars for turning the lights off and on and controlling modes.

bigquotesThere's little practicality in these lights but if you want to race DH at night, go on an expedition, piss off your riding buddies, or just have the best lights money can buy, the combination of these two should do the trick.

Lupine Wilma R14
Lupine Alpha

Pros

+ So many lumens
+ Incredibly well built, robust housing
+ Bluetooth app is functional and practical for lights of this caliber
Cons

- You can buy bikes that are less expensive than the two combined
- Massive thermal rollback on the Alpha
- Button on the Alpha is difficult to reach, especially when the light is hot. Using the remote is almost required






Specialized Flux

Specialized Flux
Flux 1200
• Lumens: 1200
• Runtime: 1:15
• Mount: Helmet and Bar - proprietary mounts for each
• Modes: Low/Med/High
• Charger: Micro USB
• Weight: 184 as tested
• MSRP: $150 USD
specialized.com

Lights are a tricky category, and Specialized have done a few things differently than a lot of their competitors. The Flux is targeted more towards a commuter or road rider, but it does work well in the woods too. It has an even beam spread but the pattern is a little narrow for really aggressive trail riding.

There's a low, "get out of the woods" output mode which is a cool concept in that you can't fully drain the battery and it not work at all - there should be a little bit of low power left even if you burn up all of the high. The output, at 1200 watts is also reasonable for a self-contained light. The mount that the light fits into is a little finicky to use at first, but once the light is in it is secure. There's a small bolt on the side of the light that does take an allen key to crank down, otherwise, you'll have a loose light bouncing down the trail.

bigquotesThe Flux 1200 is more road worthy than anything else but it's equally at home on the trail when your short ride turns long and you find yourself benighted.

Pros

+ Easy to use
+ Indicator light on side tells charge
+ Good size and weight for 1000 lumen self-contained light
Cons

- More geared towards road riding than trail
- Can come loose if not set up properly
- Mounts are proprietary and it takes a different one for each bar, helmet mounts are sold separately

Specialized Flux





Lezyne Superdrive 1500 XXL

Lezyne Superdrive 1500 XXL
Superdrive 1500 XXL
• Lumens: 1500
• Runtime: 1:40
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Multiple Options
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Extra High/FEMTO plus two flash
• Charger: Micro USB
• Weight: 266 as tested
• MSRP: $120 USD
lezyne.com

Lezyne make a variety of products from multi-tools, pumps, and plug kits to lights. All of their lights are self-contained, meaning there's no extra battery and cable, it's all in one unit. The Superdrive 1500 XXL is their most powerful model. It's a fairly simple light with one button operation. The light does have some heft to it, largely due to the size of the unit and the batteries in it coupled with the surface of the unit which helps with heat dissipation.

The light has a number of modes accessed from one button on the top of the unit. The button also indicates the level of battery life via a red, yellow, or green light. The high output modes provide more than ample light for trail riding and the FEMTO mode is enough to walk out of the woods, or look at a map, but not nearly enough power to safely ride trails. The interface on the buttons can be tricky and it's easy to get lost in a flashing mode which, when you're just trying to up the power for your descent, but you can switch to the overdrive race mode that toggles directly between high and low power.

The light is ideally placed on the bars due to its weight but does work on the helmet as well, and is easy to manage in that situation since there are no wires to fuss with. For a little more money, there's a loaded version of the light that includes Lezyne's Direct-X lock mount and a wireless remote for the light that goes on the handlebars.


bigquotesThe Superdrive 1500 XXL is a good option for tossing in the pack if you're fairly certain there's a chance of finishing your ride in the dark and you need an ample amount of power.

Pros

+ Good option for a self-contained light
+ Lots of power for a self-contained light
+ Good cooling
Cons

- Too heavy for helmet use
- Modes could be simplified, most people don't need multiple flash settings
- Strap/mount is a bit bulky to work with

Lezyne Superdrive 1500 XXL





Bontrager Pro RT

Bontrager Pro RT
X2 Adventure
• Lumens: 1300
• Runtime: 1:30
• Mount: Helmet and Bar, Bontrager magnetic helmet
• Modes: Low/Med/High/Night Flash/Day Flash
• Charger: Micro USB
• Weight: 173g as tested
• MSRP: $100 USD
trekbikes.com

Bontrager is the other big brand with an excellent and comprehensive product line. The Pro RT is a 1300 lumen light and important for a few reasons, the biggest one being its battery. The battery it uses is the 21700 series lithium-ion cell that's going to become more standard in lights in the next few years. It will enable over an hour and a half run time and an output of 1,500 lumens from a single-cell, self-contained light - ideal for helmets.

The Pro RT is simple, clean, and just simply works. It seems that Bontrager tried to make something basic and functional... and they succeeded. The light is also only $100, and functions better than many that cost twice that. It's also one of the only lights on test that exceeded its advertised run time. That being said, there are some places it could be improved. The interface can be annoying in cycling from low to high power. You have to go past the strobe settings which is unacceptable, especially when you're in the woods at night. It also doesn't cool incredibly well, but we're splitting hairs here. The handlebar mount is a little bulky, but it adjusts to fit any size handlebars and the helmet mount, when used with Bontrager's "Blendr" interface, is functional and rad. There's nothing easier than dropping it in and riding.

bigquotesThis is the light I bring along on daytime rides that even have a slight chance of going into the night. The light is small, works well, and is reliable. It's a lot of light for the price.

Pros

+ Small for over 1,000 lumens
+ Multiple mount options that work well
+ Basic and no frills, it just works
Cons

- Doesn't dump heat that well
- Having to cycle past strobe settings in interface
- Battery indicator is a low resolution

Bontrager Pro RT







What's the best light set-up for you?

If you're on an expedition, racing DH at night, or you're simply trying to prove a point and blind your friends, maybe you should roll with two Lupine Alphas. If you're a bit more conservative and are looking for something functional, durable, and somewhat more affordable, the Light & Motion SECA 2000 or Gloworm lights could fit the bill.

If you don't do a lot of night riding but your rides end at dusk and getting back from the trail safely is important, the Specialized, Bontrager, or Niterider Lumina could be more what you need. Quick and easy, simple to charge, and small enough to toss in your pocket.

Personally, for the trail riding I've been doing that involves longer climbs and fast descents, I have really been liking the Gloworm set-up just as is above. The X2 Adventure is a small enough set-up to put the light and battery both on my helmet and the XS is an ample amount of light thrown from the bars. I have also swapped the X2 for the Lupine Wilma when I'm wearing a pack - if I had the smaller battery pack and could make it self-contained, I would run the Wilma on my helmet more often but as is, with the 8-cell battery, it's too heavy to use without a backpack but for longer rides where the backpack is warranted, it's dialed.

For rides where I'm not sure if I'll make it out in time or if I'm just way out to where a mechanical or other issue could warrant an unplanned night under the stars, I've been bringing along the Bontrager Pro RT. It's small, lightweight, and puts out enough light to ride out at a good tempo.


295 Comments

  • + 130
 The thermal management of the lupine shouldnt matter. After having it on for a only a few seconds the flames from the burning trees will light the way.
  • + 44
 Lupine -- because you just can't strap stadium lights to your handlebars.
  • + 24
 Lupine designed an app so you can shut it off remotely and stop burning your fingers. Thats thermal management!
  • + 27
 A whole new meaning to burning up the trail. I'm going to spend $1,200 on a flashlight said no one ever.
  • + 16
 @oldtech: Agreed. I know mountain bike stuff is expensive, and you gotta draw the line somewhere. I'd say about $150 is where that line is for me for this particular type of product. I'm sure they're great lights, but damn.
  • + 4
 It's a cool test but after learning many of the quality CREE LED's are made of the same components as an Ebay/Amazon light it's a lot of money for the same performance. Heck you can get a 300 lumen LED flashlight from Home Depot for $30!
  • + 12
 I bought a couple of handlebar/helmet mount lights off Amazon for $20 each and they work great, super bright, rechargeable Li-ion, last long.... I think it's sad Pinkbike doesn't mention these and only reviews the ridiculously expensive ones.
  • + 9
 Conspiracy Theory: Lupine actually caused Chernobyl
  • + 10
 Kind of an odd choice from Pinkbike to compare "sensible output" models from several companies with the most extreme models from Lupine. It would be like doing a bike grouptest with trail/am/whatever bikes from several companies and then the full on DH bike from another company to then conclude that the DH bike is overkill for what they're riding. A Lupine Pico or Blika would have been more on par with the other models and probably more than enough for most mountainbikers. Actually, a tiny Lupine Neo would probably be fine on the helmet especially when paired with another handlebar mounted light. Then of course if the whole purpose of including these powerful lights in the article is to trigger a shitstorm of uninformed nonsense in the comment section then of course Pinkbike is doing just great.
  • + 9
 @vinay: Yeah, I initially wanted something more sensible but the folks at Lupine sent those for the test, and they are pretty rad to ride with...I noted that they have more relevant options for normal riding though.
  • - 4
flag vinay (Jan 30, 2019 at 11:29) (Below Threshold)
 @danielsapp: That's a good reason to write a review of course, but that review wouldn't fit in a group test like this where products are judged against the same criteria. I've got to admit I don't quite see purpose with a 7k lumen on a mountainbike but then again a few years ago 2k lumen would be considered extreme too. Know your audience. If something is both expensive and so extreme that people don't see their purpose, the banter will be all about that and doesn't do justice to the build quality, performance and service (spares, repairs etc) which is a shame. A Lupine Pico with remote, bluetooth and everything would have allowed you to discuss the same features but on a level that helps your audience behave and focus on the stuff that matters.

