Round Up: 10 Lesser-Known American Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff

Feb 6, 2020 at 14:12
by Daniel Sapp  


This week, we're boarding a jetliner and heading across the Atlantic from Europe to the good 'ol US of A, the birthplace of baseball, competitive eating, NASCAR and, of course, mountain biking. Depending on where you look, you'll find nearly anything you might need to build a bike, produced here, with a high level of pride. Scattered all across the country are smaller and lesser-known manufacturers making some really cool parts.

While some of these brands are surely well known amongst certain circles of people, for others, they may not be as much at the forefront. We're willing to bet that not everyone knows that all of these brands are both based in America and do all of their production in America. Let's take a look at several of them and see what's going on.





PAUL COMPONENT ENGINEERING

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Everything from stems to crank arms are designed and machined start to finish in-house.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The inner workings of Paul's mechanical disc brake.

Paul Component Engineering is what those who know would no doubt consider the OG in American made components. It started in 1989, with Paul Price in his California garage. After the first big order of his now famed quick-release skewers, the company quickly took over the rest of his home. That little house was the base for everything from prototyping, machining, finishing, and shipping...even employee housing. Things evolved to where the house was no longer fit to live in, as it morphed into more of a manufacturing center than a home.

Fast forward several years and Paul Component Engineering is in an old Texaco shop in Chico, CA, amidst a region that could be considered the epicenter of American crafted components with Paul and multiple frame manufacturers all in close proximity to each other creating a rad subculture of incredible craftsmanship. The shop still produces, start to finish Paul's legendary skewers, stems, seatposts, hubs, brakes, chain rings, and chain tensioners amongst plenty of other products.

There are well over a dozen more employees now and Paul is still there day in and day out. He has a prototype shop on site that has some manually operated machines that allow freedom and precision in trying out new designs and ideas.

Paul's website.





SPURCYCLE

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Spurcycle's tool is my favorite out of all the multi-tools I've ever used.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The bell that kicked off Spurcycle's business and put them on the map.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Spurcycle's hip pack.

Spurcycle may not be a name that is all that common, but their story is an interesting one. Spurcycle began in the San Francisco Bay Area in 2013 via a Kickstarter campaign. Nick and Clint Slone decided that they were going to make a bike bell that had a unique design, was made completely out of American parts, assembled in the US, and had one hell of a ring to it.

Now, a bell isn't all that exciting to some, but anyone who marvels at well-made products can appreciate quality craftsmanship. The bells are handcrafted and the design was so loved by people looking for bells that their Kickstarter went 16 times bigger than planned as riders seemed to buy the idea that they could get a quality made product that doesn't fall apart and was made in the US.

“Our sheet metal parts are formed in New Mexico, the wire form is made in Ohio, we have a turned part that comes from Reno, there’s another turned part from Alabama, a plating vendor that’s all the way on the east coast in Pennsylvania, and then we have some parts that are made in Pleasanton, California,” said Spurcycle co-founder Clint Slone. “We do some assembly of the bells here in Sausalito, just north of San Francisco, and we also have a subcontractor that does assembly in Pleasanton.” All of this gets riders a bell that costs $50 and comes with a lifetime warranty.

The bells have even been subject to counterfeiting, as reported by James Huang for Cyclingtips.

It doesn't stop at the bell. Spurcycle have also designed a beautiful and functional titanium multi-tool that's stayed in my riding gear bag for a couple of years now, a hip pack, and a few other accessories.

Spurcycle's website.





WOLF TOOTH COMPONENTS

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Water bottle mounts that allow for more adapted options are just one of the few solutions Wolf Tooth make.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Dropper levers in a variety of colors, this is a limited edition selection.

Wolf Tooth Components, based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, have recently made a big mark in developing a range of components in the USA. Their name is no doubt becoming more familiar to many as they have engineered some nifty solutions to problems that have plagued riders for decades, those solutions being the premise of what the company is founded on.

Their range of componentry covers everything from chainrings and derailleur hanger extensions that allow riders to run bigger gearing to tools, headset parts, chainguides, dropper levers, axles, and tools.

The background of mechanics, racers, and engineers have led Wolf Tooth to come up with some of the more unique products that people may be looking for.

Wolf Tooth's "EnCase" system fits in a handlebar end and keeps emergency and quick-access items such as tire plugs, a multi-tool, and chain tool at the ready.

Wolf Tooth's website.





WHITE INDUSTRIES

White Industries Photo

White Industries Photo
Precision engineering.
White Industries Photo
Cogs on cogs on cogs.

White Industries, based in Petaluma, California, makes a variety of components ranging from hubs to cranks, headset adapters, axle adapters, chainrings, and more.

According to Sean Walling, who wrote a fascinating in-depth history of White, Owner Doug White started working as a machinist for United Airlines in the late 60's. In 1970 he moved to Marin County, the unassuming birthplace of mountain biking. Doug wound up working at Sunshine Bicycle Center in Fairfax where he teamed up with one of their customers, Phil Brown, and started making bike frames in 1972.

Frame making didn't last all that long and, according to White, they sold 30-35 frames in total before selling off his frame fixtures under the pretense that he could "borrow" them when needed. In the mid 70's Craig borrowed those fixtures and built a 26" wheeled, diamond-style MTB frame for Charlie Kelly. This was one of the very first mountain bikes ever produced. Various other projects kept White working for years, including a multi-colored elastic band called "Peggers" - the band was used by commuters to keep their pants out of the chain and grease-free.

