Thought Experiment: The Most Adjustable Mountain Bike Possible

Dec 6, 2022 at 11:47
by Dario D  
It seems like mountain bike geometry is reaching something of a plateau, with most companies settling around the same mix of numbers and angles, but baked-in adjustable geometry is still common, and often quite elegantly integrated. Flying in the face of elegance, here I've concocted what is likely the most adjustable mountain bike you could cobble together, allowing for a truly staggering range of use and utility.

Base Frame: Nicolai Geometron G1
With some healthy modifications, of course.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

As the preeminent modular bike platform, the G1 offers a whole suite of adjustments when it comes to wheel size, shock stroke, and geometry hard points. You can run it with essentially any combo of large or small wheels that you please, all while also adjusting fit geometry and shock kinematics. Of course, there are some adjustments Geometron is leaving on the table here, so we're gonna have to add them.

First off, implementing a shock mount like the one used on Starling's new generation of frames, should allow for even more tweaking of the shock stroke and progressivity.

Starling Cycles
So many options...
Starling Cycles

I'm also envisioning some mashup between Geometron's Mutator chips and Rocky Mountain's Ride 9 system, which should give the end user quite a bit to think about when tinkering trailside.

16.04.21. Pinkbike Forest of Dean Rider Seb Stott. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography
A little bit of this...
2021 Rocky Mountain Altitude
...and a little bit of that

While we're at it, we might as well pop an eccentric bottom bracket in there, to allow for some slight tweaks to either the BB height or the front-center / rear-center balance.

Challenge 06 Descente. Isola 2000 France. Photo by Matt Wragg
For those ever-so-slight gains in geometry perfection.

Front End Geometry

Thanks to the extensive tinkering done by Chris Porter and the mainstream efforts by folks at Transition bikes with their SBG concept, we can all appreciate the combination of long reach, slack head angle, short stem, and a short offset fork. Other big companies like Specialized and Trek are integrating head angle adjustment into their flagship frames as well, giving folks the ability to push that head angle as low as 63°. That said, there's no reason consumers should have to settle for just one fork offset and a workshop-adjusted head angle. Some additional components will be necessary to give the people what they truly need.

First is this ingenious quick release adjustable headset, cooked up by a few engineering students at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo.

Unforeseen upside: no room for through-headset cable routing.

This mechanism, in combination with the racetrack-shaped headtubes used by Specialized on their Stumpy EVO, could theoretically give you a full adjustment range of around 5°, letting you swing as slack as the Grim Donut, or as steep as the current crop of progressive XC bikes. The integrated adjustment (i.e. Trek/Specialized method) would require some tools or a few minutes in the home shop, but the Cal Poly Engineers' device can be swapped in only about 20 seconds, tool free.

All that headtube angle adjustment is fun and all, but you're going to start feeling bad about how un-adjustable your fork offset is in comparison. Have no fear, as the adjustable fork crowns from Outsider Bikes should have you covered. Offering anywhere from -10mm to +8mm of offset adjustment, you should be able to find a millimeter increment that suits your local lap just so.

August Aston Product
With a whole host of chips to choose from, one is sure to fit your needs.


Cockpit Considerations

To match the wide range of offset adjustment we're going to have on this bike, you'll need to play with a variety of stem lengths in order to keep your steering dynamics dialed. Sure, you could just have a bevy of stems on hand and swap them out to try different combos, but that's hardly convenient when you could integrate multiple stem lengths at once with the 3FStech AIM adjustable stem. This groundbreaking innovation graced the front page of Pinkbike way back in 2015, but I'm not sure it was given the discussion it deserved.

High performance, and handsome to boot.

As initially designed, the AIM stem allowed you to use a bar-mounted remote to switch from a +6°x55mm to a -7°x95mm to a -20°x120mm on the fly. It would be easy enough to modernize the numbers there, with something like a 35-60mm sweep, because think of all the times you wish you had a different length stem at various points throughout a given ride.

This would of course be coupled with a handebar that offers a similar level of adjustability, namely the VariGrip bars from Newmen. They use an ingenious threaded insert at the end of the bar with an accompanying grip design that allows you to adjust from 710mm - 760mm or 760mm - 810mm, depending on the model.

Simple, yet effective.
A strange amount of upsweep, but that could be fixed with the next idea.

