Check Out: TRP Levers, Track Pumps, Books, & More

Dec 7, 2023 at 7:41
by Dario DiGiulio  


A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



PRO Team Tubeless Floor Pump

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• Floor pump with compression charging chamber
• Schrader and Presta valve compatible
• Alloy construction, 260psi max
• States 2.3" max, tested up to 2.6"
• MSRP: $150 USD
pro-bikegear.com




bigquotesIdeally a floor pump is one of those items that simply performs its duty and never requires thought, and the Pro Team Tubeless accomplishes just that. With a sturdy construction, simple yet functional features, and plenty of volume for typical mountain bike tires, it's been the only pump I've used over the past year and a half. It even received the truest sign of Dario approval: getting completely covered in stickers.

The charge/pump lever is cleverly nested into the pump's head, keeping it out of the way and intuitive to use, compared to other designs out there. The only tires I've had trouble seating were ones that proved fickle even with the use of a compressor, so suffice to say it'll handle typical shop setup well. The gauge is fairly accurate, but I never rely on pump gauges and always double check with a Topeak Smartgauge D2.




Ottolock Cinch

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• 3 stainless steel bands wrapped in aramid fiber sheath
• 3-digit tumbler lock
• Weight: 145 grams (shortest size)
• 18, 30, and 60 inch lengths
• MSRP: $69 USD (30")
ottodesignworks.com




bigquotesI bought this beefy zip tie from a shop I worked at years ago, and it's been a consistent staple ever since. It's no match for a real u-lock or chain when it comes to security, but blows those two out of the water convenience-wise. I strap it to my belt loop for trips to town, toss it in a pack while traveling, and use it to secure my bike to a rack if I'm grabbing food in town post-ride.

This is the second Cinch I've owned, with the first falling prey to wear and tear - eventually the tumbler lock seized up and I had to cut it, which was luckily a bit harder than I expected. I warrantied that first lock, and the second has been trucking along for about four years now.




Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

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• ISBN#: 978-0-374-10409-2
• 208 pages
• Delightfully weird sci-fi thriller
• First novel of the Southern Reach Trilogy
• MSRP: $13 USD
jeffvandermeer.com




bigquotesEarly sunsets mean more time to read, so I'm packing my winter with all the books I've accumulated while I was too busy riding over the summer. Annihilation has proven to be one of the best I've read in a while, with a gripping plot and beautifully spun world that draws you in immediately. I won't reveal much here, as there are plenty of synopses you can find online, but suffice to say it's a wonderful and weird tale.

Though I haven't yet seen the accompanying film, I have to recommend the book above all else, as VanderMeer's ability to intertwine haunting and beautiful text is quite impressive. Reading is good, it's like technical climbing for the brain.



Freedom Coast TRP DH-R Evo Levers

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• 12mm closer to the bar than stock levers
• Uses all stock TRP hardware
• Machined in the USA
• MSRP: $119 USD
freedomcoast.net




bigquotesTRP's DH-R Evo brakes have proven to be some of the best on the market at this point, but for some users there's one fatal flaw; folks that prefer to run their levers very close to the bar simply can't with the stock product, as the reach adjust bottoms out further than other options out there. Freedom Coast took the existing hardware and designed a fully different lever that brings the contact in about 12mm, allowing for to-the-bar pull if that's your thing.

I've gone through phases with brake setup, and though I once like the very close pull feel, I've recently settled on a bit point that is further out from the bar - meaning the stock TRP levers do me just fine. That said, these Freedom Coast levers have excellent ergonomics regardless of your setup, with a pronounced hook that makes it easy to reef on the brakes.

I'll be doing a little comparison between these, a similar product from Oak Components, and a new reach adjuster from TRP that all achieve similar results. Stay tuned.



Send It Randy Riding Pants

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• Not one, but two forms of camo
• Internal waist adjustment and belt loops
• Two small zippered pockets
• Heavier woven fabric on knees
• MSRP: $115 USD (currently on sale for $92)
senditrandy.com




bigquotesAs a proud lover of camo patterns, these pants really do it for me. It just so happens that you can ride in them too, which is a welcomed bonus. Features are fairly simple, with a hook and loop internal waist adjuster, belt loops, two pockets, and some ventilation in key areas. The burlier knee patches are a nice touch, and serve as some extra abrasion resistance with or without pads.

The fit through the legs is a bit tight in my size Medium, so I'd likely size up if I were to buy another pair. Similarly, the zip pockets are quite small, just fitting my iPhone mini in one, and a multitool and some food in the other. Considering the popularity of packs, I don't think this is a huge deal, it seems like I'm something of an outlier in how often I try to carry everything I need in my pockets. The fabric itself is very comfortable, the ventilation works well, and you can rest assured knowing you have the coolest looking pants on the hill.



