Guerrilla Gravity Appears to Have Closed Up Shop

Oct 3, 2023 at 12:19
by Dario DiGiulio  
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Questions about Guerrilla Gravity’s future started circulating back in July, when Yoann Barelli shared an Instagram post reminiscing fondly about his time representing the Colorado brand for the last 2.5 years. The split seemed odd considering the mid-year timing plus the clearly affectionate relationship that stayed in place.

What seems to be happening is that Guerrilla Gravity is shutting down, probably unexpectedly. A source with knowledge of Guerrilla Gravity who would like to stay anonymous told Pinkbike that the angel investor(s) who had been supporting the brand previously decided to pull out and shut the company down. September 1 seems to have been Guerrilla Gravity’s last day.

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I really liked this bike, and was looking forward to seeing more come from the brand.

As to what exactly happened, we really don't have much besides a vague understanding here. A few of us have reached out to various parties at GG, but no comment seems to be the comment of the day. From what we've gathered, the primary funding source behind the brand has been lost, and as a result production had to cease.

It seems as though Revved Industries - Guerrilla Gravity's parent company - is still operational, so it's possible that we'll still see something come of the novel carbon fiber manufacturing process that they've pioneered. It was a promising concept, with solid social and environmental gains made over traditional carbon manufacturing techniques. That said, money talks and it's possible that bike manufacturing just wasn't the ticket to success.

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Employees on social media do seem to be confirming the company’s end. Plus, the brand’s marketing manager – who would probably be the person in charge of creating a public statement – seems to have departed around the same time as Barelli, so that might be our easiest explanation for the radio silence. There also hasn't been any activity on the company's Instagram page for over six weeks.

GG's CTO announced his departure from the company via a LinkedIn post, with some earnest memories about the early days and benchmarks of the 10+ years of operation. I'm hoping all the talented folks who spent time at the company can find a place that feels like home in the industry, as we will all benefit from more creative energy in the bike world.

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Reception to this news has been mixed so far, especially without a clear sense of how exactly things are going to wrap up. Riders are sad to see the brand go. Frustration is directed at both the former investors and at the brand itself: now many riders will be stuck without ongoing support from the brand they bought serious goods from.

Regardless of what exactly the future holds, it seems safe to say we won’t see Guerrilla Gravity carry on in the same ways as before, and losing a unique brand that was happy to forge their own path is a loss for the industry.

Condolences from us here at Pinkbike, we'll be watching curiously to see what happens with Revved in the future for carbon manufacturing. As for product support, order fulfillment, and spare parts for the many Guerrilla Gravity owners out there, we'll just have to stay tuned and see how things shake out.




Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
147 articles

412 Comments
  • 913 3
 Former GG/Revved Employee here. Most of this information is true with a couple minor errors. Revved and GG were basically one company all along. Both were under one roof and employees all worked together on a day to day basis. Revved was created to allow us to make parts for other OEMs. Both companies were officially done as of last Friday (9/29). The companies are for sale. Go buy them if you have the money. All employees saw that the end was near. There were four rounds of layoffs that began in February. The company was a blast to work at and I would never trade that experience. We had our growing pains, but we made the best of it. I love my GG bikes, the community, and the experience I gained from my time with them. Go hire an ex GG/Revved employee and I’m sure you won’t be disappointed. Ride your bike and pour one out for a cool company that had great potential.
  • 445 0
 As another former employee, I want to echo this exact sentiment. I am so grateful for this opportunity!! I wouldn't hesitate to do it all over, even though the end was an emotional rollercoaster, lol
  • 63 0
 Thank you for taking the adventure fellas. I was really proud to see a new brand take risks and be true to the culture.
  • 19 3
 @Eazybeeezy: sorry to hear things haven’t worked out there for you guys.

Did either of you guys work 80+hr weeks as is being suggested by @wyorider
  • 180 2
 @justanotherusername: There were definitely weeks earlier on where I worked five 12 hour days. It wasn’t because I had a manager telling me to hit my deadlines. It was because I was passionate about my work and excited to be apart of such a cool project. I have no hard feelings about the long nights and weekends that I gave to the company.
  • 12 1
 @lffopii: I hope the 12 hours included a lunch ride Smile
  • 43 5
 GG/Revved + WeAreOneComposites north american super team?
  • 20 14
 Working for a manufacturing startup in an engineering role and they like to spin 60 hour weeks as “4 on 2 off, 12 hour shifts”. Typical management BS to spin a shitty situation and overwork salaried skeleton crews.
  • 58 85
flag nickfranko (Oct 3, 2023 at 17:11) (Below Threshold)
 @lffopii: I hope you got paid for 60 hours, because otherwise you’re the perfect employee and Elon’s wet dream employee.
  • 6 0
 Thanks for the info and best wishes to all the employees. I for one hope they get bought by a solid parent company. In my opinion, GG bikes were in a way similar to the last Iron Horse bikes with DW Link, unique design looks and burly construction.
  • 65 0
 Love working at Revved/GG!!! Loved it so much I went back after they had laid me off once. Awesome Coworkers that worked their Ass off each and every day!!
We tried our best each and every day to make sure we kept the companies afloat. But, in the end, they decided to pull the plug. Made many great friends and memories as well. GG!!!!
  • 6 0
 How/where are the companies for sale?
  • 7 72
flag KK11 (Oct 3, 2023 at 20:48) (Below Threshold)
 Good riddance. Will ran it into the ground, lol.
  • 31 3
 It would be cool to find someone to bring it all back together with greater potential. Those bikes were sik and had me Revved up to buy one! As they continued to evolve into beautiful bikes, with really cool geometry and the ability to adjust said geometry, which is a huge leap forward ,especially for a small brand, plus they offered Mullet bikes before other companies that wouldn't adhere to the mixed format.

I also believed that if other manufactures such as Evil, Transition and whoever else would partner with the Revved frame manufacturing for their brand... pouring money into a larger production facility, it would have enabled them to bring frame building back to US soil and ditch traditional carbon and the ridiculous footprint of world wide shipping and exporting of a friggin bike frame. If this unity was sought after from other brands and implemented, the Company and others would have profited exponentially, while still keeping cost of bikes lower than the insane current market. A conglomeration of companies merging together with funding for a manufacturing facility would benefit greatly all parties and consumers alike. The way i see it, that is the future and its foolish to not become one, together in the quest for profit and cost efficiency, with rapid turn around times and production having high quality control standards. A union of sorts that maintains their own brand under the same umbrella. Wouldn't that be a cool concept?
  • 11 0
 @skills25: DM if you’re serious and I will give you a contact
  • 5 4
 @KK11: No clue who that is, but sad that most the business went to "influencers" reselling their parts around Colorado. Thought GG was considering lawyers at one point to recoup some profit.
  • 66 1
 I'm gonna hop on this as well and reinforce the sentiment about how great of an experience it was to work at Revved/GG. We worked hard, but we did it because it because we loved it - very few companies offer as much freedom to try new things as we had. It was painful to watch the high-level decisions being made this past year which resulted in its fate, and I'm really heartbroken that we never had the opportunity to debut all of the exciting projects we were working on behind the scenes, especially in light of all of the PB comments tearing us apart for not updating the frame platform. I learned a lot, had a ton of fun, and met so many amazing people. To all of the other Revved/GG employees reading this, thank you for making it such a great experience, one that I'll always strive to find again.
  • 7 1
 @slabcity: Sweet, was commenting on the random riders that took advantage of the company, not the company itself. I'll reiterate that I don't know who any of the GG guys are, just some of the guys that supposedly promised to help promote and rarely posted but always had parts for sale.
  • 6 1
 @slabcity: can you elaborate on some of said "high level decisions"?
  • 3 0
 If someone out there really did want to buy it, how would they even go about it?
How much does a company like this cost to buy out? (Obviously it's more than just buying out, as you'd need to match whatever those investors were putting in but still.)
  • 14 8
 @davemays: If you have to ask then you can't afford it. That's how much.lol
  • 5 0
 @davemays: That’s depends on how much debt the buyer takes on or if creditors or the current owners take the hit for it
  • 3 0
 @MikeGruhler: haha clearly I can't afford it, but I'm wondering when these companies close up - is there some kind of marketplace they get listed at?
  • 5 0
 @davemays: yes generally an investment bank will represent the interests of the current investors, it's not like Ebay or Zillow, that has a public facing view. You need to be qualified to see what is available. Big names in this space are Stifel and a few of the big banks.
  • 6 0
 @davemays: A lot of times these sales are just through word of mouth and networking. The industry is small. Otherwise, businesses list at Loopnet or BizBuySell or similar marketplaces. I just bought a business through BizBuySell recently.
  • 5 12
flag jrocksdh (Oct 4, 2023 at 9:05) (Below Threshold)
 @justanotherusername: 12 hour days pretty standard for any small company that wants to be successful.
  • 50 1
 @jrocksdh: @jrocksdh: Not really. I've worked exclusively at startups over the past ten years, all of them still in business (and one currently valued at some insane number, multiple billions IDK the exact figure). Never worked a 12 hour day in my life (outside of a few event days). Nor was it normal for anyone I worked with to put in days that long with any regularity, although I'm sure it happened occasionally.

Let's not normalize working insane hours as a necessary condition for success. It isn't. And it can easily lead to the opposite, as burned-out employees make mistakes, and high-skill employees get sick of the grind and leave for greener pastures.
  • 8 1
 @lffopii Sent you a private message. FYI.
  • 5 3
 @jrocksdh: for owners, maybe for paid staff absolute, utter bullshit.
  • 3 0
 @lffopii, @Eazybeeezy and all the rest of the former employees: thank you! Had some of the best customer support experiences with you I've seen in the industry, and love my Pistola.

Hoping for the best for all of you in your next adventure -- you all deserve it!
  • 4 4
 @charliewentoutside: wow that's nuts..most small biz owners I know are similar to myself
and are working at least 12 hours a day on their business. Especially if your dealing with Asia.
  • 3 0
 @charliewentoutside:
I agree with that, I also work at a start up which is growing and expanding and having a 12h day is and has to be an exception. Usual working hours are very reasonable and it seems like it's a good recipe for motivated and focused employees.

I don't get this insane hours competition, I have a life beside work, and passions like MTB and also need time for that.
  • 3 0
 @ridetenet: bring it on home to Bellingham.
  • 2 0
 another former employee here. Really enjoyed my time at GG. we made a great product, regardless of what the nobodies said. we know what we did. gonna miss all the homies I made while working there, and hope at least some of us stay in touch. we could have done great things.
  • 3 0
 @Swampjunkie: You DID do great things. I saw somebody out shredding one of your bikes just the other day and having a blast – that's great. Obviously things didn't end the way you hoped but that doesn't negate all the positive things GG did, or the fun GG owners have on bikes you made.
  • 6 0
 Going to play devils advocate here in that I was employed at GG from 2018-2019. My experience was far from stellar.