In the late 80's White Industries really cranked things up making products ranging from a sealed-bearing titanium spindle BB to ultra-lightweight titanium cassette rear hubs and front hubs, the lightest at the time and built with an oversized axle that helped stabilize flexy suspension forks. White also made some of the first forged cranks, 2x9, and 2x10 drivetrains.

In the 90's White's ENO freewheel and ENO eccentric singlespeed hubs were highly sought after by serious singlespeed riders disappointed by the lack of durability of Shimano's offerings. Those hubs, along with a variety of other products are still in White's line today. Produced in the US by a company that has stood the test of time.


White Industries' website.






HED

HED Photo
Steve Hed with his carbon disc wheel.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
HED's new Raptor XC mtb wheels.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The Raptors have an offset drilling and are hand-laid. We have a set on test so expect a review in the coming months.

HED was founded in the 1980's by Steve and Anne Hed. Until his passing, Steve dedicated himself to making the best cycling equipment available and the fastest wheels possible. On the road side of things, HED is known for building some of the world's most aerodynamic wheels. HED got their start building disc wheels that were, at the time, some of the only wheels affordable to the average person.

Steve Hed had wind tunnel and manufacturing experience that helped him develop products with advantages in ride quality and aerodynamics. Battling poor ride qualities that a solid disc wheel had on the front of the bike in any sort of wind, Hed invented the deep section carbon wheel that is common on many high-performance road bikes today.

The company is now based in Minnesota and is run by Anne Hed. Anne has won numerous awards and grants with the business in its new facility and has gained notoriety outside the world of bikes with fascinating articles from Forbes and other publications telling her story.

The brand has branched out beyond road wheels and now produces carbon MTB wheels, along with other products and is a highly acclaimed contract manufacturer for other companies. The carbon is all USA sourced and hand-laid in HED's Roseville, Minnesota, facility.

HED's website.





EFFICIENT VELO TOOLS

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
EVT's Right Arm Repair Clamp

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The Bleedin' Gauge is an incredibly accurate pressure gauge available in five different increments. It's built out of parts from the Pacific Northwest.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
EVT's Knuckle Saver Pedal Wrench Adapters allow the use of a higher leverage pedal wrench on tough hex bolts.

Efficient Velo Tools was founded in 1999 by Brett Fleming, a master mechanic and service manager. Based in Portland, OR, Brett designed EVT's Offset Velo Clamp that did a better and safer job of holding expensive bikes in repair stands than other clamps he had used.

EVT now offers a complete line of bike repair tools that Brett dreamed up while managing the service department at The Bike Gallery in Portland.

Tools range from their Right Arm Repair Clamp that utilizes only 2" of seatpost to hold a bike and their EZ Lift repair stand that can help lift heavy bikes off the floor with a counterweight. Their catalog also includes tools for wheel dishing, alignment, headset and bearing presses and removers, picks, left-hand drill bits, and a smorgasbord of inflation heads and accessories.

Everything is made in EVT's Portland shop and painted a noticeable red color that we've been seeing used by more high-end shops and mechanics as time goes on.

Efficient Velo's website.





ONYX

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Onyx hubs are available in countless color and axle combinations.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
A cutaway of the hub shows the unique sprag clutch system.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Cam Zink even has his own model.

Onyx Racing Products is yet another Minnesota based company in the circle of bicycle parts manufacturing.

The company was started out of a demand for a fast-engaging BMX hub, as instantaneous engagement is critical for a fast start. Onyx’s patented sprag clutch design removes the ratcheting noise of traditional hubs and provides an instant engagement with no ratcheting noise at all.

The hubs are designed and manufactured in the US and have a heat treat hardened stainless steel driver that can stand up to insane amounts of power. The hubs are completely serviceable and bearing preload can be easily adjusted for minimal drag. The hubs also feature a contact-free labyrinth seal that keeps out elements without causing added friction, in an effort to make the hubs even more efficient. Axles are interchangeable and each hub comes with ceramic hybrid bearings.

Onyx have different colors and configurations for their hubs and there's a model for nearly any style or type bike made. Hubs have a five-year warranty and two-lifetime upgrade programs.

Onyx's website.





ODI

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The ODI AG2 was designed in-conjunction with Aaron Gwin.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
ODI also make handlebars.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The F1 Series signature Tinker Juarez Dread Lock Rasta grip.

ODI may not exactly count as a 'lesser known' brand, but the fact that their grips are made in the USA earns them a spot on this list. ODI came into existence over 25 years ago, and the Southern California brand pioneered the Lock-On grip system which is widely used today and has spawned numerous similar ideas for mountain bike grips.

The ODI system is still tried and true and the brand still, after over two decades, produces all of their grips in the USA, in their own facility, rather than outsourcing overseas in search of a better margin.

ODI now makes grips not only for mountain biking but for BMX, motocross, snowmobiling, jet-skiing, quad riding, and more. The brand offers custom programs for those wanting to design their own grips and works with a number of top-level athletes such as Aaron Gwin to design their own grips that are then available to the public to purchase.

In addition to grips, ODI produces handlebars, bar extenders, and a myriad of accessories.

ODI's website.





ABBEY BIKE TOOLS

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
A look inside most any World Cup level mechanic's toolbox will show at least a few bits of Abbey's signature anodized green tools.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The Crombie, the cassette lockring tool that started everything.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Abbey collaborates with RockShox for custom suspension tools.