Wolf Tooth Remote 360

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• Actuates in any direction
• Clamp and base rotate 360°
• Made to work with busy cockpit setups
• Manufactured in Minnesota
• MSRP: $60 USD
wolftoothcomponents.com




bigquotesE-bike controls, complicated lockouts, and interfering mounting standards can quickly make simple-seeming mountain bike controls start to look like the control panel in a B-36 Peacemaker. Okay maybe not that bad, but in the name of elegance and function it's nice to see the folks at Wolf Tooth bringing this clever dropper lever design back to market. There have been a couple other joystick-style levers over the years, and they've proven to be a good alternative to the typical paddle design, albeit a bit funkier.


Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
168 articles

137 Comments
  • 39 0
 Not expecting to see an Annihilation rec on here, one of the wildest and most engaging books I've ever read. Highly recommend, but if you prefer your stories to be clear cut and comprehensible it might not be your cup of tea.
  • 35 0
 I think he’s calling us Pinkbike readers stupid. lol
  • 7 0
 @gnarlysipes: I can see how it came off that way, but I really mean that it's super abstract and doesn't really come to a conclusion, although it's part of a trilogy so that kind of makes sense
  • 5 0
 Agreed, I loved the book! The second one in the series was a little less captivating, but the third one is back to being awesome. The movie, in my opinion, misses the point of the book in favor of cool looking imagery.
  • 6 1
 People hype it up but I though it was formuliac and drab. Roadside Picnic is far superior if you want thoughtful and unique sci fi.
  • 2 0
 i was not a fan of Annihilation. I read it a few years ago and it just didnt land for me. a friend recommended it along with the alchemist. neither were that good to me tbh
  • 1 0
 Huge plus 1 for checking out Annihilation (and the rest of the Southern Reach series). Definitely a mess with your head kind of book though, so I could see how it wouldn't be for everyone.
  • 2 0
 I read the series twice. Some of my fave of all time. If you like this, Borne is great too.
  • 2 1
 @Portland-maine: The movie is complete garbage and misses everything that made the book great. It should have been a series on HBO so all the books could have been included.
  • 2 0
 @totaltoads: Formulaic is definitely not the word I'd use. I love the fact that for once we're given a scenario that is uknowable in its entirety but just close enough you feel desperate to understand. No cohesive ending is offered, which seem far more likely in the even of first contact, if you ask me.

I loved these books. If it wasn't obvious.
  • 1 0
 I simultaneously find myself really liking the VanderMeer stuff I've read (Southern Reach and Borne) and also finding it just kind of pointless. Definitely fits into I think they call New Weird fiction, cause it is all certainly weird. But while something like Pan's Labyrinth could also fit into that category, that film was about something bigger than being weird. I never got that sense from VanderMeer. More just felt like a bunch of weird stuff happening to the characters as if there's some big set up and then, nope, it just ends. I'm guessing that was the point though. I do like the complete lack of exposition in explaining the worlds they take place it, but it also feels unnecessarily obfuscating. I'm glad I read them, I enjoyed reading them, but after just never felt satisfied.
  • 4 0
 Another Sci-fi my biology brain absolutely loved was Children of Time. If you like biology or zoology and sci-fi, I can't recommend that book enough.
  • 1 0
 Yeah the the story is very ambiguous at the best of times. Highly abstract stuff. I thoroughly enjoyed it.
  • 2 0
 @willis1021: Yeah, this was a pretty cool read. Never looked at jumping spiders the same again! Loved the depictions of the octopus ships
  • 2 0
 @Mrtonyd: agreed.