To bring a few things to light from my experience:
1) I was lied too about my compensation package and given unrealistic sales goals. Was told I would be earning commissions on sales starting month 1 (hence the super low base salary like most sales jobs).
2) I NEVER got one single commission check. Not one. Again - due to unrealistic expectations
3) The leaders of this company were great people with a great idea. But what sucked the most for the rest of us is that we never had an opportunity to get skin in the game (equity) even if we were one of the original 15 employees. How does management expect a lower level employee to commit as much time and effort as those at the top when we are incentivized?
4) Lack of respect for time off. I missed my best friends wedding for this company because even when electing to take unpaid time off, they wouldnt even consider.

I get GG probably changed a lot over the years but i cant help but think some of the same issues were what drove this place into the ground.
  • 326 17
 Makes me think lifetime warranty means their lifetime, not mine. Something to consider when buying boutique
  • 76 2
 Its also worth remembering going under can happen to a company of any size if it doesn't get the right support in adverse conditions.

In the UK, a national high street (budget) retailer of 90+ years just went down.
  • 11 9
 same thing happened with Turner..........
  • 46 11
 I'll never understand why people think companies will be around forever. That's never been the case. Like people, they all die eventually leaving behind poop and piss for someone else to clean up.
  • 64 5
 Also "lifetime" doesn't always even mean your lifetime... it refers to a reasonable lifetime of a bike, which is subjective.
  • 10 9
 Precisely. I never put any weight into that marketing statement of "Lifetime Warranty". Craftsman has a lifetime warranty, even through the sale of the brand to Lowe's, they STILL honor the warranty just by bringing in the broken or defective tool. Bike companies are selling vaporware - if you sell the bike, no more warranty; company is sold or goes out of business, no more warranty. It's B.S. made up for marketing purposes. And I own a Yeti! They don't back their warranty either.
  • 39 1
 @jokermtb: Turner is still making bikes and has a rad little Ti hardtail.
  • 10 4
 Learned this the hard way a few years ago. Big company + lifetime warranty is the winning combination.
  • 20 0
 @jokermtb: Turner Bikes is still open turnerbikes.com
  • 19 61
flag ceolmhar (Oct 3, 2023 at 13:26) (Below Threshold)
 Lifetime means life of the product. Carbon doesn't last as long as aluminum, and significantly less than steel. Nothing lasts forever.
  • 11 2
 @Pabsm80: what do you mean by the right support?
Its a business - the right support means selling stuff and making a profit.
Wilkos were outcompeted in the end.
The name has now been bought by their main competitor and the Range will trade with Wilko name too!

Dog eat dog no bail outs
  • 1 0
 That's always the case
  • 28 81
flag sanchofula (Oct 3, 2023 at 13:36) (Below Threshold)
 @Linc: BS, if the reason you buy from big name is the warranty, then you're missing out on the very reason to buy a boutique frame: the ride.

I'd go back to trail running before I'd buy from Trek, the big S, any other mega corp.
  • 19 15
 Something relatively similar is Recon Racks. When ONE UP bought them out, ONE UP refused to warranty any of the old parts from Recon. As a matter of fact, they even said "A bunch of the welds on the old models have been breaking" yet still no recall/warranty. They refused to stand for something they took over. I'll never be buying ONE UP again.
  • 31 12
 @sanchofula: ‘boutique’ is way overhyped in mtb world. Most riders will be way better served by big company products with high stock levels and long warranties. Shred your shit. break it. Replace it fast.
  • 13 0
 @jokermtb: Turnerbikes were so amazing for their time. Such a class act outfit. TURNERBIKES!
  • 4 2
 @renoirbud: It's the same in that Turner went through a long period (years - much longer than GG (so far)) of radio silence. Then, years later, Turner came back selling titanium hard tails and gravel bikes only, with no real explanation of what happened and/or what future support looks like for Turner FS customers.
  • 3 4
 @Linc: Soooo, not SRAM then?
  • 7 2
 @renoirbud: @JudyYellow: Yeah, Turner is still open, and he is putting out cool Ti bikes, but in the last days of the suspension era there was a point where if you needed something for, say, your carbon RFX, you were on your own. I cracked a seat stay well within the warranty — but the Turner suspension days were over. There was no warranty, there was no crash replacement. He didn’t have any inventory to sell. You were just on your own. There were a couple warning signs in addition to that (uncharacteristically bad customer service) before it was all over — very similar to GG.

I understand and have no beef, but this is exactly the kind of thing GG riders have to worry about now. @jokermtb is exactly right. Lots of parallels based on my experience. It sucks to have the support pulled out from under you when you buy an expensive bike.

That said, Dave is back doing cool things, having great customer service again and all that. So it’s nothing against him or the company, just the reality of buying a brand that kind of just disappears one day.
  • 10 3
 @sanchofula: yes those big brands that build race winning bikes that are bought by journalists who get to ride a lot of boutique bikes. Literally unridable
  • 23 2
 @tfirth12: Why would they guarantee the previous work that was not their own.
  • 20 10
 @njparider: because they bought the brand and are profiting off of it. Because it's the right thing to do
  • 1 0
 @Pabsm80: which one?
  • 4 1
 @Pabsm80: that's more a commentary on the UK business/economic climate than anything....
  • 7 1
 @ceolmhar: boy howdy do you have that exactly backwards. lmfao.


someone needs to take your keyboard privaleges away!
  • 11 0
 @Linc: meh. we don't all have the same priorities in life. some want maximum value, some want to ride something no one else has.


there is no wrong answer here. you do you......and all that jazz
  • 5 0
 @njparider: Unless the company was bought out of a liquidation sale those customers and product 'are' the new owner's customers and product. I guess there weren't very many Recon Racks sold before because Class Action chsers love those kind of rug pull cases.
  • 3 0
 @tfirth12: I wonder if the broken welds were. Safety issue if they could be forced into a recall by CPSC in the US. It seems to me they owned that liability
  • 6 1
 @TalusRider: Craftsman is owned by Stanley Black and Decker. Not too sure where you got that Lowes idea from.
  • 3 2
 Common misconception. "Lifetime" never means a consumers lifetime, nor is it company lifetime. It is always product lifetime, with few exceptions.
  • 6 0
 @sanchofula: What brand of trail running shoes are you going to buy?
  • 9 0
 I offer lifetime warranty with my bikes and thats my lifetime. Even after I retire and close up I will repair the frame if it is a material or workmanship fault at my cost. As long as I'm not in a home eating porridge of course. I even offer a reduced repair cost if you fuck it up. The big companies make great bikes but they also have massive overheads and they will only do enough for the consumer to stay away from the law and keep their margin.
  • 3 17
flag Durtwrx (Oct 3, 2023 at 17:10) (Below Threshold)
 @whitebirdfeathers: wrong
Stanley manufactures
Lowe’s own trademark stop your misinformation kook
  • 7 0
 @TheR: After the initial glory years, Turner was always operating on a knifes edge with insisting on outsourced domestic manufacturing. Frankly, credit to Dave for making it work for as long as it did.

But, what never made sense to me was the fact that, as far as I know, to this day, he’s never made any official announcement. Not even something as simple to his customers as here’s what happened, here are my plans, here’s what it means for FS customers. And there’s also a lot of mixed or confusing messaging. About 2 years ago now, my carbon RFX was getting overhauled at a local shop and the mechanic called Turner and according to my mechanic, the message was: “get a new bike, I’m really supporting these bikes anymore.” And then just recently, I see he has parts up for the carbon RFX.

Anyways, in part because I thought Turner was no longer supporting my bike, I bought a GG Smash - as GG was a company I was already following. And here we are.
  • 14 0
 @Durtwrx: I work for SBD.
  • 6 0
 @burnermtb: Turner bikes were great and for a while they had some of the best customer service in the business. I rode my 5-Spot for 10 happy years before eventually hanging it up. The carbon frames were the straw that broke the camel's back but if you ask me the first crack to show was the move from 4-Bar Horst Link to single pivot suspension. After 10 years of extolling the virtues of 4-Bar suspension they did a full 180 and proclaimed a single pivot was just as good a nobody would be able to tell the difference. They lost real credibility from that episode.

Then came the ugly DW-link bikes, then came the carbon RFX that failed at the aluminium inserts. The death of their full suspension range followed soon after.

Fun fact. When I bought my 5-Spot the rear chainstay had both a Specialized Bikes and Ellsworth Bikes patent sticker on it. Them were the days!
  • 1 0
 @Pabsm80: I had never heard the words budget and high Street in the same sentence before. Nevertheless best of luck to those affected.
  • 2 1
 @burnermtb: Your record sounds like mine with the bike companies. First I had an RFX, then I had a Kona Process 153 (which is an awesome bike, but what’s going on at Kona these days?), then I was actually considering a GG as my next one — glad I didn’t!

As for Turner, your story is exactly what I mean. For the suspension stuff, they might as well be out of business. My guess is what he has now is leftover inventory. Once it’s gone, it’s gone. Dave isn’t shy about telling people to get new bikes — even when the old bike is one of his own. One guy said Dave told him to get a Ripmo to replace his Turner a few years back.

At any rate, I feel for him. It’s not easy to be a small bike company. The Ti stuff is cool. I especially like the gravel bike and the new aggressive hardtail.
  • 1 0
 @devlincc: wow…I must have been under a rock and thankfully came here to share my condolences as a recent GG purchaser. But then I see your post and the clicking got me to the yellow bike….and my favorite material! How do these wind up in the USA??
  • 3 11
flag sanchofula (Oct 3, 2023 at 20:35) (Below Threshold)
 @Linc: friends don’t let friends buy corporate sell outs, but feel free to support companies that profit off the low wages and poor living conditions of workers in other countries.
  • 2 0
 @jgottya1: thank you. I'm just in the last bit of getting material ordered to build a batch. Keep an eye on the insta and I'll be announcing frame only and two full build kits very soon, next week or so. Happy to ship over but need to explore options for shipping.
  • 1 0
 @devlincc: I just got off work 11pm here and wore my screen out going back and forth on your bikes. Oh yeah very nice. I will absolutely keep an eye peeled and will be in touch. Be interested in frame only to start. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @cantaloupe13: in England "high street store" is just a reference to any store you would find in a town centre.
  • 1 0
 it took this to figure that out?
  • 18 2
 @sanchofula: "I'd go back to trail running before I'd buy from Trek, the big S, any other mega corp"

Trek is owned by John Burke, the son of the guy who founded Trek. It's $1-2B turnover, employs tonnes of great people, sponsors huge riders and race teams, lifetime warranty on frames, their shops offer reasonable pay and benefits (for a bike shop). The company doesn't make that much profit at all. Hardly some evil mega corp...
  • 11 0
 @TalusRider: I can attest that Yeti does honor their frame warranties. I bought a holdover 2019 SB150 Turq in spring of 2020 (that was actually used as a demo bike by the LBS for the entire 2019 season). Before I bought it, I specifically asked the shop if the lifetime frame warranty would still transfer to me even if it was sold “new to me” as a demo bike, and they told me yes. After a couple of rides this season, I noticed hairline cracks all over the front triangle of the SB150. I brought it to my LBS and with no questions asked (had to provide serial numbers, original purchase receipt, and pictures of the cracks, that’s it), Yeti sent me a brand new 2023 SB160 Turq frame with factory X2 shock immediately. They even asked what color I wanted. It took about a week to process the warranty and ship the frame, then a few days to swap it over, so overall less than a two week process. Based on my experience I can’t say enough about Yeti’s warranty process and customer support. If they honor someone who bought a demo bike that was used by who knows who for a year beforehand, I’m sure they will give equal support to their customers who buy “showroom new” bikes. As always, I’m sure others will have their opinions/experiences, but mine was enough for me to stay as a Yeti customer for the foreseeable future, and has even steered some of my riding friends toward Yeti just based on what they saw me go through. Thanks Yeti!!!
  • 5 2
 @wburnes: So a new owner should have to run their new company into the ground because former ownership sold faulty product which most likely helped in their demise originally? Just because you "Should" doesn't mean you "Can". It does suck that shit like this happens though, I'd be pissed to
  • 3 0
 @JudyYellow:
and they are still supporting their old rides, like the Burner, Czar and 5spot... amazingly enough....
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I respect the difficulty in owning a small bike company. I think most people who buy from them do as well (it’s part of the appeal). Poor communication, however, I have less sympathy for. Even if the news is bad, most customers will understand, given that most customers of small bike companies have accepted the risks.

