Review: Reeb Steezl - US Made & Super Capable

Oct 1, 2023 at 22:38
by Dario DiGiulio  
Reeb Cycles has been making an eclectic lineup of bikes for some time now, but they've remained fairly low-profile until the past couple years. They garnered quite a bit of attention with their SST trail bike, proving yet again that steel is a perfectly viable material for high performance mountain bikes. That bike was the vanguard of a new era for the brand, one centered around simple, well-designed, boutique bikes made in the United States. Following in the steps of the SST, and influenced by some wild side projects, the Steezl came to be.

The Steezl is a 155mm all-mountain bike, designed around 160 or 170mm forks. The front triangle is made of steel, and the rear of aluminum. You can run the Steezl as a full-29", or with a 27.5" wheel in the back.

Reeb Steezl Details

• Full 29" or mixed-wheel setup
• 155mm frame travel, 160-170mm fork
• 64° head angle
• 445-520mm reach
• 434 or 444mm chainstays
• 77° seat tube angle
• 5 sizes available, XL tested
• Weight: 35.02 lb / 15.88 kg
• Frameset: $3,795 USD
• Complete: $6,695-$9,795 USD
reebcycles.com

The Steezl comes in two main suspension variants: air or coil, with a variety of brands and price points represented in that lineup. The other major differentiator in price is by drivetrain, with cable-actuated GX and wireless X0 Transmission kits available for both the coil and air builds. I've been testing an extra large frame with the X0 Transmission - RockShox Ultimate tier air suspension build.



bigquotesThere's no one distinct element of the Steezl that defines the descending to me, it's just a nicely rounded package. An easy bike to feel comfortable on, and a good bike to push if you so desire. Fun, quiet, and super capable.Dario DiGiulio




photo

Frame Details

While the material selection and straight lines of the Steezl may look simplistic and traditional, the manufacturing methods are anything but. The front and rear triangles feature a host of cleverly machined and 3D-sintered metal components that make the fabrication of the frame more controlled and repeatable. There's a straight 44mm headtube, a straight and uninterrupted seattube, and fully-external cable routing with clamped guides.

There's room for a gigantic water bottle, and though the top tube lacks an accessory mount, I think that's the kind of thing you could easily request when ordering a frame from Reeb. In my eyes, that's one of the main upsides to metal bike construction, as details like that can be added ad hoc in the middle of a production run, without having to completely change a carbon layup schedule.

photo

Thanks to the yoke-free rear end, tire clearance is very good, with more than enough room for a 2.6" rear on a 30mm rim. Reeb was able to achieve the stiffness they wanted in the rear end without the use of any external bracing by implementing a cleverly designed tri-lobe spindle connecting the two rocker links. They call this design CRT, or Cool Ranch Technology. Much like the tasty chip, this little triangle packs a punch bigger than its footprint.

All of these details, from the frame welding to the DMLS lasered parts, are made and assembled in the United States, which is a huge point of pride for the team at Reeb. No small feat, and a strong value add for people who want to reduce the shipping and labor footprint of their fancy toys.

If you decide to run the bike in a mixed-wheel configuration, you can do so by flipping the little two-position chip in the lower shock mount, with geometry and kinematics kept essentially the same.

photo

photo
photo

photo

Geometry & Sizing

The Steezl features a very well-sorted geo chart, with most of the numbers hitting what I think of as the right marks for a bike in this category. The 64° head angle and 77° seat are pretty typical of most all-mountain bikes now, and the tightly-spaced reach figures mean there should be one or two measures that suit anyone. The stack height on the XL is 641mm, which in tandem with the 25mm bottom bracket drop makes for a very roomy feeling bike, without all that space coming from an overly-long front end. In fact, the 500mm reach on the XL felt a bit shorter than I'd expected, likely due to that nice high stack.

As opposed to going with a different chainstay length for each of the 5 size options, Reeb opted to instead offer two different lengths that customers can choose from: 434mm or 444mm. In the stock configuration, the S, M, & L bikes come with the shorter option, with the XL and XXL sporting the longer rear end. That said, you can run any size bike with either stay length, so take your pick.

If there's no spot in that geometry chart that suits your fancy, then you can have the Steezl geometry modified to your exact liking with Reeb's semi-custom option. You can have a head angle anywhere between 62.5° and 65°, a fork between 150mm and 180mm of travel, reach between 430 and 530mm, and chainstays at either 434 or 444mm in length. Pricing for the custom geo add-on starts at $500, and all you have to do is fill out a form.

photo


Suspension Design
The Steezl's 155mm of travel is delivered by a pleasantly simple Horst link layout driving a 205x62.5mm trunnion shock. You can run the bike with coil or air shocks, depending on terrain and preference. As a bit of a secret menu item, you can increase the rear wheel travel to 162mm by running a 65mm stroke shock. This will work a 29" wheel and the long chainstays, or a 27.5" wheel and either chainstay length.

The engineers at Reeb gave the Steezl a fairly neutral leverage curve, with a fairly linear feel to it. While I didn't try it with a coil shock, many Reeb employees and customers seem to be happy with that combo. I personally would stick with the air, as I like the adjustability and felt no lack of grip or small bump when sag was set correctly.

photo
Wheel Path
photo
Leverage Ratio
photo
Anti Squat
photo
Anti Rise

Specifications
Release Date 2023
Price $8595
Travel 155mm
Rear Shock RockShox Super Deluxe Ultimate, 205x62.5mm
Fork RockShox Lyrik Ultimate, 160mm
Headset Cane Creek Hellbender 70
Cassette SRAM XO T-Type
Crankarms SRAM XO T-TYPE
Chainguide SRAM XO CRANK BASH
Bottom Bracket SRAM DUB
Pedals n/a
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO T-Type
Chain SRAM XO T-Type
Front Derailleur n/a
Shifter Pods SRAM XO T-Type
Handlebar OneUp Carbon
Stem Industry Nine I35, 40mm
Grips OneUp Lock On
Brakes TRP DH-R Evo
Wheelset Industry Nine 1/1 Enduro S
Hubs Industry Nine 1/1
Spokes I9
Rim Industry Nine Enduro S
Tires Vitttoria Mazza Trail, 2.6F/2.4R
Seat Chromag Lift
Seatpost OneUp V2 w/ OneUp Remote



photo

photo

photo










Test Bike Setup

The build kit on the Steezl comes pretty correct right out of the box, with a large percentage of the parts being ones I'd happily run on my own bike given the choice. This made setup that much easier, requiring few tweaks or changes. In terms of suspension pressures, I typically ran about 96 psi in the Lyrik, and 165-170 psi in the Super Deluxe, giving me a hair under 30% sag. Tire pressures were quite a bit higher than I'd usually run, due to the light and fairly thin casing on the Trail-spec Mazzas. I experimented with both the stock 20mm rise bar and a 35mm variant, just to see which better suited the nice tall stack height. More on that later.