Abbey Bike Tools is the product of necessity and ingenuity. The brand was started by Jason Quade in Bend, Oregon. A hobby of building a number of frames turned into a more serious endeavor after Jason connected with Jeff Crombie. Both had a background in aviation and a shared involvement in bikes.

According to their story, Jeff was working as a mechanic on the Canadian Pro-Continental team Spyder Tech and was in search for a tool that he could use to check lock rings on riders bikes as part of the standard "bolt check" any race mechanic goes through. The pieces fell together and Abbey's signature cassette lockring tool, the Crombie, was born.

The tool quickly gained a following from the first batch that went to friends and people Jason knew. Jason ended up selling more to race mechanics all over the pro race circuit in 2012 and then started getting calls from random people he didn't even know who wanted to buy the tool.

A couple of tools went to magazine reviews and after that, things picked up steam and requests for other tools started coming in. It was a simple case of demand for a high-quality product and someone who was willing to supply it.

Today, Abbey Bike Tools still makes the Crombie, but they also produce a smorgasbord of other high-end bike tools ranging from specialty suspension wrenches and sockets to bearing presses and four-way multi-tools.

Abbey's website.





PROFILE RACING

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Profile's MTB hubs are available in a variety of configurations whether for geared trail riding or single-speed dirt jumping.

10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
Profile's Helm MTB stem.
10 Lesser Known American Manufacturers
The MTB Z-Coaster freecoaster hub allows riders to disengage the drive mechanism of the hub with a kick of the pedals allowing for riding fakie without pedaling backwards.

Anyone in the BMX world likely knows of Profile racing, but the brand also has a full mountain bike line of products as well that come out of it's St. Petersburg, Florida, machine shop.

Started in 1968, the brand was first a racecar chassis shop in New Jersey. In 1971, the brand moved to Florida where owner Jim Alley's children got into BMX racing. Coming from a fabrication background and knowing how to work with chromoly and alloy components, Jim started creating parts for bicycle racing.

In the mid-80's, a lot of American manufacturing moved overseas but Profile held out and continued to manufacture all of its products in the USA. Profile grew, adding more CNC machines, employees, and area to their shop and branched out from BMX racing to street, freestyle, and mountain biking. Today they also make products for road, cyclocross, and even unicycles.

Profile has only continued to grow in the last couple decades and is one of the longest-standing American manufacturers. Their designs have gone through small evolutions and continue to be a benchmark for many riders looking for something quality and durable. All of their products are backed with a lifetime warranty and the team at Profile is proud of their made in America componentry.

Profile's website.




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254 Comments

  • 279 14
 What the hell did you guys smoke!? since when is ODI or Wolftooth a lesser known brand?
  • 92 2
 I didn't know ODI was American *scratches head*, does that count?
  • 49 4
 Probably the same stuff the guy from Profile Racing who designed that stem smokes ! I want some !!
  • 12 1
 I know you guys are MTN centric...but Hed? Really? I still recall reading Winning magazine and seeing the ad for the (now) H3, then labeled by Specialized...."this wheel at 30mph has less wind resistance than turning the page of this magazine...."
  • 22 3
 yaaa for instance they probably should've had rev grips here instead of odi.
  • 5 2
 Whatever man. It's all legal in Canada, as well as Washington State and a number of other states.
  • 9 0
 And Profile Racing...I was riding their BMX stuff 20+ years ago...
  • 29 0
 @RoadStain: "Daddy, what's a magazine?"
  • 6 6
 i thought wolf tooth was Canadian
  • 38 5
 It literally says, “ODI may not exactly count as a 'lesser known' brand, but the fact that their grips are made in the USA earns them a spot on this list.”
  • 6 0
 They say they came into existence over 25 years ago... I guess technically that’s true, but I would say it’s closer to over 35 years ago. I have a set of Ron Wilkerson signature grips to prove it. Bring back the Mushrooms!
  • 2 0
 @RoadStain: Ha. You're as old as I am!
  • 4 0
 I just came to see the Kearny and Trecker, was disappointed to not see it in use. Frown
But agree on the brands, all well known!
  • 3 1
 LOL, scrolled down to say exactly this.
  • 2 0
 Are they considered 'core' MTB brands? Not as mainstream as other brands but core to the principal aspects of their desired fields
  • 3 0
 @friendlyfoe: isn’t ODI pretty well known?
  • 3 2
 It's well known to us bike nerds but the general public does not know about them.
  • 3 1
 @edreyes: yeah, but pink bike is meant for us bike nerds though
  • 4 1
 @edreyes: and the general public doesn't read pinkbike
  • 1 0
 @lbsteinm: can you bring it from Washington to Canada? For years I've always stashed my nuggs in Bellingham before crossing the border.
  • 1 0
 @nate35: SO first of all, I'm no legal expert .. so whatever happens is based on whatever life choices you decide to make ... and not some stranger giving shitty advice on Pinkbike.