It felt like it was trying too hard to be a deep story and failed for me.
  • 6 0
 Any info on claimed/real weight for this book as it is nowhere in the specs?
  • 6 0
 @iLFreno: e-book or regular?
  • 1 0
 @Portland-maine: that’s interesting, I really liked the film or at least the premise, but haven’t read any of the books. Will give it a shot
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: LOVE Borne. Southern Reach ended up being meh for me unfortunately
  • 1 0
 @steezysam: Vandermeer comes up with amazing and mysterious worlds I want to know everything about but he's too damn stingy to reveal!
  • 1 0
 @FMHUM: new weird, China Mieville “Embassytown”
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: If you haven't read The Strange Bird yet definitely pick it up!
  • 1 0
 I loved the first book but the second one felt like a real drag to finish and made me give up on reading the third
  • 1 0
 @willis1021: That was a great book. It was pretty funny trying to explain that one to my wife though... "so you have these spiders and ants right...." (as she falls asleep of boredom)
  • 1 0
 @totaltoads: That's funny - I'm currently reading Roadside Picnic as I'm going through a Sci-Fi phase that started with exactly the Southern Reach trilogy.
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: These were great while youre in that phase: www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/38362809
  • 15 0
 Just saying, Randy is that new guy in town that starts dating your best friend's ex you still hang out with in Point Place, WI. He thinks he's part of the crew and that he'll replace your best friend but he isn't and won't and everyone secretly hates him.
  • 5 0
 I was wondering who Randy was. Oh, that GUY!!!
  • 1 0
 *sobs quietly into hand*
  • 11 0
 TRP reach adjust solution eh? Say more!
  • 3 0
 The levers really help if you have shorter finger or just like a closer reach to the levers. I have the freedom coast levers on two of my bikes. 10/10 would recommend.
  • 7 0
 @Austink: I'd prefer for TRP to provide this "solution" on their own, ie change the damn gorilla levers to something a little more user friendly. I love TRP and I've been on their brakes since the beginning, good thing I have XXL hands, but really, TRP fix your levers!
  • 6 0
 Alright everybody, So I reached out to TRP Customer Service, asking about this. Here is what they said. "We have some pushrods with a longer threaded portion that will allow you to get the lever closer to the bar." and they are shipping them to me, no questions asked. I am in the U.S. If you are comfortable swapping out the pushrods yourself, I'd encourage you all to reach out! If not, they offered to do it there, assuming I'd have to ship the brakes. @Dario Digiulio @Bro-tato
  • 3 0
 I wish someone would make these for the non servo wave shimano brakes…
  • 1 0
 I tried both Freedom Coast and Oak Components levers for TRP. Both solve the reach problem but the Oaks have better ergonomics and more leverage.
  • 1 0
 How people choose TRPs over Hayes Dominions puzzle me…
  • 1 0
 @v57z3F0q: Have you tried both? I've heard great things about both, but ultimately seems like more racers/riders are using the TRPs and having amazing results. I've never tried the dominions but would love to
  • 1 0
 @misteraustin: I did try them, but I felt super fatigued from the lever (I have fairly small hands). A buddy told me about the Dominions and I never looked back. No arm pump! Smile
  • 1 0
 @sanchofula: alright so it's not just me? I'm 6'2" with large hands and I still wish they were closer...
  • 11 6
 "Pro Team Tubeless ... plenty of volume for typical mountain bike tires ... The gauge is fairly accurate, but I never rely on pump gauges and always double check with a Topeak Smartgauge D2."

If the gauge is fairly accurate, you shouldn't have to check it with a separate gauge. Unless you're obsessed with a certain number. Just go with whatever number on the pump feels good. Perhaps verify the number shown by the Smartgauge so you can use someone else's pump if need be, but there really is no need to always double check.

That is, if the pump actually is "fairly accurate", but I don't see how you could ever get a good accurate reading for MTB tire pressures from that gauge. Besides the fact that most gauges are the most accurate near the middle of there ranges, and the 15-30 psi needed is not even close to the middle, the smallest graduation indicated is 5 psi! My preferred 19F and 22R would basically both be ON the 20 psi graduation.

Not quite as bad as the Topeak Dualie that simply doesn't have graduations between 30 psi and 35 psi, but this pump's gauges are still pretty useless for MTB.
  • 4 1
 Is this a tire pump or does it want to be a crappy shock pump too? 260 psi? What is that for? Ok so it can help seat tubeless tires… but it makes it a crappy pump 99% of the time?

One pump to do it all! Except you still need other stuff to make up for all these shortcomings…
  • 4 2
 Ill put a 6 pack on the fact that you cant tell the difference between 19 and 20, or 22 and 25. I'll bring the pump, and spend the time, you just let me know when youre in the PNW to test it out
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: that test interests me.
And I'm in the PNW...
  • 4 3
 @BarryWalstead: Cool, I'm in

I had plans to head to Bellinhham next week to do some riding, but i think work is gonna get in the way. Lets try for end of January.

I wonder if PB has any interest in a series "debunbking your opinions"
I guess if I just do the test, and write it up, they can try it out. I'll keep in tongue in cheek, and try my best not to piss anyone off

Hey @brianpark willing to give it a go, payment only needs to be a set of Santa Cruz Fillmore valves so I can test those out too...
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: Just like with suspension settings, some people can feel subtle changes and some people couldn’t feel a substantial change.
Usually the people that care about settings and pressures can feel the difference and those that don’t care won’t notice a difference until something is very wrong.
  • 7 0
 @onawalk: I'll take that bet, and make it a case instead of a sixer, because I've done it before: ask a friend to set a pressure within a few psi of "normal" for you, using your usual pump or gauge, ride it blind, compare, learn what you really like and want.

Sure, 19 to 20 in the front can be tough to figure out immediately depending which side of 20 they hit and which side of 19 I hit initially, fork settings, and the temperature on the day (cold slow rubber feels more damped, harder to notice small pressure differences). But something like 18 to 20 on the front is definitely noticeable, with my tire and rim of choice, after just a couple runs. And even that hard-to-detect-acutely 1psi change is quite noticeable after a long day of riding well-known trails.

In the back, slamming 100 kilos around on 160mm travel, 22 to 25 is easily noticeable (bouncy, pinball-y), as is 22 to 20 (squirmy, will burp much more easily), even with a DoubleDown style casing.