One unusual spec item that I tried for a while was a full-on fork swap. I'll get into the details in the Descending notes, but in short, a 170mm Zeb felt quite at home on the Steezl.

Dario DiGiulio
Dario DiGiulio
Location: Bellingham, WA, USA
Height: 6'3" / 191cm
Inseam: 34" / 86cm
Weight: 180 lbs / 81.6 kg
Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Instagram: @danger_dario
Many Whistler laps were spent on the bike with that beefier fork up front, as well as a few with a smaller 27.5" wheel in the back. From a variety of possible stock setups, to something I would probably run if it were my bike, I tried the gamut. The one option I didn't experiment with was the shorter chainstay length, mostly because the 444mm rear end is what comes stock on the XL, and it suited my preference.


photo


Climbing

Thanks to a nice stack-to-reach balance and a fairly steep seat tube angle, things were immediately pretty comfortable for me on the Steezl. The longer rear center and upright geometry make you feel quite planted in the middle of the bike, with room to move and navigate over obstacles on climbs. For long grinds on gravel climbs, the seated position is ideal for my preferred fit, which is pretty upright and straight through the hips. Nothing ever felt too cramped or stretched, and I didn't have to compensate with any unusual components to get the fit right.

Suspension-wise, the green Reeb had a nice balance of grip and pep, with a slight bias towards conforming to the terrain rather than stiffening up while pedaling. This is a great boon to technical climbing capabilities, with solid grip delivered through the rear wheel, even while standing. The seated climbing feels pretty even-keel, without too much energy loss so long as you're pedaling evenly. Stomping on the pedals does yield some chassis movement, but nothing atypical.

The bike felt surprisingly light in the stock setup, which is partly due to the impressively weight-conscious frame, but probably had more to do with the light casing tires that came stock. They were quick to spin up and made trail riding feel zippier, though I ended up running heavier rubber to better suit the capabilities of the bike. I think you could really bias towards a lightweight build here, if that's your bag - I just happened to err in the other direction.

Having spent multiple very long days on the Steezl, I can confidently say it would be a great companion on long pedal-heavy missions, especially when there's good descending to warrant the climbs.

photo


Descending

There's no one distinct element of the Steezl that defines the descending to me, it's just a nicely rounded package. An easy bike to feel comfortable on, and a good bike to push if you so desire. Fun, quiet, and super capable. This is the bike I brought with me to Crankworx Whistler this year, so it saw about two weeks of park laps and nasty pedal trails in addition to all the more typical riding around home. Skinny tubes and all, the Reeb held its own at the bike park, with one important caveat: I swapped the Lyrik for the Zeb pretty early into that stint, as it really felt better suited to the bike's intentions. Overall, my only criticism of the Steezl is that it does feel like a bike better suited to the biggest forks on the market, despite the original build kit it came with.

With a 170mm fork installed, the head angle is slightly slacker, the stack is a bit higher (though it never felt too low), and the suspension felt more balanced front to rear. If anything, this is a weirdly circuitous compliment to the rear end of the bike, which worked very well in a very wide variety of terrain, from slow picky tech to fast-as-you-can bike park bumps. Some part of the comfort in that latter terrain is possibly due to the steel chassis, but I think that ends up being more to do with the quiet sound of the bike than any sort of distinct flex or damping.

It's definitely not a super-stiff chassis, like some massive box section carbon and alloy bikes can be, but I'm hesitant to bang hard on the steel is real pulpit and say that the tubing is the only factor at play here. To test this out, I popped a very stiff set of carbon e-bike wheels on the bike and went for a back-to-back ride with the stock alloy hoops, and found that the rigid set really changed the character of the bike, giving it a slightly more unforgiving feel. All to say, I think the Steezl is a plenty stiff bike for hard riding, without being harsh or chattery on choppy sections of trail. Equal credit goes to the well-considered tubing spec, the smartly-chosen aluminum rear end, and of course the Cool Ranch Technology in the rocker link.

photo
Thank you 240 dropper.

I spent some time with the Steezl as a mixed-wheel bike, which was a nice easy swap thanks to the simple shock mount flip chip. The bike felt a bit better jumping in the bike park, and had that additional maneuverability that tends to accompany the smaller rear wheel. I wouldn't say it's significantly better in either orientation, but for the most part I think the Steezl feels like it's meant to be a full-29 bike - you can just happily run a smaller wheel should you choose to. Because of the somewhat higher ride feel of the bike, some people might want more butt clearance for steep features; you can see me hovering above the danger zone in a few of the ride shots. I think I tend to crouch a bit more over a bike with a higher bottom bracket, in order to get my weight lower over the wheels.

The suspension feel is supportive enough for hard pumping and speed generation, without any weird drop-off that you get with more progressive bikes in this travel range. The grip is there when you want it, and the shock remains active even when the brakes are locked up. That latter attribute is something I've really come to look for in bikes that you'll be riding in steeper terrain, as it allows for better braking and control in rough sections where you're simply trying to dump some speed. Some people really prefer the deep and planted feel of a bike that squats a bit more when the brakes are on, but I like the lively, sometimes exciting sensation of a higher ride.

Along those lines, the bottom bracket drop isn't massive on the Steezl, so folks looking to be very in the bike might want to give that a thought. It's not as on-the-bike feeling as my SB160, but not nearly as low-slung feeling as other options out there. Again, this is a matter of preference, as I think the bike still feels very balanced and secure in tricky spots - it just rewards more active riding than pure passenger mode.

photo
Reeb Steezl
photo
Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Alloy

How does it compare?

Here we have two mountain bikes, with 29" wheels, 150ish millimeters of Horst link suspension, metal frames, modern geometry, and some adjustment baked in. They're similar and different, and I'd have a hard time choosing an all-out favorite. The geometry isn't always even between the two, thanks in part to the Stumpy's wide range of adjustability, but in the 63.5-64° realm things do feel fairly similar handling-wise. I think the suspension on the Steezl is more refined and well-rounded to my liking, with a slightly bigger feel to it than the Evo. Where it felt better for me with a Zeb/38, the Stumpjumper Evo is definitely more of a Lyrik/36 bike.

If adjustability is your main focus, then the very malleable Specialized is definitely the winner, though the Reeb isn't necessarily lacking. Thanks to the angle-adjust headsets that are readily available for the 44mm headtube, you can change things up pretty radically if you should so desire, plus you have the mixed wheel flip chip. Stumpy also has the internal frame storage bonus, which makes it awfully convenient to carry a bunch of baked beans or whatever you bring on rides.

In terms of livability and long term ownership, I think I'd give the Steezl my final point. The linkage alignment is great, which means bearings are going to be happier when you neglect them and keep smashing turns. Press-in headsets don't creak, where the slip-fit cups on my Stumpjumper always managed to make some exciting crackling noises after a few dusty rides. The overall frame quality on the Reeb just makes it feel like a high-end product, and though the price reflects that, I think it's worthwhile for the right person.

photo

Which Model is the Best Value?