I will say that I agree that Dave doesn’t shy away from one on one communication. But, leaving it up to the the off chance of having a conversation with the owner strikes me as poor communication when it could be accomplished simply and more broadly with a formal statement on their website, mass email, etc.

As for the parts, they weren’t available at the time and my mechanic was told they’d have to be fabricated at great expense. But, now, it appears they’re in stock and at a decent price.

Anyways, it’s ok at the end of the day. My GG is awesome. I expect to have many years left on it, barring something extreme. But, when I go to buy again, these experiences will definitely guide my decision on brand choice.
  • 2 0
 @Linc: I agree. The thing I see a lot of is the smaller companies taking on investors/loans. So they really are never solvent but from the outside it looks like they are...then you find out they are millions in debt....just to make a bicycle that 30 other companies make just as good.
  • 3 1
 @Planetx888: the other fun part is why anyone cares about a lifetime warranty? it's never transferable, and how many people keep a new bike for more than 3-4 years anyways?

give me a 5 year, no questions asked, transferable replacement gaurantee. that's gods plenty. so when I sell it after a year or two, I have the remaining gaurantee as a selling point.
  • 8 0
 @tfirth12: 1up USA that is. OneUp Components has no affiliation to bike racks of any kind and has not acquired any other companies.
  • 1 0
 @burnermtb: I hear you and I don’t disagree. There was one episode at the end there that soured me on the bike, and it was all related to communication.
  • 2 1
 @puukkopedro: True but it also requires investors and banks to have a sensible timeline for realising their investment. Often in the U.K. investors expect their roi unreasonably quickly
  • 4 1
 @Linc: So true. People still think sc are boutique not just a brand of one of the biggest bike companies in the world
  • 2 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: That depends on the deal. You can buy the company but not take on the debt and past obligations in the U.K.
  • 2 0
 @scott-townes: I bet 90% of bike shops and bike companies die within 10 years. It's an industry of passion not supported by profits
  • 2 0
 @tfirth12: that's sad I'd really considered the One Up racks, but that sounds shady.
  • 3 0
 @davemays: point of clarity: 1up USA make racks and bough Racon.

OneUp is a component company from Canada and completely unrelated
  • 1 0
 Callahan Bikes "Buy from us. We'll take a dump in a box."
  • 4 0
 @owenbfoster: except PON owns OneUp Components
  • 12 1
 The notion that any of these companies are ‘evil mega-corporations’ is exhausting. Pon Bikes (20 brands) $2.6B, Trek $1B, and SRAM ~$900M annual revenue for 2022/estimated for 23. Those are the big boys ‘n girls.

A few random reported/estimated examples REI $3.8B, Skanska $17B, Walmart $611B, Pfizer $77B, Nike $51B. I could keep going and misquote other numbers, but the point is that it’s a niche industry driven by a relatively small group of people who mostly like bikes. And also like making money since that’s kind of the point of for profit businesses.

Mountain biking is an even smaller sliver of the niche industry; probably staffed by even more enthusiasts. Sure, relative to a mfg who makes >$50M, the above are 800lb gorillas - but let’s stop making late stage capitalist bogiemen out of everyone we don’t like.
  • 2 1
 @njparider: This is like saying new ownership of an amusement park isn't responsible for old owners lack of maintenance and that they shouldn't be responsible if something breaks.
  • 1 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: Ha! That's funny you say that because yesterday afternoon (after my comment) I got a job notice from SB&D. Yes, you're correct, but Craftsman is sold through Lowe's where I live so I thought they had bought the brand. Did I see another comment that you work for them?
  • 3 1
 @MikeGruhler: if they don't, the brand that the brand that they bought, and their existing brand will be damaged by association with poor or nonexistent customer service and faulty products.

When you purchase a company this is what happens. If they didn't want to deal with this they could have just made their own new rack design rather than buying a rack design and brand.
  • 2 0
 @TalusRider: I do, though I’m in another business. I still see what’s going on with all the brands. It’s a pretty good place to work.
  • 2 0
 @owenbfoster: I figured the two were related. This is good info to know. Thanks for sharing!
  • 1 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: Do you have an employee referral program? Wanna refer me for the job? I'm happy to talk via DM or something private first.
  • 190 2
 Cheers to the people that tried something different. This has been a brutal couple of years for brands of this size, and I'm honestly surprised we haven't seen more outfits close up shop. I'm hopeful that something will get worked out behind the scenes and someone will pick up where GG left off. But if not, it'd be a really nice gesture from the parent company if they released their designs open source as a way to help their riders keep their bikes rolling in the future.
  • 29 55
flag wyorider (Oct 3, 2023 at 12:43) (Below Threshold)
 They worked their employees like dogs-the technology was good but it was a horrible place to work.
  • 23 0
 @wyorider: say more, king.
  • 14 5
 @wyorider: you work there before yourself, or this based on your 5 min visit?
  • 20 1
 @wyorider: maybe you know something I don't. Few guys I ran into who were associated with them (lived 10 min from the location near the Mile High Stadium) seemed to be happy there.
  • 6 5
 @wyorider: This checks out with what I heard, but limited sample size.
  • 13 1
 @wyorider: protip - no manufacturing job is fun or easy where employees don't get worked like machines
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I'd love to see their IP go open source too but that'd likely involve the investors to agree, the same people that are dissatisfied enough with the situation to divest. Depends on how much equity the owners sold to investors, but my guess is the contingent of stockholders who'd be into this idea are 50% and the rest would rather sell/license their IP. Fingers crossed though.
  • 4 5
 @Bro-LanDog: hours and pay are key. Sure, the work is repetitive and thankless, but time and $$ to……go for a ride goes a loooooooong way.
  • 11 0
 No article on Evolve?
  • 19 6
 @wyorider: idk. i work like a dog, by choice. if people want a cush job, a startup is not the right choice.
  • 9 0
 @Acid11: would love to know about this too. Have had a few evolve owners come into my shop with some serious issues. I once called evolve asking for a torque sheet/ torque specs for the linkage. I was told "torque sheet? we dont have one. Everything is 20nm"
Upon closer inspection some of the hardware had torque specs printed on them with very small font. None of them said 20.
Also heard people have ordered bikes, paid, and never received bikes or a refund months later. Seems a story like this would suit pinkbike seeing as though evolve and pinkbike are based in squamish
  • 14 7
 When you buy a Santa Cruz a GG dies
  • 7 0
 @Acid11: I messaged @brianpark about Evolve on April 26, still waiting....
  • 3 5
 @wyorider: Can confirm, at least within my personal experience.
  • 6 0
 @ParkerLikesToBike: The manager at evolve told me through text that all linkage bolts are supposed to be 20nm and loctited. My linkage constantly came loose and caused all sorts of issues. This was about a year ago, i’ve since sold the bike. I contacted his number regarding the closing of evolve and no answer… Seems like shady business and a quick cash grab. I’ve heard of lots of aspiring owners never receiving their bikes. A criminal investigation was also launched into the owner of evolve and their shady practices. I don’t think anything ever came of it and he has since skipped town.

Sherpa bikes used to sell the same frame. It is an Ican P9 sourced from china and all they did was add branding and slap parts on it. If any of your customers have questions i’d suggest contacting ican directly. They were somewhat responsive to me though there is a language barrier and goodluck getting any warranty out of them…

icancycling.com/products/enduro-frame-p9
  • 10 4
 @wyorider: and here I thought you saved your asinine comments for ebike articles only.
  • 4 1
 @Acid11: Didn't Evolve just have open mold frames?
  • 1 0
 @Lanebobane: their ip is probably the only asset they have to sell
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: Doubtful they would give away their assets as a customer service gesture when they are trying to recoup big losses.
  • 3 0
 @silvershredsled: Ya i was are of the open source frame. My same customer has shifting issues that was due to a bent hanger. I did some digging at that time and found that exact frame and website where they sell replacement hangers.
Told my customer to order a dozen of them if he plans to keep the frame. I suggested fixing and selling
  • 3 0
 @Dogl0rd: when you buy a Specialized everybody else dies
  • 2 1
 @Acid11: Evolve was never a real bike company to begin with. They sold Taiwanese catalog frames their whole existence in a vain attempt to fund the design of that prototype bike that made it on this site. They weren't so much a bike manufacturer as a re-seller, not once selling a bike they had designed any part of.
  • 5 2
 @wyorider: All the previous employees in here speaking up about how much they loved working there is making this comment look pretty ridiculous. Newsflash: working long, hard hours can be fulfilling when you're doing something you're passionate about.
  • 2 1
 @wyorider: @WE-NEED-MORE-ROOST:

Going to play devils advocate here in that I was employed at GG from 2018-2019. My experience was far from stellar.

To bring a few things to light from my experience:
1) I was lied too about my compensation package and given unrealistic sales goals. Was told I would be earning commissions on sales starting month 1 (hence the super low base salary like most sales jobs).
2) I NEVER got one single commission check. Not one. Again - due to unrealistic expectations
3) The leaders of this company were great people with a great idea. But what sucked the most for the rest of us is that we never had an opportunity to get skin in the game (equity) even if we were one of the original 15 employees. How does management expect a lower level employee to commit as much time and effort as those at the top when we are incentivized?
4) Lack of respect for time off. I missed my best friends wedding for this company because even when electing to take unpaid time off, they wouldnt even consider.