Even if you couldn't acutely notice a couple PSI difference, why wouldn't you want to at least be consistent? a 200 psi gauge in 5psi graduations for a target psi circa 20 is just stupid to being with, and is going to be extremely inconsistent in practice.
  • 3 2
 @ripridesbikes: While I agree in theory, I dont have personal data to back that up

When you take into account varying pressures due to temp, and altitude, high volume tires, varying trail surfaces, tire wear, etc, I think there are way too many variables to be able to say Yes, 19 psi is what im most comfortable with, not 20, not 18, 19! (@justinfoil I'm not trying to use you as an example, those numbers just stuck in my head)

Heres what I typically find, people have a preconceived notion or bias, and being the stupid animals we are, we allow that to cloud, and sometimes completely block out any info that doesnt verify our initial view point. lots of us are very aware of this, but believe we are somehow immune to it, cause we are a smarter ape.....

Imagine how narrow your "feel" for enjoyment would be if you could determine a 1psi difference in tire pressure?

To be clear, Im not saying you, or anyone else isnt that unicorn, you could very well be, but I am saying, I'm willing to spend a day in the woods with people to find out. Not a single person, locally or otherwise, has taken me up on that offer, and the ones that are the most adamant about being that sensitive, are typically the ones who go quiet real quick when presented with the opportunity
  • 1 2
 @justinfoil: A case just becomes too much of a liability, and a 6pack can be enjoyed while we are at the trailhead.

Sure, your method sounds great, im not sure I understand why you need a friend to set pressure just to find out what "you" like, but if that helps with the confirmation bias, thats cool

Im not arguing against consistency, and honestly, im not trying to call people out on things, I am genuinely curious about these ideas.

I have spent quite a lot of time bracketing suspension both on mountain bikes and for moto/enduro, and i have never experienced someone so sensitive to 1 psi in tires in offroad applications. Its not a judgement on someones ability in any way, theres just too many variables at play, and conditions that change while trying to set baselines.
Consistency is good, comfort with adaptability is gooder.
I find im at my best on my bike when im open to changes, and ive had the most success with myself and others when they are open to changes. Being open to those changes, and working on adaptability typically makes us faster and more comfortable in our riding (youve heard of being coachable right)
  • 5 0
 @onawalk: Try riding a fat bike. With the massive tire volume, even 1/2 PSI makes a noticeable difference.
  • 6 3
 @nnowak: Are you threatening me Mike Levy
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: yes, the friend to set the pressure is to make it a blind test and virtually eliminate confirmation bias.

What are all the variables? Ride the same few well-known trails a bunch of times on the same day with the same suspension and the same everything else, changing only the tires... as long as the weather doesn't make a huge swing mid-test, that seems like a decent consistent test setup. Isn't that how you would bracket suspension? Why wouldn't bracketing tires be exactly the same?

I'm not saying I can't ride with 2 psi difference. It doesn't suddenly destroy the flow or enjoyment. I'm saying I prefer what I prefer, and can feel the difference and how the the tradeoffs affect my ride. Plus, keeping the bike consistent lets you push down the adaptability to assist with: blind riding new trails, getting close to or slightly over your limits, trying new shit and surviving.

No good coach is going to tell you to constantly change your equipment to somehow build adaptability. They're going to help you get comfortable with your equipment, utilizing the customizations available, and then challenge you to adapt with different actual riding/sporting situations. Artificially creating a non-ideal bike setup, like "go down this race course with not enough pressure in the front tire", is not really going to help anyone (unless they're just scared of trying to finish out a run after a mechanical, but that's a special case). Consistency is huge for peak performance.

Being open to changes is how I found the pressures I prefer. Otherwise I'd still be on 35 psi with tubes!
  • 2 0
 @onawalk: "Imagine how narrow your "feel" for enjoyment would be if you could determine a 1psi difference in tire pressure?"

Where is this "feeling for enjoyment" idea coming from? Are you trying to say that a person can't notice differences unless they're big enough eliminate enjoyment, big enough to ruin the experience?

That's like the thing me & TEAMROBOT had going about damper clicks: as you move some setting incrementally away from ideal, do you feel good, good, good, bad, worse, worst> or best, better, good, bad, bad, bad>. You seem to be in the former group, I tend to be in the latter group.

Again, a couple psi difference does not ruin a ride. I can adapt, I can still enjoy it. I just happen to know the set up that maximizes my enjoyment in the widest variety of situations, and lets me adapt to those situations, and most importantly _new_ situations, instead of adapting to my bike over and over again.
  • 1 1
 @justinfoil: We've strayed a bit from the original context,
I made the statement that I didnt think you could tell the difference between 19 and 20 psi, and 22-25, and until shown otherwise, i stand by that statement. Again its not a judgment of you or your ability, and I'm stoked to find out I'm wrong.