None of the build kits come cheap on the Steezl, but that's not terribly surprising given the price of a frameset. You pay more for a high-quality domestically manufactured handmade item, and if that speaks to you then it's worthwhile. I don't see the Reeb as purely a boutique item though, as it really does perform well.

I'd personally pick the GX mechanical and RockShox air build, as mechanical shifting is still the bee's knees, and the RockShox shock really meshed with this bike well. I might try to upgrade to a bigger fork out of the gate, but most all-mountain applications should be well served by the stock Lyrik. Otherwise, I think the build features a host of very well-chosen parts, with excellent brakes, the longest dropper you can get, decent wheels and tires, and a cockpit that is both high end and sensible. You can really climb the price ladder with the higher-end builds, but I'd wait to upgrade things down the line or simply build it from frame up. Unique bikes deserve unique parts.

photo

Technical Report

Transmission X0 Drivetrain: The shifting performance was excellent as ever with the T-Type kit on the Steezl, but one annoying issue did arise with the derailleur. A few weeks into testing the clutch force got noticeably weaker, resulting in much more chain slap than before. It led to more noise on an otherwise quiet bike, and made the gear retention a little less consistent in rough descending. I talked to a SRAM representative about this, and they said that while the clutch tension was still "within the range of acceptable," it could simply be a warranty item and the clutch would be replaced.

Industry Nine Enduro S Wheels: These wheels have a very comfortable ride feel to them, especially compared to some of the stiffer carbon wheels I've been testing of late. That said, they proved to be some of the least durable wheels I've had on a bike recently, requiring truing and re-tensioning multiple times over the course of the test. They never fully gave up the ghost, but without quite a bit of attention they would not stand up to regular abuse. No fault of Reeb here either, just something to be aware of if you're spending time with a set of them.

TRP DH-R Brakes: These TRPs really impressed me. Consistent feel and a strong bite after they initially heated up, without any fade or pump-up over long descents. Though the bike came with a 180mm rear rotor, I never felt the need to size it up, as the stopping power was plenty for heinous steeps and lengthy runs.

Vittoria Mazza Trail Tires: I don't mind the Mazzas, but the Trail casing is too light for a bike this capable. They feel similar to Maxxis' EXO in terms of support, and I had a few tire burps even at pressures higher than I'd typically run. Probably fine with an insert, but also just nicer to have a tire with a bit more built-in support.

OneUp 240mm V2 Dropper: I was so happy to see this wonderfully long post on this bike. They give you all the clearance you can get, and thanks to the long straight seat tube it's no sweat to run full stroke on plenty of frame sizes. More of this!

photo



Pros

+ Extremely quiet
+ Easy to get along with on a wide variety of terrain
+ Very high-quality frame that feels like a great one-bike to own


Cons

- Some people might want deeper-feeling suspension
- Feels better suited to a burlier fork spec
- You'll get a lot of questions about your cool-looking bike



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesIn a world of increasingly chunky bike profiles, the Steezl really stands out. But it's not just the tubing and color that set this bike apart, it also offers a ride quality that matches the craftsmanship. I was happy to pedal the bike all day, ride features I'd never seen before, and even spend two weeks in the bike park all aboard the 155mm Reeb. If it were mine, I'd probably run a burlier 170mm fork and consider a different wheelset, but otherwise it's a delightfully easy bike to get along with, and could easily be the only one you own for people with the right terrain. Dario DiGiulio






Author Info:
dariodigiulio avatar

Member since Dec 25, 2016
191 articles

201 Comments
  • 154 0
 So am I supposed to go carbon because it’s stiff, or steel because it’s compliant?

I know I can do alloy because that’s for poor people.
  • 13 2
 I meant to say "can't", but I am guessing you figured that out. I need too prouf reed stuf.
  • 3 0
 W comment
  • 4 0
 Ti front, carbon rear.....cuz I am bougie and want the same thing as steel/AL, but also need to exude my winning!
  • 2 3
 I very recently bought an all carbon bike (first in my life) for a lot less than the price of this frame, carbon and alum-alloy today are more or less same for not so rich people.
  • 4 0
 Chassis compliance is the new geometry mate.

"Carbon because it's stiff" is so 2017.
  • 2 0
 @PtDiddy: it works with "can" or "can't" haha. I read it as, "this is what I can do, since I'm poor" lol
  • 1 0
 @trialsracer: I have a Marin alpine trail E1 and Stumpjumper Evo S-works.Both ends of the spectrum. So it could go either way.
  • 2 4
 Steel as expensive as high end carbon. They are Steeling your money!
  • 2 0
 @likeittacky: steeling my heart you mean
  • 49 2
 Its the exact same weight as my basically stock YT Jeffsy... not sure if I should be giving kudos to Reeb for keeping the weight down or hate to YT for keeping the weight up.
  • 7 1
 Unlike most steel frames, it's not a tank for once.

The downside is that the SST isn't much lighter, so potential buyers are faced with "do I want a 32lbs 120mm all steel bike, or a 34lbs 155mm mostly steel bike?"
  • 37 2
 I think there is a misconception about both steel and aluminum bikes being super heavy. A very well-engineered, high-end bike made of metal is often very comparable with negligible weight penalties to carbon. I think because carbon bikes are almost always high-end, and steel/aluminum bikes are traditionally always low-end, we think of them as clunkers. My Cotic is a great example of an engineer carefully selecting the tubing material, thickness and shape to make a bike that is the same weight as a carbon enduro bike with massive frame layup and burly components.
  • 18 6
 @i-like-toytles: Like-for-like frames (as close as you can get) the carbon one will always be lighter. Seems to be by around 2lbs on average. It's the reason I went alloy with better spec, than carbon with poor spec. But I agree the best frame is the best designed frame, material is secondary.
  • 3 1
 @redrook: absolutely agree. I think it all comes down to use-case. An XC racer chasing the podium isn’t going to choose the steel version of a frame, but if you’re a guy like me who just digs riding for fun and you don’t want to worry about cracking or damaging a carbon frame, the weight suddenly doesn’t matter too much.
  • 7 5
 @i-like-toytles: this is only 90% true. Everything is a sacrifice. Aluminium frames with weights around normal not overbuilt carbon frames had huge issues with denting and durability. First Gen Giant Glories, Trek Sessions, Intense Bikes when alu was still the high end choice were ok if you didn't crash but were dent prone AF.

As for Steel - I don't know your cotic but we should not compare bike weight but frame weight and probably not the burliest carbon frame to the lightest steel frame as the durability is probably not comparable.

