First Ride: Michelin's Aggressive New Wild Enduro Tires

Apr 17, 2024 at 22:17
by Dario DiGiulio  
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Michelin is breathing new life into their mountain bike tire lineup with a whole host of releases today, including revamped tires in their downhill, enduro, and eMTB families. The focus here is on the new Wild Enduro tires, which come in a few different patterns to suit terrain and conditions. Those new patterns are significantly more open and aggressive looking than the outgoing models, particularly the MS variant that I've been testing.

In addition to the Wild Enduro MS, there is a Wild Enduro MH, and a Wild Enduro Rear. MS is geared towards soft conditions, MH towards hard, and the Rear is one you can probably guess.

Wild Enduro MS Details

Wheel Sizes: 29" or 27.5"
Width: 2.4"
Casings: 2 x 55tpi
Compound: Magi-X Extra Grip
Claimed Weight: 1290g (front), 1200g (rear)
Actual Weight: 1233g (front), 1173g (rear)
Price: $99.99
More info: michelinman.com

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Those indicators on the right might not differentiate things at all, but at least you get a sense of the conditions on the left.

Michelin is still using their Magi-X compound, which is very gummy and slow to rebound. The carcass of the tire comprises of two 55 tpi layers, an under-tread shield, and a full bead-to-bead shield for puncture protection.

Installation was fairly standard on the Wild Enduros, though the bead was quite tight compared to something like a Maxxis DoubleDown tire. Not painfully tight, but you'll need a lever to get things mounted up. Once aired up, the tires have held pressure very well, with no sealant weeping or significant air loss.

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27.5" Wild Enduro MS.
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29" Wild Enduro MS.
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Mounted profile on a 30mm internal rim.

The tread pattern on the Wild Enduro MS is a 3-2-2-3 set of blocks, with prominent edge lugs and significant spacing between rows. The pattern is a little reminiscent of the Continental Kryptotal Fr, but with that additional 2-pack of lugs.

Weights are good for tires in this category, and are significantly lower than the outgoing Wild Enduros, which Matt Beer measured at 1459 and 1350 grams apiece. The casing construction is the biggest delta between the two, with the outgoing simply containing more layers and therefore more weight.

If the Michelin blue and yellow look isn't for you, you're in luck. Michelin is also releasing the full lineup in a grey and black colorway for a more low key look.

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Noticeable wear after a few rather long rides.

Ride Impressions

I've been riding the Wild Enduro MS front and rear on my Frameworks, over a fairly pleasant but occasionally very wet Northwest spring. This is a mixed-wheel bike, and my experience is limited solely to the MS variant, but so far I've managed to catch a few long rides all over the conditions spectrum, from freezing and wet to hot and hardpacked.

Somewhere between those two extremes lies the perfect dirt realm, where no tire can go wrong, but where the Wild Enduro zealously digs in. This is a very pronounced and aggressive tire, with huge lugs and ample space between them. Mechanical grip feels similar to that on a short spike like a Specialized Hillbilly or Maxxis Shorty, but with the added 3-knob rows to increase the knob surface area even more. The tires clear nicely, and feel very confident in soft soil.

The very soft and gummy Magi-X compound has a nice damped feel to it, with slow rebound and sticky nature - so long as the temperature doesn't get too low. Even in their own marketing copy, Michelin cites low temperature performance as "down to 37.4°F (3°C)." Before seeing that figure, I took the Wild Enduro right around that point, and found the tires got quite skittish on wet rock and roots, belying their otherwise soft feel. When temps heat up, the Wild Enduros perform much better on slippery surfaces, holding traction in slow creeping sections nicely and deflecting a typical amount in high speed root sections.

For how well they dig into loose soil, they also feel quite slow rolling. This could be the pattern and the compound in equal measure, but regardless it leads to a stickier and more casually-paced climbing experience. I've taken them on a few significant pedal days, but the bias is absolutely towards descending grip.

The last point to touch on here is the wear rate, which seems to be rather fast - more than even a Maxxis MaxxGrip tire. I don't have a tremendous amount of riding on the tires yet, and the rear's rubber is already fading away. The wear rate seems to be pretty even, but we'll see how they fare as the miles stack up.

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Stay tuned for a full review down the line.

Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
194 articles

86 Comments
  • 79 0
 "Somewhere between those two extremes lies the perfect dirt realm, where no tire can go wrong..."

Mike Bear tire has entered the chat.
  • 32 0
 Tire weights less than claimed? Maxxis take notice.
  • 63 0
 Wear rate worse than a Maxxgrip? How is this even possible...
  • 5 1
 @dresendsit: are they grippier? (is the wear rate worth it for racing?)
  • 5 0
 @dresendsit: Not sure id make it home with any rubber left on my 5km pavement rip.
  • 26 1
 Maxxis is only interested in making tire widths less than claimed.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: only maxxis?
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: their XC tires like the aspen, reckon race and rekon are pretty spot on to claimed width. But once even their “Downcountry” forkaster gets the undersized trail tire treatment
  • 3 0
 @xciscool: My 27.5 Rekon 2.4 measures close to 2.2. Whereas my 29er Rekon 2.4 measures close to 2.4. Maxxis is all over the place with its sizing.
  • 3 0
 @dresendsit: Schwalbe did it for years when cornering knobs were ripping off. Riding on any hard pack and the knobs looked like they were melting off too.
  • 2 0
 @warmerdamj: they may be undersized, but at least they're overweight.
  • 1 0
 @dresendsit: came here to say the same. I hadn't used a Maxxis for years due to other better and cheaper options. New bike came with a 2.4 (measures about .15 smaller than most other 2.4) Assegai maxxgrip on the front. It's o.k on dryer dirt, but not the best in mud. Worst thing- it was noticably worn after 2 rides! 30 mikes in and it's visibly worn! On a front tyre! I now have 170 miles on an Argotal front, still no visible wear and better grip in the mud.
  • 1 0
 @thebabbizarm: Currently have an EXO+ Maxxgrip Assegai on the front and at 800km it shows reasonable wear but still works fine. Some worn sideknobs but no big undercuts. Lightweight rider, no shuttle days but very dry and rocky terrain.
  • 2 0
 @somebody-else: luckily the new ones lasts forever
  • 2 2
 @thebabbizarm: it’s because it’s new. A new tyre is always going to blow up narrower than claimed especially if you’re running low pressures. Honestly I thought that everyone knew rubber stretches but obviously not. Try measuring your tyres at max psi or just after you’ve ridden them around for bit and the rubber has had chance to bed in.
  • 1 0
 @nicoenduro: that’s good to know, I’m not getting great life out of my Kryptotal dh ss set.
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: weird... kryptotals (DH casing/super soft) for me have been much more durable than any maxxgrip tire and even maxxterra. Less sticky than Maxxis's best offerings to be sure, but I've had a set on for >6 months and all knobs are still intact with little undercut. I've seen more wear on a maxxgrip tire in less than 2 weeks.
  • 1 0
 @sspiff: I’m getting more time than on Maxxis dh maxxgrip for sure, but the same undercutting and even a few partially torn cornering knobs in the rear.
  • 2 0
 @somebody-else: yeah the conti don't last long, xynotal vs hans dampf i got half rides on the conti to have a decent thread left
  • 1 0
 @somebody-else: I thought the super soft Kryptotal RE was solid in the rear. Lasted a good bit longer than maxxis maxx terra. My bro had a soft compound Kryptotal in the rear and it lasted the whole season with minimal wear. Imo they should get rid of the soft and add an even softer compound.
  • 2 0
 @somebody-else: Literally what gave me the idea to start Versus after 7 knobs disappeared the first day riding a park with a new $100 tire.
  • 1 0
 @VersusTires: any news on the new enduro casing yet?
  • 15 3
 Good to see them out in the wild.
  • 5 1
 However their soft rubber doesn't Enduro very long, according to Dario
  • 7 1
 Dario! (sorry, couldn't seem to get the @mention to work for you :/)

Fellow PNW rider here, sometimes riding the same areas as you. How does the new wild enduro casing and rubber compound compare with the Continental DH casing/SuperSoft rubber compound?

I have been REALLY liking the Continental DH/SS stuff, as it seems to be less affected in the winter time temps than many other tires, and the tracking across wet rocks/roots seems better. I also find the DH casing to be surprisingly supple/damped, and enjoying that far more than I thought I would on a bike that I pedal everywhere (a 40lb Banshee Titan :O).
  • 6 0
 Nice to read comments about the tire performance in the cold temperatures. It's a really important feature here in Finland! Many compounds are great at the summer time but become hard and slippery in colder fall and winter temperatures. When there is snow and ice you can use spike-tires but on the wet and cold roots you need "summer" tires that remains soft and grippy.
  • 4 0
 The Conti stuff is pretty good in the cold. All rubber gets harder in cold weather but Contis stay comparatively grippy.
  • 4 0
 RIP old tread pattern, will miss your shorty-like performance in the wet and assegaish performance in the dry.