We've gotten into the weeds about bracketing, etc, as I realize I wandered there, but it was in an attempt to illustrate I have never experienced someone so sensitive to distinguish between 1 psi of tire pressure.

Hoping to be in the US PNW in January to do some riding in Bellingham, by all means take me up on my offer to spend the day sorting that out. I'll bring some beer regardless
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: it may be conditions dependent, but I believe it's obvious. I ride a lot loose over hardpak and with small knobed tires 20psi is fairly sticky. Get a pound or two lower the sidewall doesn't support the g's. Go over much and the front starts to slide-out a bit.
  • 3 1
 @flaflow: Ok,
I'll agree conditions can/do impact most everything.
I also ride a lot of loose over hard/rock, and I still stand by my assertion that 1psi isnt detectable (by myself, or others that ive had the opportunity to work with). Theres a possibility that what im stating is wrong, and thats cool, im stoked to discover that.

Hear me out though, is there the possibility, that more often than not, that we have our ego tied up in these ideas?
I think thats what elicits the visceral response in some people when those ideas are challenged, which further fascinates me honestly.

Now potentially every variable plays a large impact, from tire casing, sidewall, pressures, terrain, phase of the moon, what you had for breakfast, etc, but in my experience, more often than not, we use these as excuses.

If youre ever in my area, let me know, lets try it out, and have a beer over it.
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: 1 psi out of 20 psi is 5%. It's like changing by 15 psi in a 300 psi shock. You think no one can notice that? Is 4-5 psi in a fork an unnoticeable change?

And those are just the spring rate, doesn't even account for how a 5% change in tire pressure means much more since it effects both the vertical support keeping the rim off the ground _and_ the maintaining of the proper tire shape, especially laterally. It might be virtually impossible to notice 1 psi in parking lot, but it's really not that hard to notice in actual hard riding. Just dive into a favorite turn hard and feel the front squirm at least 5% more. Neglect to bring back a whip into a janky landing and feel the back tire roll over much more than 5% extra.

I think most people should be able to notice this, it's just that not many* have ever done the actual experimenting to be able to say they can notice it.

*(Outside the pros. Have you not seen Dialed? Riders feel/notice much smaller than 5% changes all the time.)
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: How would ego play into [blind] bracketing? You ride a bunch of options [potentially without knowing exactly what option you're on]. You note your feelings for each, then look at which options gave the best feelings, and then stick with those feelings-selected options despite what you thought was "best". You don't make the choice, the [blind] feelings made the choice for you. Pretty sure that's not ego.

Are you not having a visceral response to even _considering_ that some people are more sensitive than you thought possible? That sounds more like ego there.
  • 1 0
 @litany: It has a tank for seating tubeless. You pump it up to 240psi and release the little lever on the head.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: Theres a possibility you have yourself a little too wrapped up in this, my comments to @flaflow werent directed, or hinting to you at all, but i do see that it might have appeared otherwise.

I am open to the idea that I'm wrong, did i not mention that repeatedly, if i didnt...

Theres a possibility im completly wrong. It wont be the first time, wont be the last, and i welcome the opportunity as its how i grow and learn as a person.

I'm only basing my opinion on my experience, which I assume you are as well, however Im not trying to belittle your opinion or am I asserting that I'm "right", I am offering you the opportunity to prove me wrong, or experiment with anyone interested in giving it a go in the woods one day.

Honestly, theres not much need in getting upset in something that is so uterly pointless, but if thats your jam, thats cool. My opinion shouldnt bother you so much
Again, January in Bellingham if youd like to try some decent BC Hazy Pale Ale, or i might bring some winter beers, cause you know, tis the season really. I'll be sure to have another 6pack in the hopes that i'm dead wrong
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: sounds great.

@brianpark, this could be a fun test...
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: If I had to make a bet on who would pass your test I'd say:
2 out of 10 top DH pro's
3 out of 10 top XC pro's
0 out of 50 top Freeriders

I think you are on point about obsession over details hampering the fun.
Whenever I get a new component I do a handful of rides focusing on refining adjustments, once I find it I pretty much stick with that and try to keep within a close margin of those settings.
I kind of enjoy nerding out about adjustments and sussing out their effects.
  • 2 0
 @ripridesbikes: I didn't read it as "obsession over details hampering fun". It explicitly reads as "no one notices those details". No one is saying "just ride instead of tweaking things constantly", because constant tweaking is not really in this discussion. Some of us are saying "be precise in that initial setup and be consistent in maintaining the setup" (you seem to be on the same page there), while [one] others are saying "pfft, no one can feel that, just ballpark it".
  • 2 0
 @ripridesbikes: I have never had the opportunity to work with WC pros in this way, but think it would be an intense time, and I'm down for it.

one of the fastest athletes I've worked with was as fast on a certain timed section on both his long travel bike and his XC bike (obviously the section wasnt the gnarliest DH section, but it was way beyond what you or I or anyone would typically be riding on a trail bike)
It wasnt component, or setup or geo that was time limiting the sector, the biggest differentiate was something else, and he continued to work on that.