I get GG probably changed a lot over the years but i cant help but think some of the same issues were what drove this place into the ground.
  • 3 0
 @rbb23: Well, if it makes you feel better, your equity would have been worth exactly nothing. lol
  • 2 0
 @rbb23: Oh, I didn't doubt him. I just wanted to hear specifics rather than a veiled criticism. Sorry to hear you had a shitty experience. Having worked in the bike industry myself, I actually had a lot of similar issues, and I think a lot of these issues are endemic to the industry (not that that diminishes what you went through at all). I think frequently, us industry employees are expected to put up with crappy work environments/conditions/situations because we're passionate about our line of work in a way many other folks just aren't. Personally, I've made up my mind and will (hopefully) be moving on.
  • 1 1
 @stravaismyracecourse:

Haha fair point. Just more of a principal of greed and how these guys managed employees
  • 121 5
 dont want to sound like a total dick, but why is Niner still around?
  • 13 0
 They are owned by a larger firm. I am assuming the firm hasn't pulled the plug.

www.unitedwheels.com
  • 107 0
 Niner? I can maybe understand that one, but how do you explain this?
ellsworthbikes.com
  • 27 0
 @FatTonyNJ: truth
  • 13 1
 I think they do decent with their gravel offerings
  • 3 29
flag ThatEbikeGuy (Oct 3, 2023 at 13:56) (Below Threshold)
 Because they make what people want these days, ebikes. This lot didn't.
  • 1 3
 Great question. Even on the front range, people only get them if they’re on super duper sale.
  • 9 0
 @idecic: I see what you did there
  • 11 1
 @cornichons: They're still around, for the Moment.
  • 4 3
 @FatTonyNJ: Man! Ellsworth used to be good. I had a Truth a long time ago and liked it. Then the company was sold and turned to crap. Then it was sold again and is where it is now........yikes
  • 7 0
 @edummann: I was building wheels for the Rockshox Devo Team at the NORBA nationals back in the late 90's. They rode Ellworth for a year or two. Almost all of them cracked included XC's. Yes they had wild annodizing and that looked cool back then, but MAN those frames were suspect
  • 7 0
 @FatTonyNJ: because, one cannot simple de thrown the fugliest name branding. That’s what keeps them alive.

But real talk. When I did live in San Diego. You mainly saw, Giant, Santa Cruz, Yeti, and Intense. I saw more people ride Eminent Cycles than Ellsworth. I have a hunch the Founder has an actual main source of income, and Ellsworth bikes is for shits and giggles. Like big dick “F you money”
  • 5 1
 @kroozctrl: can confirm. No one in San Diego rides Ellsworth. Maybe back to 2011ish, 5 people rode them. I've seen one since.

But you moved from SD to MS? WTAF? lol
  • 3 7
flag alexisfire (Oct 3, 2023 at 21:57) (Below Threshold)
 Personally, I think Intense is next to go.
  • 4 0
 @alexisfire: there’s so much money into intense. I’m not sure they’d let it go willingl, and they might be doing ok with their e-bikes, particularly crossing over to moto people. Kona also has to be struggling.
  • 4 4
 @shredddr: Race teams and rider sponsorships are an indicator of company's health - not 100% but you can get a read on them. After a few rocky years, Intense seems to be going strong. The bike industry is in for a few rough years, a couple smaller brands will likely close. Devinci and Ibis just folded their enduro teams, not saying they are next for certain but I'd keep an eye on those.
  • 4 0
 I don't know what's happening on the corporate end of Niner, but I've been on my WFO for a year and it has been a fantastic bike. One of the most fun bikes I've ever owned.
  • 3 0
 @ThatEbikeGuy: the people have always wanted to be lazy, it's nothing new
  • 3 1
 @alexisfire:Intense has been on the struggle bus for a few years. But really any independent brand is likely to fold. In the US watch what happens to Alchemy, Evil, Transition, Reeb, Canfield, Revel, Allied, Spot in the next few years.
  • 3 0
 @jpmccrash: that’s a good list. I’d take transition and revel off it though.
  • 4 0
 @jpmccrash: man I hope you're wrong. Specialized makes great bikes, but it's gonna be sad when Trek and Spesh are the CVS and Walgreens of MTB
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: Not sure about Revel, but I’d really like to see them stick around.
  • 4 0
 @sandiegotrent: I needed a change and I got a job offer. So I said I would check out all the bike parks on the south and east before I move to my final state. Which is either Colorado or Montana. But yea, born and raised in San Diego. Don’t miss it. I just miss the convenience of being 1.5 hours away from a lift access bike park.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: Transition is a good possibility to see some type of change IMO. They have an overly saturated lineup, with a lot of new bikes/ebikes added in the last few years, and they've expanded their facilities and hiring which is an indicator that they anticipated more growth than is going to happen. They also increased their prices pretty dramatically, which makes competition hard when Specialized is pumping out bikes considerably less expensive. All this adds up to increases in cost for support, facilities, etc when the bike market is slowing dramatically and competition with brands who have been buying bike shops all over the US has increased. It's a rough time to be a smaller bike brand.

Unlike GG, though, Transition has more exposure, more bikes, and more brand recognition. They also have traditionally run pretty lean although I have no idea if that has continued after 2020 or not. I doubt they'll go away entirely, but again, it's a rough time to be a small brand and too much growth during the boom could be dangerous, so some change is possible.

Basically any brand that isn't Trek, Specialized, Giant, or Santa Cruz is at risk in the coming years. Those that run lean or didn't grow aggressively thinking the boom would never end will likely survive, those that overproduced and can't reign in costs while the economy is down and bike sales cool off will be bought or go away. Brands like Transition with a reputation and big brand will stick around in name at least, whereas companies without that like GG, Allied, etc are more likely to go away entirely.
  • 4 0
 @shinook: My guess is that Yeti and Ibis are in more trouble than Transition.

The fact Ibis dropped their pro team isn't a good outlook. They are a popular bike brand, however.

A lot of this probably comes down to whether or not they over purchased during 2021
  • 3 1
 @HB208: yeti? nope
  • 2 0
 @jpmccrash: I wouldn't be so sure, I think the boutique brands that have priced themselves very very high will have issues. I am also not saying they will have to sell the brand, just that it is more at risk than Transition.
  • 1 0
 @jpmccrash: Yeah, I’m with you. Yeti doesn’t seem to be in much trouble. They’re not suddenly slashing prices, and they don’t have huge racing teams to support at the very top level. I suspect the development teams and ambassadors aren’t taking more than they’re bringing in. Staff seems pretty minimal.

Of course, I could be all wrong about this. I’m not on the inside. But appearances from the outside don’t indicate much trouble.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I have seen many deals on Yeti lately. Between 1000 to 3000 off the original price. At big online retailers. We will see the retailers feel the pain first, the retailers will not order so many bikes this coming season. Hurting the manufactures
  • 1 0
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: On the new bikes, or on the older bikes they’re phasing out?
  • 1 0
 @HB208: I feel like Yeti has to be hurting because of ebikes. Big spenders used to buy Yetis, but now they buy Ebikes and not necessarily Yetis
  • 1 0
 @Dogl0rd: Yeti has the 160E.
  • 1 0
 @ZSchnei: Yes, doesn't change the argument. I think they lost hold of their market in the ebike revolution
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I am not sure what model years. But what people who have been in the industry awhile are saying certain brands hardly ever have such deep discounts even on their older models, like Yeti and Santa Cruz. This discounts are also hurting the use market
  • 1 0
 @Bike-JAM-AMA: if it makes you feel any better about the used market, it’s probably temporary. These manufacturers will start adjusting inventory and prices accordingly. People will get a better picture of what their used bikes are worth. Also, we are probably going to see a lot of inflation. Those old bikes might be worth their weight in gold in a year or two.
  • 1 0
 @FatTonyNJ: Wow. I had almost forgotten, blast from the past. Looks like someone is keeping the dream alive with only 2 bikes, what I am sure represents their top sellers. They must have a small following, CA probably.
  • 67 1
 Say what you want to about how their frames look, but we need firms like this the try and do new things even when they fail. Hats off to you guys, thanks for everything.
  • 11 1
 Hopefully owners of the bikes will get enough support and parts to say the same
  • 12 0
 On the other hand, I have a gnarvana and I love it. But why would I want to drop that kind of money on a bike company that may not be around in 5 years. I realize this could be any company but GG took off like a dad going out for smokes.
  • 63 0
 The broader venture capital/tech model does not apply to the bike industry. You are unlikely to see something 100x (or even 10x) in the space. Whenever I see news that a company has shut down following an "investor pulling out", it tells me they've been operating at a loss. While this may be reasonable for a non-high growth company within the first 12 months of starting, this is very untenable to any investor after multiple years have passed. This is always true, but its extra true when rates have moved up (substantially), cost of capital is higher and there are alternatives with much lower amounts of risk at relatively high rates of return.

Fact is, GG was unlikely to even be a breakeven, let alone a positive IRR unless they could have scaled it huge and sold the thing to one of the private equity backed conglomerates out there....but the way they were manufacturing doesn't really jive with the "buy the brand and cut costs" ethos.

In any business, knowing your real TAM, your niche and where you can (realistically) operate sustainably is absolutely crucial. I have learned this the hard way...

Best of luck int he future GG employees!
  • 34 2
 "I think we can get a tech valuation for a Mountain Bike brand on this."

- Kendall Roy, probably.
  • 3 0
 TAM, SAM, SOM... SoB
  • 31 0
 Sometimes you just gotta... do the whole, "we use our proprietary carbon manufacturing tech and process to get some fat defense contracts which allow us to also make some bikes sometime" model. As American as apple pie.
  • 7 0
 Appreciate someone on PB laying out the basics on how these things work. The squeeze isn't relenting anytime soon, so it'll be interesting to see who else gets shaken up. With the current environment it's gonna come down to who can cut the most burn and balance cash on hand, plus the investor's pain threshold.

Hey @brianpark and crew, would be cool if PB did a deeper series on how the industry works from the business perspective. Maybe just pull over some writing from Vosper at BRAIN.
  • 2 1
 Agreed, seems very unlikely this was anything commercial never mind insitutional and more likely just an individual(s) with cash to burn who took an interest in the "unique" nature of GG, felt buyoed by the boom, then saw recent financials, did some googling on the bike industry, made a couple calls and decided to pull the plug given uncertain macro situation especially.

while they may not be "creditors" i sort of doubt they funded a ton of money without a contract that gave them the ability to pull their money back out in the form of any available assets, if cash is not available. hence shutting down, liquidating, etc. investor will take a loss and hopefully GG owners aren't out of personal pocket if there isn't enough to cover their investment, but there will be (less than) nothing left for them. sort of doubt they'll even get to keep the IP unless it's somehow a personal asset that's protected by the funding contract.
  • 2 0
 @sarahallen: I agree, more focus on the business side of MTB. All due respect, I think they'd need some outside help; most of the staff comes from the product marketing side not the finance side - which @JeffreyJim is talking about. Investors/stakeholders dynamics will vary from large to small companies. But it becomes a basic math problem for start-ups, when the future revenue potential doesn't justify the current investment - investors stop funding.

But yes, more articles on running a bike biz, funding teams, etc.
  • 48 0
 First Kitsbow, now GG. Everyone says "make it in the USA" I'll buy one! And once people bring it to the masses, and crickets.

Hindsight is always 20/20, but I wonder if they continued to offer aluminum models at more attractive prices they would have lived on a little longer.
  • 59 0
 People really want "make it in the USA..........for the same price as making it in China". It's all cool until you can buy a very similar bike for thousands of dollars less. I shop local when I can, and try to buy things made close to me, but when I can get a bike for $4,000 or a similar bike for $6,000 but made in the USA, I'm probably going to opt to save $2,000.
  • 8 0
 @tvan5: I agree 100%, and I'm the same way (I do prefer to shop at my LBS and buy whatever they carry, different story).