Not saying steel or alu is bad. It's just carbon has a slight weight advantage given similar durability. You just pay a lot for that advantage
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: The weight difference is not coming from the frame, just saying ...
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: FWIW my SST feels super light with an in-line shock, a pike, and I9 270s
  • 1 0
 yes
  • 3 0
 @spaced: I do agree with all of that. Ultimately my stance is that there are lots of companies that are doing really great things with materials we thought were dated for a while. Knolly's aluminum work is really really impressive, and I think Cotic and Reeb are good examples of pushing steel where it had never gone before.

As for the steel-to-carbon durability comparison, I truly like steel bikes because of the durability factor, and Cotic preaches that a lot. The ability to replace/repair a section of a steel bike vs trashing a compromised carbon frame is nice, and also knowing that certain impacts that will crack or break carbon won't affect steel in that way, and if it does break it can repaired rather than replaced.

Ultimately it really does come down to feel preference and weight goals, and figuring out what tradeoffs you're willing to take when you choose a bike.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: always the latter when choosing between two bikes by the same manufacturer with the same suspension platforms. no real penalty for the bigger bike on lesser terrain.


now.....for the one manufacturer that I can think of that uses a completely different suspension platform for each bike, Antidote, the answer is clearly one of each!
  • 1 0
 the second, I'd go for the second, first gen Jeffsy was lighter (more expensive to manufacture, probably more prone to damages)
  • 1 0
 @i-like-toytles: carbon frames are actually pretty repairable. I damaged the chain stay on my road bike from chain suck (yeah, I know a metal bike wouldn't have had this problem), took it to a local guy who used to work on composite race cars, and he fixed it in a few days. He was happily repairing stuff that looked pretty scary to fix, even including forks! He's been doing it for years, so presumably it's fine... I know of several other companies doing similar
  • 1 0
 @PHeller: Which steel frames would you say are "tanks"? I know Cotic and Starling aren't much heavier than aluminium frames. They're the most-common steel frames in my country (excluding BSOs obvs).
  • 41 0
 So basically this Reeb Steezl works very well, it's quite light and is made in steel which is recyclable.
OK it cost 3800 USD but it's craftsmanship, if it was made in large quantity in Taiwan it would cost half the price.
So why are we spending the same amount to buy some non recyclable carbon frame made in China?
To save 1 kg.. and still.
  • 19 25
flag valrock (Oct 3, 2023 at 12:15) (Below Threshold)
 why do you care about recycling? How many bikes did you recycle vs how many you sold? Did 2nd\las owner recycled your bike? Does your local recycling facility actually recycle it properly or will it end up in the landfill?

I am raining on your parade here... I am genuinely curious why it is important because as hard I I've tried I see absolutely no way to confirm my shit gets properly recycled

The best thing you can do - is not to buy this bike, it will have much more impact then "possible" future recyclability of it
  • 10 5
 @valrock: So your argument is no one should care about recycling because there's no way to confirm if your "shit" gets "properly" recycled? Does this mean you throw everything in the trash and skip the recycle bin?
  • 9 0
 If any of you are throwing bikes in your recycle bin your doing it wrong.

I took my last aluminum frame to a scrap yard and got $4 for the frame. It helped that it was raw and I had popped the bearings out.
  • 4 1
 @valrock: Carbon fibre production is energy-intensive, it is difficult to recycle and not biodegradable. It cannot be remelted and recycled like aluminium, and no sustainable end-of-life solution is around. Unlike steel or aluminium, which worst case, will simply break down over time leaving nothing harmful.

Curious to know what you mean by "shit". In Canada your household recycling is handled by your municipality, and they will tell you what happens to it. If by "shit" you mean bikes, then there are thousands of companies who upcycle/recycle bikes.
  • 11 1
 @valrock: if you're sending metal to recycling then it's definitely 100% getting recycled. Guaranteed. Recyclers pay you pennies on the dollar for scrap metal. Plastic recycling is a completely different story and most does end up in landfills and a lot of times it heads to a different country before being dumped in a landfill. Plastic recycling is the biggest scam going, most is not recyclable to start with . For the most part we're just sorting trash for the landfills so they can put it in the right area of the landfill. I've done a good bit of research about starting a recycling company that could pay for plastics and in turn create new non-single use products. It's not easy, hopefully material science will catch up sooner than later cause there's a serious supply of materials just being tossed that should be easily recycled into new long-term use products. I think we'll eventually get to a solution but honestly just moving away from certain types of plastics and creating standards for the ingredients used will do the most. You can't recycle plastic when you don't not what's in the formula. Therefore strict standards for the formulas used are needed to support the 100% recycling of plastics.
  • 1 4
 @redrook: in Canada shit is being recycled only on a paper. I do not get paid for bringing anything to the local eco station. There are many investigations available on the internet showing that your recycle bin content either ends up in the landfill or is burned. Also, it takes a lot of work to prepare a frame for recycling, you would need to remove the paint, all the mixed materials and grease/contamination, and then MAYBE it will get recycled.

So yeah, I vigorously fill up my blue bin, even used to wash food containers and etc. But I would not be making my purchasing decision on the recyclability of the item.
  • 1 4
 @nwberm: I care about recycling, I just know that where I am it doesn't work as advertized. So, I, as a local, have no control what happens to my garbage. Unfortunatly.

When I buy new shit, recyclability of it doesn't influence my choice. But how eco friendly company who makes that shit - is!
  • 6 0
 @valrock: I'd love to see some evidence on that which isn't vague "the internet says". I can find plenty of videos online saying the moon landing was faked or that bigfoot is real. Metal recyclers do it day in, day out, and it's actually not very difficult because they do it en mass. Sure, a proportion of it isn't recycled, but that's really only household waste, not metals which actually have inherent recycling value. You absolutely can't place blame anywhere else if you aren't taking the first step. You can control that much.

