First Ride: Mondraker Dune Carbon

Jun 24, 2015 at 16:32
by David Arthur  





The morning after the spectacular sight of a World Cup downhill mountain bike race being won on a bike sans chain, Spanish brand Mondraker pulled the covers off of its brand new Dune Carbon while under the suitably futuristic looking pod-style team pits used to cocoon Danny Hart and Emmeline Ragot during race weekends.

The headline for the new Dune Carbon is a frame that is said to be 540 grams lighter than the previous aluminium version, with a claimed frame weight of 2,460g (5.4lbs) without the shock. Mondraker also says that the lightest complete bike build will come in at a respectable for its travel 12.6kg (27.78lbs).

The new Dune is carbon from front to back, with carbon fiber used for the front triangle, swing arm, and even the rocker linkage. Along with the change of material, Mondraker has optimized the Zero Suspension for single ring drivetrains, increased the size of the pivot bearings, routed the cable and hoses internally, and included smart details like a carbon fiber chain guard.

Their divisive Forward Geometry remains, along with the 10, 20 and 30mm stems, but the new frame now offers the ability to adjust the length of the chain stays between 430 and 440mm, and adjustable head angle by plus or minus a single degree.


Dune Carbon Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• Adjustable head angle: +/- 1 degree
• Adjustable chain stay: 430 - 440mm
• Carbon fiber chain guard
• Internal cable routing
• Forward Geometry, 30mm stem (10 and 20mm optional)
• Frame weight: 5.4 lbs w/o shock
• Sizes: S, M, L and XL sizes
• Pricing from £4699 - £6599

Three models will be available, priced from £4699 up to £6599 (USD pricing not available) for the high-end Dune XR that's equipped with a FOX 36 Float FIT Kashima 170mm fork and Float X2 Factory Kashima shock, SRAM Guide brakes, Mavic Crossmax XL wheels and SRAM's X01 1x11 drivetrain, all of which adds up to a complete weight of 12.9kg (28.4lb). Surprisingly, the mid-range Dune Carbon RR is actually the lightest in the lineup at 12.6kg (27.78lb).

Dune Carbon
Dune Carbon
  The new Dune Carbon RR is middle of the range model.



Frame Design and Stealth Carbon

In an extremely crowded 160mm marketplace, Mondraker has managed to make a name for itself by thinking outside the box when it comes to frame angles and lengths. Its Forward Geometry was a radical departure from the norm when it first arrived, but other manufacturers have slowly been catching up, although none have taken things to the extremes that Mondraker have. The Dune is a core model in the company’s range and is targeted at the increasingly popular enduro sector, and it has also been through several iterations over the years, most recently jumping up to 27.5'' wheels in 2014.

Mondraker Dune Carbon

The Dune is the latest bike in the Mondraker lineup to get their Stealth carbon makeover. The Foxy went carbon in 2014, and earlier this year the Summum Carbon downhill bike was released, meaning that the new Dune frame wasn't exactly unexpected. It’s clear from speaking to Mondraker that enduro racing has pushed the development of the new Dune Carbon. Not only has making it out of carbon fiber shed a chunk of weight, but they have worked on the stiffness of the frame to find the optimum balance of performance: Mondraker revealed it performed blind tests using Dune frames made up of different carbon fiber layups to asses the variations in performance, handling and responsiveness.


Mondraker Dune Carbon
  The carbon frame is entirely new, and Mondraker says that it's 540 grams lighter than last year's aluminum model.



The Dune Carbon distinguishes itself with the best lightness and efficient qualities of the Foxy Carbon while inheriting the best strengths of Summum Carbon: a structurally very robust frameset suited to the rigours of enduro racing,” says Mondraker in its official blurb.

In making the Dune from carbon fiber, the frame weight has been drastically reduced, with the claimed 540 gram saving over the aluminium version not to be sniffed at if weight is on your agenda. It’s a sizeable decrease in heft that will certainly help ensure the new Dune Carbon appeals to weight conscious enduro racers and more casual riders out there.

Weight and stiffness aside, the company has worked hard to develop a visual identity for the new bike that sets it apart from its rivals. There’s a clear common design language flowing into the new Dune Carbon from the Summum and Foxy, but Mondraker’s industrial designer set himself the task of designing a bike that looks fast. In my books, it’s a success; it’s a handsome bike.

The split top tube creates what Mondraker calls a ‘window’ behind the tapered head tube, and it is the most distinctive aspect of the new frame design. The top tube is wide and flat and is very sloping, providing plenty of standover clearance. The attention to detail and packaging is impressive too - the gear, brake and dropper lines are routed internally, there’s armour cladding on the down tube, further protective material on the chain stays around the chain rings to both protect the carbon and dampen the noise, and a neat carbon fiber chain guard.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
  The window behind the head tube gives the bike a very unique look.