I was more so saying it's the keyboard warriors saying they'll buy it, but never do, for exactly the reason you note above.
  • 20 3
 I bought a V1 Smash new in early 2021 (so already Covid) with XT, Code RSC, top-spec Fox/Rockshox, aluminum i9/hydra for ~$5500. Show me another brand, domestic or overseas, that beats that price/spec significantly. Hard to even find an aluminum build manufactured overseas for that. Lower spec models at the time for a little over $3k. I also own a couple of kitsbow pieces (though yeah those hurt the wallet). Some of us do try to put $$ where our mouths are.

Had a great experience with GG. Bike still running flawlessly. Was a great run while it lasted, they'll be missed.
  • 5 0
 @tvan5: That is the problem. I went with a made in US gravel bike but it was about 40% more. I think most people are looking for the best value though and I don't begrudge them that. I could justify the extra expense because it is basically a one time purchase (it is titanium and replacing a 25 year old bike) so the cost is insignificant over it's lifetime. This would not be true for most mountain bikes so I would not be as willing to accept such a big cost difference.
  • 17 1
 @tvan5: Most GG bikes and builds were in that price range. Kitsbow is another matter. They were wildly more expensive.

GG had a good formula and it doesn't strike me that sales or cost was the problem. The investors likely got spooked by something. Likely market volatility.
  • 6 2
 @NRZ: I'm not giving the keyboard warriors a pass, but the problem is also one of lack of options. Clothing and bicycles are aesthetic objects, it's entirely possible that those two brands failed because they made things not enough consumers would want regardless of country of origin.

Clothing is especially difficult in this regard.
  • 7 1
 @tvan5: And for a lot of people, it's not even an option. It's not like everyone has the extra $2000 laying around, and really nobody should be financing a bike, especially if they can't afford to buy it outright and it's not just for convenience or a zero percent interest rate.
  • 9 0
 @tvan5: For the most part, you’re right, but GG was competitively priced. Definitely not like Yeti or Pivot, which are made overseas and yet still cost a good deal more. Something went wrong here, but it wasn’t the Made in the USA part, unless trying to sell USA-made bikes at Taiwan prices is what did them in.
  • 4 0
 @tvan5: If you live in Canada, your frame made in Canada bike is 13% cheaper right off the bat due to no tariff being imposed on it. It probably makes for a pretty equal wholesale cost to make the frame here and kit it out than bring in the whole thing from overseas. Look at Devinci; many of their made in Canada framed bikes are competitively priced.
  • 1 6
flag stonant (Oct 3, 2023 at 15:19) (Below Threshold)
 Tough to buy a bike that you couldn’t easily demo. Also, lack of waterbottle holder is a deal breaker for a lot of people.
  • 3 1
 @maffein: on 10/03/2023 you can get a carbon transition sentinel with GX build for $5,500. same price after 2 years of horrendous inflation, so it's cheaper.
  • 4 14
flag Mtbdialed (Oct 3, 2023 at 15:46) (Below Threshold)
 @tvan5: that's cool and all, and hard to fault......except.....how long until we are in a hot war with china(taiwan) and your $2000 savings are what fueled it?
  • 2 0
 @maffein: that’s awesome. Unfortunately it kind of proves that small brands can’t survive if they actually give us the deals we’re looking for.
  • 6 3
 @Blownoutrides: so stop looking for bro deals. That mindset is the problem.

Hi, it's you.....you're the problem its you!
  • 1 1
 Agreed made in the USA might work for some but the price point has to be right especially for a startup. However for customers I the rest of the world made in the USA or made in Taiwan doesn’t really camel any difference. It’s still major oceans away
  • 5 0
 @Mtbdialed: I think the sales of millions of iPhones is more likely to fuel it than a few bikes
  • 2 3
 @Mtbdialed: the concept of “bro deals” is dumb. Most luxury goods can be negotiated down from MSRP/the floor price, or services can be negotiated as part the purchase (free services/tune ups). If I walk into a jewelry store I can negotiate the price & services of jewelry/watches, but for some reason we shouldn’t expect the same with mountain bikes? I know the margins aren’t as large, but when local shops or brands don’t incentivize purchases the average customer will look elsewhere.
  • 11 0
 @stonant: oh no, I get some negotiation.....10%? maybe cover the sales tax? store credit on accessories? all fair game on bikes over like $3000. but when some tool rocks up with 400 followers and wants EP pricing for a few IG posts? f*ck directly off! lol


even a legit influencer, I will offer them 5% on sales per referral. Not a single one has ever taken the offer. if they could actually help me, it would be a no brainer for them. I am talking about some names you very likely know from YT and IG.....it's all a giant circlejerk of people with no value trying to get things for free or heavily discounted.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: gotcha, I’ve never encountered this as I live in an area that’s primarily road bike sales and very few shops have legit mtb offerings/services. But I did encounter this when I was selling boats - a grom’s dad asked for a free boat because his son was doing well on the national circuit ($150k+ boat).
  • 1 1
 Right now the Facebook group for GG riders is at 3.5k and people are active buying different seat stays. I would say they need to market a little bit more, they should have seeded a bike too a big bike YouTuber. For some reason they never really got there Smash into one of bike industries, bike shoot for this model. I Have the GG Smash, and I didn't buy because it was USA made
  • 43 1
 Standard guerilla warfare tactics, slide out undetected.
  • 22 1
 I think you’re glossing over the gravity of the situation
  • 9 2
 Any evidence they were ever here has likely been shredded.
  • 31 2
 Mad respect to Will and Matt. They were starting up when I was shutting down One Ghost Industries and we have remained friends all this time. They created something awesome, especially with regard to their use of thermoplastics and frame building. The story is bigger than what is written here, I know it but won't share it out of respect for Matt and Will. It's a sad thing but it's very representative of the state of the bicycle industry as a whole.
  • 1 0
 Although I don't dirt jump these days, I've still got my Tanto (raw frame) built up with the split top tube and hexagon shaped down tube. Still such a unique bike!
  • 31 3
 What's strange is they were accepting new orders for bikes until the day they closed, without changing information on their website related to the lifetime warranty, etc. They then shipped out all the bikes they could, again without telling people their warranties on brand new bikes are effectively worthless.
  • 23 4
 They may have had no idea the parent company was due to pull the plug.

It’s a company, not an individual selling the frames too, nobody has ran off into the sunset with the money from the last few sales.
  • 74 5
 "What's strange is they were accepting new orders for bikes until the day they closed"

That's kind of the definition of what it means to be open and then close.
  • 8 5
 Eventually the warranty might not be worth a damn, but there’s a possibility you’re jumping to conclusions a bit too quickly.
There isn’t a confirmed announcement from GG, or the parent company, and there might very well be ongoing product support.
You or I don’t know either way quite yet, so maybe chill on releasing the hounds….
  • 10 2
 @onawalk: I have yet to see a company that no longer exists continue to support its customers. Can you name one?
  • 4 0
 They were accepting orders, but it seemed like everything I was looking at was out of stock.
  • 7 0
 @justanotherusername: except for the posts from the employees above saying the layoffs started in Feb...
  • 4 4
 They were and weren't Sick bikes.
  • 1 1
 @pmhobson: @justanotherusername: There were rumblings for a couple of months
  • 3 0
 @zanda23: Once they stop selling bikes, they’re closed. There’s no way around the “selling bikes yesterday but not today” situation.
  • 1 11
flag onawalk (Oct 3, 2023 at 20:47) (Below Threshold)
 @jakemcab: what a jackass response. The parent company isn’t closing, there’s a myriad of possibilities.
But sure, grab yer pitchforks if that’s what makes you most comfortable.
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: The top comment on this article is a former employee saying that GG/Revved were the same company, they just created the "revved" name for doing OEM work for other clients.
  • 3 4
 @ccrida-pnw: Meta laid off thousands of employees this year, they’re worth almost a trillion dollars and nowhere near folding.
  • 3 4
 @jackfunk: He said "basically the same company" which is not the same as their the "same company"
Business's don't work like that, you can have 2 separate companies under one roof but you would never want to combine the accounting. Having 2 separate companies working together helps spread liability and debt across both companies. Not to mention it makes payroll a PITA unless everyone is salary in both companies and can just switch without worrying about hours worked in either.
  • 2 1
 @ccrida-pnw: Meta has gone through 5 rounds of layoffs since March.....do you think they are going to shutter tomorrow?

layoffs do not mean impending doom
  • 2 1
 @justanotherusername: I would expect the directors to have a good enough relationship with investors or the parent company to know what was going on. It’s a key part of their job.
  • 3 2
 @MikeGruhler: It also means if you want to be really cynical you can transfer the assets to one. They liabilities to the other then crash the one holding the liabilities. I’m not saying this has happened in this case, I have zero knowledge ,but it does happen all over in business
  • 1 0
 @chrismac70: ah yea right, the directors can read the mind of investors can’t they, no investor has ever pulled the rug out from a director ever.

Don’t be naive.
  • 1 1
 @jackfunk: Whew,
I'm willing to bet they are seperate companies, but share a lot. As mentioned in another response or two 2 comapnies can be seperate, share the same space, and have plenty of overlap of employees, contractors, even materials and equipment. Its a way to diversify, and protect the failure of one, from the other.....
Its also a way to shelter money, pay less tax, etc.
Now, I dont work for either company, and dont know the inner workings, but I have a tiny bit of knowledge and experience in some of these other areas.
My comments are insulated from all the others, as I dont go through and read every comment, so its possible that theres new info available, that wasnt when I made my comment, you get that right?

Either way, someone owns the rights to their designs, and patents, so there might still be hope that current customers can still get support, and that was sort of the gist of my comments..
  • 3 0
 @onawalk: I wasnt at all trying to be a dick bud, I was just pointing out that comment from a former employee that seemed to explain the situation. They mentioned the Revved name was created after GG was started, as a way to do OEM work for other brands with their tech. So it doesnt sound like Revved is a parent company with more resources, just another name to put on OEM parts.
  • 2 1
 @jackfunk: A parent company, or holding company doesnnt necessarily have more resources, but has a controlling share of the other company, used as a shelter for tax and legal reasons.

The debts of GG, do not necessarily become those of Revvd, if GG is in financial trouble (I''m just using those names as an example, in truth, you, or I, and likely most of the employees have no idea how the company structured). Revvd can hold the patents to some of their proprietary ideas/methods, that GG then liscences to use to build their products. Just a way to move oney and resources around.