But aside from recycling, lets get back to the other, more important facts, that carbon is more energy intensive to produce and more harmful to the environment when we're done with it because it does not degrade and it becomes micro-sythetic particles. As I say, at the very worst, your alloy frame will rust away to the minerals it's made of.
  • 29 0
 Been lusting over this bike for a while and this review isn't helping. I have limited use for a longish travel bike but I'm doing all sorts of rationalizing. Well done, Reeb.
  • 4 0
 @flattoflat: You know they make a shorter travel bike, right?
  • 7 0
 Life is short, get the bike
  • 2 0
 @motts: Yep. unfortunately I'm very happy with my trail bike.
  • 23 1
 What about a review of the Chromag Lowdown while we're on the top of steel cool-guy bikes?!
  • 13 0
 The Lowdown has one glaring design flaw: the kink in the seat tube. Reeb got it right going straight to the downtube.
  • 36 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards, that's on the way - the Lodown was in the Field Test that we're putting the finishing touches on.
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer: Would also be interested in hearing comparisons to the Starling Murmur, Twist, and/or Swoop. I'm basically down to Reeb vs. Starling for my next bike purchase. They both look fantastic.
  • 1 6
flag Oxiros (Oct 3, 2023 at 9:45) (Below Threshold)
 @HawmStacks: I assume it's there for extra added strength as perhaps it;s meant to be ridden very hard, you see the Chromag guys doing back flips and shit so...
  • 6 1
 @Oxiros: That seattube kink has nothing to do with strength, it's just a matter of how they drew up the frame. Chromag does use slightly thicker tubing though.
  • 7 0
 I'm curious to hear about the Lowdown too. On paper, the REEB looks like a more well-rounded bike. The Lowdown frame is only about $100 cheaper and made overseas. For slightly more you get the USA-made REEB. Aesthetically, the Steezl is better too.
  • 3 0
 @Oxiros: The kink in the seat tube is for strength? Consider me skeptical.
  • 2 0
 @brettbob: I love my Murmur but a Mega Murmur is top of my list.
  • 2 0
 @brettbob: There are some Starlings up in Buy/Sell right now for a killer deal
  • 2 0
 @brettbob: I've not ridden the Reeb, but from the review it sounds a bit more stout/less compliant than a Starling - so the main differences will be that extra compliance on the Starling and the suspension working better under braking on the Reeb.
I have a Murmur and it's beautifully made (and to look at) and has a special ride quality, but it's more of a hefty all-mountain bike than an enduro rig IYKWIM.
  • 2 0
 @HawmStacks: Yep, got a Large SST with a 240mm one up v2 post and it fits like a glove. Nothing better then getting all the clearance for your body to maneuver around on descent.
  • 1 1
 @dariodigiulio: So you are saying they just put it for pure aesthetics? interesting choice then...still I prefer the look and finishes of both FS Chromags vs Reeb. Just a matter of personal taste. I am just very happy the steel FS world is expanding!
  • 3 0
 @Oxiros: speaking for myself, my guess is that’s it’s kinked to account for desired tire clearance and axle path
  • 2 0
 @Oxiros: it's for tire clearance at bottom out. Same reason the SST seat tube is pushed forward of the bottom bracket. Just different ways to accomplish the same things, but the SST solution also allows for a full insertion dropper post.
  • 24 0
 Id steel this bike
  • 20 0
 Specialized comparing to this looks like a space alien
  • 23 7
 You can buy a Stumpjumper EVO alloy frame for $1300 right now.
The Reeb frame is almost triple that, is it 3x better? Smile
  • 64 1
 @bikebasher: No, but it's 3x cooler!
  • 4 1
 @Been-Jamin: Indeed! If I had the money, I'd 100% go for that Reeb. This is the kind of special bike that you can fall in love with and keep for life, looking at it everyday and always finding it beautiful... like when you truly fall in love with someone exceptional Smile
  • 7 9
 @bikebasher: Reeb seems to be trying to make money off of selling bikes, as opposed to litigation. So, yeah?
  • 12 0
 I’ve never ridden the SST or the Steezl. But the fact that they just look like bikes and not an industrial design student’s studio project really speaks to me.
  • 4 0
 @pmhobson: I can confirm that they also ride like bicycles.
  • 3 0
 @pmhobson: That. Modern carbon bikes are so f*cking ugly.
  • 14 0
 Recently picked up a SST, 150 Lyrik and CCDB ILCoil, and a lot of what you talk about carries over to the short travel brethren. The SST absolutes RIPS. Geo is pretty bang on and the straight lines will never go out of style, and it wants to ride harder than some 130-140mm bikes. My only complaint is that even though mine came with the i9 Enduro 28h wheelset there has hardly been a ride where the spokes don't need attention, the bike writes checks these wheels can't cash. I may be slightly biased since I live in Colorado but the guys are Reeb really nailed it with the SST and Steezl.
  • 7 0
 Second this. My SST rips and the I9 Trail S wheels it came with broke spokes and developed cracks all around the spoke holes. While waiting on the warranty, I bought a We Are One wheelset. The much stiffer We Are Ones' feel very very stiff to the point I need to adjust my suspension.
  • 4 0
 @Telebikes: I had the same issue with the Enduro S wheels that came on my Following. I broke a ton of spokes, warrantied twice, eventually they’d start cracking around the spoke holes. When it happened a third time I just gave up and got some revel rims
  • 3 0
 Yeah love my SST, insanely capable bike
  • 1 0
 Do you happen to work in Louisville? Pulled into work today and one of our work neighbor's had a SST with a coil and gold i9's on the back of a outback that I was ogling...though it is CO, so could be coincidence haha
  • 2 0
 @macabre-toboggan: haha nope, wasn't me!
  • 14 0
 Seeing these things around in CO and everyone loves them. Dario seems to feel no differently.
  • 14 0
 can we crowd fund an aenomaly switchgrade for dario so we don't have to look at that seat angle?

such a rad little frame.
  • 21 7
 disappointed that the cables are not routed thru the headtube
  • 2 0
 As soon as Bluetooth brakes hit the market you can grind off all the zip tie mounts.
  • 10 0
 I LOVE that not a single comment mentions that this frame has a big 3D printed section. I live in the Additive Manufacturing world daily and the BEST applications are those where it isn't a 'feature' but the right tool for the job. That's the case with the REEB
  • 9 0
 I love the bike, but the rear end sure does look like Horst link Turner bikes from 2001 (which is not a bad thing).
  • 6 0
 Kind of ironic that this review of an amazing US made boutique bike is below a post about the demise of an amazing US made boutique bike brand. I haven't ridden either but reviews and concepts for both brands seem to be positive. Reeb bikes do look pretty. Straight tubes for the win.
  • 8 0
 I like that I can tell who the tester is from the first photo of the bike!!
  • 2 0
 It could have been Kaz, but Dario "the Truffle" is definitely the man who mostly deals with special craftmen bikes.
  • 4 0
 External cable routing, no cable tourism, good geometry, reasonable weight, customization options, and price in-line with other boutique stuff. Not Bad!!