As far as extreme output goes, I personally want to avoid upsetting the environment with my light pollution. People can complain about trail damage (e)-mtb would do (which has proven to be quite minimal compared to other types of recreation). But if mountainbikers become known for riding with such high output lights that would actually be a more solid complaint to hold against them/us. So I'm surprised this wasn't considered an issue here. I ride with the green filter from Lupine over my first generation Lupine Pico (550 lumen max). Not sure if this is actually correct but aside from looking pretty cool (as if you have night vision equipment) my theory was that plants that reflect green light probably don't wake up because of green light.
  • + 9
 It’s making me see spots just from photo.
  • + 6
 @danielsapp: How could you not test them. Those lights are awesome. Plus they double as a fire starter and signal beacon if anything goes south and your stuck overnight.
  • + 8
 @SacAssassin: Exactly. I was tempted to see which lights could start a brush fire most quickly but it's been raining too much here for that.

@vinay: I didn't compare the lights to each other and rank them 1-10, I pointed out the good and bad of each light, independent of each other. Furthermore, I think there are likely a number of people who were interested in the performance of Lupine's top tier light (myself included) and some who may even use it. Afterall, there are nighttime DH races from time to time and people who go on some pretty far out excursions who could want these lights who are a part of this audience just as there are some who will see the practicality in the 1300 lumen Bontrager light far more than even the Lupine Pico.

As far as the environmental impacts go, I agree that it's something we as riders should consider and be conscious of. Light pollution is a thing just like noise pollution or anything else that disturbs the natural environment. If I was a bear and someone shined a few thousand lumens into my den or came by making noise, I'd wake up agitated, just as I do when my redneck neighbors get drunk, sit in their driveway, and rev the motors on their Harleys and pick-up trucks until midnight.
  • - 2
 @danielsapp: Alright, clear indeed that this wasn't really a group test of supposedly similar headlights. It appeared to me like that as all these lights were performing fine for the general trail riding area whereas the tested Lupine lights were in a very different ballpark. I think I wouldn't be so disappointed if the review was honest for what they were intended for. What I read:

"
Let's be honest, you don't need the 7,200 lumens that the Alpha puts off, and there's just about no one that would know what to do with that much light on a bicycle...
"

If you think these are great for nighttime DH racing or far out excursions than why not say so in the article.

That said, the power drop even in freezing conditions is a bit of an issue indeed. You wouldn't want that during your DH run. Lupine has heat sinks for their Blika and Pico lights. If they aren't working on one for the Alpha already, you may to send them your feedback so that they can get on it. I doubt they're selling many of those so they're probably getting little feedback on them too. In that respect, nice you've been testing them Smile .
  • + 2
 @vinay: just like your computer will never need more than 64k memory.
  • + 3
 @preach: I think it was the other way around, Chernobyl caused Lupine!
  • + 3
 @vinay: just let it go
  • + 1
 @RollinFoSho: agreed. I have a set of solar storms x2 and X3 which perform absolutely flawlessly at a fraction of the cost.
  • + 58
 Or get a couple AliExpress solar storms for $20, helmet mount one, bar mount the other. Use em till they die and get some new ones. Unless you're dentist rich or you're brett tippie, and putting in 20 mile night rides 5 days a week, I just dont see the value in spending $500 + on a light setup
  • + 9
 i've been running these for a couple years now (solarstorm X2's); had low expectations, but they've been surprisingly solid. amazing value.
  • + 9
 100% on this.
£20 and you can get a 17xCREE LED with helmet mount and 8x18650 battery pack that lasts over 2hours on full.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/14178354
Who ever thinks $100 is worth it for a light needs a wake up call.
I can replace mine every year for years on that much! (it's been going strong for 3 already)
  • + 6
 I also used Solarstorm x2 for a few years, but, although they light up the night really well, I had a few problems with them. A couple of times they turned off without warning, it's really scary to go pitch black at 30-40 km/h in a forest. Battery life indication is a joke, one of the lights i had kept going from 3 leds to one in a matter of minutes, another one turned off immediately after displaying 2/3 leds. One pack of batteries died after just a couple of months, one of the chargers didn't work from the start. The wires are pretty bad quality, they break easily. All my Solarstorm kept heating up a lot during 3-4 hour nighrides.

Another thing, they may be strong, but the spread, spill, intensity, light color are not ideal. I switched to Ferei and then Lezyne and got significant more quality and reliability for just a few extra $$.
  • + 13
 I wouldn’t charge them inside the house. I have heard too many times of folks had the cheap lights catch fire while charging.

Or you could think of it this way, with all the money you saved on good lights that savings could be used on the insurance deductible when you rebuild the house...
  • + 10
 Pay peanuts, get monkeys. I had these and for the $, they’re great. That said, they’re cheaply made, (duh - $20) unpredictable and the color of the light isn’t great. Oh and you’ll love ‘em with a bit of precipitation.

I had the Niterider Pro 2200 which was great but decided I don’t like the cables. Plus it’s just overkill - if you go too powerful you just washout the trail, at least in SoCal.

Best set-up is a pair of Niterider Luminas 900 (or more powerful) - one on the bar and one on the helmet. They can be had under $200, NO CABLES, light-weight, two gives you great depth perception, quality build, great color and water-resistant.
  • + 2
 Until that day you finish in newspapers about your battery fired up yourself and the forest. AliExpress diaries...
  • + 5
 I used to ride those too but, the mounts suck and the light moves on your bars in the chunk. Battery life is also vastly less. The beam is white hot and blows out the trail contours. For the helmet, any independent battery unit is lame. There are all kinds of light single units that secure on a GoPro mount. A Blackburn 800 I bought cost me only $60 and puts out vastly superior light to the $20 crap ones that need a new indepently affixed battery each year.
  • + 20
 Buy just the light for $20. Then buy a panasonic battery pack for $30. My cheapo lights with the panny batteries have been going strong for 5 years now. No fire hazzard either.
  • + 2
 Up vote and to the top you go! Bingo.

Great luck with Solar/Creed as well.
  • + 8
 I was going to comment something very similar. I bought 3 sets, one for the bars, one for the helmet and a spare to throw in the backpack. With the help of a little electrical tape, the lights on the bars don't budge and easily last 3 hours. Best $60 I've ever spent. They have been going strong for 2 years.
  • + 3
 I've had mixed success with cheaper lights. At first i figured that for £20 a set I'd just replace when they die but after three or four instances of a light failing without warning whilst out on the trail i decided it was a false economy. To be fair to them i use them for daily commuting also so about 2 hours per day. I think water eventually makes its way into the battery packs and makes them unreliable.
  • + 2
 @jeremiahwas: Agreed. I am riding the Lumina Micro 850 on both the bar and helmet. They have plenty of light, good run times and retail is $65 each.
  • + 9
 I've used cheap lights and I've used posh lights.
Cheap lights are amazing for the money but the battery life quickly drops off with repeated use, particularly if it is cold where you live. Also the light spread can be poor with a brighter central ring and dimmer outer ring, which causes your eyes to tire if you are out for a long ride and could be a consideration if you need glasses etc. I happily recommend cheap lights to anyone who wants to give night riding a go, and see how they get on before considering making a more expensive purchase...
I'm now on expensive branded lights (Lumicycle) bought on sale or second hand - I used to ride at night enough to justify the outlay before my shifts changed. The batteries last better (I've had one Lumicycle battery for over 5 years and it will still give me 3 hours of decent lighting, whilst some of the Chinese ones would be lucky to last 60 mins in the cold after a season of use). They are brighter and a better quality of light, plus have safety features such as dimming when the battery is on its last legs (as opposed to just cutting straight out). This can be mitigated by having 2 lights (which is something I'd ALWAYS recommend anyway, in case one breaks).
As a regular night rider I have probably spent £300 on my lights which have lasted 3 years so far and I anticipate will last a number of years more. That was after burning through £90 of Chinese lights in about 2 years. As a long term investment I don't see it as a massive additional investment - 5 years of ownership of Chinese lights and you are looking at £200-250, plus i suppose it's better for the environment rather than regularly chucking batteries if that is a concern for you...
  • + 0
 @jeremiahwas: So you're out $20-30 if it breaks you could buy them 6 times over. Also for the amount of rain southern california gets I doubt you'd be able to ride in enough rain at night to justify a 'name' brand.
  • + 1
 Im running the solarstorm/securtying ebay lights, I prefer the 2 cree vs the 3 cree as light output is about the same and the 2 cree has better battery life. I've used them for 4 years now without a battery replacement.

I used simple parts from the hardware store to convert them to gopro mounting.

