Norco Files Patent for New Downhill Bike

Jan 18, 2024 at 10:32
by Dario DiGiulio  
We've already covered Norco's new DH race rig pretty extensively in the Inside Scoop article that Matt wrote up this past August, with a detailed look at the test mule they've been developing things on. Now some of the intangibles have been set in stone, with a patent filed to describe the rear suspension kinematic and all it's contingent components.



Photos by Tom Richards
The test mule.

photo
The final drawing of said mule.

Published by the US Patent Office earlier this morning, Norco's novel suspension design sports a few details we don't often see in combination, as well as a wide array of possible adjustments to change the kinematic bit by bit.

As touched on in that first look, the bike implements a 6-link design, with the added complexity put in place to allow for that kinematic alteration without too many knock-on effects. Those two extra links come in the form of an upper shock link actuation member, and a pushrod actuating the damper member. As noted in the coverage of the test mule: "The lower link mounted to the front triangle and the chainstay also drives a pushrod link that actuates a further upper link that drives the shock. That pushrod link rotates on two spherical bearings to isolate the link driving the shock from lateral loads."

One of Norco's development engineers laid out the principle goals of the new designs when we met with the team back in August, and those goals are worth reiterating here.

bigquotesWe’ve filed two patents based on the suspension layout and kinematic adjustment designed into the new DH race bike. The first patent applies to the overall suspension layout which retains the axle path and anti-rise characteristics of the high virtual pivot layout used on the Range while introducing a dedicated shock actuation link for greater independent control of the bike’s leverage curve. The second patent applies to the method of leverage curve progression adjustment we’ve designed into the bike which allows us to alter the level of support from the rear suspension in isolation without needing to alter shock tune, damper settings, spring rate or shock pressure. Colin Ryan

Though they were tight with information about the specific curves the bike was achieving, those are laid out a bit more plainly in the newly filed patent. Great care was taken to differentiate the new 6-link design from prior 4-link (referred to as "prior art" throughout the patent) designs, particularly in the leverage ratio and progression department. Those factors can be altered by changing the mounting points of the shock and other members, though the resultant curves aren't specifically laid out in the patent.

photo
Leverage ratio.
photo
Progression ratio.
Though there are no numbers accompanying these figures, the shape tells the story. "Rear Suspension 10," which represents Norco's new 6-link layout, shows a more linear and consistent curve than a traditional 4-bar, in both progression and leverage ratio. This should help make shock tuning process easier, and assure that the ride quality is consistent and predictable. Being able to preserve these characteristics while changing other variables is impressive, and should allow for careful, discreet tuning of different areas of the bike.

The described model has a high instant center that moves forward as the suspension is compressed, which is a determining factor in the overall axle path of the rear wheel. This can negatively effect the anti-rise curve of the bike, so extra links are used to maintain the desired non-linear anti-rise curve that is typical in a 4-bar layout.

The patent also describes an alternative layout to the current design, meant to achieve the same variable control and kinematic. It's hard to say whether this will show up for other packaging application, such as a trail bike, ebike, or alternative downhill frame, but it's there to see just the same.

photo
Current layout.
photo
Alternate layout.



Beyond all the kinematic information presented in the patent, there are some other interesting details worth noting that showed up in the designs.

photo

As you can see here, the bottom bracket shell is far more complex than the typical cylinder most bikes use. The mule had a racetrack-shaped bottom bracket, which is likely used to alter ride height and pedaling forces on the suspension, but this diagram shows what could be more space to the front of the BB as well, perhaps for more adjustment or a more robust method of fixing the bearing in place.

Photos by Andy Vathis
Photos by Andy Vathis

Also shown in a couple of the drawings are what look like bottle bosses in the downtube of the frame, both in groups of three. That's a detail that wasn't present on the alloy mule, but I'd guess they're a more elegant method for playing with chassis weight. You could bolt weights to the various points of the frame, effecting the ride characteristics significantly.

photo
Threaded inserts here.
Photos by Tom Richards
But none here.