Most of the time, employees have no idea of how companies are structured on paper, so unless its one of the directors/owners providing that info, I dont put a lot of value in it.
I'd be willing to bet the reason we havent gotten an official press release about it is because a lot of the details are still being sorted out.
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: I worked maintenance for a property management company but I actually worked for there their maintenance company which was a separate corp. which handled all the service work. They owned 200+ units spread throughout about 9 different holding companies with the owner being on the boards of all the companies with different individuals filling out the rest of the board seats. They were basically in the business of accounting because they had so much bookkeeping. Everyone was on salary because at any given time they were working on multiple companies books. As well he was also part owner in a civil engineering concrete company which has multiple entities underneath it as well. Not to mention the owner runs one of the biggest childrens pediatrics charities in the state. Its all about spreading liabilities and creating growth within there business group by doing business with each other. Don't hate the player hate the game.
  • 1 0
 @MikeGruhler: I dont hate either actually
  • 23 7
 Gotta pay to play. You either get boutique prices or overseas manufacturing where labor is dirt cheap. The idea you can make nearly anything in the US especially in Colorado anymore is a pipe dream.
  • 1 0
 Damn, that’s sad
  • 5 0
 I would also note that their prices, well not 'cheap', weren't as high as one would expect for a NA produced frame/bike... not as much profit as they could have been turning? Or would that have scared off all customers? Finding the balance between price and volume is tough.
  • 5 1
 @Quinn-39: I think that was the problem. They were trying to sell bikes made in the US for the price of bikes made in Taiwan. Maybe they just couldn’t support themselves in the end.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: I thought their model was to improve the manufacturing method so it could be more automated and less manual, that should remove the labour cost advantage the East has and at least allow an equal playing field. Maybe the process was still too manual?
  • 3 0
 @RichieNotRude: Yeah, who knows? Maybe they will explain it to us one day. But sometimes business models work, and sometimes they don’t.
  • 12 0
 I've owned three (including a Gnarvana currently in the stable) and have enjoyed them all. Fortunately for current owners there are plenty extra chainstay/seatstay kits sitting on shelves in people's garages due to the modular nature of the design, and small parts like bearings, hangers, etc seem to be off the shelf components so these frames should be easier to keep running. Now is the time to buy a used GG for a backup bike because the prices are low and they still ride great despite the lack of a factory. I'll miss you GG and hold out hope that the brand can be resurrected by a competitor.
  • 14 1
 Or buy a whatever else you want at 30-40% off.
  • 16 1
 in the mist
  • 10 1
 Took PB long enough to pick up this story. GG owners have been talking about this for months. I love mine and own 3 seat stay kits, even thinking about grabbing an extra frame just in case. Great bike, sad to see them go. Lots of investment dollars went in, and the investors didn't see the return. Talks are they'll move the tech to other industries. They also didn't really bring anything new to market. Hard to compete in the bike industry when you've got the same frame and everyone else has their next gen model coming out. Not going to get coverage or in a group review when it's still the same bike from 3 years ago.
  • 9 0
 Former employee to share the same sentiment! Had a blast with the boys and girls who were at it every day! Mind blown that they couldn’t figure this all out! To many irons in the fire so to speak. Curious as to who and what is next with the brand that’s for sure. Lots of good for sure. Hope all the peeps found new jobs! Peace y’all!
  • 1 0
 Man I'm totally bummed! Love my GG and was given great customer support from advice to parts. I wish I had stocked up on bearing kits before all this. They seemed like really nice folks over there. RIP for warranty as well
  • 8 0
 Pinkbike's efforts to confirm the recent rumors around GG is greatly appreciated. This really is sad. Business is business. If the basic economics were not working then the outcome is not surprising. However, GG never provided any indication of trouble and still has not made any direct statement. As of now their website is still up and showing products. Ghosting their existing customers really tarnishes the excellent reputation they had.

I've owned other "boutique" bikes. So I have no illusions about the perils that may include. But the most enjoyable bikes I've ever ridden were built around locally made frames from small builders. When I bought my GG the company had been around for a decade and just moved into a new location. All were indications to me that GG would be around for the long haul. I don't put much stock in "lifetime" warranties even from Big Bike companies. Trek and Specialized will find a way to deny your warranty claim. My concerns are about obtaining basic service parts like proprietary pivot bolts.

Best wishes to the former employees who were impacted by this debacle.
  • 1 0
 “If” actually ghosts it’s customers, that would really tarnish the good will built up by its fans. But, it’s too early to say that they have…though, people will rightly ask questions as this goes on. There’s tons of legal and other stuff that goes into dissolving a business. And that takes time and if statements are made prematurely, people get in trouble. The real worry is bankruptcy. Thats when most hope is lost for existing customers.
  • 8 0
 I was probably one of the first Revved GG owners in my local area of Vancouver's North Shore. Customer service was second to none during my purchase process, which took place right at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. Usually, same-day responses by GG's team which was a welcome change to my past experiences with other DTC brands. The bike has been awesome, and I think I have been riding with more confidence and control since I picked her up. Also, I was stoked to see Yoann's influence on the region and more local dealers becoming retailers. The stoke for GG was spreading! Post-purchase customer service remained at a high level when I needed to contact them for a warranty replacement for a broken seat stay. Thank you, GG! I will ride my MegaSmash until she breaks and enjoy every minute of it!
  • 8 2
 Rubbish news - Have seen GG grow from the alloy frames to this carbon manufacturing process and always thought they looked like a cool company.

It’s a real shame they needed ‘Angel investment’ to grow and couldn’t go it alone with nobody to answer to but themselves.

Seems like trouble starting to brew at the smaller guys - here in the UK a few smaller brands seem to be close to the edge not including Stanton and the 700k someone put into the company and lost.
  • 6 0
 I got the impression that GG was selling a record amount just a year or two ago when the global supply chain was all crazy and it took a year to get a bike or parts. Since GG frames were made in house it seems more people were choosing GG. It's weird how it seems they were making more money than ever before just a year ago and now they're done. Maybe I'm wrong.
  • 5 0
 Could be part of the reason they're done. Boom and bust doesn't happen without a boom.
  • 4 0
 The parts shortage probably didn't help. They couldn't get enough parts to meet the high demand during the boom and had huge wait times. Then they suddenly had way too many parts after the boom and had to sell everything at a discount in 2023.
  • 8 0
 Here's your chance US bike industry! Swoop up the manufacturing plant and all, get off the Asian milk.
  • 6 1
 Lobby your congress critter. The fact is the cost of doing business here is too high. Mainly due to health insurance overhead. We could have nice things here but benefits feudalism keeps talent stuck at corporations and costs too high for sustainable businesses. Will keep riding my metal smash until it breaks. RIP GG.
  • 8 1
 @wyorider: I know a few folks that worked at GG and they all had glowing reviews of the place.
  • 5 0
 The list of extinct bike brands is much longer than the ones still plugging away.... Don't fall in love with a brand...........
  • 5 2
 I bet this has something to do with that big new building they got in a few during the pandemic. Hard to stay profitable when rent prices are through the roof. Denver is not affordable in the slightest. That being said….this is speculation. I hope we find out what happened. They were a rad company that made cool bikes!
  • 4 0
 Huge new facility. Lots of new staff. A few more "Frame Maker" machines. All of that costs a tremendous amount of money that has just dried up in the post-covid bust.

Seems pretty simple honestly - stop production. Clear out stock. Pay employees until you can't anymore. Turn off the lights. File Chapter 7 Bankruptcy.
  • 9 6
 I had the first megatrail and it was the biggest piece of crap I've ever owned. Alignment issues with the rear triangle that they told me to shim with pedal washers since it was "not possible to machine it perfectly". Torque spec was something like 5nm and if you went over that it would preload the shit out of the bearing, if you went to just 5 even with locktight it would loosen up. To top it off the rear tire contacted the seat tube on bottom out, which it did easily since it was super linear. Made for a nice surprise rear brake on landing bike park features. Sold the bike and the bottom bracket broke out entirely along the welds on the second owner. They told him it was a month out of warranty and he was sol. Not sad to see them go
  • 9 4
 I had two buddy's with major issues from GG. Neither of these fellas ride together, they were entirely seperate experiences.

One buddy had the same issue as you. If I remember right, he had multiple chainstays break and on one occasion the warranty frame arrived missaligned. He ended up getting a full refund from GG because his experience was so bad.

Fast forward to the new Trail Pistol and a different buddy cracks two carbon seatstays at the exact same spots, both times resulting in catastrophic failure and serious crashes. The breaks were at the top of the post mount and the seatstay bridge. Not only did GG claim he was "out riding the capability of the bike" ( in Raleigh, NC haha), but they didn't want the broken parts back to investigate if it was a manufacturing issue. Instead, they charged him for the seatstay, and when he complained and told them he was moving to a different bike brand they fired back with "you'll be hardpressed to find another bike with carbon as strong as ours". Over a year later and double the miles, the little Rocky Mountain Element is still ripping trails without any issues.

Shitty QC and shitty customer service, all hidden behind "USA Made" and some fancy marketing about shredding gnarly trails.
  • 1 1
 @ZSchnei: yep totally agree
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: Pretty sure we know the same person, I don't think he got a refund, he pieced it back together and sold it. He went through several alignment problems before they got it right and he got fed up, then sold it. It was years ago so I could be mistaken but I remember what a nightmare it was. He also had problems with the rear shock blowing out because it was so badly out of alignment.

It sounds like they tried to take care of it, but having responsive CS only goes so far. There is only so far people should have to deal with constant failed replacements and being unable to ride for weeks on end because they couldn't get it right.
  • 3 0
 Sucks for the employees..and a bunch of customers. I ordered a bike before they went under, ignored the red flags..started hearing the rumblings and tried to cancel my order. At that point the company was ghosting everyone and it was known, the only communication I got was the automated shipping notification oh and than bike arrived missing parts. Tried to communicate politely through the whole process but not a single person could reach out and at least say sorry man, you're out of luck enjoy the bike.. I'm a small business owner, I would never.. I feel for the employees and shit rolls down hill so I don't blame any of them The way the company went out was shady at best. If Matty G gets back into the bike industry I will never give him another dollar, so many great bikes out there. Sounds like he took all that time off on our dime
  • 2 0
 This is entrepreneurship and innovation. You make a bet on an innovation you believe the market will value above existing offerings. If you’re right, the market rewards you accordingly. If you’re wrong, or simply have bad timing, you get to go back to the drawing board and try again. Kudos to GG for giving their tech a proper shot and bringing some modern manufacturing techniques into the mountain biking world. I hope those innovators come back in a few years with another novel product, and I hope someone values their innovations enough to buy the IP and apply it to a bike design that is in higher demand.
  • 2 0
 Definitely was a fan, wish I could have bought one... I can't help but wonder if going all in on the carbon production was the best idea? Also, I'm guessing that they didn't get the OEM production business for other companies like they were shooting for with Revved?

Tough times in the bike business right now...
  • 4 0
 It’s the start of the bike crash.