I had one battery short that I easily fixed myself. Overall im super happy.

even with 50% off i couldn't bring myself to buy something fancy.
  • + 3
 @Boardlife69: link please
  • + 1
 Pair of Solarstorm X2's here aswell...have used them around the house and hiking and as shop lights working on the vehicles more than anything...but yeah, they're great for the $...haha. Just as an extra safety precaution I only charge them when I'm staying in the same room...
  • + 1
 Solar storm off eBay.....
2-3 hrs burn time
£12-15 job done..
  • + 3
 @coyotecycleworks: I’d rather spend $150-200, know they’re going to work all the time, know they’re going to work well, have better quality light, no cables, etc. That justifies paying even MORE that $200 in my book. Time is money. I’d rather have quality the first time and enjoy the increasingly rare time I have to actually ride.
  • + 4
 @jeremiahwas: I probably have spent at least $200 on crap Amazon ones (and batteries) in the past 5 years. I finally bit the bullet and spent $200 on a good pair of lights and was instantly amazed at how much better the light and beams were. The cheap ones are no value at all assuming these good ones last 5 years.
  • + 3
 @Rubberelli: That's perhaps a bit harsh saying they have no value. They aren't as good (unsurprisingly) but more than adequate for someone starting out, with less income, or for occasional use.
I agree that value can be found with regular and long term use though...
  • + 2
 Do the world a favor and avoid filling dumps with the waste from faulty batteries and LEDs. Most of these Amazon/Ali "deals" end up as flickering lights, unchargeable batts/packs, or fragile connectors.

Get 2 Nitecore HC30s ($110), 3 Orbtronic 18650s ($25) and two Twofish XL lockblocks for bars and helmet ($20). Good field of vision/brightness, solid batts/mount, and durable (three years in WITH crashes/drops...still good).
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: In the states, saying something is not a value, means that you are not saving the money that you thought you were, not that the thing contains no inherent value at all.
  • + 1
 @DoYaSeeMe: i got the solar storms and same experience, but for 65cad for 2 sets >>> no complain
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: strong. Do you have amazon links for the battery?
  • + 1
 @Stinky-Dee:

I charge my solarstorms at work, either way, the outcome is win-win.
  • + 1
 How many people have actually had these catch fire, or is this just perpetuating a myth? I bought a headlamp and bar mount 2 years ago shipped all in for less than 60$ cnd which is like 30 pounds depending on the day. For that price, I wasn't really expecting much, but they light the trails up like I've got a spotlight (for about 45 minutes oh high). I've found the head mounted ones really heavy and annoying, so I ride with the bar mounted ones and a AAA headlamp in my pocket if it dies. When it finally kicks the bucket, I will happily buy another for 30$.
  • + 3
 @MartyFluxMcFly: It could be a fair bit of perpetuation at this point...but if I'm recalling correct, when these Solarstorms first came around it was a reputable poster over on NSMB that claimed his actually lit up one time....can't be too careful with fire.
  • + 1
 Fellas, none of us have died due to the cowboy chinese LEDs! They're probably more widely used than everything reviewed here combined, but still omitted. It would shame these manufacturers charging hundreds for the same hardware.
  • + 3
 @Vastusaurus: If your only use for a light is to pack it to get home safely if it gets dark, then absolutely go the cheap option. But if you want to regularly ride at night and not have to ride more cautiously, then you absolutely should buy quality lights. In the long run, they will cost about the same with all the replacement cheap ones you will buy and the light they emit is nowhere near as good.
  • + 60
 No Exposure lights?
  • + 7
 Spot on..
  • + 10
 Too true! Exposure make the best lights available to humanity, and no stupid cables or batteries to stash.
  • - 2
 Yes, Exposure does make some incredible lights but we couldn’t do everything.
  • + 8
 My Six Pack is AWESOME. it is THE best light.
  • + 13
 I never see any US based publications even so much as mention Exposure. They are in my opinion at the top of the game. Excellent design, good battery life, compact size/shape, and great value per lumen. I love my Diablo Mk8.
  • + 5
 Man I completely agree!! The exposure lights are easily top 3 out of this group. Bang for your buck, compact, great cooling, last a hell of a long time, and very sturdy. And the best part, self-contained!!
  • - 2
 @zachinblack: because its from england???
  • + 2
 @Matheusgsg: So because something is from the UK, that means its irrelevant to us Stateside? Plenty of UK/Euro brands get US attention (YT, Hope, Canyon, etc).
  • + 2
 @Matheusgsg: bc the nr set I have has batteries 1/2 the weight of my bike and enough cables to hang myself with, so yeah, self contained sounds pretty good.
  • + 5
 Lame! Exposure tops every test in the UK. Are Exposure the Evil equivalent for lighting in PB world? This is like doing a doing a supercar test and not including Ferrari. @danielsapp:
  • + 3
 I agree. I just got myself Diablo Sync and Maxx D Sync and they are perfect. The bluetooth is a bit buggy but doable. Was expecting them here.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: totally get you can't review everything, but missing the only lights that adjust brightness with an inclinometer and accelerometer to achieve competition-crushing runtimes (advertising up to 36) in a self contained package... seems like a big oversight.

I guess it would have put the other products under a less flattering light.

Get us an exposure review please.
  • + 1
 @robguide: Precisely!

And to boot, UK riders seem to do night riding a whole lot more than US riders do. Gotta say, those limey's across the pond are way hardier than I when it comes to riding in inclement weather/night. No excuses.
  • + 2
 @dontcoast: Honestly, I bet Exposure would love the (forgive the pun) exposure to the US market via gear reviews. They would likely send their mainstay MTB lights for testing. Shoot em a line! i know their US distributor is at Sea Otter each year too. Hit em up if you're there!
  • + 2
 Love the exposure lights, have 3, replaced all my cable lights , so much easier to use
  • + 51
 to everybody here saying that "you should get aliexpress/whatever else" crap, please be advised that the light emission numbers on ANY of those lights do not represent any actual output and are just randomly taken from nowhere by a shady chinese manufacturer, who probably has children putting them together in near-slavery conditions and dumps waste straight into the ocean. Not to mention the huge environmental impact of shipping yourself a new light across half the world every year, because the previous one "died"
  • + 14
 This.
  • + 6
 Your right, but my eyes don't care if its the 12,000 lumens advertised or the 10,000 actual lumens. Still bright AF.
  • + 13
 And the batteries are crap. Complete hazardous, unregulated, untested, set your house or hand on fire CRAP. There is a reason the replacement batteries from a good light company are so expensive. The batteries are where most of the cost is in a nice light. Those $20 amazon lights are so cheap because the batteries are horrific, unreliable, completely unsafe, and rapidly lose their ability to hold a charge.

It honestly boggles my mind a little bit how much people are willing to rely on those shit lights to save a couple bucks up front. Even if its $200 up front, its REALLY not worth it. You head out at night and most likely in the winter and bomb down trails at speed, and your sole light source that you are depending on, quite literally with your life, is a Chinastar special made by kids with small hands and shipped from the other side of the planet, that somehow manages to land on your front porch for $20 and promises 3000 lumens. Don't worry, you'll notice the real world benefit that your $160 carbon bars and $500 carbon cranks to save 100 grams are providing you a lot more than the benefit from a quality light with a nice beam pattern and that also wont kill you or set your house on fire. I completely understand the logic.
  • + 16
 And you think that the overpriced lights are made any differently? You probably think that mountain biking is a 'Green' sport because it takes place in the woods too...
  • + 3
 I got myself a Convoy S2+, advertised for 1200 lm. Comparing to some very expensive lights I can say that it is at least that much. It seems really well made and has been very reliable for 3 years now.
It was however rather expensive, about $20 and the 18650 cell was not included. 2 high quality cells and a charger like the Nitecore will put you back another $20.
Be wary though, these come with various LEDs, controllers and lenses. You need to choose a seller who clearly specifies the internals.
  • + 8
 Tough decision. If I don’t order, a child may lose their job. If I do they might keep it. Don’t most of these lights ship from China or Taiwan anyway?
  • + 2
 Not all of them, no. Some are overpriced for sure.
And some are doing things very differently and are made to very high standards and will last you for years and years nowadays. I thinks its actually a good time to invest in a good light, as the LED's and especially the batteries are not taking HUGE leaps ahead every year like they were 10 years ago. If you spend $250 on a good light today, its still going to be an extremely good light in 5 years. And a lot of smaller manufacturers have upgrade programs that make it a lot more affordable when the time comes if you want to get a new light.
  • + 3
 xcept that the 20€ light i got is brighter than the 450€ Lupine (an older Wilma model) i have.

As per conditions of labour, yes that is a huge topic, agreed. Although the big, expensive players are not necessarily more responsible on that front. Apple/Foxconn anyone?