The new bike certainly looks to be a well-engineered project, and with team testing well underway with their newest up-and-coming athlete, this is sure to be an exciting season for Norco on the world stage. We'll be trying to get our hands on one of these as soon as possible, so stay tuned.



Editor's Note: We've received this note from Norco, regarding the new design and their plans going forward.
bigquotesYou were quick to spot this one! The patent that was published today is one of the patents we spoke about with Matt when he visited last summer to chat about our DH bike. This patent applies to the suspension layout used on our new DH race bike and was developed from our learning with the High Virtual Pivot layout on the Range. We wanted a suspension layout that built off the benefits of the Range while allowing more independent adjustability of different kinematic traits to tailor the bike exactly to the needs of the Norco Factory Racing team. This design has proven itself over the last season and a half of testing first with our DH Development Engineer Kirk and later with the team riders. We’re excited to continue to develop it this year with the Norco Factory Racing team! Colin Ryan


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Member since Dec 25, 2016
176 articles

221 Comments
  • 480 7
 Minnorco
  • 20 16
 This needs more applause
  • 30 4
 Gnaarco
  • 33 5
 Gregorco
  • 30 3
 The patent application should include a little Minnaar riding the bike (of course with a little number and arrow pointing to him like all the other parts: Fig 6. 37 -> GOAT). Then if anyone else signs him they can file for infringement
  • 6 2
 The GOATPP
  • 18 2
 Norco should just rebrand to Greg&Co.
  • 14 2
 Gregs
  • 5 4
 Mignarco
  • 3 1
 Goatco
  • 150 7
 Look nothing like a session
  • 60 3
 Treks' lawyers will find a way to disagree
  • 32 9
 @BitsNBobs: Trek isn’t Specialized
  • 19 4
 Looks like the nukeproof dissent.
  • 6 0
 "Looks like a Supreme" is the new "Looks like a Session".
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: looks like a demo
  • 86 3
 The amount of puzzling Greg Minnaar will go through with this bike will be phenomenal.
  • 42 1
 Jordy is going to finally have to get his PhD in psych.
  • 9 6
 Greg will get lost with all this! Feel sorry for jordi and the mechanics.
  • 25 1
 @mattjolley: Jordi is one part suspension expert and three parts therapist
  • 4 3
 I think Minnaar wants it in carbon, though. Wink
  • 13 1
 Can you imagine if loris was on the team though. The sheer spectrum of noises to decipher
  • 3 1
 @mattjolley: more like PTSD
  • 5 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: Jordi looks like he needs a therapist after dealing with some of the riders. Smile Dialed is such a good series.
  • 11 0
 Wahahaha, Too right!
  • 73 6
 Norco really seems to be doing some cool things these days and dare I say it one of the most innovative bike companies out there right now?
  • 20 57
flag HeatedRotor FL (Jan 18, 2024 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 But putting a High pivot on low travel bikes isnt the innovation we need....
  • 45 0
 @HeatedRotor: I dunno, my Forbidden Druid was a pretty sweet bike.
  • 7 0
 @HeatedRotor: I can't say whether we need that or not in particular, but the definition of "innovation" seems to have become pretty loose...
  • 8 1
 Only a mere 17 years after Corsair Bikes, and how many years after the Balfa BB7?
  • 5 6
 @HeatedRotor: idk why you are getting down voted so much for your opinion. Maybe people haven't found out that the next gen Optic and Sight are HP's
  • 4 2
 @ChristianToole: They're getting downvoted because innovation is apparenlty a bad thing because this individual doesn't like high pivot. All bikes should apparently be just like the one they currently ride.
  • 5 2
 @ZSchnei: No, they shouldn't be just like the bikes we currently ride. But the benefits of HP aren't, in my mind, worth the downsides on a light travel bike.
  • 2 1
 @rrolly: Light travel bikes are XC bikes and Downcrountry bikes. The Optic is a short travel trail bike, and although it can do a little bit of everything well, the outgoing generation placed an emphasis on maximizing descending capabilites in a short travel package.