I think everyone gets hung up on details, and it holds us back sometimes. Sometimes in our fun, sometimes in all out performance. Sometimes it leads to great innovation as those people get right stuck in and challenge every little detail.

I enjoy working within the details as well, but I know myself enough to understand that its very difficult to distinguish and isolate some of the details that we are obsessing about.

If youre interested, come join us in Bellingham to engagge in some silly "broscience", drink some great Canadian craft beer (it is the best in the world) and if theres enough interest, we can do some suspension bracketing/testing. Keep in mind, youre required to make some wild statements about the outcomes, and wager a 6 pack of what I can only imagine is going to be watery puddle water with a fanciful label on it...
  • 4 0
 MTB tires are typically running less than 40 psi. Huge fail putting a 260 psi gauge on a pump designed for MTB, impossible to accurately measure tire pressure with the pump
  • 1 0
 Yeah, it could have two guages. That being said, Milton 0-30 PSI guages are about $15, ANSI certified, and IMO, hella good looking.
  • 3 1
 The best short term "lock" I have found if you can keep your eye on your bike is to remove your front axle and take it with you into the store, or undo the QR. If a thief wants to take the bike, the wheel will seperate, and even if the thief runs with the wheel, you'll be faster.
I also carry a toe strap to strap the bike to a bike rack, or a zap strap I can cut off with my leatherman.
  • 5 0
 Wolftooth has re-released a Crank Brothers dropper remote from 16 years ago.
  • 1 0
 At least they charge more. lol
  • 7 5
 $69 is like saying "Happy-69" to a bike thief on any given day when you park and lock your bike outside of 7-11. Might take you forever to cut through with scissors. A bike thief can cut through that POS in like seconds!
  • 7 1
 I have a couple of those locks and they are really only good for deterring grab and go type thefts. As long as you're using them in the right context they're a pretty neat little product. I would never use it to lock up a bike that is going to be out of sight or in a sketchy part of town though.
  • 4 0
 I've gone back and forth on those zips ever since I first saw them, portability has got to be unmatched, but security is comically low. Then again, for coffee/beer run bike that's going to be sitting in line of sight next to the patio of your preferred destination it would certainly deter many opportunist thieves the same as a cable lock. Having cut many cable locks with forgotten combos and seized rollers, I'm very curious if these would put up more fight against a pair of 7" diagonal cutters. Perhaps they're just a more realistic reminder that anything less than a pair of ulocks isn't going to actually do much to stop someone that really wants it.

I am also curious how many of these 69 dollar zips have the combo set to 420 and 666
  • 4 2
 A cordless angle grinder with the right wheel will cut through pretty much ANY lock in just a few seconds. Any lock will deter the casual thief who would just ride off with an unlocked bike, but no lock will stop the serious thief. The type of lock you use is less important than what it is you are locking up and where you are locking it up. The best way to deter theft would be a bike that thieves would be uninterested in stealing.
  • 1 0
 @pockets-the-coyote: one of mine got frayed at the end after a few years of use so I took the opportunity to test its security with some diagonal cutters from Klein. Took two snips and about 10 seconds.
  • 2 0
 I've literally cut those style of locks off with scissors and side cutters. You can get small locks that work in the same fast method that are harder to cut. Yes, any lock can be defeated with an angle grinder, but you're kidding yourself if you feel that's a solid defense for using a lock that can literally be cut with scissors from dollarama.
  • 3 0
 I use variations of these locks from hiplock (much cheaper). Yes, you can break them (or even just unlock them) super easily.

But I love them and get great use out of them. Never use them in place you go to regularly and always with the bike in sight or out of sight for only a minute or two.

Trips to the shop, beach, bakery all good! Especially for stops during real rides, they fit in your pocket, so perfect for lunch rides where you stop to pickup a sandwich.
  • 2 0
 @ARonBurgundy: That's fairly equal to punching in the combo, what floored me cutting my first cable lock was how fast it was, using the same snips shown in the lock picking lawyer videos. @CSharp I've seen so many of his videos yet there's always another, or in this case two, that I've managed to miss, good share.

@nnowak "but no lock will stop the serious thief" you mean to say that if I *don't* lock my bike than it will be clearly too cheap to be worth stealing? /s
  • 2 0
 Sorry for double post: also very practical to have one in a backpack as a substitute for a padlock for e.g. in lockers of gyms/pools etc.