The environmental aspect of shipping, well, yes and no. There is sort of an impact, but you won't be saving the planet by buying Lupine instead of China will you? Instead, the environmental aspect of any form of transportation, whether it be goods or people, is best neutralized by renewable energy. Entirely different subject.
And not to be invoked when discussing the luxury of bike lights. If you really wanna go green, you need to stop mtb-ing entirely, dump your car and get an environmentally written-off bicycle from the 70s. Otherwise it's not a green sport, at all.
  • + 10
 @Metacomet: The best possible battery cell used in lights, the Panasonic 18650 3400mAh (NCR18650B) costs about $5 a piece in retail. A high quality charging controller is about $2. The prices are similar for the other components like the leds other electronics and casings. All of these lights, both cheep and expensive, are made in the far east anyway, mostly from catalog circuit boards and components.
$20 total in retail is indeed rather cheep for a good quality product, but $50 is really feasible for a 1000-2000 lm light.
If you use some common sense when shopping you will be ok. $1000 for a bike light is simply a rip-off.
  • + 3
 @Konyp: $1000 is a rip off yeah. I also think most of that cost is in all the other built in features like bluetooth and the app to control the light with your phone and customize settings. I don't see those features as a value add personally.
Regardless, those $20-$50 lights are built to the absolute lowest possible standard. The battery cells are one thing, but what about the assembly and wiring and soldering? Maybe its because I had a cheap battery burst into flames in my hands and almost set my house on fire? Maybe because the cheap batteries rapidly lost their ability to hold a charge and it was always a guessing game as to how long they would last in the woods? Maybe because the wiring would come loose inside the light housing and the light would shut off in the middle of a descent?
I really think there are much better options built in the US for a fair amount of money. I think guys like dinottelighting.com strike the right balance of cost for quality and reliability, and are actually made domestically in NH.
Call me crazy, but I don't think $250-$300 is too much to spend for what is probably the most important piece of gear I own when safety and absolute reliability is concerned.
  • + 1
 @Metacomet:

Thats ok bro....without people like you, the light industry wouldn't survive....i'm willing to take those chances for the amount of night riding I do.
  • + 2
 @Metacomet: Agree Re: DiNotte lights. I have had my XML-3 for 7 years and the thing has been nothing but reliable.
  • + 6
 @SacAssassin: Lupine does everything in house. They may not be so well known as Hope here on Pinkbike, but just like them they're able to provide you with every tiny spare part and they can repair your gear when it's broken. They'll also accept your old battery for recycling. Once you grow old like I do (turning 40 by the end of the year) you get kind of fed up by the throwaway culture. That it is more economical to get a new product than fix the old one where you merely ripped the cable out in a crash. I know some people can get quite excited when they can justify having to buy something new, but I usually feel pretty bad about getting something new and disposing something in nearly working condition. So it gives me some peace of mind knowing that when I break my stuff, it can probably be fixed.
  • - 1
 You mean exactly like every other expensive light on this list? A Chinese factory is a Chinese factory.
  • + 3
 @jayacheess: A factory in Germany is a German factory.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Pardon me. I'm so used to everything being built in China.
  • - 1
 Funny thing is that same children who likely made that Chinese crap under slavery conditions likely made all the lights above reviewed in the same shady factory run by the same Mao's cousin (the biggest mass murderer in history by the way), and all the waste were dumped into the China Sea as well.
so what about the phones from which you're posting your comments? Are they free from this?
  • + 0
 You think all big brand lights aren't made in 'near-slavery conditions and dumps waste into the ocean'? Where do you think these companies are having their stuff made? Don't be fooled by the made in the US/UK/CAN, if you look closer it's assembled in the US/UK/CAN but all the parts are made overseas. For the same reason majority of bike brands are having frames built overseas as well drumroll..... profit margins! Might as well buy that cheap $20 light that was made in horrible working conditions and donate to an organization improving workers rights in the country you bought it from. That would be money well spent.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: well yes they are. It’s all in the battery, product design and thermal management. Lots of friends use eBay £20 specials and crowed about how they are the same as my exposure and hope light coz they all have Cree bulbs yet mine cost 10x as much. Yet in all cases their lights have failed when they have been charging down a trail or mid race (strathpuffer most recently). My exposure and hope lights go on and on.... ????
  • + 14
 I knew the Amazon lights would be the main topic of conversation here. Thanks PB for the in-depth review of all these lights. Remember everyone, if you buy these during the summer they are mostly 30-40% off. I don't buy the Amazon lights, but I have an 800 lumen helmet and 600 lumen handlebar mounted light that are name brand and I only spent about $100 for the two.
  • + 6
 Got Niterider 750's on Amazon for less than 100 bucks for the pair. Crazy amount of light, hitting daytime speeds on familiar trails as well!
  • + 1
 Uh, can't you get the one's reviewed here on Amazon?
  • + 1
 @h-beck83: Yes, but to me the amount of lumens on these seem like over kill, my point was more you can get same brands at a lower output as still have more than enough light. The 750's already make you blind to everything in your peripherals, pretty unnerving catching a tree you cant see anymore in the shoulder.
  • + 1
 @h-beck83: It's about the brand, because buying the most expensive thing means you're getting the best....right? right?
  • + 11
 You know what is the one thing all the lights do have in common? Shitty helmet mount - all of them put the light so high it usually make your helmet moving around.

And it is sooo so easy to solve this while most of the helmets has the vent right on the fine spot so you can just open a bottle of wine and set it up correctly...

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10563296

Anyway the prices are out of this space, better to get chinese one for like 10 bucks, just not leaving it in charger without supervision
  • + 2
 Nice hack! I did something similar with a piece of radiator hose
  • + 1
 Nice - I might copy that! I take it the Cork is just cut to an angle and wedged into place from underneath?
  • + 1
 Great hack!!!! Will try this!
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: exactly, just find the sweet spot so the helmet will support the light from moving back and forward while the light circle is still where you need it, tear of a glue just for sure (Iam keeping the cork there even without light) , then the light is holded by rubber O ring,
  • + 2
 You are an absolute hero @bok-CZ , great idea.
  • + 11
 I did it the other way round. The important question is: How much weight on my helmet is comfy and how many lumens can I get with that restriction.

For me, it was Lupine Piko + Bontrager Ion 800.

After buying a Lupine I can tell you that you can not compare Lumen data of some Alibaba lamps and Lupine. My 1900lmn feel two times more than my buddy's china lamp with 3200lmn!
  • + 1
 My buddy has a Piko and the amount and quality of the light it puts out is just incredible. If money was no object that would be my first choice helmet light...
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: you're right they are a bit pricy but 350€ for me is a fair price for my ticket to ride. Without good light I would barely have the time to ride from October to April.
  • + 11
 www.outboundlighting.com

The marketing hype is real. These are fantastic lights and not bad pricing when compared to the other big names. Been using the"downhill" package all winter so far.
  • - 1
 No one at PB gives two squirts of wanky about your pocketbook. They only care about advertising dollars. As long as knobs keep buying these overpriced products companies will keep cramming them down your throat. There's dumb consumers online every second of every day.
  • + 5
 I've also been using the Road and MTB lights from Outbound Lighting. These are actual, engineered lights for bikes, not over-glorified flashlights.
I'm not going to accuse PB of simply being shills. This comparison of lights is woefully slim; and perhaps you found the best out of these seven, but you didn't actually find the best of anything in any category.
  • + 1
 Agreed. Mine has been fantastic for night fat biking this winter. They're also members here on Pinkbike.
  • + 2
 I would love to give these a try. Outbound's design for beam pattern and hotspot adresses my experience exactly. I find I want good throw farther down the trail to see what's coming. I don't need the forest all around to be lit up. And if there's too much light right down in front of my wheel my eyes adjust to that level of light, and I can't see what's coming farther ahead. Outbound's design seems built to address those very points.

But it's also so large that I can't fathom running it on my helmet. Hopefully, when it comes time to replace my current setup (ITUO XP3 on the helmet and XP2 on the bars), Outbound will have come up with a smaller form factor. Because I really want to try these.
  • + 1
 @slyfink: I run mine on the handlebars paired with a smaller blackburn 800 light on my helmet. That combo has been amazing for me.
  • + 7
 @oldtech: I care about your pocketbook, and I believe most of the lights reviewed here are *not* from advertisers.