Some riders don't need oodles of travel, but they want a competent descender. This bike could be an absolute riot, and finally give the successful short travel Druid a run for it's money. For these people, the benefits of HP are worth it in a short travel package.

It's simply foolish to say something isn't the innovation we need - as consumers we want all innovation and all the choices we can get.
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: I'm all for innovation. The problem arises when you change a design of something that removes the benefits of the original (eg. headset routing).

The Optik was a an efficient climber and a really good descending short travel bike. Changing it to a HP does indeed make it a Druid competitor, but you lose efficiency and practicality in order to gain a different descending characteristic, one that many don't want.

Of course, I could totally be wrong once I get a chance to ride the new Optik. But the change to "more capable" descender isn't always a good one. When Norco changed the 2019 Sight to the 2020 iteration, they lost a playful trail bike in exchange for a mini-Range.
  • 3 0
 They really should have made this into an ebike. I just want to see all the heads explode Big Grin
  • 1 1
 @rrolly: I see your point, but in reality there will always be benefits gained and benefits lost during innovation, this doesn't just apply to bikes. Benefits lost are all subjective, and in the case of bikes, cannot be generalized just because the category of bike. More choice is still better, IMO.

Personally, I believe that Norco is making some really good changes to their lineup. The new Fluid fills in for the outgoing Optic, and now the Optic becomes a rowdier short travel trail bike for those who don't need a Sight. This gives riders two choices in just Norco's trail bike category which is a win win for consumers.

The new Slash is a great example of how well an HP bike can climb, and many argue it climbs better than the outgoing non-HP version. This tells us that the Optic could still be an efficient climber, but we'll of course find out once it's released.
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: Choice is good. Buy what works for you. To claim that Norco shouldn’t build a HP optic because it won’t work for your use case is not a great argument.
  • 1 1
 @kylar: Mine was OK, But it was never good at 'overal' It reminded me of the current sight, Good bike but just lacks that 'edge'
  • 1 1
 @boozed: brands still cant figure out About idler placement.... All the bikes released with an idler on the seat stay arm(DH bikes) Instantly appeared at races with new locations... most wised up and put it on the pivot...
  • 3 0
 @HeatedRotor: That is because of the I-track patent
  • 1 0
 @VampireKing: Do you have a link or info about this?
  • 1 0
 Innovation = more pivots
  • 2 0
 @HeatedRotor: he is right about the I track patent
  • 1 0
 @haen: not arguing against, just want to see the patents for myself & how it looks compared to.
  • 1 0
 @VampireKing: so looking at I-track and what john hall says is the opposite of what im saying.
I-track's patent seems to be about a moving idler in relation to the front triangle, so putting the idler on the high pivot bolt isnt infringing?
  • 1 0
 @haen: see my reply to vampireking. Its the opposite of what im saying, in other words you can put the idler on the pivot bolt.
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: your earlier post mentioned how the high pivot DH bikes moved the idler from the seatstay to the pivot. The reason was to avoid the itrack patent. An idler at the pivot does not move relative to the front triangle.
  • 1 0
 @haen: Many HP bikes have the Idler on the seat or Chainstay which causes the Idler to move, which is what the I-track seems to be, I-track has its limitations in the form of travel path vs Idler location the possibilities are endless in the way of its to hard to get right.
If they were trying to avoid the patent why do so many try it/do it?

Does any brand put the idler on an upper link like the enduro/stumpy has? does that fall into the patent?
  • 1 0
 @HeatedRotor: The I-track patent only applies to Mulit-link bikes. All the bikes you are thinking of are single pivots. Like the Trek, Devinci, and Commencal.
  • 20 0
 Cool design!
  • 14 1
 In the current climate, when I read ‘’Norco files’’, my brain finished the sentence by adding ‘’for bankrupcy’’. Good to hear it’s for a patent that a company files for this time….
  • 11 1
 It's closer to an upside down version of Knolly's 4x4 than a true 6-bar. Axle path comes from the stays and lower link, leverage curve comes from those plus the upper linkage. But the upper linkage (the 2 more bars that would make it 6) has nothing to do with axle path like the links in a true 6-bar would.