Also, bearing alignment being spot-on is really, really important if you want a frame to ride right and last a long time. Most companies have reasonably good alignment these days, buy some budget frames (one rhymes with eye-tea) have an earned reputation for poor bearing alignment.
  • 6 0
 REEB has some really cool builds of late.
Anyone see these in the wild yet? Any real-time impressions to share?
  • 4 1
 I've seen Jeff Lenosky on his purple steezl in mountain creek. Looks wild. The price is definitely up there though
  • 28 0
 we have a full demo fleet in Colorado and I have a size run of SST's on the east coast now as well. If either of those are options you or anyone else can hit me up to set up a ride. jeff@reebcycles.com
  • 2 0
 I rode one 2 months ago at during a free demo event at their shop... It was amazing, climbed very well, poppy and playful on the descents and it looked amazing! Would absolutely buy it if I had the cash.
  • 3 0
 Buddy of mine got one over the summer. He's loving it coming off a Yeti SB150. Says it climbs better.. Also he got a custom color and it looks beauuuuuutiful.
  • 3 0
 I know it's not the most recent, but I rode a Sqweeb (the precursor to this model) at the Sedona Bike Festival and loved it. Even after riding back to back with all the big brands the Sqweeb is the bike that I enjoyed the most. Reeb is definitely on my shortlist for next bike.
  • 5 0
 I’ve had a Steezl for the summer. Agree with the review. It’s a solid, quiet, fun bike. It builds momentum downhill like crazy (from my perspective coming off a ‘trail’ bike). Pedals well, considering mine is built up on the heavy end with a 170mm Mezzer and no carbon. Might have to try a 65mm shock next spring!
  • 6 0
 I've had mine since May, I have a SST as well. I rode this primarily for the last six months, at least as much as I can with my arm issues (now partly resolved).

I have mine with a 170mm Mezzer and Kitsuma rear. I haven't tried with an air shock in the back. It replaced a Sqweeb.

The bike rides great, it pedals really well for a bike in this category and while it's not as lively as the SST, it doesn't pedal like a hulking mass or rob your energy either. I find it really planted feeling, it tracks well and carries speed through rough/chunky sections very well. It's a very fast bike when you let it open up. It's not as responsive as the SST, which is to be expected, but it is still responsive enough for a bike of this category. It doesn't feel super cumbersome or awkward in turns, it carries through switchbacks better than any bike I've had (for reasons I can't entirely explain). I ride mine on pretty chunky, not super steep, stuff and it's the only bike I've had in years where bolts weren't falling out by the 3rd ride. After 6 months of riding I've not had to tighten a single bolt and all were still to spec

My only issue is the seatpost clamp seems insufficient, the post was slipping a bit for me at first, but some friction paste solved that. That and I kinda miss the versatility of the Sqweeb. These are such minor "gripes" they are barely worth mentioning.

REEB is a great brand to deal with too, I've had their bikes on and off since around 2017 and they are a great group to deal with. They are a small brand, so you have to keep that in mind, but their CS is better than any brand I've dealt with. I just wish they'd make cranks and handlebars (I still have a pair of Dale's bars though!)
  • 1 0
 @jeff-lenosky: hey Jeff. Sorry to bother you through pinkbike, but as prices on your website are in $ only, and as I’m getting seriously confused with added taxes, non added taxes, import duties and all that crap.
Would you mind telling me what a frameset incl RS SDLX would cost me in € and directly delivered to my European door?
Thanx!
  • 4 0
 I rode with Jeff this past weekend at outerbike in Moab, both of us on the steezl, on day one.
At the end of the event on Sunday, we met up and he asked me what I thought of the steezl compared to everything else I rode. Hands down I felt the reeb Steezl was the all around winner. It climbed as well if not better than carbon bikes and descended with travel to spare. This should be your next bike if you’re looking for anything over 120 in the rear. Also, the entire Reeb crew should get shout outs for making good on their name (backwards) and handing out cold ones all day every day of the event. Support this company, they rock.
  • 2 0
 @qbensis: shoot me an email jeff@reebcycles.com and I can help you out. We just sold a bike to a customer in Germany a couple weeks ago so that might give a idea of the total cost. We don't ship a ton of bikes internationally so we usually let the consumer handle declaring values etc.
  • 7 0
 Oof yes I love REEB bikes!
  • 6 0
 I would totally put an old school Turner sticker on one of these if I bought one. Very cool bike, and a good review!
  • 4 0
 The RFX is back!
  • 1 0
 @Otago: That's exactly what I thought when I saw this review, miss my RFX - awesome bike,
  • 3 0
 Steel is real!!
I currently own a stumpy Evo alloy and since this bike came out I’ve been lusting for it. Fortunately, I’m semi-local to the Reeb shop in Lyons, Co. I was lucky enough to demo a steezl, and I must say it absolutely blew my mind. Coming from a really stiff alloy frame onto a more flexible steel front triangle made it feel like the limit was more forgiving. I’ve never had so many controlled two-wheeled drifts, let alone on something completely unfamiliar. Reeb consists of some of the friendliest, passionate, stoked bikers you’ll ever meet. Can’t wait to be able to support them in the hopefully near future!
Dario- I think your saddle and bars are broken you may want to fix those! Great in-depth article!
- Chase
  • 3 0
 I was in Lyons, CO and accidentally walked into the REEB manufacturing shop (no joke) and was blown away to see the quality of bikes they were manufacturing in such a creative space, and how welcoming the folks their were to my unexpected visit. Of all their bikes I have seen this one is my favorite, I hope to ride one someday!
  • 2 0
 Quite interested in how much damping does steel provide, vs carbon and/or aluminum. There's always been anecdotal recounts of how good steel is, plus pure materiel scientific tests, but seeing some blind tests on bike frames specifically would really be nice. Maybe the same-ish frame made from different materials with a couple testers choosing their favorite frame? Obviously the frame would have to account for how different materials behave, e.g. round steel tubes. Maybe even add titanium in.
  • 2 1
 go check out Neko Mullaly frameworks series, specifically this episode youtu.be/pMeOHsDlyOc?si=15w_6o3vDquxaCYe where he swaps out his aluminum frame for a steel version. Probably the closest you are going to get to a well controlled experiment of AL vs steel
  • 2 0
 I went from a 2019 Intense Primer to a 2023 Cotic FlareMax and the damping is real. The Cotic is much quiter as Dario mentioned about the Steezl. The only other thing which I've found makes that much of a noise difference is rim inserts, but I prefer no inserts.
  • 2 0
 You will feel this more on stuff like road bikes where there is nothing else to dampen shit. On a mountain bike you not only have suspension but thick tires with not uber pressure so the difference between materials is less noticeable.
  • 1 0
 Really, material is only part of the equation. Hardtails for instance, can have wildly different ride feel baked into the frame design. Two identical frames one in alloy and the other in steel, the steel bike will have a nicer feel but there are stiff steel bikes out there too.
  • 5 0
 Wow Erik, killer shot of that rock roll move! I've looked at it many many times. I gotta step up and hit it this year.
  • 5 0
 My kids dress like I did in high school and college and then this bike! The 90s are back!
  • 3 0
 I think the leverage curve graph is wrong. It doesn't start at 3.25, and that curve doesn't have 29% progression. (Sorry for the nerdery. Nice review. Bike looks rad. Steel is real. Etc.)
  • 2 0
 honest question: why is steel usually more expensive than aluminum? Is it because it's a nichey market? Or the production process is more complex...? Stump EVO alloy is being sold for $1299...

By the way, this bike looks very good
  • 4 0
 Aluminum per pound actually usually costs a little more than steel. But, since it’s lighter, you get more material per pound. It’s also generally easier to work so manufacturing can be more automated when using aluminum.