Outbound looks interesting.
  • + 4
 @OutboundLighting I would love to see the outbound lights reviewed and compared with these lights. I have been extremely happy with mine and the price completely reasonable.
  • + 1
 I bought one of the trail edition and I’m super stoked on mine. Plus this guy makes them stateside and cares about quality.
  • + 1
 @cyrways: Very good point! I actually went to school with one of the guys. He came from a rally race background where lights are very critical. I rode with him in his car at night once for practice.... Yeah I won't do that again!
  • + 7
 One consideration not mentioned- if riding in well below freezing weather, which is the norm for winter nights here in Alberta- power output will diminish considerably once the batteries become "cold soaked". I keep the battery for my helmet light in a jacket pocket, or close to my back in my pack, which is not an option with the self contained lights.
  • + 2
 The heat generated from the led’s in my Exposure (self contained style) help to keep the batteries warm, it also helps to thaw our your fingers!
  • + 7
 What isn't mentioned is that you simply don't want too much light and you don't want the light to be too white. Of the above pictures, the Lezyne looks the best. Notice how the others are blowing out the contours of the trail? One of the other MTB sites has an article about bike lights and, if I recall correctly, says you want well under 2000 lumens on your bar and about 600 on your helmet, or else run more powerful units at lower settings. I found this to be true. I run a Niterider at full 1400 on my bars (It has a real nice beam) and my Blackburn 800 on low on my helmet to hit max speeds. If I crank the Blackburn up, the trail gets blown out and I begin riding more catiously.
  • + 3
 I hope people take note of your comment as your comment about light quality is spot on.
Having a brighter bar light means you still see shadow in the undulations of the trail, which massively affects how you read the trail (particularly at speed), and some of the cheaper lights have a brighter centre ring of light that can play weird tricks on you and tire your eyes (particularly with 2 of them)...
I'm not sure about the recommended lumens though - I'm not sure that matters. As long as you've enough to go as fast as you like, I don't think that extra light will necessarily slow you as long as you still have that contrast from brighter bar light(s)...
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: I notice if I go max brightness on my helmet light, it will blow out the contour lighting created by my bar light. And yes, those cheap $20 Amazon lights create a crap light pattern with littlw contour to see.
  • + 6
 I made a 3D printed mount to attach a Night Rider Lumina to a Go Pro mount that came on one of my helmets. If anyone has that light, and wants a mount for a helmet with a factory Go Pro mount, send me a PM and I would gladly send you the file so you can print your own. The tollerance is actually tighter than the factory mount, and using the Go Pro mount actually gives you more adjustability for what angle the light sits at.
  • + 1
 I've done the same thing. The same mounting system for the whole lumina series is a real winner. Same with their taillights.
  • + 7
 I like Niterider because they've been using the same mounting system for years - so I swap lights between mounts and etc. I don't buy the fancy pants ones with the oled screen, though.
  • + 10
 Magic Shine
  • + 6
 yeah, modified mine (MJ880 ) with new cables and overhauled the battery pack. gives plenty of light and is almost as small as a lupine pikko. Running flawless with those mods in the 5th season now.

To all of you buying cheap throw-aways for 1 season use, consider spending 5-10 times more and keep the light 5-10 times longer. But yeah, f*ck sustainability because "cheaper" Wink
  • - 1
 Remember when those burned down peoples houses? No thanks.
  • + 1
 I have an ancient magic shine that works great ~ I also have the glo worm X2 and it's a PIA to use.
  • + 3
 100% .. I have 2 MJ900 lamps for helmet and bars. 4 years old. Still perfect, never an issue. I will never understand the need for a $400 light. Both my NiteRider's sit in a drawer, they are crap.
  • + 2
 Ditto Great medium priced lights. My main complaint is I always worry when disconnecting the battery from charger or light that I will pull the wires out. Not a problem with their newer plugs. That being said using their lights for years and never broken. Also for their blue tooth models remember to unplug battery as bluetooth will slowly drain it. 60 bucks usd for a claimed 1200 lumen light is a steal compared to big names and so far just as reliable. Lastly when I did have a battery problem no issues at all . They paid postage to return battery and sent me a new one.
  • + 5
 @danielsapp Just to note on the Lezyne lights - I have one, albeit the slightly smaller one, the 1200XL. The flashing modes are annoying - but you can disable them. IIRC you hold the power button for a few seconds, and that puts it into 'enduro' mode (their word, not mine!). I don't think this is in the manual. You then have just two settings to toggle between - high and low. Or, down and up, for me; they're just the right amount of light for each. I've happily gotten 2.5 hours of usable night ride out of it this way with the battery still in the green, even from the smaller light and at 0 degrees C; it's a great flood spread, which coupled with a Joystick on the helmet gives the best of all worlds. I've been super impressed with it, and it only cost me £50; I bought it to try out night riding but don't find myself wanting for more, now that I've got a taste for it. The colour and the quality of the light are excellent.
  • + 4
 I'm using 2 Lezyne Power drive 900xl for night riding. This combination is very flexible, I can obtain a larger cone of light by rotating them outwards a little, or place one to project the light further away, (useful on higher speed). When climbing, I turn one off, when in the city, I turn one on strobe. I can go from 1.5 hours with around 1400-1500 lumens (both combined, on max power) to around 4-5 hours (in power saving mode).

Since they're small, they don't have problems with their mounts, they're easy to carry, even inside pockets (145 grams each). No hassle with external batteries, connectors, cable rattling, they're waterproof. I got them new, on offer, for the equivalent of 75-80$ shipped. Only issue is that the batteries can't be replaced, otherwise they're the winning setup.

I'd like to see some light combos in reviews as well. It doesn't have to be only 1 vs 1, the most powerful, the most expensive or the cheapest, etc..
  • + 4
 Sorry if this was said before but the Lezyne 1500 xxl has a "race" mode making it MUCH easier to adjust between useful trail settings. If you hold the button down for a few seconds(5-10?) it puts it in race mode which is two brightnesses, 600 or 1500. I find it very useful if someone is coming my way to bump it to the lower setting or for commuting. Like you said it is heavy but not too bad. They make a clip on mount option as opposed to the rubber around bar one it comes with which is secure but kind of hard to attach.
  • + 5
 I (and most of my riding buddies) have been using cheap Amazon lights for years with no issues, they are about $25-30 bucks and work great.

Some of these lights are way too expensive.
  • + 6
 The best part I've found about the cheap lights is you get to try out a brand new one every two weeks! By then the battery life is down to about 20min - usually timed to die around the lower 1/3rd of the big decent - and the handlebar mount has loosened to rotate and point whatever may be left straight into your eyeballs if it doesn't break entirely. Then you find a new battery costs 70% as much as a whole new set up. Before you know it you'll have like 8 and you're afraid to use every one!

Finally gave up and bought 2 niteriders. You don't have to spend $300 but one way or another, you'll spend at least $100. Might as well be on one that will work when you want it to.
  • + 4
 Light & Motion all day every day. I've had two SECAs for over 6 years and they still work amazing. Batteries have never died on a ride, nothing has ever unplugged or moved, the light pattern is the best, and 6 years later they are still in the mid range of brightness among the current competition. Doing a 24 hour race this spring and wouldn't use anything else.
  • + 3
 I have a niterider lumina 750 (non pled) and it's fantastic. USB rechargeable, no external battery pack, and I can slip it in my hip pack if I'm scared it's going to get dark on me. Simple, small, reliable, and bright enough for a 3 hour ride.
  • + 3
 I have a Gloworm X2 that is 5+ years old and works flawless. also have a 6 year old X1 too. I just got the Bontrager Ion Pro to try out on the helmet to get the cables and remote battery off of me, Works great. Pricing is good and it last!
  • + 1
 It’s good to hear you had a good experience with Gloworm, my experience wasn’t so positive - I had an XS and every year when winter rolled around I would use it 2-3 times then the cable would fail either making the light intermittent or just straight up not work... I’d send it away for repair, a few weeks later I’d get it back and it’d work fine until the next winter, then, same again... After it went out of warranty i got it fixed once more, then when it broke again, I finally gave up and bought an exposure Diablo and have been super happy with that! Really liked the light spread and power but the longevity - in my case - left a lot to be desired...
  • + 2
 @Spazzdick: Hey, really sorry to hear about your experience with our product. We have worked tirelessly on our cable to improve the lifespan of the product. We now firmly believe the cable and connections are almost indestructible. I'm also happy to send you a new product......just drop us an email at support@glowormlites.co.nz Cheers, Bruce
  • + 3
 I've been happy with my Gemini, simple on and off helmet mount that works perfectly on my Smith helmet. It came with a handle bar mounted wireless remote, which I don't see on any of those reviewed in the same price range. Canadian rider owned company.

gemini-lights.com/collections/lights/products/duo
  • + 3
 The super cheap lights can be a good deal, or you can get one that stops working on the first couple of rides like I did. I bought two solar storm x2 lights, still use one and have both battery packs, but the cheaper name brand lights are the way to go, I like the looks of the bontrager one.
  • + 1
 I originally had a solar storm x2, the battery shorted /smouldered at one point... Didn't trust it anymore and invested in a more reputable company for peace of mind.
  • + 4
 As an old fart who used to clamp on 4 Ever Ready Xenon plastic lights (after removing my bar ends....) and go night riding, I find it hilarious that a 1200 lumen light is now a commuting light ha ha.
  • + 2
 Some of these are real overkill IMO unless they have an extremely wide beam making use of all those lumens. A narrow 1200-2000 lumen beam is crazy. The only thing on my wish list compared to my current 800/600 helmet/handlebar setup would be something like a 1500 lumen setup with maybe 10 LEDs thats actually spreading that light in a very wide area.
  • + 3
 Buy these, neutral white tint:
kaidomain.com/KDLITKER-BL70s-Cree-XHP70_2-3000-Lumens-4-Mode-LED-Bike-Light

kaidomain.com/KD-2-x-Cree-XM-L2-U2-4-10-Mode-2200-Lumens-Bike-Light?search=Cree%20bike%20light

And these:
Magicshine MJ-6092 Small and Lightweight 2 Cell Bike Light Battery, 2600mAh Li-ion Waterproof Rechargeable Bike Light Battery for MJ-900, Round Plug www.amazon.com/dp/B01EOP4AWU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_3ZBuCbJVKR314

Magicshine Bike Light Battery, MJ-6102 high Capacity 6 Cell Li-ion Rechargeable Battery for Bike. 7800mah Waterproof Battery for Mountain Bike Lights | Round Plug www.amazon.com/dp/B018NP9OAA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_Q0BuCb2ZFYJTE

Gets you 5200+ lumens, your choice of color temperature and name brand batteries for about $160. Pay for the dhl shipping from China. I got my lights in 2 business days once they shipped (took them a few days to process the order but shipping was unbelievably fast). Get a couple of go pro mounts for the lights and you’re set.