The Fasst Flexx handlebars have been created to reduce the vibration that makes it to your hands, but I think there's some room for more user adjustability in the design. Thanks to the linkage separating the center clamp from the bar extensions, you could theoretically articulate the whole thing up and down to simulate various bar rises and upsweep geometries. Hell, just add another layer of complexity and you can control the backsweep too.

flexx handlebar
Just imagine all the angles you could adjust with this baby.

That takes us to the grips, the simplest and humblest of bike components. But not on this bike they're not, we're taking it up a notch with RevGrips. As the only grip design to feature actively moving parts, they allow the rider to adjust the degree to which they throttle on the bars, which qualifies them for this escalating nightmare of an adjustable machine.

Revolution Suspension Grips
Is that adjustable? Yep, it's going on the bike.

Last but not least, we have the seating arrangement. This bike will certainly sport an Aenomaly Switchgrade, so folks can adjust saddle angle on the fly. With -10° to +12° of range, it's a no-brainer. Atop that will sit an SQlab saddle, as their design allows for the rider to swap out between 3 different durometer inserts to adjust the seated feel. Both of those will ride on an e*thirteen Vario dropper, for as far as I can tell it has the widest range of travel adjustment on the market

Climb mode, flat mode, descend mode, just like that cool stem earlier.

SQlab 610 Ergolux saddle
You can even run it without the cushion, so technically there are 4 options.

Drivetrain

Here's where things get a bit tricker, as you're increasingly locked into one brand and one mode of operation with modern drivetrain components. To start, we've got the TRP TR12 Drivetrain. Sure, it doesn't work quite as well as Shimano or SRAM equivalents, and it is rather expensive in comparison, but it features both a 40° lever position range, as well as a two-screw clutch tension adjustment.

TRP
Just imagine all the ways you could set this thing up.
TRP
Hall Lock, a clutch on/off, AND tension adjustment?

Cranks are typically such a drab and thought-free part of the mountain bike, so let's zest them up a bit with the Aerozine Xeon-A1 adjustable crankset. They come in 4 different base arm lengths, from 130mm to 170mm, and through the use of 4 different threaded inserts, you can adjust the length by 5mm / 3mm / 2.5mm / 1mm. With options like that you're sure to find one that suits your terrain and preferences just fine.

Say goodbye to static crank lengths, folks.
Some of the arm lengths even come in carbon!

Because the Aerozine cranks use the SRAM 3-bolt chainring standard, you're free to swap rings to your heart's content, ideally in a way that's trailside adjustable, being that we're trying to maximize that here. Something like the OneUp Switch Chainring System should do the trick, or perhaps an O-Chain, with 4 options when it comes to degrees of float.

Switch Chainring System
Carry a few different size rings in your fanny pack and you're good to go.

Maybe not a trailside adjustment, but something to mess with nonetheless.

Suspension
AKA the bottomless pit of adjustment possibilities.


There are a lot of options and directions to go when it comes to suspension, so we're searching for a good baseline here, as well as trying to stick to consumer-available products. Starting off, we've got the Ohlins DH38 m.1. This fork has seen some massive success under riders like Loic Bruni over the past couple years, but that's not why I'm including it here; the name of the game is... adjustability. Available in 29" and 27.5", with an impressive 4 stock offset options, the DH38 already seems a bit more nuanced than other options out there. But the real magic lies in the travel range, which is rebuildable to anything between 120mm and 200mm, which means you can find a balanced travel number to match the sum of all your other adjustments and settings.

With both a main air chamber and a ramp pressure to adjust, you'll have no shortage of bracketing laps to get things dialed in.

Ohlins DH38 m.1
120mm dual crown for the local hot lap, 200mm for your big ride.

In keeping with the fact that Geometron tends to stock them on most of their builds, we'll be speccing an EXT Storia shock. Though there are shocks on the market with more clicks, the rebuildability and boutique nature of this model lends itself to the near-infinite adjustments we'll be able to make on our true do-everything bike. Anything you can't tune on-trail, you can refine internally to get where you want to go, so there's no base uncovered.

EXT Storia Lok V3 review
Plenty of knobs and dials to fuss with.

Now, coil may seem like an odd choice when one is looking for maximum adjustability, but there's a bit of a trick here, and that comes in the form of the Sprindex adjustable-rate coil spring. With plenty of range to adapt to your rider and gear weight, or even your preference for a given track, the Sprindex should get you right on the money. (Or at least within a 5 lb. increment of that point.)