That being said, weed is still federally illegal in the USA. That means the federal agents, CBP, get paid by Uncle Sam. They have to follow federal law. Personally I wouldn't give those guys ANY reason to shake you down. They're "overzealous".
www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/border-officials-were-overzealous-stopping-iranian-americans-at-washington-canada-border-cbp-chief-says
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: DMT
  • 138 5
 what about Sram?
  • 101 4
 Haven't heard of them. Do they make anything good?
  • 64 15
 @Ron-C: heard their brakes are pretty good
  • 22 1
 @Ron-C: I think they contract out for Shimano stuff building Alivio derailleurs for the American market. Hopefully it does well for them. Remember that name, "Schram"
  • 33 0
 @Ron-C: I can promise you have heard the sound of them on the trail.
  • 8 5
 @Ron-C: No . They don't.. and I don't know if they actually produce anything in the states.
  • 13 12
 @Intoxication: no they kinda suck
  • 11 0
 @Intoxication: at least they keep you fast...
  • 14 5
 @Ron-C: in the title it says "that make exciting stuff"
  • 7 22
flag incubus (Feb 12, 2020 at 4:52) (Below Threshold)
 Ignoring the fact that they don’t manufacture anything in the US for a moment... what part of “lesser-known” do you not understand?
  • 5 0
 @Intoxication: Your name is very fitting
  • 2 0
 Who ever told you that was lying @Intoxication:
  • 1 0
 All this chatter about how 'big' companies are, but you'd be surprised to see how small cycling HQ's really are.
FSA (Full Speed Ahead) seems fairly reputable, owns Vision wheels (which many top UCI road teams run), but their HQ in Washington looks like some random HVAC shop on a country road. I always have to remind myself that the brunt of the work is done elsewhere. I'd like to see more manufacturing shops in Asia get highlighted.
  • 1 0
 @SvenNorske: I live locally, so I went there to buy a headset. They literally sold me a headset that wouldn't fit what I told them I had.
  • 91 5
 Whoa PB. Chill out. This is a piece to give some props to some great companies. Let them have a day in the sun without you guys sh*ting yourselves!
  • 1 0
 No doubt!
  • 46 7
 There is a brand I recently heard about that seem to have quite a wide range of products, you guys might want to check it, it's called Specialized. I'm curious if they will become mainstream in the next years. I heard they sponsor few riders
  • 22 0
 I can't find anything on the internet about them. What do they specialize in?
  • 217 3
 @excavator666: lawsuits but they also do bike related products
  • 17 3
 @excavator666: They have an amazing legal team. Some of the best lawyers money can buy.
They makes bikes as a side business.
  • 26 1
 The articles was focusing on Made in USA stuff, not "branded in USA and shipped from Taiwan"
  • 3 3
 @zede: you mean Merida USA? (...with mike on mushrooms for ideas!)

Spesh is just barely an actual US brand, some proprietary USA R&D... Asian manufacturing, R&D and probably majority ownership. Definitely not a "made in usa" brand AT ALL.

(their product seems solid as of the last 2 years though)
  • 1 0
 @zede: ZING!!!!
  • 1 0
 @dontcoast: the R and D is partly done in Freiburg germany
  • 1 0
 @MartinKS: Yep and a lot of the ebike R&D is in switzerland. Stand by my point: International superbrand with US roots, not a mUSA brand.
  • 37 0
 dang who is the guy in the wolf tooth components photo, front row. Has he been machining his cheekbones and jaw? Can I have his number?
  • 4 0
 Marketed face
  • 12 0
 There's a reason the jaw is clamped shut though. Wolves teeth
  • 19 0
 my dad's well, thanks
  • 5 1
 my dad's well, thanks for asking
  • 5 23
flag beanandcheeseburrito (Feb 12, 2020 at 4:10) (Below Threshold)
 Haha. Are you gay? Asking for a friend...
  • 4 0
 @BillyBoy0519: it's a great icebreaker at parties. well, unless,... you know..
  • 13 2
 Never seen a skinny American before?
  • 19 13
 @dtimms: well let's face it there aren't many
  • 1 0
 Lol. Next time I ride with him I'll send him your love from scandia.
  • 2 0
 Those are some distinguished cheek bones... Makes everyone else in the photo look like a bunch of chipmunks!
  • 3 1
 more interested in the lady 4th row back, left hand side to be honest
  • 5 0
 No machine work, all natural baby. Wink
Just message me here hahaha
  • 2 0
 @cgreaseman: what's up Casey!
  • 2 0
 I was really hoping that tat on his arm was the wolf tooth logo...missed opportunity...
  • 2 0
 @billyballa33: not yet at least. Maybe one day Wink
  • 2 5
 @pigman65: had to look thrice and I saw there is an Afro-American guy. I must say he is stealth as f*ck. The second lady in the front raw next to jaws looks nice to me Smile
  • 4 0
 The lack of PPE on the shop floor is disturbing! Shorts! Flip-flops! oh my! ... ... never mind, all CNC units. Not a lathe or mill to be seen. Smile
  • 3 0
 I don't know, but nobody in that photo has proper footwear for working in a machine shop.
  • 1 0
 Happy to see the ladies pictured at @WolfTooth A welcomed change.
  • 22 1
 What no Hadely? The best hubs I have ever used? Since they do not have a website.
www.rbikes.com/product/hadley-disc-rear-hub-36107.htm
  • 8 1
 I think a Hadley write-up and story would be cool. Mom & pop shop, no website, nearly indestructible hub
  • 7 14
flag excavator666 (Feb 12, 2020 at 6:28) (Below Threshold)
 Never understood people's obsession with hubs. I've had everything from cheap to hope and as far as I'm concerned a hub's a hub. They all pedal when I pedal and go click click when I don't.
  • 3 0
 @excavator666: I always thought the same until the newest Deore. Deadness....so dead.
  • 4 0
 I agree, Hadley Hubs are the best. As I scrolled down, I was hoping to see them on the list. Pinkbike doesn’t even know they exist. In the 2000’s, they were known for being the fastest rolling hubs and were popular with DH racers.
  • 3 1
 @blowmyfuse: is that good or bad?
  • 6 1
 @excavator666: I thought the same thing until the stock novatec on my almost-new bike blew up and almost trashed my frame when it seized. You don't need crazy-good hubs (XTs are solid as long as you keep an eye on the bearing compression) but bad hubs are bad news.
  • 2 0
 @excavator666: so very bad. Have never had an issue with Shimano stuff until now. Internals on the Deore are so badly sealed they just gutted.
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: Shimano likes making things that are well made, then remove seals so they do now do not last as long, makes sense that they will sell more, if wear out faster!
  • 5 0
 Hadley is freaking awesome! Hopefully they get a microspline license soon.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: that's a shame, I've never had an issue with older Shimano hubs.