Last use case is in the riding bag, I sometimes stash the bag on hot days and do a few loops before picking my bag back up, this allows a touch more peace of mind, by locking the bag to a tree.
  • 3 0
 With how much my bike is worth, and how small they fold up, an Abus riveted lock seems vastly more appropriate.
  • 4 1
 Hear me out,
as pointed out in the video, theyre really just a "peace of mind while I nip into the 7-11" kinda deal.
Or, when youre at the bike park, and youre having lunch, and you can see your bike, but youd never get to it in time if someone grabbed it. and with so many other options lying around, youd prolly be okay. Thats all its for, and it means I'm not hauling around a heavy u-lock or chain.
See I dont live in a high crime area, dont frequent high crime areas, but every once in a while I ride close to downtown, which is full of breweries, so I like to stop for a pint after my ride. Like lots of areas theres a significant homeless population that would love to relieve me of my ride. A lock like this helps ensure they steal a likely less valuable ride, and pass mine over.
  • 2 0
 It's funny a few times when my friend and I were at a park and at a gas station. He went to take a pit stop. So, I stuck around to make sure both our bikes are still around. I just hung out a short distance to keep an eye out. Sure enough, this guy comes around and started checking out our bikes! I kind of sat back and observed a bit longer. The guy approached the bikes and didn't notice me until I said "Hi there - nice bikes, eh? That's a brand new Trek you're looking at." Freaked the guy out and he kind of said he was just checking out the new Trek model and left. LOL. Happened twice. The second time, another guy noticed me and walked away. Both bikes have the Yakima locks on them. You don't even need to use cutters to get to the bikes with those locks. I usually double or even triple lock with the heavy thick gage chain with the kevlar sheath. However, if I need to hang out with my friends after a ride in a pub/restaurant, I will seat myself so that the bike is always visible. If I can't see my bike, I will put it inside the trunk of my car and cover up everything with tarp or lock it up in a place where the bike is visible at all times. Bikes get stolen so quickly in major cities in Alberta it's not funny! I've seen a few of my colleagues' bike get stolen - from $10K road bike to a cheaper Giant hardtail. The $10K road bike was locked on a sign post for less than a minute. The colleague comes out of his office after a minute just to get something from his desk. Bike was long gone when he got out the door! The Giant hardtail was a funny one. My colleague locked up his bike where I usually put my bike. So, I just locked up my bike on another rack with the u-lock just on my frame and front wheel. When I went to get my rusty old bike, I noticed my colleague's front and rear wheels were gone. I texted him after work to see if he had taken them home. Low and behold, he said that his wheels were stolen off his bike even before he got off work! Next day, we're still chatting about his bike and decided to go down to check it out. When we got to the bike lot, the whole bike, without wheels, disappeared! You can see the Kryptonite U-lock on the ground! This was behind a gated fence as well. The security cameras did capture the culprit using a cordless angle grinder in broad daylight. This was shown to the police but they said they couldn't do anything about it even when they knew who the suspect was. Moral of the story: lock up a shitty looking bike anywhere and it won't be stolen Wink I had the KHS label taken off and the bike had tons of dings on it from other work people parking their bikes next to mine and don't care if scratches up other people's beloved bikes. I also let my frame and wheels rust a bit so the bike looks like a POS beater. Meh, it served its purpose and I still have my bike. It still rides fast to work!
  • 1 0
 @nnowak: I actually had this happen in college. A shitty old rock hopper with flat tires and shit brakes. They cut my lock and decided to leave the bike... Then I figured it had passed the "too shitty to steal test" so I fixed it up... But I was down a lock and it got stolen a few weeks later. They just wanted me to fix it before they stole it.
  • 1 0
 Just buy a lezeyne pump and never think about it again , if you really want the tubeless rush then buy a canister with. The integrated charger pumps are all kinda cumbersome to use if you're not using it for only seating tyres
  • 26 0
 Or be like a sane person and buy an air compressor.
  • 14 0
 @kroozctrl: Once Lezeyne makes an air compressor that costs $800, is gold plated and has a sexy twist on valve that removes my valve core 77% of the time.... I consider buying one.
  • 2 1
 @kroozctrl: lugging my compressor to the trail head gets inconvenient every now and then
  • 2 0
 @kroozctrl: This, right here.

If you're even the least bit handy, and have the space, an air-compressor is indispensable, and useful for so much more than just mounting MTB tires.

Even if you live in a small space you can get one of those little pancake ones for not too much money.
  • 7 0
 @BaGearA: seating tires at the trailhead seems pretty inconvenient.
  • 2 0
 Air pigs are really useful, if you have the space.
  • 2 1
 @RonSauce: exactly

Which is why i do that shit at home with a compressor and have my track pump in the car that makes topups or adjustments easy ?

I said Lezeyne cause mine has lasted forever , most spez p[umps would probably also but the Pro/park , topeak ones always seem to have just enough plastic so it will eventually die
  • 1 0
 Haven't had trouble seating tires with a Topeak Dualie. Never used one of these with a pressure tank. They may be the best solution for some combinations but if a large volume pump (like said Dualie) with an accurate gauge does the trick, it is probably the quickest solution. Thing is, I suppose those pressure canisters require a high pressure (so not high volume) pump so that's great for charging the canister but will be slower if you're just pumping straight into the tire.
  • 2 0
 @BaGearA: check out the fumpa. It is the Gucci-est piece I own and it’s absolutely wonderful.
  • 1 0
 @gotohe11carolina: I've seen these but always been very skeptical of how they work.