EXT Storia Lok V3 review
Seems a bit too simple to me...
Sprindex
That's more like it.

Brakes
When it comes to end-user adjustment in the brake market, one brand has been pushing the envelope longer than anyone else: Magura. They're not the most popular stoppers out there, but if you want to customize and tweak every last element of your brake system, their MT7 is a pretty safe bet. With myriad lever options, color and decal packs, and 4 pads per caliper, you can really get into the weeds and play with different combinations to suit your extra-special requirements.

There are even aftermarket levers available to those who aren't satisfied with the stock options. If ultimate adjustability is your goal though, then the HC3 lever is going to be your best buddy. This brake lever has 3 independent adjustments all contained within itself, so fiddle to your heart's content.

Maybe throw a few different pad compounds in your pack and try to bracket all those as well, in the name of adjustability.

Stock vs.
Aftermarket.

4 is more.


Wheels and Tires

Things finally start to get simpler down here, at long last. Since we haven't yet integrated camera lens-style aperture technology into our bicycle wheels, the size of your rim is a firmly set diameter. That means hub setup and tires are really the only things you're going to be playing with after the initial build, which still leaves plenty of room for messing around. On the hub front, most through-axle designs have moved away from adjustable preload, instead relying on the axle tension in your frame to keep things tight and aligned. Project321 has stuck to the ways of yore though, integrating a preload adjustment in their new M-Pulse hubs, now being featured in Stan's wheels.

M-pulse hubset. Note the preload adjuster on the front hub.
Adjust everything, settle for nothing.

When it comes to tires, there's little replacement for the tried and true method of prying different sets of rubber on and off your rims, to suit a given track or set of conditions. That said, people have tried some other solutions, though often to middling success. Where the ability to adjust on-trail really lies is with pressure, and no system packs more pressure variables into a tire than Schwalbe's Procore. With what is essentially a 2-chamber design, Procore lets you change the ratio between the two to suit your riding goals. At this point there are many better tubeless insert systems out there, but this is about adjustability, not off-the-shelf performance.

Schwalbe Procore
Like tubeless, but with a tube.

In Conclusion

*slaps hood of imaginary mountain bike*
The way I see it, this could be the only bike on the market, as it can essentially be modified to fit any use case and terrain. It might be a bit heavy with all the ancillary components, but luckily bike weight doesn't matter. I'm pretty sure the rough math works out to you having to do about 3.5664x10^13 bracketing laps down a given track to get your settings dialed, but just think of how dialed your bike will feel once you settle on that perfect combination of settings.

For those of you who struggle with detecting a facetious tone over the internet, rest assured that I think this is an insane project and that you should just go ride your bike.


173 Comments

  • 117 1
 Just what my OCD needed, thank you!
  • 11 0
 What would people discuss in the comments if you actually have them every single thing , pinkbike would die overnight
  • 5 1
 @Compositepro: you should really switch the coil out for elastomer so you can get rid of the dampening cartridge too.
  • 19 1
 Yes it truly IS the greatest most adjustable bike! I can spend ALL my time tinkering, adjusting, edging ever and eternally closer to the PERFECT bike. Plus, since I will be perpetually tuning and tweaking, I no longer will have any time to ride. I'll finally get that ride-monkey off my back!!!
  • 9 0
 imagine going on a group ride: "lemme adjust my head angle for this trail real quick"
  • 7 0
 As you get passed by the SS hardtail with a rigid fork .. and no seat Smile
  • 3 0
 Are you kidding me? 3.5664x10^13 laps aren't even going to be enough just to try all of the different setting combinations. I think you're looking at something in the 10^20 region!
  • 83 1
 And I am over here running a hardtail with a coil fork partly just so I have a minimum number of things to mess with...
  • 12 0
 Got an HT with coil and thumbshifter, as well as a Nicolai with everything, so both of my personalities are happy.
  • 10 0
 And apparently an extremely reliable, mostly-analog car! 90's Honda FTW
  • 6 1
 Absolute horseshit,
Quick look at your profile has me looking at not 1, but 2 different bikecadd images of custom hardtails, along with real life pics of them. You have literally looked at all available models of bikes out there, and NO, No god damn way sir, I will virtually build my own bike sir, and have it custom built for me!.