Wonder if the redesign is more of a cost optimization issue (matrix shall look the same as for DH22) than about performance gains...
  • 1 0
 The Goodyear enduro tires are remarkably similar to the old Wild Enduros I think?
  • 8 0
 These will be my future tires because of the sick sidewall logo design.
  • 4 6
 I assume you are being sarcastic. The blue+yellow would clash with my bike, and is the only reason I have not ordered these. Why can't we have black on black like car tires?
  • 8 0
 @collapsedlung: Not being sarcastic haha. I think they would look awesome on my battleship Stevo. They remind me of their race rally tires.
  • 10 0
 @collapsedlung: A black permanent marker solves the problem in a couple of minutes. Same ritual for Maxxis yellow logos personally + DT EX471 without stickers = beautiful minimalist wheels Wink
  • 2 0
 @Hectorres2001: I quite like those logos on my black out Enduro to add some color. New grey logos are hard to see. Got all the DT stickers remove,even those on the hubs, only sticker in my bike is the one on the shock. Even my forks are all black no stickers hehehehe.
  • 1 0
 @danstonQ: no need for a permanent marker. They offer these tyres with dark logos too.
  • 6 1
 I find Michelin's naming scheme confounding. Suppose that's true for most manufacturers at this point. WTB and Spesh do the best job at making things fairly easy to decipher.
  • 2 0
 So true. I for one swore off Maxxis since I can't get more than 3 months out of any of them before they go to shit. But I continued to ride them for about 2 years because I couldn't be troubled to learn the language of another manufacturer.
  • 2 0
 @Stoaks: Run Dual compound in the rear only, especially if using an Aggressor...it will last a long time and is a great tire; anything else will prematurely wear with that particular tire. Front tires with 3C MaxTerra will last quite awhile in my experience. MaxGrip is really sweet but unless you use it as a race tire or ride a lot of slabs or rocky- wet terrain its gonna be good but expect to replace them every 1 - 3 months depending how much you ride and every 3 weeks if your racing them.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: I appreciate the tip. I somehow destroy MaxxTerra Assegai and DHF fronts in a couple months.
  • 7 0
 Is no one else going to be the pendant? Oh fine... I'll do it. I think that's a 3-2-2...
  • 3 0
 Those new tires looks very very good. To me Michelin makes the best rubber compound, love the DH22, the grip is just amazing. But old Michelin tires had a weird carcass feeling, on the hard side and of course the weight a ton. Have seen them since 2 years ago while there were in development,winning a ton of races. I think Michelin could be one on the top now. We need a Maxxis Assegai,Continental Kriptotal fr,Michelin Wild enduro MS and Schwable Magic Mary comparative.
  • 2 0
 Add the Continental Argotal in there too. IME, it actually compares really well to the MM.
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: I think those tires I mentioned are true do it all tires,make to be and all round good tire but not super good at 1 specific terrain. Maybe the M.Mary is the less do it all of the group,but I mention It cos many riders love them and ride those all year round in any terrain.
I would make only a front tire comparative with the same rear tire,then a full test of front and rear same brand. I would add the Specialized Cannibal too,it looks great and I think it can compete in the do it all tire segment better than the Butcher,same thing for the Argotal.
There are more brands in the game with very good tires,so they could add more to the test.
To my taste the Assegai DD/DH for enduro and the Michelin DH 22 for pure DH/bikepark are a no question ask choice,100% you would have a good tire no matter the trail. For the rear tire I have been ridding the Butcher for 4 years mostly the DH T9 version.
  • 1 0
 I think Loam Wolf had a video up a few weeks back on the new Michelin Tyre line up and had a pretty glowing review. (At least I'm 75% sure it was LW! Any matter, there is a review up on YT that covers a lot of Maxxis v Mich talk)
  • 5 0
 He gets paid by Michelin to say that. It’s an advertisement.
  • 1 0
 Been really happy with these tires in finnish mud/soft weather and waiting to temperature to rise up and dry little so I can put that rear specific tire on and see how it rolls compared to MS. Dont notice any wear on mine yet after about two weeks of riding.
  • 1 0
 I have a set of the prior generation Wild Enduro Race line tires. I love the grip, but they are so heavy and slow I only really use them on shuttle/park days. They use the DH casing and rubber compounds. I'm interested in how these new ones compare.