Novel because it hasn't been applied to an inverted-horst high-pivot, but the idea of a secondary linkage to control leverage independently of the axle path is not at all novel.
  • 11 0
 In the first diagram #2 is the front tire and #4 is the rear tire, in case anyone was wondering.
  • 3 0
 Big possibility that #12 might be the frame?
  • 9 0
 Oh that externally routed rear brake hose, with no under-bottom bracket "stick grabber" loop - a golden design moment right there!!!
  • 6 0
 I would love someone explain what this "progression" graph is, I always thought that progression is simply a derivative of leverage curve which in this case looks like a constant.
  • 28 1
 Progression is generally defined as: (lev_start - lev_end) / (lev_start) * 100% (Note: some people/companies divide by lev_end which gives much higher percentages for bikes that are very progressive). The derivative of the leverage curve is related to the wheel rate which is a little different.

In this case the progression curve just makes the above calculation at each step of the travel. I don't personally think progression is some magical metric that tells you everything about the bike but looking at where the progression is being added in the travel can be just one more helpful bit of info when tuning.

Source: I wrote the software that output those curves.
  • 3 1
 Agreed. I don't understand why the progression graph isn't just a horizontal straight line.
  • 1 0
 But you always thought it right. Progression is derivative of leverage curve. If you look at leverage ration curves of those two alternatives, you can see the 4bar is a bit curvy while their 6bar is almost straight line. That's why the progression curve of their 6bar also looks like straight line, but it isn't.
  • 1 0
 @RoboDuck: Always good to get things straight from the source Smile . I don't really see what this metric of 'progression' adds in terms of insight. Leverage ratio is important for tuning, since it determines the ratio of spring and damping forces. Derivative of leverage ratio would tell you more about where in the travel progression is added than this metric.But I guess a straight, tilted line is less boring to look at than a flat line.
  • 2 0
 @RoboDuck: good to see the Syn screen grabs here Smile
  • 7 0
 Fun patent facts. US patent applications publish on Thursdays ~18 months after the earliest filing date of the application. New issued US patents publish on Tuesdays.
  • 7 0
 Proper lookin race machine. That's at least 50% of it for me. You gotta be able to sit there and admire your bike.
  • 6 0
 Very innovative solution to get a water bottle cage to fit
  • 6 2
 So cool the industry is balls to the wall with DH teams, bikes, development. I am kidding, I am curious why so much DH mojo lately, not like it has a promising future.
  • 11 0
 Dh racing doesn't have a promising future, but that won't stop the park rats. Depending on where you live, bike parks are still awesome even if dh racing isn't on tv. Plus free ride is live and well I think
  • 8 0
 @DCF: Being a mid career office worker-type professional, I prefer "park patrons". Seriously, owning a downhill bike makes me inexplicably happy. Racing has been through these crises in the past and will recover.
  • 1 11
flag emptybe-er (Jan 19, 2024 at 0:00) (Below Threshold)
 @The-Foiling-Optimist: In the states, “park rat” is a general term used solely by people with the inability to jump, manual, or jib in any capacity. It seems like an attempt to avoid feeling incompetent. “Oh, of course they can jump, honey, that’s all park rats do” Same with shop rat. We get it, you’re not mechanical. It’s ok.
  • 5 2
 @emptybe-er: I think of park rats as the people who only ride bike park. More specifically the edge lords who are always these overly rowdy attention seeking types.
  • 2 0
 @Solorider13: Ah man those guys that can ride are so annoying, huh?
  • 2 0
 @Solorider13: jumping and stuff is so edgy! It’s actually offensive if you love your spandex and wagonwheels
  • 1 1
 @Solorider13: The park rat label is only used by flaccid, emasculated bird watchers
  • 2 1
 @emptybe-er: So if a bird watcher can get a boner, are they ok? lol
  • 3 0
 @emptybe-er: Emasculated and flaccid kinda go hand in hand, so let's not waste space on semi-redundant insults.