In all honesty, big props to you, i currently have 3 different bikecadd tabs open with three different designs open that I’ve been obsessing over for the last 6 months.
How was your experience with Marino bikes? What was the quality like? I have so many questions!
  • 4 0
 @onawalk: no experience with Marino but I contacted him with a single pivot design but he wasn't interested in building it for me. So if you are only tinkering with geo numbers and are happy with his regressive or linear suspension designs then go for it. But if your design is more than just a geo I recommend going elsewhere. Currently I have my design in the waiting list of Egerie in France. The guy also built 2 one-offs for Aston. He is a lot more flexible about designs than Marino and really open to discussion. I had him build a custom HT and it went really well, can't wait for my FS to be built. One down side is that his paint is meh but that's not the end of the world and if protected it should be fine. Oh and prices are on par with Marino. No idea what it would cost to ship to Canada tho.
  • 6 0
 A rigid single speed is what you really need if you want no adjustability.
  • 3 0
 @fartymarty: with solid rubber tyres.
  • 2 0
 Marino egyszerü munkás ember en láttam mennyi bicikli vázat készitenek,mert neked egyszerre nem ugrott Marino akkor már rossz igaz??? ö cnc gépet kezel ha jol tudom 4 embere hegeszt 1 ember tervez nekem volt töle 4 vázam 5 ik vázzal jelenleg futok még bike cad programot is kaptam töle... szép napot
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: been eyeing egerie's work for quite a bit. Anyhow, I asked in a Paul Aston post on Instagram how much cost a frame and he said about 2000 euros, which is quite a bit much more then Marino. How much have you been asked for your FS?
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: HAHA. One is a 26in single speed. Just purely for fun and dicking around. Trying to get a bit of a dirt jumper meets trail hardtail feel. The other will be a rigid bikepacking rig. The reason I went custom with this one is I wanted a high stack height and slacker then most rigid bikepacking bikes I have seen. I am just finishing up the single speed. The frames look pretty good. I had to have the BB threads chased but otherwise it is going together pretty well. The wait was pretty long but communication was good and I have no complaints.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: We are going to ignore how I am adding all kinds of adjustability to the suspension of the Honda...
  • 1 0
 @Marcignano: prices vary quite a bit depending on what tubing you are using, and I imagine there is a premium also if you ask for a proto that is out of his standard offering (which would be fair enough). I paid my custom hardtail made of Zona and 651 tubes about 950€ delivered to my door, single color paint. That was in June and it is possible the his prices have increase with the increase in raw materials of the past months. If you ask for a basic crmo tube instead it goes down to 650€ I think and if you go with high end tubes more like 1300€. For my proto with crmo front triangle and 651 rear triangle he is asking around 1800€ which is less than a Meta SX frame. I don't know how much he is charging for a custom geo on one of his standard designs. But get in touch with him, he is very quick to answer.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: very helpful, thanks!
  • 53 1
 You forgot those tires with zippers to adjust your tire pattern.
  • 12 0
 Those were too ridiculous even for this bike
  • 4 0
 “ That said, people have tried some other solutions, though often to middling success.”
Click that link homie.
  • 45 0
 I'd to it for the bling factor, and then go to great lengths to point out and explain everything, only to tell people that "I don't really mess with the settings" when they ask follow-up questions
  • 39 0
 Sigh... throws Stumpy evo in the trash and pulls out wallet
  • 6 6
 One of the things I love about my Stumpy Evo is the adjustable geometry. I was just thinking the other day that it was a shame that it didn’t have adjustable shock mounts.
  • 18 0
 You're missing the best never-been-released-and-probably-never-will-be chainring design that allows you to change the number of teeth on the fly with a series of channels and sliding chainring bits.
  • 46 0
 I have a bike that switches the number of chainring teeth with a series of chainrings and a piece of metal that pushes the chain around. Not sure if its outdated or hasn't caught on yet but I don't see it around too often.
  • 8 0
 i like the idea that the chainring stays the same radius but just has less teeth on it
  • 3 0
 @i-like-toytles: sounds pretty basic. But sarcasm aside, someone did actually prototype a single ring that can change diameter/number of teeth on the fly with a system of sliders and moving chainring sections.
  • 3 0
 @seraph: Until I actually see a picture of that my mind is imagining it moving like a transformer and lighting up as it changes. RoboRing.
  • 3 0
 @i-like-toytles: youtu.be/xKzX-lIHsyU
Someone will make a useable cvt for bikes one day
  • 1 0
 @gotohe11carolina: I think they have? I seem to remember that it’s available on some e bikes.
  • 2 0
 @gotohe11carolina: Dang that's actually really freaking cool
  • 15 0
 "Unforeseen upside: no room for through-headset cable routing."