@big-red: I had Novatecs for about 2 years on my Vitus Sommet and never had any issues with them. I never even changed the bearings once.
  • 5 0
 @excavator666: Started out with basic hubs, then bought a bike with really high engagement... I was still getting back into the game and didn't notice the change much.

but then I sold my bike and have been demoing a few bikes lately. Demo'd a Santa Cruz MegaTower with those DT Swiss 370 hubs and noticed the low engagement right away. Things like trying to get in quick extra pedal strokes before somewhere I need speed... it felt like I'd lost 1/3 of the power I was putting down. And tech climbing it was really obvious... but also technical slow descending... getting in short pedal strokes to move around obstacles and such was much worse with low POE.

People will disagree, but after riding both styles back to back on my local trails... I can't go back to low POE.
  • 2 0
 Exactly Wheres effin Hadley on this list, over ODI fo sho. Wolf tooth is cool, Hadley > ODI on this list
  • 6 2
 @shaheeb: I was going for some diversity...it was starting to be a list of hub manufacturers. Keep in mind, it's just a list, not a ranking.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: tru that, good job. lets get some more sick bike reviews!
  • 17 0
 Onyx, Wolftoth, Hed wheels. Yeah Minnesota is pretty rad. Come ride here sometime instead of flying over.
  • 10 0
 ....Parkrtool, QBP/Salsa, TwinSix... tbf everyone flying over is probably headed to Banf or Whistler anyways.
  • 2 0
 @cgreaseman: Still can't believe QBP/Salsa hasn't advocated and built sweet trails out their door at Hyland.
  • 2 0
 @SvenNorske: The PWB NIBY's would never let that happen haha
  • 12 0
 Great article. I know it's "ten" but I'd add Project 321, MRP, Guerilla Gravity and Park Tool.

Minnesota sweeps the podium!
  • 2 0
 I love Onyx and Woolftooth. They should have said Woolftooth is based in Savage, Mn. That's what the shipping label always says when I buy their stuff. Sounds more CVLT
  • 3 0
 What about Phil Wood? I don't know if they're small enough, but they do make mountain bike parts, and their machining is phenomenal.
  • 12 0
 That world cup toolbox. HNNNNNNGGGGGGGG.
  • 5 0
 It's a thing of beauty, isn't it?
  • 4 0
 and it can be yours for a mere 20 grand
  • 13 0
 No MRP? What the fork.
  • 22 14
 These articles are a pisstake. If this was posted on a non-MTB site it might make sense but come on , ODI, Whyte, Abbey,Wolf Tooth , who reading PB doenst know their entire product range
  • 13 1
 ‘Mercia just got upset that they didn’t get the same article as the lesser known UK brands so this was their response lol
  • 37 2
 As an new-ish guy riding mtb , I don't … I really think alot of readers on pinkbike over-estimate the general knowledge of most rider when it comes to specific parts and manufacturer. Its like cars, to me 540cc injectors form a gen3 3sgte is a wonderful upgrade with the wolfkats top feed rail, but you need to also check the fpr if you go walbro 255 or tt pump, makes sense when you go gtx3582r. But when you take a step back, alot of people won't know wth im talking about.
  • 1 2
 @2tall2ride: Just go with ID1000 or similar. It's not worth your time messing with old injectors and you would not believe the difference in idle with newer tech injectors. can you set up Injector dead times on you ECU?
  • 2 1
 @cuban-b: I’m cuban, b
  • 2 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: the one person in the world who gets the reference made this screen name all worth it.
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: I always chuckle when I see your username
  • 3 0
 White Industries is not the same as Whyte. White is a tiny manufacturer which makes sense to place in the article.
  • 3 0
 @awitt: White Industries still makes the parts to rebuild my 1992 Speed Racer rear hub. But it doesn't need them yet......
  • 1 0
 @tineira: ID1000 are cool, but 540cc redtop are really cheap are widely available , also very reliable. Last set I got I paid 40$ for and spent 20$ getting them flow tested. But I agree with your comment
  • 9 0
 I guess Wheels Manufacturing isn't big enough to make this list of lesser known American manufacturers, top quality stuff wheelsmfg.com/about-us
  • 12 3
 And Paul! Come on, you might as well have not heard of mountain bikes if you haven't heard of Paul components
  • 10 1
 Exactly! How are you supposed to wear your Rapha kit if you don't have any Paul components on your bike???
  • 10 0
 once you've heard a profile hub in person, life just ain't the same
  • 7 0
 i can testify for this
  • 2 1
 I was considering grabbing a new one, but watch the hub drag in this video of how fast that thing slows down:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ct7vlcB_V4A
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: Profile hubs just need a quick break-in; check this their hub actually spins forevers:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwGiCCaDs1c