$1285 for a light? F*off
  • + 1
 Those bats come with extension cable? I need a new bat for my grinding but the cables look short
  • + 8
 No hope light?
  • + 0
 This.
  • + 2
 or Exposure
  • + 1
 R8 Blind The World Smile
  • + 2
 i own a Bontrager Pro PT and Nitrider Lumina 1200 and both produce ample light at their 2nd highest settings. ive gone out on 1.5hr rides and havent ran out of battery, still need to test on longer rides though. i can say though that the Nitrider has a more spread beam and the Bontrager is more of a spotlight. 100% do recommenced both!! though Niterider needs to get their shit together and give us more run time.
  • + 2
 All these lights sure beat the BLT's we used to have in the 90's.

Actually, only one guy had a BLT, he rode up front and everybody else just followed the person in front of them.

It was sorta the blind leading the blind.

It worked well until the lead guy screwed up a turn, and went into a ditch, only to be followed by 6 other riders thinking that was where they should go. ????⚡️????

I don't really trail ride much at night now.
  • + 2
 I've got the Bontrager...despite a warranty issue(which they sent a replacement immediately no questions) it is awesome. It feels like a quality item, spews more than enough light and will run at least that claimed time. Thumbs up.
  • + 2
 I have the Light&Motion Seca 2200 and it puts out more light than my 1996 Toyota Tacoma on high beams!!
I compared, more than once. It’s nuts...
Left the light in a pack that stayed soaking wet for a week.. No damage!! They told me they started making dive lights originally, they expect the light to survive this treatment.
But I’ve been screwed twice by finding the best deal on the light.. Two bad batteries.
Got a great deal, now I need a new battery that I’ll ONLY buy from Light&Motion.
  • + 2
 I love my Seca. Light & Motion customer service is also great - they hooked me up with a killer deal on a new Seca after I just lost my battery and it was past warranty. Beam Pattern is so good.

On a different note that Lupine is so bright it just blows everything out, there is such a thing as too much light apparently.
  • + 2
 It would have been nice to see them review this type of thing against the expensive options so we know what you get for that extra money and whether it is worthwhile if you have the money to spend.

I love night riding and bought my current Hope light many years ago which is starting to feel pretty dated. I am shopping for new lights and would love to know if there is a reason to spend £300 quid rather than £30.
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32: I went with the cheap option about 7 years ago (900 lumin torch style light mounted on helmet) and it still works now. It's fine for casual night rides about 10 times per year. Was about £26 total Inc, charger and basic mount. If I rode a lot more at night I would invest in a better quality set up but the cheap option is a great way to go if it's just for occasional use.
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32: You can hire lights to see if there's a difference that is worth it.

I'd recommend you consider a modular system (seperate battery and light) if you do go for a nice light though - I went for a Lumicycle but there are other options. The benefit of this is that I've got a spare battery that I can stash in my bag on longer rides, and that I've previously sent my light back for an upgrade to the led and circuitry (about £30 iirc) to make it brighter, more efficient and compatible with a remote control on the bars (not that I've got one yet!).
  • + 6
 Laughing at Lupine prices until 2100.
  • + 2
 How a $1,300 light doesn't have PRICE as a con is beyond me. What a joke.

I use Victagen lights from Amazon. Run around $30 each, have decent spread and good battery life. They don't have a helmet mount option, but a small piece of aluminum, a go pro mount, and a drill press took care of that. Done. And if they die (only lost 1 so far due to a drenching night ride last year) they are easy to replace.
  • + 2
 Serfas. the end. unbelievable performance for price. do you really need more that 500 lumens? the E-lume and True series can be had in numerous configurations. They have a great WARRANTY program and can buy parts.
www.serfas.com/product-category/products/lights/headlights
  • + 2
 OR you could spend about $50 for a set of two Convoys including all the kit:
translate.google.pl/translate?hl=&sl=pl&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.1enduro.pl%2Fconvoy-s2-plus-latarka-na-rower%2F
(sorry, this is Google-translated)

That will give you about 1600 lumens and the flexibility of a two-light setup (handlebar + helmet), plus cheap and easily replaceable 18650 batteries.
  • + 2
 If you are going to go the cheap Chinese light route have a look at the BT-40.

www.gearbest.com/bicycling-gear/pp_180805.html

and for batteries look for a guy on eBay called Hunk Lee he sells quality Panasonic battery pack for a reasonable price.
  • + 1
 Ran the BT40 for about a year then it crapped out. Good light until it wasn’t. The KD BL70s beats it handily in output and color temp. Plus the BL70s is the only (cheap) bike light I found that uses the Cree XHP 70.2 chip. Solid light so far.
  • + 2
 @edim: I've had mine just over a year but use my Yindings more,so it will probably last quite a while.
  • + 1
 My helmet light is the little dual led yinding. Great light. If you ever need a new bar light that KD light is worth a look. Seems well made and is super bright. Definitely a bar light though. The light head is huge. @rideonjon:
  • + 4
 Any chance you could test the real outputs of Lumens?
Because I'm sure some lights catalogue quoted figures (especially those on eBay) are wildly inaccurate.
Thanks
  • + 1
 There is nothing more embarrassing than joining a night ride with lawyers and doctors, and stating the number of lumens on your lamp as 7200 while a German site tested to be 5600. At least as bad as adding a second C sticker behind you Bronson C.
  • + 2
 I'm a big fan of my Light and Motion Taz and Lezyne 1500 combo, If they're fully charged and I run them on medium power (which is plenty) they provide at least 3 hours of strong steady light, without me having to worry that they will crap out before I get home.
  • + 2
 Table does not include lumens per dollar, the only number that really matters. My gemini lights at 12 lumens per dollar have served me well for two years now. Glad to see nothing in this review comes close even after two years of price cuts.
  • + 5
 "Just because the days are short and the nights are long"

"Haha" - The Southern Hemisphere
  • + 2
 Bought a set of GloWorm X1 for the helmet, X2 for the bars- one of the best purchases I've ever made. They're more than bright enough for me on high power to ride at my daylight speeds on known trails. They come with a ton of extra pieces (nicest thing- different lenses so you can really dial in how you want the beams to feel,) they're light and batteries hold a charge super well even during cold PNW winter riding.

I had a set of eBay specials and was constantly worried about being stranded in the woods with no light if the batteries died (a super common occurrence with the cheaper ones.)
  • + 2
 I don't understand the need to have thousands of lumens for riding. The law of diminishing returns kicks in pretty quick. Maybe its because I haven't had experience with brighter lights, but I use a 300 lumen light on my bars and a 500 lumen light on my helmet and I've never felt like that was inadequate.
  • + 2
 I run a pair of Gloworm X2s and I'm pretty happy with the setup. Can't remember the optics pairings for each but the bar light is set up more as flood lights while my helmet is closer to spot lights. I also bought a plastic sheet of photo filter, cut pieces out to match the lense shape, and inserted them between the lense and housing to warm up the lights a bit. No problem with the plastic so far due to the heat. The US distributor can also sell the lights with a more neutral colour. The only problems I've had are with the plastic bits. The slot on the GoPro helmet mount where the straps go through broke when installing for the second time. Solved that problem by sticking on an adhesive mount. One of the tiny tabs on the bar remote used to secure one end of the silicon rings also snapped off. Haven't had time to fix that yet but I have another from the second light. Contacted Gloworm about this but they won't replace just broken piece and will not warranty it. They also suggested that I may have tried to install the remote on the larger diameter part of the bar near the stem. Not sure why anyone would install it there as it kind of defeats the purpose of having a remote, so that's where I ended communications.
  • + 4
 Hey @mookmeister! Thanks for the feedback. Drop us an email at support@glowormlites.co.nz and we can sort you out with the broken stuff. Not sure why you were denied a warranty as all our stuff is covered. Hit us up and we will sort you out pronto. Bruce (Co-Owner)
  • + 1
 @glowormlights: It's all been taken care of now. Thanks for the head up!
  • + 1
 So, judging by the photos, the sweetspot is around 1100 lumens (I asume the camera maintained the same exposure value through the test).

I got a Planet Bike Blaze 1 watt light (I don't know how many lumens) back in 2010 and while sometimes falls short on the city, when in the trail where there's no street light it appears much brighter.
  • + 3
 I set it up for a decent exposure on the first light I shot and then went from there, keeping settings the same. Don't look too far into it. It's more meant to show the differences in each light while keeping them all within a reasonable exposure rather than highlight a sweet spot. I'd say closer to 2000 is what I would consider ideal for typical trail riding.
  • + 2
 No Exposure Lights? Amazing UK brand and don't have the external batteries and cables, Reflex Technology so they dim and brighten automatically, dependent on terrain and speed. Plus they look badass!
  • + 1
 I really like my Blackburn Dayblazer 1100. At 55$ (normally $89) it was good middle ground between Amazon lights and the low end Light & Motion, Bontrager, Nite Rider etc. It puts out some real good light on high but only has about an hours run time (the lower modes double and quadruple run time). My downs are usually only 20-30mins max on my regular trail rides... so it works for me. It also has replaceable batteries. The button has 5 modes (high/med/low/pulse/strobe) and displays green/orange/red for battery life indicator. My only complaint is I wish the high/med/low progression was reversed so I don't have to cycle thru pulse and strobe to get back to high.