Brands like Evil, Propain, Transition, Revel are in danger since they are Small. They don’t have the large bank accounts to survive
  • 2 0
 Propain and Transition will make it. Their bikes, quality, and service are all stellar. Transition just took two spots on the women's junior podiums at Snowshoe too. I'm surprised Revel is still around - the Ranger I bought was not assembled correctly causing the hardware to grind the main triangle away. They did not stand by it either, so I just sent the frame back on the 30 day money back period. Longer term I consider it a bullet dodged.
  • 2 0
 Quite a few places are struggling now from ramping up during covid and crashing post covid due to over stocking and lack of sales. Just recently a UK called carbon wheel business called Sixth Element has ceased trading and a lot of people bought crash replacement cover. Feel for anyone who is now stuck with a product and no warranty.
  • 3 2
 I had a size 2 and then swapped to a size 3 front end. I had no trouble with the size 2, but the size 3 is just bad. The seat tube hole isn't the right size and the post moves around and creaks no matter what I do. Even got an attempt at service when they were still in business and they couldn't help me. One thing I can't tolerate is a creaky bike.
  • 1 0
 2 things because I've dealt with the creaking on my GG and a slipping seatpost in another: Is the seatpost the right size? Obvious thing to check but figure I'd mention it because I had too small of a seatpost in a bike once. Seemed like it fit but kept moving. Second thing, I lightly greased my entire seat post to get rid of the creaking for my GG. I wonder if you couldn't carbon paste (the gritty stuff) on the seatpost around where the collar tightens and grease every other part of the post to fix both issues.
  • 2 1
 Sucks for them. One of the few carbon bikes I ever had any interest in (luddite/neurotic) and liked how it was made in Colorado, just cause. Sorry to see a dream die. Hopefully at least some of that crew can keep making cool stuff. Definitley leaves me wary of buying from more niche brands if I'm gonna spend real dough.
  • 3 0
 It's a shame to see one of the small companies like GG going out of business. Would have loved to try our wheels out on your frames... stay strong and keep pushing !
  • 4 0
 Long live the GG/DH! Converting mine into a ski bike this season and it's gonna rip
  • 2 0
 Nice I did that with an old Intense M1 and it was great fun (if a bit deadly...)
  • 2 0
 I went on the GG group ride in Moab in 2018. It was an awesome group of people, and (along with a glowing PB review) a big reason why I bought my aluminum Smash. Sad to see them go.
  • 2 0
 I was with you on that ride. It was such a sweet idea and I loved visiting new places like that. Went to Moab and Bellingham with them.
  • 1 0
 I picked up a used Megatrail frame this year as it’s one of the few remaining 27.5 enduro bikes out there. On paper and trails, it’s up there with the rest of ‘em. Love the frame’s flexibility/modularity and it’s a blast to ride. The website had all the parts you’d need to keep it running for a lifetime. Such a shame to see them close doors…
  • 1 0
 Well crap. I am coming off a major injury from riding (broken tibula at the knee, torn meniscus, and a fully separated shoulder, all requiring surgery) so I’ve decided to walk away from MTB and focus on bike packing and gravel. I just listed my GG for sale on here to fund a new bike more suited to my new adventures and I guess I’m screwed. I’ll probably have some really nice parts listed soon with a frame sitting in my basement.
  • 1 0
 I should also say that I absolutely love my GG. Bike absolutely f*cking shreds and it’s never let me down. Took it to snowshoe a month ago instead of my DH bike and it handled everything there with no problems whatsoever.
  • 2 0
 Good luck to all the staff there - I hope folks land on their feet. I'm still laughing at everyone who says "my GG was great" - well, most of them will still work just fine tomorrow! My Mullet Shred Dogg is great fun!
  • 4 3
 Sad to hear this, hats off to the employees and thank you for what you did. GG was my first trip back onto carbon since my original Kestrel wayyyy back then. Never had faith in the impact resistance of tossing it away in my rock strewn area of the world that I reside and ride. Just got a megatrail early summer and love the thing. Sucky to think no spares or warranty should something come up. Real bummer to see a legit, local, cutting edge design and the people that made that happen go away.(only temporarily I hope) Best wishes to those who were in it and gave their heart. #investorssuck
  • 5 4
 Investors are just vultures in $500,000 cars. These companies "operate at a loss" because suddenly there are 10 people who want a 6 figure check for doing little more than throwing money at a company. Investors eat off the same plate as everyone else, and when they don't get what they want they flip the whole table.
  • 4 1
 @RonSauce: it's not the VCs that are the issue....it's the foolhardy company owners that take on too much capital!

it's like offering a kid unlimited candy, then they blame you for the tummy ache. no sir!
  • 1 0
 I've had 3 GG bikes, including one purchased this summer. Bummed they are out, really cool to have a quality US made bike. I hope they get purchased and live on, but I'm skeptical with current economic conditions. Wonder what it would take to buy it.
  • 1 0
 Loved my two alloy GG bikes. They were ahead of their time with geometry. Sadly, aluminum has a fatigue limit. Both bikes fractured in multiple places. On a big brand bike now that has the same modern geometry as a 2017 GG...
  • 8 0
 I've owned tens of aluminum bikes going back to the mid 90s and not one has ever broken. They should not be designed so that the fatigue limit comes into play with intended riding. Imagine if airplanes did that I hope your big brand treats you better than the GGs did. I almost bought a smash but couldn't get over the music bro centric branding of it all. I may get down voted to oblivion for this opinion but 'guerrilla gravity', the smash, gnarvana, pedalhead, shred dogg all sound dumb as hell. Trail pistol was a cool name though. Revved would have been a better brand name imo.
  • 2 0
 Alum does have fatigue life limits but it's typically well within a lifespan of a frame. Airplanes are made out of alum too and they fly 10's of thousands of hours, going as far back as WW2, and still flying to this day. So it's less about the material and more about how it's used and designed.
  • 1 0
 All materials have a fatigue limit
  • 4 1
 @quesoenfuego: technically incorrect - it's the limit in which infinite cycles can occur without failure. Steel and Ti if kept under that limit would last indefinitely from a stress failure perspective, but of course may have other modes of failure. Alum doesn't - it is constantly degrading from Day 1 and has a limited life.
  • 2 4
 @RadBartTaylor: This guy knows his stuff. Also if you aren't eventually snapping your Al bike you aren't riding it that hard or often. For my use an Al bike frame lifetime is 5 years max. Yes airframes are made of aluminum... they also have a useful life of ~30 years beyond that they may fracture. GG made a good frame. Could it have been better? Sure. Did it meet expectations from a material perspective? Yes. Most importantly GG made crazy fun bikes that outperformed until the big brands caught on.
  • 1 0
 What a shame, fewer cool bikes with fun/playful geometry left to choose from. Do hope some big players dare to release more playful models like the boutique brands. And I do hope the talented people at GG find interesting new jobs.
  • 1 0
 I would like to share my personal experience with the GG workers on this thread to commemorate your work and share what the brand has meant to me.

I bought a revved GG Trail Pistol in 2019. I was so stoked to buy a bike built in my backyard. The main 2 reasons I bought it were 1) They made a HUGE size 4 bike and I am 6'6" tall with extremely few options ... most bikes not fitting me is the most frustrating thing in the world. Bobby helped me dial it in, and he was like 6'8 so he knew the deal for tall riders. 2) I heard they were burly bikes but fast and fun. Their modo was "I love goin' fast." Hell yeah.

It was the best bike ever. I loved it and I felt like part of a family when I'd high-five fellow GG riders on the trails... the same way Jeep drivers give the wave. I rode all over Colorado on it. Front Range, Crested Butte, Beaver Creek, Vail, Monarch Crest. It was a special bike and I never had a single problem with it. Never. I raised my daughter riding on the front of it, and we had incredible adventures together on trails and around town. My house burned down in the Marshall Fire in late 2021 in Colorado and I lost everything I own -> that bike is now in the atmosphere from the 2000-degree fire. Replacing that bike was the first big item I purchased after the fire and it made me feel whole again. I got it with dope orange industry nine hubs and decals and call it the "Inferno edition" to say F-you to the fire. Dustin at GG helped me design it, and he was awesome. He let me do a few custom things even when GG kind of sunset the fully custom builds because he knew I needed the right bike. I cried when I got the new bike because I felt so lost in my life without it. I also bought a GG hat because I lost 2 cats in the fire who were named George and Goose, and the GG logo always reminds me of them, and I wear it all the time to spread the vibe about the brand.

Below is a link to an album I had put together showing some experiences on the bike and in life along the way. In there, you will find the cutest picture of a little girl cleaning her daddy's bike, and my newborn twin boys that I pulled around on it all at once. I am so heartbroken to hear this news and wish all the best for the amazing employees of GG. Perhaps someone special or a smart bike brand will pour their heart into resurrecting this exceptional brand for the GG lovers among us. Or maybe a clever crowd-funding campaign to reserve their next-gen bike? I'd put money down.

photos.app.goo.gl/Xton3FfkuJJWBATY6
  • 1 0
 I’m sad about GG but I didn’t get the bike because no water bottle mount but for them to create that frame is pretty awesome hopefully someone thinks of the same
Formula but different layout on frames or maybe just come out with a full Ebike company
  • 1 0
 Woah.
The only thing that stopped me from buying one of those bikes with the pandemic.
There was nothing available, otherwise I would own one.
Kinda glad it didn’t happen now..
  • 2 0
 I'm shocked, I thought they were one of the most up and up companies. Bummed too, had them at top of my list of bikes I'd like to one day own; US built and carbon.
  • 3 0
 Bummer to hear. Met some great people who worked there and they were a great piece in the community for a while.
  • 2 0
 I was planning to ride my metal GG for many more years but the chainstay had other ideas. At least I got about 5 years out of it; enjoyed every minute.
  • 3 0
 Respect to them for giving it go and wish the founders and employees well on their next ventures.
  • 3 0
 Sad to see. I love my aluminum Shreddog/Megatrail. Best mountain bike I've ever owned. I hope i can still find bearings.
  • 3 0
 The pivots are Enduro brand and the headset ones are pretty standard, that's not the issue. Be nice to your frame hardware and tapping out those bearing spacers though.
  • 3 0
 Where's Tony Ellsworth when you need him...surely he could have saved their world.
  • 1 0
 Sad to hear, love my Smash. Probably one of a handfull in Australia. Hope everything works out for the staff, only had great interactions with everyone I spoke to when getting my bike. Cheers GG!
  • 2 0
 Very sad to see them fold, I really liked the story of that company and my alloy Trail Pistol. Hope someone picks them up but at the moment I think it's unlikely.
  • 2 0
 Many more will follow. I'm sure everybody's getting sales emails these days. The economy is taking a shit. Tough times ahead of us.
  • 1 1
 I'm sorry to hear that (although rumours have been flying for quite a while). I had no intentions of buying a GG bike, but I did appreciate what they were doing. I'm worried about the other smaller bike companies out there. I don't think GG will be the only one to go out of business. The good news today was that Bicicletta has new owners and will be back in business!
  • 4 0
 Canary in the industry coal mine. Many more shoes to drop this winter.
  • 2 0
 New pinkbike game. Build a team of companies and you get 10 points every time one ends up 6 feet under. It's sad it's happening but that's what happens when you try to artificially inflate and industry.
  • 2 0
 The shroud of the recession has fallen. Begun the bike wars has... This probably won't be the last company to go belly up in the near future.
  • 1 1
 If you have been reading between the lines, in the MTB world alone (easy to find other examples in rest of industrial world) with lots of other manufacturers 'extending' deep discounts you've already come to the realization we're in the early stages of what will likely be a deep recession. I always had a soft spot for GG - sad to see them go.. look for other boutique brands to follow suit. Tighten them boot straps fellas.. bumpy ride ahead (for most of us).
  • 2 1
 What a bummer! I was looking forward to trying one of those bikes from the state I grew up in. Glad I didn't end up getting one considering this news.
  • 4 5
 Cool bikes - loved what they were all about. Thought the alloy frames had some of the sickest welds I've seen and was a fan of the US-based carbon fiber manufacturing with Revved. Unfortunately I think the a-little-too-basic suspension platform was a (the?) main factor in their sales not getting where they needed to be. The modular platform concept with separate seatstays and chainstays was a sweet concept too - but on the longer travel stuff there was a bit too much flex in the rear end and it seemed for any big sender I knew on a Gnarvana had the same issue where the rear tire would buzz the seat tube on the bigger hits.