Also, their trail tires, the wild/force Am2 combo is absolutely fantastic. So much grip but carries speed really well. My favorite setup for most riding.
  • 4 0
 But is it better than a DHR?
  • 2 0
 I'm just glad to see the mainstream maxxis get outdone as far as looks, (and possibly performance) by brands like versus, michelin, continental and more!!
  • 1 0
 I've cut the side walls and ripped the knobs of all the michelin rear tyres I have had, they are great for a few rides then they are not. Never had trouble with Maxxis, schb or vic on the rear.
  • 1 0
 Really liked the old Wild Enduros in the summer, but the low temp performance was so bad that they wont be getting another try.
  • 3 0
 Today has to be a World Tire Day or some sort.
  • 5 2
 Yes they are good, but are they better than Assegai/DHR2 combo?
  • 14 2
 Might be time for you to try Continental Kryprotal
  • 1 0
 @souknaysh: Yeah I have, my friend runs those they are great! They only go up to 2.4in for the front though so I am going to stick with the Assegai thanks.
  • 2 0
 @souknaysh: made the switch after 3 years of Assegai/DHR2. Couldn’t be happier with t he Kryptotals. Only complaint is the different damping characteristic of the Contis. Prefer the Maxxis DD feel, other than that, the Contis are sublime!
  • 2 0
 @RadJekyll: if you ride soft/loose terrain I would suggest Argotal 2.6''.
  • 1 0
 @souknaysh: the Argo is my winter cheater tyre, though for some reason I've barely used it this year. Very happy with the Krypto rear - I just like if forget it's there. Finally starting to round off, but wear has been good (for mainly natural self-propelled riding rather than park etc)
  • 1 1
 I have a Michelin Wild Enduro on the back because it was on sale ... It seems fine, but nothing outstanding pro or con. It seems to be wearing a bit quicker than previous Hans Dampf
  • 2 0
 having had both, the wild enduro reminded me the old hans dampf, losing knobs here and there, ripped completely, the new hans dampf is killer
  • 2 0
 @nicoenduro: I'd buy more Schwalbe tires, but they're not readily available at my shops in Greater Vancouver. It's Maxxis, and more Maxxis, with a few other brands.
  • 3 1
 I think I see a Fast Suspension shock on that bike.
  • 1 0
 Fenix ...
  • 1 0
 The rear specific one has a worse wear rating than the Mud Enduro? I got the latter and the wear is super high as expected.
  • 2 0
 Aren't these just DH22s with a lighter casing?
  • 9 7
 Bike tires costing as much as car tires. What a great time to be alive.
  • 11 4
 A Michelin Pilot Sport Cup 2 is around $300 a tire, but please keep comparing your cheap all season car tires to high performance MTB tires if you the bike industry doesn’t give you enough to legitimately complain about.
  • 6 7
 @xciscool: Oh you mean the Sport Cup 2 tires that are found on sports cars and have a lot more depending on them than a bike tire? What a great example. There's no reason bike components or even bikes should be priced so high. Hence the reason the bike industry is crashing.
  • 5 0
 @Bkaram: it's your life/limb in both cases isn't it?
  • 1 0
 Didn't love mine. Just got some Onz
  • 4 3
 Looks like a magic mary knock off, not that would be bad.
  • 1 0
 MM 3-2-2-2-3 Mich 3-2-2-3
  • 1 0
 previous gen are 44% off at my local MEC... are they worth 70 CAD ?
  • 3 1
 Yes can confirm
  • 5 0
 I work for Michelin, nothing to do with MTB tires, and have a discount. I bought two of Last season's Enduros from MEC because their price is better. I've avoided the Magi X because they don't rebound in cooler temeratures. I've stuck with the Gum X. Where I ride there is lots of granite and a rear Enduro would easily get through a season, front would get me through two. I have never had a sidewall go, at 200 pounds fully kitted out. I thought I might try the Contis but the price for a set jumped with their popularity. Maxxis are ridiculously expensive here, why would I buy one tire that may wear slightly slower when I can get two for the same price?
I have never lost a lug, the sidewalls are strong enough that I've never had a slash and don't use inserts.
I don't know where you are riding but at the price I bought them for they are well worth a try.
  • 1 0
 I bought a set and they are great ! I would get another set as spare if they were not sold out at my local MEC
  • 1 0
 @Vincent66: you can get it online with delivery to home, free shipping over 50 CAD Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @Wayners: thx man, I will take another look
  • 1 0
 @valrock: Thanks, but they seem to be sold out when I go on the website.

But, that website doesn't always show "mtb tyres" when you type "mtb tyres" in the search box ...
  • 1 0
 @Vincent66: They were not showing up on the website when I first checked. MEC had them when I went to the store. Might be different at your branch but it's worth calling them up to make sure before you make the trip.
  • 1 0
 Magic Michelin Wild Kryptogai
  • 3 3
 This is super cool looking Maxxis Assegai! I mean...
  • 1 1
 those are Steller!!







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