what in tarnation

So you're telling me that that thought never crossed your mind when designing? how'd that one slip? the first thing you should think about when designing a bike is not geometry, nor build kit but instead the pb comments section...
  • 2 0
 Bro this is straight up fax no cap
  • 2 0
 This bike was designed for the sole purpose of fkn' all of us around ! a quote from a friend .
  • 12 0
 The cranks with “adjustable length” are pretty dumb. One of the advantages of running a shorter crank is less pedal strikes with poorly timed strokes. The “adjustable” ones just move your pedal but leave a metal or carbon but still hanging down. Doesn’t make much sense to me
  • 1 0
 Kind of depends how you smash your pedals. If it is the inside or entire leading edge then yes, it is not going to help (especially if it is your leading foot). If you'd otherwise smash the pedal on the side (when cornering or at least tilting the bike) then it would help.

The model in the picture works with a chip (which I don't quite trust considering how thin it will be in the middle) but cranks with multiple holes for the pedals are common for unicycles. For the kind of increments (typically 5mm or so) they're trying to cater for here it may get tricky though.
  • 9 0
 What about clipless pedal float considations? Or find a way to have some wedges I can put in my chamois to further adjust my body position?
  • 5 0
 And/or varying flat pedal pin heights and colors.
  • 1 2
 @kfccoleslaw: I litterally screw my pins in a bit on one up pedals due to the nut on the back so.... I do adjust pins lol. mind you the rattle before they get packed with mud.
  • 9 0
 @ridingofthebikes: I set my pins short on techy climbs so I can do quick dabs, and then I back them out to full length at the top for maximum grip on descents. Sometimes in midair I adjust them back to the mid-depth so I can get my feet off easier for no footers while still being able to grip when landing. Then once I'm back on the trail I'll extend them all the way.
  • 3 0
 @kfccoleslaw: bro that's a good idea, I should try that! Thanks. We're about to revolutionize pin usage. I'll let pinkbike know they left out a crucial adjustment.
  • 1 0
 @ridingofthebikes: we'll need a wireless handlebar remote to adjust pin depth on the fly, please.
  • 1 0
 @kfccoleslaw: Saint clipless pedals have adjustable pins and tension
  • 2 0
 Dude I've been waiting for an adjustable stack chamois for years now.
  • 2 0
 Stuff those wedges in the front to adjust the angle of the dangle.
  • 1 0
 @ridingofthebikes: this is not the way
  • 9 0
 Really enjoying Dario's work. This is a great article, really enjoyed his work on the Vital enduro bike test videos as well.
  • 3 0
 Very enjoyable article, and actually a useful thought experiment for once - as I'm reading it thinking "yep, nope, maybe" for each bit.
I still feel like I have to try to catch @dariodigiulio out though, so I'll mention this: nsmb.com/articles/machina-bikes-first-ride ... which has adjustable stiffness/flex on the chassis.
Actually a really good idea IMO - and something I thought of myself last year when my swingarm came a bit loose and I suddenly found I had improved grip on techy, offcamber trails I was riding that day.
  • 3 0
 @chakaping: Fair play, we've got to get some stiffness tokens on this bad boy.
  • 2 0
 @dariodigiulio: I've said it before, and I still think chassis stiffness will be the new geometry - now that geometry has been solved
  • 4 0
 I have a G1 and some other bits mentioned in the article. I doubt folks with bikes like mine adjust much once they find their preferred setup. It would be nice to have a small fleet of these bikes at a place like Whistler, so that folks could order/buy bikes in the geometry and dimensions they have tested to work best for their needs.
  • 3 0
 Got a G1, rode it for 1 year, for my taste too low, so installing mutators as we speak.
  • 4 0
 Problem is, if you test it at Whistler, it is not tested at home, where you ride most and most likely completely different:-(
  • 4 0
 Getting all the different mutators for my G1 wasn’t cheap a few years ago, but glad I did. So nice to adjust for the trip based on what I want to do or wheels I want to run, etc. For the amount of money my friends spend on the next big thing bikes each year…they’re still amazed to see me still running it after several years without issue and at any geometry setting I feel like that day. Also, nice to not have a care in the world when plowing rocks and other nasty stuff knowing the frame is build like a tank. Big thanks to Chris P. for the BPW demo that led to the purchase.
  • 2 0
 @dogdaysunrise: I had some custom 20mm seatstay mutators made. You can also stack steatstay mutators.
  • 1 0
 @gooral: It would appear that you could make a weekend trip Monmouth to ride with the Mojo crew and dial in what you want. Folks further afield could pay shipping ( and rental) to play with a multi adjust bike for a weekend on their home trails.
  • 2 0
 Have been happy with my 15, 18.5 and 22mm but am thinking of trying 12 and 10. id even try 25 but I don't think its a thing. I am also hoping to get on 54mm chainstay chips when its available!
  • 8 1
 If it was TRULY adjustable, it would have the option to change which headset bearing the cables route through
  • 6 0
 Ummmmm water bottle holder adjustability?