Sure Blackburn's parent company Vista outdoors is controversial - but I'm also not rich so... there you have it. Their customer service / warranty is also insanely good - like no questions asked, old LL Bean style good. For example: I hamfistedly broke the mount and to my surprise they sent me a new light... WTF?
  • + 1
 I'd just like to confirm how good the Gloworms are, I've been running the X2 and XS for 3 years now, and despite one crash damaged lead, they have been faultless. I now have an X1 on the road bike, so I have a range of battery pack sizes to run. Once programmed, which is tricky, they are great to use, although the default settings are excellent as well. Changeable lenses mean that you get one light to light the trail, and the other to light where you look. Would by again and again and again.
  • + 1
 @glowormlights Any thoughts of a rear light? Something small and simple, single lens,with a built in Battery, side Visibility, and Two running modes (Road - High, Med, Flash, with Brake feature, MTB - Low, Med, Low Flash)
  • + 1
 @torch-taylor: indeed! watch this space Wink
  • + 1
 @glowormlights: Excellent, I.m a bit OCD with matching sets!
  • + 1
 The most important thing about light, you must have second lite and spare battery. Otherwise shit can happen. All of those lights have one disadvantage, when person use them on the public road typically it tend to blind incoming traffic
  • + 1
 Check out ZebraLight. I have a nightrider pro 3600 which is amazing but can be overkill for a dusk ride where I don't know if I'm going to be out in the dark long, but just want a light just in case. For those rides and my daily commute, I use a Zebralight 18650 headlamp with a narrow beam (you can order from a variety of beam spreads/types). It's probably the best lumens/gram you can get - about 1000 lumins for 99 grams including batteries and all mounting supplies. Yup, 99 grams. I just weighed it). It installs securely to most helmets using a hair elastic (ghetto, simple, and surprisingly bomber). You get about two hours on high on one battery which you can change out in a few seconds if you need more time. I don't need to buy another light for other out door activities because it works just like any other headlamp when it has a strap attached. Beam pattern may not be as good as other bike specific lights. They are pricey, but excellent build quality.

www.zebralight.com/H600w-Mk-III-XHP35-Neutral-White-18650-Headlamp_p_186.html
  • + 2
 I feel my 4k headlamp gives out too much light and run it at 50 or 75%, same with the 3.2k barlamp. Too much light gives you glare and reflection from the fog, tyre debris, cables, frost, etc and reduces my night vision
  • + 3
 just wanna point out that Gloworm do offer a 35mm bar clamp as an option. Also the quality and customer support is second to none in my experience.
  • + 1
 @feazel Cheers buddy!
  • + 1
 I didn't ride all the lights in this review, but I think the NiteRider gets short shrift. I have a the 1100 OLED Boost. I can charge it anywhere, I mount it to my bike helmet and don't need anything on my handlebars. The display is nowhere near as complicated as the reviewer makes it out to be and is worth every penny. I can't read the display while it's on my helmet, but I can either take the light off my helmet or take my helmet off to read it and then turn the OLED off to save the battery. I don't understand needing a handlebar light in addition to a helmet light. I got one of the sticky mounts and mount this light to my ski helmet also. I'd recommend this light to anyone who asked.
  • + 1
 Bar lights - see everything, go fast. Helmet light - see around switchbacks and tighter turns at speed (and helps seeing over those pumps bumps and jumps). That, and having a backup system are why run both. If you don't need both for your typical riding, great, keep a spare battery/light combo in your pack for those just-in-case moments.
  • + 1
 i have had great luck with cygolite trion 1300 on the bars and an expilion 850 on the helmet for the past 5 years (maybe $250 for the set). they are still working great and I raved about them to everyone i rode with that was running either chinese crap or niterider luminas or whatever. they always seemed to have problems and I had zero and still have zero with any of the cygolite stuff. That said I rode w/ a guy that had an exposure six pack 4700 lumen self contained light and was blown away by the light quality and run time. Then another guy i ride w/ got a niterider pro 4200 and again i couldn't even ride in front of him because it was so bright i'd just be in my shadow the whole time. I also know a guy with a crazy ass lupine system. WOW, thats bright!!! I night ride a lot all winter long in so cal so its worth it to pop for something that will stand the test of time. I have just bought the full exposure setup (Six Pack SYNC 4750 for bar and joystick 1000 for helmet) and it is the bees knees. just starting to use it but self contained lights rule in my opinion (hate cables dangling all over my bike) and the run times and quality of exposure is insane. if they last indefinitely like the cygolites then its worth the $700 i spent.
  • + 1
 there are plenty of lights online that cost under $100, some under $20, and perform great, No need to have to decide between buying a bike or a light as some of these are as expensive as some bikes now days
Even the new magicshine lights are good.
  • + 1
 muhaha, I tryied a lot of headlamps, best combination for fast bike riding in the forrest are COB leds for wide coverage and T6 crees in reflectors for long throw. Turn them all on at the same time and you are golden. I use panasonic 3400mah 18650atteries for $6/piece and headlamp for $12 - my test here www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlsdK7z0MsA , it is best combo ever! (I even moded cables to get 2Amp current)
  • + 1
 OK, $40 and ultra reliable. I've been running Bright Eyes off Amazon for years, and have always been curious how they stack up to the real deals from major brands. I'd love to see something like this included in a roundup: www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00GJZ015Y/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  • + 1
 What about Serfas? I personally want to recommend them

I was running a TSL 1800 that developed a short in the wire (I commute in -25c / it became cold from extreme exposure)

Their warranty department was awesome to deal with and the ended up upgrading me to a TSL 2500 ( I was just over the year warranty period as well)

I would definitely purchase again
  • + 1
 I use the Niterider Lumina for commuting to work on the road. Even on pretty even surfaces, the mount fails to secure the light and it frequently slips forward, leaving the light pointing straight at the ground. It's a great light otherwise, but I can't imagine using it while mountain biking.
  • + 1
 Go for a Magicshine Combo and save hundred of Euros! Quality is great, app is not the best but you get what you pay and for the few times you need this combo these are perfect and the customer service of Magicshine is excellent!
  • + 2
 I've been using the Bontrager Pro RT and have been happy with it. The clamp is a bit of a pain to get on a 35mm bar, but is secure once attached. I will probably get another one for a helmet mount.
  • + 2
 bah, you have big names like bontrager and specialized but no Dinotte XML3 in there. Nonsense. Small New Hampshire based company. The XML 3 is amazing in so many ways and has been for years. Only getting better and better.
  • + 2
 Second the DiNotee XML-3! Very reasonably priced for quality American made goods!
  • + 1
 I didn't expect to see many of these stadium lights on a helmet or handlebars being the best test subjects. Having batteries and cables everywhere, that's not realistic for many. For me it's hard to beat the simplicity, weight, and run time of pretty much any Nite Rider 750-1200. These are the lights that Nite Rider are known for, and for good reason. Good to see the different options out there. The only thing that I could see needing to improve is the mount to light interface. I have lost a Nite Rider 750 right off the handlebar mount.
  • + 1
 My setup is simple, Bontrager Ion RT Pro’s are the way to go. Because I can get them for dirt cheap I bought 3 and swap them out when they run out of battery. There’s no way in hell you’ll see me with an external battery on my helmet, I’m not spelunking.
  • + 1
 Gah, you guys are brutal. "What, no [insert brand I bought]?" I thought it covered the major established brands as well as some I didn't even know existed, with very useful information. I personally have the eBay CREE lights, but I love my Bontrager helmet and was curious about their light -- much neater setup for a head light, and not as pricey as so many of the established brands that don't seem to perform that much better than the eBay lights. Figure I will pick one up and run the CREE on the handlebar after this review.
  • + 1
 I don't ride with a pack anymore or do frequent night rides, so I got a Lumina 1200 and 1100 on sale. The beam pattern is very good for a small single lens light and they're plenty bright even in the lower settings, but damn do the mounting for these light suck. it's so bulky on the helmet and on the bars isn't too bad but they really should ditch that mechanism asap. The 1100/1200 are too heavy for the helmet on anything but short rides, and the helmet mount certainly doesn't help. I do like that you don't have to cycle through any flash modes by default.
  • + 2
 Light an motion is the best i ride it all winter rain an snow an it also can get submerged 3 feet into water no problem. It mounts on the chest for backcountry touring and its bright as
  • + 1
 How are you mounting it to your chest? and also why? (not trying to be a dick, just curious)
  • + 1
 @kjjohnson: splitboarding at night
  • + 1
 One thing I'd note is that IMO you probably shouldn't use 1000-2000+ lumen lights unless you ride alone or are leading the pack. They cast shadows if you are following other folks that can make it tough to navigate for the people in front of you as speeds increase. I notice this with some of my riding buddies who have 1300-1500 lumen lights sometimes behind me. If they turn the intensity down it's better.
  • + 2
 Our you can ask your 'mates' to stop being muppets and leave a bigger gap... You are right about the shadows though.
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: Or I could drop the hammer.
  • + 1
 Most higher lumen lights have turn down My 2500 lumen light has 4 settings, the lowest being 800.
  • + 2
 I've been using the Niterider Lumina on my CX bike for the past few years and I love it. The OLED screen is worth the price of admission. Like the review stated, every light should have that feature.
  • + 1
 Wow,call me a techno peasant if you want,but I still use a 6volt SLA from BLT.Fresh battery every year at 15 bucks,and stash last years bat at the turnaround the day or week before.Yup,there is a few out there I find in the summer.
  • + 1
 It seems contradictory to say the Gloworm X2A is light enough to put on the helmet at 262g but the Lezine is too heavy at 266g. I can't imagine noticing a 4 gram difference. Is it the ability to locate the battery in a different spot than the lamp the reason?
  • + 6
 No Hope lights ?
  • + 4
 Is it light? Is it bright? Does it work at night? Does it shine white?
  • + 2
 Does it improve your sight? Does it relieve fright?
  • + 2
 Why didn't you mention the led type? Because it would be too obvious how obsolet these lights are? Lights with e.g. xhp50.2 or xhp70.2 are rare in the mtb world.
  • + 1
 Lupine is only good in cold climates, in AZ in only operates on low most the time due to thermal issues. The Bontrager lights are seriously SO good!!! Perfect for a helmet light.
  • + 1
 Niteriders have great performance/price ratio however the quality is rubbish. Two units died in less than two seasons. Still using the third one but when it fails I'm going to get something else.
  • + 0
 No Action LED, like the Gemini Xera? I've ridden mine all winter with the 2 cell battery option and it rocks! And costs a 1/3 of the Lupine system. Not sure why anyone would need more than 900 lumens to ride at night.