My Profile hubs are super smooth.
I've added Slikoleum inside to the pawls. It's true though... some Profile staff are a bit crack smoke, and tell you to run the whole driver "dry", which yes slows down the mech and adds drag. With normal oil their hubs are amazing.
  • 10 0
 Surprised that Thomson isn't in the list.
  • 11 0
 Thomson, "we'll trade you real nice stuff for all your monies"......I think they figured out the bike industry, before the bike industry figured itself out.
  • 3 0
 Newer 35mm Thomson stuff is made in China.
  • 4 0
 @shawnoen: Really? Bummer
  • 10 1
 Is it company policy at wolftooth that no one over 30 is allowed to work there or something? Lol
  • 7 1
 I think they took the photo on "bring your kids to work day". lol
  • 17 7
 Nothing Paul Componants makes it’s exciting
  • 12 2
 unless you get you blood pumping watching your bank account drain
  • 3 0
 Paul Components are excellent at taking a product that everyone else has had on the market for 20 years, making it minimalist, and then making it multiple colors. Oh, and making them in the USA. You gotta be patient for that level of color coordinator and quality.
  • 27 0
 People who spell it 'componants' aren't really their demographic I guess.
  • 2 6
flag freeridejerk888 (Feb 12, 2020 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry to busy buying stuff relevant to this century @mgolder:
  • 6 1
 @freeridejerk888: Oh aye. I forgot how nobody uses cranks, stems, QR clamps, 12 or 15mm thru-axles, dropper levers or even seatposts in 2020.
  • 3 0
 @mgolder: They even make a 35mm stem!
  • 3 0
 @freeridejerk888 I hope the photo was a very old one - Square taper cranks ...
  • 6 1
 I'm pretty certain they at least excite people on bespoke steel singlespeeds with Mission Workshop hip packs and Kitsbow merino shorts riding mildly bumpy double track through the desert while taking selfies of themselves disinterestedly browsing the Radavist.
  • 6 0
 First off, Paul Components is one of the godfathers of mtb component manufacturing and second they do make cool things, just may not be for you. They make some of the best mechanical disk brakes and levers as well as a very nice stem and dropper lever. They also used to make arguably the best derailleur on the market
  • 4 0
 @TyBrenninger: as someone who actually owns an old school 7 speed paul billet derailleur I can attest to the manufacturing quality, that being said paying 90 bucks for seat post clamps and over 100 for skewers and thru axles is a straight up status move. Also the klampers are overpriced BB7's with a few more bells and whistles, the yokozunas are a way better investment
  • 2 0
 @JohnnyVV:
Ha. Best post of the day
  • 3 0
 @JohnnyVV: that was hilarious...
  • 1 0
 Oh we all use that stuff. But that stuff does nothing better than this stuff. Plus that dropper leaver looks like a brick compared to everything @mgolder:
  • 1 0
 @TyBrenninger: True, the Paul disc brakes are better than 99.9% of what's out there today.
  • 11 2
 In what world is ODI lesser known?
  • 7 1
 lol, i enjoyed the european article so much i just had to come and see which american brands pinkbike were ushering into obscurity. these articles must be for people who literally arrived yesterday.
  • 1 3
 IS ODI rubber grown in America?
Or is grip rubber just made from oil? now?
OR is made in America mean the whole of American continent?
  • 5 0
 How can cane Creek not be on this list? They are probably the American manufacturer with the most diverse product offering. From suspension to cranks and headsets to elastomer seatposts. Plus, their super blingy road brakes.
  • 5 0
 because literally everyone has heard of Cane Creek
  • 7 1
 Going to check that ODI website - didn't know about them!I think they must be new in grip business.
  • 2 0
 And I always thought ODI grips were made by Sensus
  • 6 0
 Profile has been around forever. Had a crank set on my GT performer 22 years ago. Wow I'm old .
  • 4 0
 204 Points of Engagement. But for some reason they only put wheels out on basic Sun MTX rims. Weird.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: Profile make such great stuff, but yeah they're a bit of an odd bunch. The MTB site actually lead with a unicycle for a while .... instead of their sweet MTB Boost hubs or Elite cranks.
  • 5 0
 ODI and Aaron Gwin.....lesser know indeed.....to a tribesman in Papua New Guinea probably....
  • 5 1
 i9, NOX, P321, OneUp, MRP, Cane Creek... Just on my bike alone. Ok, I guess a few of those are well known, but probably at least as well as anything on that list.
  • 8 0
 OneUp has their production over seas. NOX builds wheels in Knoxville but likely sources their rims from overseas as well, not to mention their hubs.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: maybe the reference was to the car racks? Otherwise one-up is Canadian but manufactured overseas.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: Yeap, the racks. NOX makes their rims in-house.
  • 1 0
 @Abacall: do they? I dont see anything on their website mentioning MUSA rims. Just “hand assembled”.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: “ We work closely with a manufacturer in Asia to produce rims using our molds, layup schedule and proprietary production techniques. The carbon for our rims is sourced from Toray in Japan.“
Looks like you’re right about that. At least they use their own molds and labor to build.
  • 2 0
 @Abacall: Sorry to challenge you on it, but since becoming a Guerrilla Gravity owner I've become a bit of a MUSA snowflake. Quite sensitive to the marketing lingo many companies use to hide the fact that they don't manufacturer stuff here in the USA. Don't get me wrong, plenty of stuff on my bike was manufactured overseas and that doesn't make it lesser quality, but a lot of consumers are so stoked to buy something "Made in USA" only to be corrected later on it was just "assembled" or "designed" in the USA, not actually manufactured here.