Helloooooooo?

I want the option of anywhere from 2oz for my commute, through to 4 gallons for the epics.
  • 7 0
 I can’t even imagine how bad I would make this bike ride with my tinkering
  • 4 0
 Nicolai has engineered the sh!t out of their adjustable frame hardware so that it doesn't creak over time. I wouldn't trust most large manufacturers to do that well, especially not on carbon frames. Personally, I buy a bike for a specific geometry and handling. I have no interest in steepening head angles or shortening chainstays.
  • 2 0
 Specialized specify a 50 hour service interval for the adjustable headset, I presume for this reason.
  • 7 0
 Satirical article is satirical.
  • 7 0
 I hate to say I love this so much
  • 4 0
 Bought the new bird aeris 9 as it's highly adjustable. 180/180, 180/160 with flip chip or 160/160. Suits pedal days and park days. Can even go mullet or full 29er. All the bike you need. Love adjustability.
  • 1 0
 Which setup have you been using so far and what do you reckon?
I'm on 180/180 and it's pretty impressive.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: same 180/180 mainly as take it to parks every week. Not tried 160 yet. Pedals very well still in 180/180
  • 1 0
 @endorium: It does yeah, I'm keen to try the 160mm linkage but need to get another spring first.
I feel I need a coil conversion for my Zeb to level it up to the Formula Mod shock as well.
  • 3 0
 One of my favourite things is having lots of adjustability and then adjusting little or nothing, second favourite is people endlessly adjusting things and endlessly talking about endlessly adjusting things…and why.
  • 2 0
 Or paying a premium for adjustability and then not using it?
  • 5 0
 My takeaway is that 120mm dual-crowns are the future. I'm for it
  • 4 0
 With all of the parts together, are we looking at a 40+ LBS (18+ KG) quiver killer?
  • 1 0
 Syntace used to make a really nice stem/bar combo called the VRO, that used 2 "Knuckles" to allow for adjustable stem height, length and bar roll. I still have one - on a bike my kids used when they were growing like weeds - lets the bike grow with them a bit, but it's a cool tool for playing with bike fit.
  • 1 0
 Wish they would make them in wide! Besides the looks they used to be great bars. I still try to find some vro dropbar versions which would be perfect for those allroad bikes with wide tires!
  • 1 0
 More adjustments is a so clever thing that people can ride different settings at the same time. I think in the future there will be a bike, when I need to climb I can adjust it to a trail bike and later back to a downhill bike
  • 3 0
 Strive: Your future is now
  • 3 0
 Bionicon? Been around for decades.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Unfortunately they ain't what they used to be. Take a look but be prepared to be disappointed.
  • 2 0
 I remember the hot chili warp prototype by Peter denk from the ?early? 90ies with lots of adjustments.
They where thinking outside the box and even came out with a dart 4 x crank!
  • 2 0
 @dariodigiulio I don't think M-Pulse front hubs are convertible between 20mm and 15mm through axels. I9 and Spank, however, are by using different end caps. You might have lost a few adjustability points here then.
  • 2 0
 Axle width vs. preload, the ultimate adjustment battle!
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: i was also going to flame you for suggesting a 15mm hub, when there’s no 15mm axle conversion kit for Ohlins 20x110mm forks. But as of late November that aftermarket kit exists, for $200, so your build is technically possible…
  • 1 0
 20mm fork, 15mm hub and axle, with eccentric adaptors to adjust height and trail. Oh yeah!
  • 4 0
 The ultimate "quiver killer" bike - bike brands are quaking in their 510s
  • 4 0
 SHUT THE F UP AND TAKE MY MONEY
  • 4 0
 One bike for the whole family!
  • 1 0
 onderwaterfiets?
  • 3 0
 I want to clock my crankset at different angles than the ho-hum yawn yawn 180°. Give me a 192/168 split
  • 3 0
 I bet you could build this meme bike up and release a whole video about it before we ever see the Grim Donut 2 video.
  • 4 0
 The switch grade seat clamp is actually super legit for steeper terrain
  • 2 0
 Totes
  • 2 0
 Haha. 21.5kg or so I'm guessing. This is a good one though, very creative. I went the "less buttons, more riding" way a few years back now. You can keep the buttons.
  • 1 0
 Nevermind. I didn't read the article before spouting off on the saddle doing the downward-facing yoga pose. Uncool angle but I guess it's adjustable. I was all up in arms, mind you - luckily there was time to hit Edit.
  • 1 0
 How many of those frame holes are „rideable“ and how many just marketing? I looks like the bike company cannot find a good suspension setup so lets delegate finding a ride setup to customer.
  • 3 1
 Stumpyevo is the OG in the adjustability arena! All bike brands will off hta changing cup system in the coming year for their trail and enduro bikes.
  • 1 0
 I'm hoping so. Every bike I've owned would be perfect, if Reach and HA could move a few more millimeters and degrees (+ or -) . I believe HA should be adjustable along with Reach both independently of each other or together. CSL should be adjustable , keep BBH and fork offset stationary in a Neutral position; this IMO is all that's needed and will make any bike like a Swiss Army knife, without too much to think about or unwanted added weight. A spare link to switch from 29 to mullet would be needed as well.
  • 1 0
 Agree. The ability to change it from park bike mode, to steep trail, to tight tech trail mode is really useful if you ride a variety of trails.
  • 3 0
 Sooo thankful I’ve regressed to little balance bikes…Wish the seat could go higher though.
  • 1 0
 Although not easy, there’s one more adjustment I made on my G1 that wasn’t mentioned. Went with a 37 mm offset CSU to a 29” lower Fox 38. Personally think bikes under 62.5 hta could benefit from this.
  • 1 0
 Oak levers for Magura are 150EUR for a pair, that's as expensive as my pair of MT5, wth:

r2-bike.com/OAK-COMPONENTS-Brake-Lever-Set-Root-Lever-for-Magura-MT-Brakes-raw
  • 1 0
 I like the idea and this could be taken as early prototype to look at optimum setup. Imagine if you could turn up to a shop and try something like this to ensure you are buying the right kind of bike.
  • 1 1
 Here we are, on a site with so many views, people waste time writting this stupid article, when it could start a series of "HOW TO....", leading everyone to be a better rider.

Going this root, it's just another day in planet troll-pinkbike
  • 2 0
 Just think of this site as entertainment, not information. It's easier that way.
  • 1 1
 @iamamodel: complete waste of space (www) and time
  • 3 0
 Infinitely maladjustable.
  • 3 0
 But what I want to change the number of wheels it has?
  • 1 0
 I'm going to buy every one of these that come up on Buy/Sell, then check with a microscope to see if any of the settings were ever actually changed.
  • 4 0
 What!? No U-Turn fork?!?
  • 1 0
 A bike with all these adjustable parts would be great at bike shops for people to demo to find out where they sit before ordering a custom frame made.
  • 3 0
 "Cool!" [Sets to lowest, longest, slackest]
  • 1 0
 I have a RM Altitude and it came in this setting and I haven't moved in 2 years.
  • 1 0
 This is awesome but its too complicated for the average rider. Having too many adjustments will cause issues and no one will be able to properly set it up.
  • 1 0
 26/27 flip chip on the rear and a air/coil chip is all I'd ever want. Although I did have an Idea of reach adjustable BB's (same concept as a reach adjustable H'set)
  • 1 0
 It gives me more excuses when I don’t ride well in stead of just “ oh dam just realized my lockout on my suspension is still on” I’m all in
  • 1 1
 My main issue with massively adjustable bikes: You really can't make them lighter, so it doesn't help you a ton to go to the steepest/highest settings if the bike still weighs 33 lbs. You don't have an XC bike
  • 1 0
 Once a decision has been made, retaining the ability to change course at any time leads to decreased levels of happiness and satisfaction. Or so I’m told.
  • 1 0
 I can hear the lightning "WAP" of a Visa card smacked down by thousands of ADHD riders looking to scratch way too many itches...
  • 2 0
 The forum pro's dream of a bike! Thanks for that article, it made my morning!!!
  • 1 0
 The outsider bikes link doesn’t appear to be working. Are they out of business? Or is there a different website link that works?
  • 1 0
 I think they folded, unfortunately.
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: bummer! They look really nice and I’d like to get one.
  • 2 0
 @Twenty6ers4life: These might fit the bill, depending on what exactly you're looking for: www.mojo.co.uk/mojo-morc-crowns-3-c.asp
  • 1 0
 I want the option to change out the tube sets, maybe use those threaded links like Ritchey did with his Breakaway bike!
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike data leak, password compromised.