Hey look - a Bushtit
  • 1 1
 @emptybe-er: I see I have struck a nerve here, calm down buddy, it’s probably maybe not even you.

I frequent the bark park quite a bit, but everyone knows the types of people described Wink
  • 2 0
 @suspended-flesh: Ones mental, ones physical
  • 2 1
 @Solorider13: Buddy? This is just critical discourse, nobody is angry. I’m ok with your lack of skill and balls and using a lame label to minimize, deflect, and ease the pain. Go ahead and sound goofy, up to you. I’m just glad I don’t have to try to repair my ego like that.
  • 2 0
 @bman33: Get your mind out of the gutter! Who said anything about a boner. Whole body is flaccid, a watery container of excuses caused by softness.
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: You have a point.
  • 3 1
 My first mtn bike was a Norco back when people didn’t know what they were. Went to the Norco presentation when they came to Squamish for the Sight release, great crew super smart obviously. Can’t wait to see this bike raced.
  • 4 1
 Looks a cool bike and I like the adjustment idea but it might be a nightmare to maintain and clean etc especially in the uk where it’s pretty much grit and mud 80% of the time
  • 4 0
 "a racetrack-shaped bottom bracket"

This made me LOL more than it should.

Do you fit the bottom bracket by only screwing it in to the left?
  • 3 2
 "Great care was taken to differentiate the new 6-link design from prior 4-link (referred to as "prior art" throughout the patent) designs, particularly in the leverage ratio and progression department."

Great care = plotting one dataset with small circles and the other dataset with smaller circles...
Without context (or a microscope) it's difficult to tell which is which.
  • 6 0
 One is squares, one is circles...but yeah. And who says all 'conventional' 4 bar systems have a leverage curve anything like that??
  • 8 7
 I really hope Norco will update their warranty for this new frame. Disappointing they only offer 3 yr for DH/enduro frames but 5 for road/commuter bikes. They need to at least match the 5 yr which is what most other lower end brands are doing. I am looking at this new Norco frame or the Forbidden Supernought however the latter offers lifetime warranty so it is tough to buy the Norco as a heavy 117kg/6’5 rider. My last 3/4 frames have had to be warrantied and I recently cracked the head tube on my S Enduro and replacement was within 2-3 weeks. Can anyone chime in on Norco’s warranty experience?
  • 21 115
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 Norco is a low end brand charging top end prices, the maple syrupers love em cuz they’re homers
  • 17 0
 @mcfadden999: What makes Norco a "low end" brand and other brands made in the same factories "high end"?
  • 15 0
 @mcfadden999: Maple Syrup is also made in the states...
  • 37 0
 @amack5: @boozed that loser also trolls the Vital boards, its probably best to just ignore him
  • 2 10
flag AppleJack76 FL (Jan 18, 2024 at 14:53) (Below Threshold)
 @amack5: Yes, Vermont. But they are so far North, with only a pop. of 647K, they should just join Kanuckistanian.
  • 9 43
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 15:22) (Below Threshold)
 @boozed: Norco sights are known to crack, the shore was dropping chains before the new slash even had a carbon mold
  • 8 46
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 15:23) (Below Threshold)
 @mtmc99: trolling and having a contrary opinion to the herd are two different things my friend
  • 10 2
 @mcfadden999: "Norco is a low end brand" is a stupid thing to say. Everybody that rides, loves them. Stop being stupid.
  • 5 39
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 15:57) (Below Threshold)
 @tjord: have you polled everyone who has ridden one? Go watch Paul Aston’s channel. Stop being a fanboy.
  • 5 1
 @AppleJack76: We'd take them, Vermont is awesome!
  • 3 28
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 16:02) (Below Threshold)
 @bishopsmike: can we have BC?
  • 6 12
flag kobold (Jan 18, 2024 at 16:05) (Below Threshold)
 @mcfadden999: They def look cheap next to Yeti and SC in the local shop
  • 9 0
 It blows my mind that any DH or Enduro frame would come with a warranty at all. You realize that just makes frames more expensive and manufacturers the freedom to build frames that break.
  • 3 1
 For a DH bike, the majority of brands like Canyon, Trek, Specialized, Commencal, Scott will have their standard 5 or so year warranty reduced to 2 for their DH bikes. Few brands will have 3-5 year warranties and only a handful will have lifetime warranties. This is how the new V10 arguably becomes one of the best value bikes.
  • 4 0
 @spicysparkes:

trek has a lifetime warranty... Good thing as I just found a headtube crack today..

www.trekbikes.com/ca/en_CA/warranty_policy

I would never consider a frame with less than 5 years warranty. Why? Because I've cracked every frame I've owned since 2007.
  • 1 0
 @stubs179:

I wouldn't buy a bike without a good warranty...

That's probably why companies offer them...
  • 2 0
 @skimtb1: My bad you're right. That's quite an impressive warranty, especially the 3 years for subsequent owners.
  • 5 0
 @boozed: this guy is a total clown he just disrupts a lot of stuff on the other site forms as well.
  • 3 0
 @bishopsmike: Vermont is indeed awesome, Quebec is awesome er though.
  • 5 0
 Yeah I can. I don't ride Norcos anymore because oh how the warranty department treated me. Absolute shit.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: perception and branding
  • 2 10
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 19, 2024 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @bigmeatpete420: I just point out bad product or points of view
  • 1 0
 Simpmano's do it all smart shock thinger will make all suspension designs obselete. Replace rider with a robot and we are getting there. Feed that robot digital money to make it go faster, which funnels right to UCI's pockets.
  • 1 0
 Off the topic, but what is the gear range? Looks kind of puny. Only one chain ring, and only a few sprockets on the rear cassette. Were they trying to keep that rear derailleur jockey wheel up and away from the rocks? Give here, take there.
  • 6 2
 Are they scared Forbidden might copy them Smile
  • 6 2
 Orange have gone bust. Don't want to be like Orange. ADD MORE PIVOTS!
  • 2 0
 Kinda funny how you need a chain stay protector on your seat stay but not on your chain stay. Have to call the upper stay a cheat stay I guess
  • 2 0
 Norco has brought aggressive euro geometry and niche suspension platforms to the masses at an absolute stellar pricepoint. Holy!
  • 5 2
 As an engineer, this has to feel good. One of your designs being patented, now that's some resume builder.
  • 3 0
 This is just published patent application. It will be more interesting if/when the application is examined by the USPTO and the inventors are granted a patent. But still cool to be named on a patent application.
  • 2 0
 So... The real question is whether we will see more of the @norcobicycles range available in South Africa thanks to the connection with Greg?
  • 2 0
 I bet a bearing change on this is going to be fun. With all the bearings and pivots I wonder how true the frame is going to be in production.
  • 4 1
 Why so many photos of privates?
  • 1 0
 At first glance I legit thought Greg had saved Nukeproof from the chopping block with how close this bike looks to the nukeproof when you first see it!
  • 3 1
 Some of the photos are private.
  • 4 2
 All for a bike they have no plans of ever putting up for sale.
  • 4 2
 can't wait till Valli's new YT is released
  • 1 0
 Norco are going to be shooting from the hip at Round 1! Thing looks insane!
  • 2 0
 Seems those mounting points are for bolt on down tube protectors?
  • 3 1
 Has a G.O.A.T. Link in it...
  • 2 1
 looks like a "shit ton of linkage" design, very much in line with the popular 6 bar linkage..
  • 2 0
 I've seen this before.........haven't I?
  • 2 0
 Real shame norco no longer have a distro in the uk
  • 1 0
 Norco's website says ZyroFisher, is that no longer the case? They seem to distribute some big brands, although they themselves say they're not a distributor, but "an enabler" of brands, whatever that means. I just hope there's no Mike Ashley connection.
  • 1 0
 @commental: no, they have now dropped norco
  • 2 0
 But can it hold onto its chain and not implode…
  • 2 11
flag mcfadden999 (Jan 18, 2024 at 23:08) (Below Threshold)
 Since it’s a norco, no
  • 1 0
 Deceptively clean, like the Range. There's a crapload of stuff going on in there...
  • 2 1
 and will literally make fuck all difference but cost more in bearing replacement.
  • 2 1
 Norco's going to give Syndicate a run for their money (Greg X New DH Bikes).
  • 1 0
 Meanwhile I'm still riding my 6yold Antidote Darkmatter with what Norco tries to patent in 2024
  • 1 0
 The coolest innovation Norco could do is bring their manufacturing back to North America.
  • 2 1
 That looks sick. Nice and clean.
  • 1 0
 Keep it raw alloy plz. Lots too sick to paint.
  • 3 2
 Looks like a Deviate Claymore/Highlander.
  • 1 0
 What was wrong with Aurum HSP?
  • 1 0
 Norco have caught my eye with this - what a class looking bike!
  • 1 0
 Low pivot bikes will be the future.
  • 1 0
 Looks as good as it probably rides. Looking forward trying it
  • 1 0
 Inspired by the 30 year old GT RTS-1?
  • 1 0
 aluminum isn't dead this rig looks sick
  • 6 7
 The lower linkage looks like it would collect rocks/mud fairly easily. A BB strike would be pretty devastating.
  • 8 0
 It looks like you'd hit the chainring/bashguard before clipping that linkage, assuming it's a wide contact point.
  • 1 2
 Take a look at the bottom bracket, its ovalized, the bottom of the oval appears to protect the rear lower link.
  • 4 0
 @Simann: I think that's so that they can run the bottom bracket lower or higher there's probably a threaded flip-chip or something similar.