www.action-led-lights.com
  • + 3
 over 1000$ for f*cking light? You can buy over 50 convoys and have some $ in wallet.
  • + 2
 reviewer: wow those light are so bright

me: hold my beer www.pinkbike.com/photo/16758895
(i made an ultimate solution)
  • + 1
 You need a good night shot picture!
  • + 2
 No Gemini?? I thought these were a no brainer. Super happy with my Titan 4000 and going to order a Duo 1500 soon. gemini-lights.com
  • + 2
 I've run the Titan/Duo combo for years. You're going to love it.
  • + 1
 Moonlight Bright as day 10000, more light with a lower price than that Lupine Alpha. moonlight.no/collections/headlamps/products/bright-as-day-10000?variant=9792170819620
  • + 1
 Oh look $1200 for a flashlight! Don't mention there are now really solid Cree XM-L2 lights available for $40 on amazon (same emitters these guys are using). $80 for 2 and you can ride the gnar full speed all winter.
  • + 1
 You didnt review the Cygolites, one of the best value overall in my opinion, due to dual beam, competitive lumen levels, adjustability, battery life, and durability. Many of the ones reviewed are crazy expensive.
  • + 4
 If you buy a bike light that costs $1200 you are a f*cking idiot
  • + 4
 Anyone use the Gemini lights?
  • + 2
 Yes, two years in, lots of PNW riding in the rain. Bluetooth remote is perfect and controls helmet and handlebars. Lights are bright. Zero failures. At 12 lumens per dollar, cheaper than everything on test in this article.
  • + 2
 they're pretty rad. i bar mounted remote can control both my helmet and handlebar light. easy to cycle through different brightness modes so i can save power on the climbs and light it up on the downs without taking my hands off the bar
  • + 1
 @Mtmw: Nice! I'm in Canby & ride Black Rock / Mac & Dunn / Alsea Falls
  • + 1
 You have the Lumina Boost 1200 MSRP as $300 then in the chart you have $150. Come on, get your facts straight. Personally I hate external batteries. The Lumina series lights cant be beat for the price.
  • + 4
 I have the Lumina Boost 1200 without the fancy screen, cost me $99 per light.
  • + 2
 Fixed, thanks for the catch!
  • + 1
 I couldn't agree more, the Lumina series are amazing. I'm looking forward to the NiteRider Lumina 1800 - Self contained dual light system.
  • + 1
 I have never felt under gunned with my Niterider Lumina's and am pretty much a vampire rider. I mean, how many lumens do you actually need when you are running a helmet/bar combo? They are durable, intuitive in design, fight cold temps very well, are reasonably priced, and their customer service is spot on.
  • + 1
 I have an older NiteRider 1400 Pro that I helmet mount. It’s enough light, but I can see the value in more lumens. That said, it’s still enough to get the odd PR on a trail I know and love.
  • + 2
 FYI the Bontrager Blendr mount system is compatible with GoPro mounts - you just need to get the small adapter piece from them. This opens up tons of mounting options.
  • + 2
 Where is the Magic Shine? I am pretty happy with it and noone here is riding with something else
  • + 1
 AGREED! majicshine makes great products and stands behind what they sell
  • + 2
 Magicshine is easily the best value light. Also they have the lightest helmet mounted light at 1600 lumen.
  • + 1
 Hope R8 on the bars and an Exposure Diablo on the lid, perfect combo. If any-one wants a working BLT with charger for their retrobike project, get in touch!
  • + 1
 I think it's worth mentioning I had a light and motion light die on me a while back and customer service didn't seem to give a damn so not buying theirs again.
  • + 1
 I'm a fire starter, twisted fire starter, hey hey hey heyyyy .......says the Wilma R14......shes a fire starter , twisted fire starter!
  • + 2
 My Bonti Pro RT has been pretty neat so far. I have a Bontrager helmet, where it just snaps in.
  • + 1
 I've had Lumina's for years, they work well for my limited uses. That being said, I'd like to try the micro on the helmet as the Lumina can be a bit heavy...
  • + 2
 Did I miss it. Where was the Exposure review. Only the best night nights on the planet!!
  • + 1
 The $775 and $1200 Lupines are such overkill in both price and lumens. No one needs more than two 1500 lumen lights, one bar and one helmet.
  • + 1
 I got a hope R8+ a while back its pricey but the best light I have used yet, got some beam pic on my profile.
  • + 1
 Moonlight mountain gear bright as day 5500 is a pretty nice bike and skimo light.
  • + 3
 What about exposure?
  • + 0
 Are they the eighth best? I think not.
  • + 2
 For real!!! My Exposure Race is the best light I have ever owned.
  • + 1
 Would have been nice if the color temperature of the light as well as what beam pattern was on each light
  • - 2
 My $30 LED light from Newegg has worked flawlessly for over four years now. Holds a charge longer than I am able to ride in the dark. As bright or brighter than any of my glamour boy name brand lighted riding friends. Just more smoke and mirrors advertising brought to you by the people who could care less about your pocketbook at PB.
  • - 1
 Overprized as always. A rip off. Don't understand why so expensive if tech is used. Better of buying quality flashlights. Cheaper and same or more lumens, easely mounted on handlebar and helmet.
  • + 2
 I like Cygolite. Extremely well made and pretty reasonably priced.
  • + 2
 Mag Lite Industrial, plus a roll of duct tape -- $30.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp Any experience with dynamo hub-powered lights on trail bikes? Freedom from batteries is pretty awesome.
  • + 1
 Can you please inform where the night time DH racers are? Sounds like a good spectator sport.
  • + 1
 Redbull had one for several years at Windrock called NightShift. Good times.
  • + 2
 Gloworm for the win. Best lights I have ever used.
  • + 1
 Yeah, they make nice lights. Too bad they only work in summertime. I have an XS, and in winter you can never get it to work at max output. Apart from that it is a very good light. the best thing about them is the different lenses you can use to tailor the beam to your needs.
  • + 2
 What about gemini-lights.com ? They're based in Victoria.
  • + 1
 anyone comment on the outbound light here or the gemini 4000 titan thanks
  • + 1
 Magicshine. $60 for 1000 lumens and very light.
  • + 0
 Wait, there's no Japanese eBay lights on here?! Are you saying they're not good. I'll go make my popcorn now.
  • + 2
 No Cateye products????
  • + 2
 Hope R6, best lightever
  • + 1
 You rode Black Mountain at night? From the top?
  • + 1
 That's exactly what I was thinking. You riding Black at night, you better be bright!
  • + 2
 Pilot and Bennett are more fun at night...if you were wondering.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Well, I wasn't. But now that you mention it...hmmm
  • + 1
 Just another day in the Pisgah life!
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: I like where your head's at young man!
  • + 1
 I see that those with 35mm bars are limited to mount options....
  • + 2
 How enlightening
  • + 2
 Illuminating.
  • + 1
 the f*ck is the new giant light?
  • + 1
 Hope lights are the dogs ????
  • + 2
 Wiiiiiiilmaaaaaaaa
  • + 1
 Is that the same Tom with a penchant for glowing spikes and bloody shins?
  • + 0
 I don't see a "rad" blendr helmet mount for the bontrager anywhere...?
  • + 1
 spooky mesas.
  • + 0
 I love the "well what about X brand??" hate
  • + 0
 No Blackburn? Really?
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