Anyone else get this warning?
  • 2 0
 not me
  • 5 0
 Just do me your password and credit card information I’ll get it figured out for ya
  • 6 0
 Dm me not do me whoops. Send me your social security number while you’re at it
  • 1 0
 LOL this reads like every product manager naive first meeting. "why can't we just build it all?"
  • 1 0
 Is there a Transformer that turns into a bike? It's more the meets the eye!
  • 2 0
 Analysis paralysis with no time to ride.
  • 1 0
 I caught the tone and I agree but lets leave the geometron and EXT out of this haha,
  • 1 0
 Why not use fast suspension with the medium speed or formula with their dual air and neo pos?
  • 1 0
 I want the ability to engage 2-wheel drive mode at the flick of a bar mounted switch. Is that too much to ask?
  • 1 0
 G1 still longer than your average tandem and twice as heavy .. coming to a trail centre near you after this story :~)
  • 1 0
 For the seat tube angle, you could modify the new Specialized gravel bike flexpost to lock into various positions.
  • 1 0
 Everything I adjust gets progressively worse, so I'm excited to see just how bad I could make this ride.
  • 1 0
 This bike would be definitely not for riding, you'll need years simply to adjust it.
  • 1 0
 Oh my god, could you imagine trying to run down a mystery creak on this thing? My brain hurts already.
  • 1 0
 I can't even be bothered to mess with the one adjustment provided by the flip chip on my bike.
  • 2 0
 Who has time for this? Just set it and forget it
  • 1 0
 Just when you thought your suspension forks had too many settings...
  • 2 1
 I reckon Jeff Steber did this with Intense 25yrs ago.
  • 1 0
 Hi i want to ad... just my cables
  • 1 0
 Rest assured, I'm sure Jumbo Visma have mechanics for that.
  • 1 0
 Go Shigura using Saint levers and braided lines. Cuz it's cool n stuff.
  • 1 0
 This is end-stage tinkeritis, and I'm afraid it's terminal.
  • 2 0
 Hell ya Dario big D
  • 1 0
 how about BMX background?
  • 1 0
 This would take me at least 4 years to find any semblance of dialed in.
  • 1 0
 Disappointed with the lack of “no water bottle mount” comments
  • 2 0
 Looks Like Megatron.
  • 1 0
 The only issue is that the springdex will snap the storia in half!
  • 1 0
 f**k'n scene from scanners
  • 1 0
 Great compilation of all the shit I don't need
  • 1 0
 Does anyone remember Homer Simpson designing a car?
  • 1 0
 You forgot flight attendant….
  • 1 0
 You forgot the ReTyre zip on/off studded tires!
  • 1 0
 Bring back the Rock Shox Boxxer Ride
  • 1 1
 For the rider who never makes it on the trail?
Does it come with “media” setting?
  • 1 0
 This gives me a headache.
  • 1 0
 has nothing like the adjustability of the sc nomad
  • 1 0
 Project321 rear hubs had loud and quiet pawl options, too.
  • 1 0
 The world needs more of this... You should actually build this bike...
  • 1 0
 MOOOOOOOR ADJUSTMENT
  • 1 0
 Typo, it's Newmen
  • 1 0
 No, just no!
  • 1 0
 Two words: Risse Lassen.
  • 1 1
 Imagine Henry's riding buddy setting this up at parking lot
  • 1 0
 this shits dope
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