Nonetheless, bummer to see this and still think GG was rad. Wish the best to the folks now without a job - hope they can land on their feet.
  • 6 1
 The sad thing is, even if the they had been meeting their sales this could have happened. I don't know who the investors were, but Angel investors are notoriously fickle and easily scared away, especially when they don't have any real passion for the market. Even a bike company that is doing relatively good right now probably isn't doing great, and certainly isn't performing how the bean counters forecasted last year.
  • 4 9
flag wyorider (Oct 3, 2023 at 12:49) (Below Threshold)
 They were comically understaffed. I don't think low sales hurt them as much as a blown-out workforce.
  • 18 2
 Are you referring to a Horst link platform as being a bit “too basic”
The same platform being used by
Specialized
Transition
Norco
Rock Mountain
Basically one of the most widely used bicycle suspension platforms, outside of a single pivot.
  • 3 2
 @onawalk: and in a zillion cars...pretty much a Macpherson strut...nobody's angry with it, like a hundred years on. Martian engineer shows up and you tell them what you want your bike wheel to do, they're probably gonna draw up something very similar.
  • 4 7
 @rockandride6: Angel investors are fickle and easily scared? I'd say they're the exact opposite. They're the people willing to take a risk. They're the least risk-averse people around!
  • 3 0
 @dfiler: Agree, although they do tend to have an expiration date when the company needs to either survive on its own sales or cease to exist. Investors generally won't keep pouring money into a failing company forever. The bike industry has always been a brutal business.
  • 6 1
 @owl-X: Macpherson struts sort of suck though, compared to a double wishbone. They marketed it as if it's this great thing, because it has a name, but the only thing it was really good at was cutting costs.
  • 2 0
 @TucsonDon: and weight and complexity. I'm a big fan of McPherson struts. Nobody's getting behind the wheel of an e46 m3 and claiming the suspension is compromised lol but i digress
  • 2 0
 @dfiler: uh, have you ever worked at a company with Angel Investors? I've been at 3, and they all come in with a heap of passion and enthusiasm, then they tend to slowly lose interest and move onto the next shiny thing. Also, I did caveat it with that it's more common when the investor isn't passionate about the space.
  • 3 0
 @owl-X: isnt a Horst link suspension more similar to an opposing A-arm design?
If you elongated the rocker link, ala old Ellsworth bikes, youd essentially have an upper and lower A-arm (rocker and chainstay) with the wheel attached to the seat stay (spindle).

A MacStrut, would have the chainstay acting as the suspended portion, like an old Moots softride wouldnt it?
  • 3 0
 I heard Revved is done too.
  • 6 7
 Maybe it's just me, could be, I'm ok being the only one.....but lots of conjecture, assumptions and vague understanding from 'anonymous sources' to put out a article eh? What if, and believe me this is a hypothetically (in my best 'Bob' voice), there is a transition or they are being bought out? Seems like good reporting practice is to wait until things are official and due diligence has been done directly with GG?
  • 7 0
 @RadBartTaylor "....I celebrate his whole catalog."
  • 3 0
 @bman33: "...No way! Why should I change? He's the one who sucks."
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTalyor:
You are not alone in this thought..
  • 3 1
 @jgottya1: wonder why I am getting downvoted so hard then? What I was suggesting was, I thought, std. reporting acumen.
  • 4 1
 @RadBartTaylor: Sadly my friend we are surrounded by those that instead of taking one’s thoughts or opinion as adult freewill and pondering it, feel it necessary to mash a button to show their dislike… I recently posted a valid concern to the sponsor or Christina’s suspension guide, Ohlins and I apparently either got downvoted off the section or was removed by the mods. Either way ridiculousness exists here in large amounts. Again, fully agree, I just bought a GG a few months back and had concerns about the rumblings but would rather see that in a forum until an official release from the company was released. Keep riding and enjoying life!!
  • 3 1
 @RadBartTaylor: HA! sorry dude you made the mistake of calling out conjecture, loose opinions and basically a lot of people trying to pass off their poorly formulated opinions as pure gold. This is PinkBike and you are essentially calling out the average user. Its like the Facebook of MTB. And good luck challenging PB for not having consistent quality journalism. If journalistic quality was a standard here, there would be almost never anything to read or yap about in the comments. If you are a reasonable person with a brain this can be a difficult social media platform at times.
  • 3 0
 That's a real shame, I liked what they were doing.
  • 2 0
 The gravity of this situation cannot be understated. In all seriousness condolences to the GG fam
  • 2 0
 They moved shop out to a little shack in the woods. Guerilla gravity has gone guerilla warfare
  • 2 1
 If the company is really good and can potentially survive, why don't the employees take it over and form a cooperative or company? They would be employees and masters.
  • 2 0
 i feel like this is coming for all those "new" brands building 2000 bikes that dont sell Frown
  • 1 0
 Bummer, if i had the money i'd want to help fund them. I have been trying to get my hands on one for a hot minute. Sad to see them go.
  • 1 1
 Wow. Just earlier today I offered to trade a guy for his The Smash. Coincidence? I think so.

BTW, still interested, Mr. JLaw3000.
  • 3 5
 "The split seemed odd considering the mid-year timing plus the clearly affectionate relationship that stayed in place."

That's not odd. Athletes almost always give affectionate goodbyes when they get change brands. Otherwise, the new brand would be wondering what shit they're going to spew at the end of that next contract.
  • 1 0
 RIP GxG- we will miss your huge head tube and your crazy looking toptube…

But seriously you will be missed.
  • 1 0
 This sucks, but in the end, businesses are hard. Sucks to fail, but good for them for going for it.
  • 7 9
 This is a bummer. I liked the made in usa aspect for sure and they were well priced considering. Didn’t dig the marketing much though. Shred the gnarliest gnar on my gnarvana brah. Meant to appeal to young shredders I guess? However, everybody I ever met riding one was a middle aged midway though a mid life crisis poser with a flat brim on. Throwing devil horns like there is no tomorrow.
  • 1 3
 With a Bell helmet and a COMBA jersey.
  • 3 0
 Yet you have YT article subs and clearly ride a Young Talents Jeffsy lol.
  • 1 2
 @Jcolis1904: ha. Yeah I actually had 2 Yt’s 4-5 years ago ya fuggin stalker. Back then they were such a good value, they were hard to ignore. And Fwiw I can actually ride a bike. My point is sometimes when you market your brand in such a specific direction, it can be detrimental or in this case have the opposite effect.
  • 1 1
 Yeah, I actually do think the marketing/aesthetics were a big issue for them. I actually did own a GG as well (pedalhead was my first "real" bike) even though I actually thought the "I like goin' fast" thing was really goofy. That bike also came with a bottle opener at the rear axle for some reason. Like was anyone actually opening beers on their bike?

I think the "shred" and "gnar" kind of lingo combined with the "you can have any color your want as long as it's black" kind of thing turned people away. The thing is, they did have some good ideas with frame modularity and miusa carbon is kind of cool, but I think that a lot of the general bike buying population just was not into their aesthetic. Which is kind of funny because I think that Transition is kind of doing that exact same thing in a much more palatable way. They have somewhat affordable, nice looking bikes with sharp angular lines implying a more aggressive intent and their website says "party time leverage curve" or whatever, but the bike itself looks clean and you don't feel like a poseur for having one.
  • 9 12
 This is probably the least shocking industry news of the year... their branding was always terrible, targeting a niche segment of the riding population, they badly botched their rebrand, and they never gained any traction outside of their original core customer.
  • 2 0
 GGWP
  • 1 0
 What a depressing end. Feel bad for all the GG owners out there.
  • 1 0
 Does this mean half off bikes?
  • 1 0
 best of luck to all the GG folks. my alloy megatrail rocked!
  • 1 1
 Aw. Sad to hear it. I'm a local and now I regret never going and visiting their shop...
  • 2 0
 I wish them well
  • 1 0
 Can’t some sort of crowdfunding bring them back?
  • 1 0
 such a shame...the Gnarvana is in my top 3 bikes i´d like to buy Frown
  • 1 0
 Looks like yoan knew what was coming based on his announcement
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio your bottle cage is on upside down
  • 1 2
 This article appears to have disappeared from the news feed, so I hope that means that GG has been acquired by a company that can bail them out and set things straight.
  • 1 2
 Ok, I am wrong about it not being in the feed, but still hope that are picked up.
  • 2 1
 Liquidation sale?
  • 5 0
 There were some insane deals a couple months ago; 27.5 bike with top end components, carbon bars, carbon cranks, I9 wheels, for like $2k
  • 9 2
 @mkul7r4: In other words, near Cost.
  • 5 7
 Seems odd the investors just accepted a loss rather than flogging a patent to greeenwash to a larger comeptitor
  • 1 0
 Investors can now license a valuable technology that's been validated.
  • 1 0
 The angel investor ownership stake is based on capital, they typically do not have ownership claim of assets. Patents and processes are assets. Basically, make money for the investor or they will pull out.
  • 1 0
 there were investors? thought this was privately owned?
  • 3 0
 @vemegen: the article said "A source with knowledge of Guerrilla Gravity who would like to stay anonymous told Pinkbike that the angel investor(s) who had been supporting the brand previously decided to pull out and shut the company down."
  • 6 3
 @vemegen: a business can be privately owned, but funded by outside investment. I suspect an investor, in this case, is just the bank that said yes to a loan. Without the loan being paid back due to the company not being profitable, the bank (read, investor) will not continue to provide capital.
  • 9 0
 @jakemcab: not likely a bank in this case. A bank would not be referred to as an investor, they would be a creditor. And if it was a bank that was providing loans that were defaulted on the company would have had to file for bankruptcy.

This had to be an investor of some sort who was providing funding in exchange for a portion of ownership in the company.
  • 3 0
 Usually $ goes in a fund. The fund makes multiple investments. Some win, some lose, some are average. You hope the winners are home runs. Taking a loss sometimes is part of the game. And once it looks like the ship is sinking, there is often no appetite to throw good money after bad to try and save it. That is left to someone else to come along and buy the name, IP, etc.and try again.
  • 3 0
 @jakemcab: A bank is a lender, not an investor.
  • 3 0
 @j1sisslow: I guess if they needed an angel investor, they weren't exactly profitable. And sales have only gone down since the pandemic ended... If they took on the angel investor to expand because of how gangbusters things were going during the pandemic and then ended up overextended when the boom ended, that could explain it too.
  • 1 0
 @TucsonDon: I would suspect the investor was there before the pandemic. The tooling to produce carbon bikes is probably very expensive. Lots of cash was needed.
  • 1 0
 @j1sisslow: yea and ‘angel investor’ is generally someone who invests very early on with seed money to get the business stated.
  • 2 0
 @j1sisslow: Yeah, I guess if they were there from the start they would have expected decent return on their investment by now...
  • 2 4
 They may have thrived if the manufacturing part was contracted out.
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