Scale is also likely coming into play. They sell way more stumpy’s than Reeb with sell Steezls
  • 6 0
 I think you're paying for the bespokeness of this bike. compared to most AL offerings. Also, most (not all) small production builders or custom builders don't mess with aluminum because it has be heat treated in a very controlled manner to make sure the frame stays straight and becomes strong/stiff. Most of the alloy steels used to produce bike frames don't require any post welding heat treating, since the temper of the metal is only affected locally and minimally. Heat treating is generally done in large ovens and in batches, if you're building 1000 frames, the cost can be amortized across all those frames, not so much for 1 or two. Aluminum is relatively easy to work with, machine, manipulate, prior to heat treating, and although welding of steel is probably slightly easier, aluminum welding isn't terribly difficult. Also, I'd venture a guess that you can buy aluminum tubing in basic tube shapes, hydro-form it into final shapes and very precisely control wall thickness and dimensions, allowing for a lighter overall product. If you look at the history of bike marketing and sales over the decades, it's all about the lightness, or has been. Only recently have people started to accept a heavier overall bike in the name of absolute durability.
  • 2 0
 Most steel bikes are hand welded so that ups the price quite a bit where as I bet the Stumpjumper is heavily automated. They are niche items so scale works against them. Add in a bit of boutique pricing and there you go.
  • 5 0
 I'd personally like to see REEB fabricate a frame that's 10% steel and 90% Dale's Pale Ale.
  • 3 0
 Quoted starting leverage ratio and progression don't match to the graph. Not sure which is wrong but would be interested to know
  • 1 0
 Graph is the one, fixed now.
  • 2 0
 Ok then it has 17% progression for anyone interested not 29%. Nerd stuff. Thanks
  • 1 0
 @joe-swann: Doesn’t exactly make me feel warm and fuzzy about running a coil
  • 2 0
 That's a good review, both in detail and praise. I'd consider one but by the time in lands down under its big bucks, no doubt good value but so are my options. . . . . But. . . . .it's bloody appealing.
  • 1 0
 What really blow my mind is the rocket solution. They build no bridge on seat stay, no joint on rockets, and a twin solution solved in the trunnion joint. Jesus that works and have no mid long time damage to the shock!. Ho yes, I'm very surprised it's a bonus over the sumpy in " linkage alignment"!
  • 1 0
 I think Dario's review is a pretty accurate description of this beautiful bike.
I was stoked to pick up my new Steezl on Friday. Put several rides on it over the weekend, from jump/flow trails, steep tech descents to smooth Colorado Trail singletrack.
First thing that struck me was how quiet and composed the bike felt. It took no time to be immediately comfortable riding this bike. It is very easy to go fast, felt very planted and confident inspiring in corners. The 155mm rear travel feels bottomless, and felt just as plush and smooth as my 170mm travel YT Capra it is replacing. Climbing, it is very composed and the suspension feels very efficient. Even with the 3 settings on the Ohlins TTX2m.2 coil, I felt it climbed quite well wide open.
The craftsmanship and logical well thought out details are top notch. Honestly I can't say one negative thing about the frame, the build or the experience. It is 10% heavier than my carbon Capra with a similar build, but very reasonable compared to similar bikes and builds on the market today. I'm more than willing to sacrifice the weight for a superior ride quality, and hopefully significantly better build quality.
  • 4 0
 For that kind of price, I could get 1/2 of a Mondraker!
  • 3 1
 I was between this one and the Chromag Lowdown and I ended up with the Lowdown. IMO the lowdown is better finished and looks more elegant.
  • 3 2
 Bump. Loving my Lowdown AND it looks awesome in person. The Reebs have kind of a "made in the garage look" in my opinion.
  • 2 2
 @hitchhikerbikes: 100% agreed. too many welds while chromag just bended the tubes making it look very clean. The amount of details are amazing!
  • 1 0
 With the upper link being two separate pieces and with no bridge or connection between them, how does the rear end stay stiff enough to feel good? Are the trunnion bolts on the shock doing a lot of that work?
  • 2 0
 "Reeb was able to achieve the stiffness they wanted in the rear end without the use of any external bracing by implementing a cleverly designed tri-lobe spindle connecting the two rocker links."
  • 1 0
 @robeasy: I clearly should have read this in more detail here at work..
  • 1 0
 @robeasy: thanks for answering that. It works great.
  • 3 0
 That's a frame that's on the short list of "gimme gimme" for me.
  • 2 1
 Sounds like a great all around bike. Definitely on my short list for my next build. Glad to hear it plays well with a burlier fork too.
  • 6 0
 we do LOT'S custom builds, our "stock" bikes are just a starting point!
  • 3 1
 Wow, very well priced for a boutique brand making their frames in-house and offering such solid spec choices.
  • 1 0
 Looks great! This one reminds me a lot of a bike from a long time ago. I don't remember the brand, but it was back when all mountain was still a thing.
  • 1 0
 Turner was the one I was thinking about.
  • 4 0
 Looks like a Nicolai
  • 1 0
 I was about to write that! Exactly!
  • 2 0
 "two main suspension variants: air or coil"

Are there other suspension variants? What secrets are you keeping from us?!
  • 5 0
 I'm going to let you in on the secret: elastomers!
  • 1 0
 I tried my neighbour 's commuter with a Lauf fork, uses carbon leaf springs in a parallel arrangement. It's not too hard to imagine torsion bar being used in some designs, volute springs could go in forks too, you just never know, there's a lot of weird people out there that just want to be different and get attention..
  • 1 0
 @ABhardtail: I'll clarify: "are there other variants in production / in common use, at the moment?"
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I was just being ridiculous. My old XC hardtail actually does have one of those elastomeric Rockshox forks and the best I can say for it is that the element has held up surprisingly well to a complete lack of service for the last 24 years.
  • 3 0
 2004 here. I WANT that bike.
  • 2 0
 The front rotor being mounted backwards in some of the shots really bothers me
  • 3 0
 Looks like a Turner, circa 2010
  • 1 2
 Reading this article after reading the one about Guerrilla Gravity closing up shop does not make "US-made" as much of a selling point as it once was (and this is from a US-based rider who bought a 1Up rack largely on the US-made merits) Frown
  • 7 0
 You run that risk with a lot of brands, but I think a big part of why GG failed is they grew excessively when they should have been more conservative. REEB is a smaller brand with fewer employees (less overhead) and they aren't shoehorned into an expensive manufacturing process. When you order from them, it comes out of a queue and it's ready when it's ready, they aren't growing out of control to meet temporary demand and seem to be operating conservatively.

Where it's made also isn't really a factor, bad management or business decisions can plague companies that manufacture overseas as well. I think it's just coincidence GG was the first to go, there will likely be other small brands that manufacture overseas and see difficult times ahead due to excessive growth the last two years followed by the cooling off of demand and the economy.