this pic shows it pretty well: www.pinkbike.com/photo/25290200
  • 1 0
 Think about which way that lower link moves as the suspension compresses too...
  • 2 0
 It probably does not protrude as much at sag though, just like for the Norco Range.
  • 2 0
 If it’s anything like the Range, it rotates up and away when the bike is weighted. I did clip it on a rock when trying to unweight once, it felt a little weird but wasn’t a catastrophe.
  • 2 1
 @danielfloyd: Even so, the lower link is akin to a Niner Rip9 and WFO. I've had both and neither were a problem. Frankly, if you are landing yourself over obstacles that contact the bottom bracket, you may need to change your line choice.
  • 2 0
 @Simann: I had a rip 9 as well. It always looked like it was going to be an issue but in reality it never was.
  • 2 0
 New Spez DH Proto is WAY worse in this regard.
  • 11 11
 Maybe it's just me, but I think all high pivot bikes look ugly.
  • 15 4
 I think it’s you
  • 3 2
 High pivots are opposite of a good idea
  • 1 1
 The yellow AND white jot patches are triggering my OCD
  • 1 1
 That Bottom Bracket is packing - good eyes danga D!
  • 1 1
 Chainstay looks super short
  • 2 3
 Developing a bike that can't take a long travel dropper post, better patent it!
  • 1 0
 wuh.... it's a downhill bike....
  • 1 1
 @onemanarmy: That's my point, nobody buys downhill bikes
  • 1 0
 The Goat will win more
  • 1 0
 YUMMM
  • 1 1
 Cool stuff! But it is still a Sunn Radical+ from the 90s
  • 1 1
 Photo is private>
  • 1 2
 Looks like a evil or niner mixed together with giant
  • 1 1
 Wow, Norco
  • 1 2
 Suspension links layout looks way too complicated.
  • 1 1
 I want this frame Big Grin \m/
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