One thing I really appreciate about Guerrilla Gravity is that it's not just about making stuff here in the USA, they also try to be competitive with their pricing. Compared to Yeti or Pivot or many other USA bike brands, Guerrilla Gravity has lower prices for a frame entirely built in Colorado. MRP and Cane Creek are also both great values considering their being manufactured with American hands.

If you want something manufactured here in the USA, don't be afraid to read between the lines and challenge brands and assemblers on where exactly their stuff is made, and if they are making their parts cheaply overseas - are those cost savings being passed on to the consumer? Are they offering better warranties, better service or higher quality product? In some cases, yes. In most cases - it depends. With as expensive as mountain biking has become, I think it's right for the consumers to demand more out their equipment and the companies who make it.
  • 1 0
 @Abacall: This is why I never understood paying the premium for NOX, might as well go LightBicycle US.
  • 5 0
 Push Industry, Chris King, Guerrilla Gravity, Industry 9. These are some other companies I believe still made in the USA.
  • 14 0
 'Lesser known'. None of those companies fit really.
  • 3 1
 @mgolder: I think Guerilla Gravity could fall into that "lesser known" category, although maybe only just and only if you live outside of Colorado.
  • 5 0
 @PAmtbiker: The most known unknown.
  • 3 1
 This is more of a "huge brands you didn't know we're American" article than anything else. I had heard of all of these brands. Paul components is probably the only one that people haven't heard of. They actually make really nice stuff.
  • 6 0
 My motto is you can never have enough wolftooth on your bike.
  • 1 0
 #woflcult
  • 4 0
 Never really wanted a bell on my mountain bike but now I do , that Spurcycle bell looks incredible .
  • 2 0
 I've got one of the silver ones! Super nice bell and it looks cool
  • 2 1
 ODI should not be included. Everyone knows who they are. This was just another opportunity for them to get their name out here. All the other companies make sense. They’re smaller companies that aren’t well known, plus there’s many more smaller companies that could have been included in this list
  • 1 0
 Here's one for ya;
Not a lesser know Co. but they are up in the PNW.... Transition Bikes who make in house - ANVL components. I still haven't figured out why the party in the woods guys don't spec their bikes with their own parts...?
  • 1 0
 Alright, I don't think Wolf is as 'lessor' known as this article makes it seem, but for SURE ODI isn't. They invented the lock-on grip for crissakes, and have been HUGE in the MX market for years, as well as, uh, MOUNTAIN BIKES
  • 4 0
 Guys Friday fails is sponsored by lesser known brand¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 4 0
 Abbey bike tools compensates for a lot of American crap.
  • 6 2
 Perfect to work on your expensive, outdated Paul components.
  • 3 3
 If a middle aged Australian with limited knowledge of the bicycle industry over the past thirty years knows of all these brands and, indeed, owns a number of examples of products from quite a few....then none of these brands should really be considered as 'lesser known'. However, perhaps the PB commentariat could suggest other, if not lesser known then perhaps underrated, US bike component makers like Paragon Machine Works and Hadley...
  • 4 0
 man this was a clickbait if there ever was one.
  • 4 1
 Wait, where are all the Europeans claiming mountain biking was invented over there first?
  • 4 0
 Why leave Hadley hubs off the list?
  • 4 0
 Make profile hubs great again
  • 5 0
 No P321?
  • 4 0
 today i learned there are no small brands in america
  • 1 0
 PB totally missed this guy.... www.mtbtools.com/shop