It could happen to them, of course, but just my observation over having their bikes over the years, they run a leaner, more conservative company than GG did and will more likely ride out storms as a result. I wouldn't hesitate based on this alone.
  • 6 0
 @shinook: yes. I have no idea what happened to GG and I am not implying anything but a company can be steered in many different ways. Nicolai has been around for 30 years. If you listen to the guy it doesn't sound like a total accident.

"we are a family. All these 20 people working together with me, they are friends. For me, it's enough to steer that company in a way that we keep it a certain size. Keep our numbers in the black and not the red. Because all these guys, they have today families, wives, kids. I have a certain responsibility there. That's the target, not big growth. I feel almost alone in this. In the bicycle business I have seen many companies dying because they have the wrong vision, or the wrong target. They want to be the biggest, or make the most money . This is not our target."

m.pinkbike.com/news/from-the-top-karl-nicolai-on-gearboxes-geometry-and-how-his-company-found-its-niche.html
  • 3 0
 External Cable Routing!!!!
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or does the rear wheel look extremely out of alignment in that picture near the top of the article? Looks like it's offset to the left.
  • 1 0
 Been waiting on this review. Sweet bike, sounds like Reeb has been doing things right lately.
  • 2 2
 Reeb and all of its bike names legit hurt my brain. Can you write all subsequent articles in Pig Latin? I feel it would be only appropriate
  • 2 0
 epon, nrael ot daer Smile
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTaylor:
Siht tnia yhtlaeh ym edud
  • 3 0
 @panthermodern: LOL....I naem LOL?
  • 1 0
 A Lime Green Marzocchi Bomber from the 90's would look soo dope on this bike
  • 2 0
 I'd love to see a review of the steel Cotic RocketMax or FlareMax.
  • 4 0
 I've been on a RocketMax G4 for a year, with a 160mm fork and a Kitsuma Coil rear shock. It's a superb bike for big mountain pedaling days, that really shines on steep, rough terrain and high speed corners. It's a much better pedaling platform than my Horst-link Transition. If you prioritize speed, steeps, and cornering, the RocketMax is hard to beat. If you ride a lot of slow, awkward tech in the desert, the Reeb is probably more adept due to it's super short chainstays and shorter wheelbase.
  • 2 0
 I'm just glad to see no headset routing...
  • 2 0
 Well done review of an interesting bike. Thx PB!
  • 2 2
 I thought dead ringer for mid 2000s K2 mtbs... also meh, although I'm sure everything is better from kinematics and performance. Cool bike regardless.
  • 2 4
 "gave the Steezl a fairly neutral leverage curve, with a fairly linear feel to it"

The chart shows ~2.67 to ~2.27, which is fairly neutral and fairly linear only when compared to the typical progressive curves wanted for coil, not neutral nor linear in general.

However, that's NOT "starting ratio of 3.25" and NOT "high overall progression (29%)", as stated in the very next sentence.

Which is it, relatively neutral/linear or high progression?
  • 1 0
 Been in love with these ever since seeing Jeff Lenosky shred them on his youtube. Dream bike for me!!!
  • 2 0
 Thank you! I really love mine... If I didn't I couldn't blame anyone but myself since we all have input! lol. We are a small passionate team who are just trying to make good, long lasting, great performing bikes.
  • 1 0
 Let’s be real—that third “con” is gonna be a real “pro” for some folks
  • 1 0
 That definitely belongs in both the Pro and Con category.
  • 1 0
 Ah shucks, so cool to see the Auburn CR-20 BMX all grown up into a CR-29.. 30 years in the making ❤️
  • 1 0
 100 percent! I remember those!
  • 1 0
 Reeb have been making Pinion hardtails for a while now. What I wouldn't give for a Pinion SST or Steezl.
  • 1 0
 Is he running the dropper with reduced stroke or the full 240mm drop? Looks odd in the pictures yet he is singing praises.
  • 1 0
 Bashguard as standard. The specs guy is clearly a mountain biking connoisseur
  • 1 0
 I mean pretty sure the whole company is like 5 guys who all ride lol. So I’d say your are most definitely right!
  • 2 0
 Ctrl+F "Ventana", no hits. Maybe it's just me then...
  • 1 0
 You'd think for the price that they'd deliver a bike with the front rotor installed facing the correct way.
  • 1 0
 I'm shocked that with that paint job there isn't a single "looks like a Sunday" comment.
  • 2 0
 American beauty right there!
  • 1 0
 That was the color of my blur 4x. That color works for me. I like what REEB did here.
  • 1 0
 Its amazing how many of you mother fuckers still think carbon is used as a weight savings system.
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio are those some version of truck nuts on the back of the stumpy? If so I dig them
  • 2 0
 Little Tree air freshener
  • 1 0
 Me likey. Now if only there was a UK disty.
  • 1 0
 Is 641 really considered a high stack on an xl?
  • 1 4
 "Reeb opted to instead offer two different chainstay lengths that customers can choose from: 434mm or 444mm"

That doesn't seem to be an option when configuring a bike. Looks like you have to go custom to select a chainstay length different from the stock sizing, but of course you should be able to do that with a custom build. So, it's not really up to the customer, as you're implying, for non-custom builds.
  • 5 0
 As it says at the bottom of the geo chart, and in multiple places on the product page, you can have any size with either stay length. You just have to send them an email to add that note.
  • 12 0
 We follow up via email after every order to make sure each customer is getting exactly what they want... You can configure any of the stock builds short, long, MX or 29. Cheers!
  • 2 5
 @dariodigiulio: As I said, there doesn't seem to be any options on the site. If emailing after an order is standard practice, what can I customize without going full custom?
  • 2 6
flag justinfoil (Oct 3, 2023 at 11:41) (Below Threshold)
 @stevethespacecowboy: I see it down in the FAQ now. I expected it to be a config option next to the suspension, but you guys do you.
  • 1 0
 @stevethespacecowboy: on a similar note, Dario mentioned a long-stroke shock as sort of a 'secret menu' option... is that something ya'll are willing to swap out as part of setup or is that considered "custom geometry/extra charge" territory?
  • 4 0
 @erg6k: We'll help you get setup with the right shock/stroke/everything no extra charge. We only charge extra for custom geo and custom paint because both take more time on the customer service and manufacturing end!
  • 1 0
 I love the look of this bike but the cost is too much for me.
  • 4 6
 Dario, wash your bikes. The comparison image of the Reeb next to the crud covered Specialized is jarring. Razz
[The Reeb is soooooo good looking]
  • 42 2
 no
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: is that the proof that you actually rode it?
  • 2 1
 Turner bikes!
  • 1 0
 SteezlKnevil?!
  • 1 2
 160 or 170mm forks! Almost got me
  • 2 3
 nice but, 29 is dead
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.057699
Mobile Version of Website