Does it work for adjustments or can you actually fill a flat wheel ? Not necessarily seat but how long would it take to get a 2.6 29er to 26psi for instance?
  • 1 0
 @kroozctrl: for half the price
  • 2 0
 @BaGearA: Pretty much every major cordless tool manufacturer makes a compressor that works with their battery platform. I am using one that takes up less space than my helmet and it is small enough to just leave in my vehicle during the riding season.
  • 1 0
 @BaGearA: it won’t seat a bead but will fill both my tires from flat and has enough battery to fill another. Has a gauge that will fill to whole numbers and is consistent enough I’ve ditched my gauge.
  • 1 0
 @BaGearA: I don’t usually get down to flat but it’s very quick and much faster than my ryobi hand compressor that I use for car tires.
  • 1 0
 @deez-nucks: So...I'll get a Milwaukee Cordless compressor, $379.99 + $99.99 battery + industrial quick disconnect hardware ($30 on Mcmaster) + $9.99 primer + 9.99 gold spray paint. Hit up Stkrd to make me a custom Lezeyne decal. mark it up 100% and sell it to you for $1200. For an extra $1000, I'll make sure it explodes with the finest glitter and fart spray every time you turn it on.
  • 3 0
 Two turning, two burning, two smoking, two choking and two more unaccounted for.
  • 1 0
 The Pro Team Floor Pump looks very similar to the £35 Lifeline one I bought from CRC about 5 years back. Even down to the gauge being 3 to 6 psi out every time I check my pressure with a Topeak Smartgauge.
  • 2 0
 $80CAD to ship a set of those Freedom Coast levers to BC? I'll have what they're smoking. Less than half that to have the Oak Components levers shipped here from Germany.
  • 2 0
 $25 CAD to ship to Calgary. I think you already smoked something?
  • 1 0
 @DizzyNinja: nah, seems like shipping to a metro area or close by is $25 and anything beyond that is $80. Vancouver or Squamish is $25 too. Whistler is $80.
  • 3 0
 Does anyone wear matching sets of trousers and jersey other than racers? Maybe we need a mtb fashion poll...
  • 2 0
 I do. But only as long as it's all black everything...
  • 1 0
 I don't but I see lots of strava people all decked out in matching spandex everywhere on trails.
  • 2 0
 I match the colour of jersey and trousers to my helmet, gloves and googles. That's about it though.
  • 1 0
 Everything I wear is mud coloured.
  • 1 0
 The Topeak Joe Blow Ace blows the Shimano pump out of the water. I pump car tires (done it for 18" tires) with the Joe Blow Ace if there's no compressor around. Also, the Shimano pump looks like the one that Blackburn makes.
  • 1 0
 Every DHR EVO owner needs to pick up a pair of the Freedomcoast levers. I was a bit skeptical at first of spending the extra money, but they are worth EVERY penny and then some!
  • 1 0
 Fancy after market brake levers are my bag baby. You spend so much time staring at them and I personally love brakes. I find myself reaching for them on every occasion.
  • 1 0
 reaching for the brakes? wise guy
  • 1 0
 I had a KS lever like that Wolftooth years ago and it slowly unwound the cable over time causing a lot of friction. I wonder if this has some preventative measure?
  • 2 0
 $60 well spent for that remote
  • 2 0
 That WolfTooth Remote looks gorgeous!
  • 2 1
 Its a newer, better version of the old Maverick Speedball from way back when
  • 1 0
 Yeah, might have to pick one up
  • 3 0
 New TRP adjuster?
  • 1 3
 I don't think the Wolf Tooth remote would look good on every bike, feels a little steampunk and would be best on a titanium or steel bike. Anybody who puts that on a carbon frame deserves to have it punch a hole in the top tube.
  • 2 0
 If they sell well you can be sure colors are coming.
  • 1 0
 B-36 "Peacemaker".
That's like calling the male appendage a "Virgin Maker."
  • 1 0
 The Freedom Coast levers are awesome! They fit my hand much better than the stock TRP levers.
  • 1 0
 re: the lock, that aramid alone is enough to dull any blade not made by elves.
  • 1 0
 Bosch handheld compressor and Airtank. Can inflate anything. I am never pumping anything by hand ever again.
  • 2 0
 You're funny and likeable, Dario.
  • 1 0
 Love seeing the Revolution Bike sticker on the pump.
  • 1 0
 dual camo pants will go well with my iron maiden goggles
  • 2 0
 Randy approves this message.
  • 1 0
 Camo FTW! I keep looking at that enve camo jersey but haven’t bought it.
  • 1 0
 Weird Sci-Fi and B-36's...I'm in!
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