I dare you to find better stuff for these prices. I picked up the headset press drivers, crown race setting tool, and bb spacers kit for less than $100!
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who looks at this list and thinks it is a bit pathetic? Maybe I am harking back to the 90s, when this list would have hundreds of weird and wonderful companies (also known back then as man in his garage).
  • 2 0
 ODI, Onyx, Profile....find something new everyday. Onyx hub, profile crank combo makes any bike into bikeporn.
  • 11 7
 Germany 1 America 0.
  • 17 5
 That would be Germany 1, United States 2.
  • 19 0
 @Trudeez: back to back world war champion.
  • 4 0
 @pensamtb: The two-time
  • 4 0
 @2tall2ride: apols, too neutral to tell the difference ;-)
  • 2 0
 I had a Profile 3piece chainset on a jump bike about 15years ago - the thing was bombproof!
  • 2 0
 Been riding Profile hubs and ODI grips on the BMX for over 20 years! Looking to get a set for the MTB soon!
  • 1 0
 I have a pair of White Industry hubs laced to carbon (atom) gravel rims I am looking to sell if anyone wants an amazing US made wheel set!
  • 5 1
 lol gravel
  • 3 1
 I kind of feel like Pinkbike and their Grim Donut should have made the list..
  • 3 0
 50 for a bell, and people moan about 10k bikes
  • 2 0
 Surprised I didn't scroll down to see Trek in there after ODI and Wolftooth popped up.....
  • 1 0
 Was gonna say Should have put AME over ODI, but then i checked their website... Their grips could be way better IMO classic bmx roots
  • 2 0
 Lesser known and lesser appreciated than Frank The Welder? www.wearespooky.com/ftw
  • 2 0
 Project321? Magnetic paws and the best most reliable hubs on the market....come on guys.
project321.com
  • 2 0
 PROFILE RACING MAKES THE BEST HUBS IN THE BUSINESSSSSSS. YEA I SAID IT!!!!!
  • 3 0
 paragon machine works!!! Richmond, CA. Coolest company ever.
  • 1 0
 GnarCal !!!
  • 1 0
 Proving you have to go overseas to make great products. A little engineering and determination go a long way. Buy local! Support your neighbors and friends!
  • 2 0
 lesser known brands ODI? Big Grin
  • 2 0
 looked at comments first, laughed, went on with my day
  • 3 3
 Really PB, I've heard of everyone of these a thousand times over from other rider's except for EVT or HED. You could've chosen something smaller like Villain or something.
  • 4 1
 You're telling me that Florida has mountain biking AND more than one component company that produces their products in house? I thought I was good to go back to California brands after including Profile.
  • 1 0
 @danielsapp: yeah dude, Florida has a rad MTB and BMX scene (check out Villain MTB).
  • 1 0
 Villain? Their MTB jerseys are top notch and made in the USA: villainmtb.com/collections/apparel
  • 2 0
 Where ya at Industry nine?
  • 1 0
 I9 isn’t lesser known.
  • 10 0
 We're chillin', still making stuff here in Asheville... sup?
  • 1 0
 @beanandcheeseburrito: Would you consider ODI, or Wolftooth lesser known? For an article spotlighting "American Manufacturers Making Exciting Stuff" I would have excepted to see Industry Nine, that is all.
  • 3 1
 Make american bikes again!
  • 6 3
 Guerrilla Gravity and REEB both manufacture bikes in Colorado, as does Lenz Sport. Not to mention a ton of handbuilt hardtails nationwide.
  • 4 0
 This guy gets it.
  • 1 2
 Why are there basically no good product shots in this list? You have Paul in there yet don't show the classic mech or anything to make anyone think ''ooooh, nice''. Lots of rendered and low resolution pics throughout.
  • 2 0
 Lesser known, FFS, you guys need to get out more!
  • 2 0
 Hed! Paper! Now! Move that melon of yours and get the paper if you can.
  • 2 0
 I'd say 6 of those 10 companies are very well known.
  • 1 0
 Real niche, but shoutout to TwoFish Unlimited and their all-US production! KingCage deserves a mention too.
  • 2 0
 I want to Hadley on the list. Glad to see Profile!
  • 1 0
 Onyx hubs are amazing. I want to have a set build for my gravel bike at some point.
  • 1 0
 How about an article on lesser known companies in Jina that make knock offs of these components?
  • 2 0
 Damn, left off Industry Nine?
  • 1 3
 It would be nice to do another article on brands to avoid that manufacturer mainland China. I’m okay with buying product from Twain, but it would be best boycott anything Chinese.
  • 1 0
 If that spur cycle tool doubles as a pipe they win
  • 1 0
 Please fix the links for White, HED, and Onyx.
  • 1 0
 I had no idea ODI grips are made in the US. Awesome.
  • 2 0
 No Velocity on the list?
  • 1 0
 Right?!?! I feel they coulda taken the spot for ODI. Don’t get me wrong I LOVE ODI!!! I wouldn’t run any grip other than and the CEO of ODI is a regular at my shop and a good friend However they are not lesser known. And velocity is a great company and is one of the only rim makers still in the US making alloy.
  • 1 0
 I thought velocity was an Australian company...?I used to have a set with kangaroos on the decals.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: They were Austrailian at one point and i think they started out there, however they moved manufacturing to I think it was Michigan for a while then now they are based in Florida.
  • 2 0
 Wheels Mfg?
  • 1 0
 Lifetime warranty bell and it didn't help them to fly under the radars?
  • 1 0
 High end square-taper cranksets.....yay?
  • 2 0
 So Canada next?
  • 1 0
 Burns would have been great for this list lol
  • 1 0
 I knew nothing about EVT tools, thanks PB!
  • 1 0
 Where is Project 321

?????????????????
  • 1 0
 No Project 321? those hubs have crazy engagement
  • 1 0
 My wolf tooth dropper lever is amazing
  • 1 0
 Damn, that toolbox is beautiful
  • 1 1
 What ! I hear shimano is up and coming !
  • 3 0
 Shimano, the well known American brand... /s
  • 1 0
 No Lenz?
  • 1 0
 steve hed
  • 1 0
 Kona
  • 1 0
 Thanks for including us!
  • 1 0
 Phil Wood?

Woodman??
  • 6 6
 'merica, fark yeah.
  • 1 2
 No Envy, Moots, Lynskey, Thompson, i9,Reeb?
  • 2 1
 Enve, Moots, Thomson, and i9 are not "lesser known." Reeb and Lynskey I agree with... unless you're old enough to remember when Lynskey's were popular.
  • 1 0
 For this one we focused on components, not frames. ENVE is also a little too well known on PB for this list.
  • 1 0
 @PAmtbiker: Being 90's mtb'er I had to buy a Lynskey two years ago to finaly say I had a Ti hardtail. I worked in shop who sold Litespeed. But I never could afford one. Great CX bike for flow trails.
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