They've also incorporated a mudguard into the upright struts that connect the rear triangle which should afford some protection for the rear shock from wheel spray. It’s a simple thing that's held in place with zip-ties, so it's easily removable if you live somewhere drier than the UK, where you’d probably just leave it in place as it adds next to no weight to the frame.

The frame is clearly a complex piece of carbon fiber fabrication, but, as impressive as its exterior appearance is, it’s on the inside that its manufacturing qualities are best exposed. Mondraker’s Stealth Carbon technology uses a Vacuum Compression Process that removes any potential air bubbles between layers and is said to produce a very clean and smooth internal surface, which was well demonstrated with a sliced in half frame that Mondraker showed us. They have also used 3K carbon fiber to reinforce key areas of the frame that are subject to high stress loads.

As well as developing the new carbon frame, Mondraker has taken this opportunity to develop a new lower linkage, complete with collet-axle pivots and bolts that use expander cone washers, and they reckon that the update will improve reliability. Large bearings are also present at all the pivot locations, and are similar the ones used on the Summum Carbon.



Forward Geometry, Added Adjustability

Mondraker’s radical Forward Geometry has earned them many plaudits and fans over the years, as well as dividing a few opinions. The essential idea behind it is to combine a longer front-centre with a very short stem in order to move the rider back relative to the fork axle but preserve the handling. It was pretty radical stuff when it first arrived, and it still is even though a slew of bike manufacturers have closed the gap somewhat. Mondraker specs the bikes with a 30mm stem, but 10 and 20mm options are also available.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
Forward Geometry is based around an extremely long top tube that's combined with either a 10, 20 or the stock 30mm stem.
Mondraker Dune Carbon
The new frame also sports an adjustable head angle by way of variable upper headset assembly.


For 2016 the new Dune now offers adjustable geometry. Mondraker has added an adjustable headset top cap that can slacken or steepen the head angle +1°/-1° from the stock 66° on the Dune XR - the Dune RR/R models have a half degree steeper head angle on account of the 10mm shorter travel fork that's fitted. Mondraker was keen to point out that it reckons 66° is the optimum setting for its Forward Geometry, but it’s nice to have the option to change it. As well as the adjustable head angle, the chain stay length can be modified from 430 to 440mm. Long wheelbases have been a key aspect of the Mondraker Forward Geometry, and the size large Dune has a default wheelbase of 1,243mm.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
Inserts at the dropouts allow for 10mm of wheelbase adjustment.
Mondraker Dune Carbon
You can rotate the inserts to alter the chain stay length between 430 and 440mm.


The Zero Suspension system has been used by Mondraker for many years now. It’s a patented design which works by sandwiching the rear shock between the upper and lower linkage, and the company claims that this reduces stress loads on the frame, so subsequently it can be made lighter as it doesn’t need as much reinforcing material. It's also used to provide the desired suspension performance and handling characteristic that Mondraker is looking for.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
  Mondraker's Zero Suspension system is once again employed on the Dune Carbon to control its 160mm of travel.



Ride Impressions

Dry and fast conditions for the Leogang World Cup gave way overnight to heavy persistent rain and low cloud cover for the Mondraker launch, but being a Brit I’m well used to a bit of mud so got stuck in. With a chairlift, free pass and challenging downhill track at our disposal, we spent the day putting the new Dune Carbon through its paces. I was paired up with a large sized Dune Carbon RR, which is the £5599 mid-range model that's specced with a FOX 36 Float fork with 160mm of travel and Float X Factory shock, a set of DT Swiss' E1700 Spline wheels with Maxxis High Roller II tires, a SRAM X01 drivetrain and a Reverb dropper post.

It always takes a few rides to get used to a new bike, but with the 30mm stock stem and default geometry settings and a middle of the road suspension tune, the Dune Carbon felt good from the start. It took a few runs to get the Fox fork really dialled in but I was surprised with just how intuitive the Dune felt over multiple runs, and didn’t really require a massive adjustment of my riding style to squeeze the best out of it. It’s a naturally very fast and stable bike and that handling characteristic definitely helps when you’re riding unfamiliar trails in slippery conditions.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
  To say that the test track in Leogang was a kinda wet is a bit of an understatement.

Dropping into the first section of trail, all rocky and rooty and twisting up, over and around dips and crests and diving erratically through the trees, it’s immediately clear that the Dune has a great tendency to quickly pick up velocity in slow to medium speed sections. Through the tighter turns it expresses a good deal of nimbleness and agility, handy when picking a line through a spiky rock garden you’ve seen for the first time while peering through rain with mud splattered glasses on. The low weight is discernible in the way the Dune Carbon accelerates, and it picks up speed between obstacles with startling pace.

While the top section of the trail was contained within the woods and provided multiple slippery rock gardens, rooty step-downs, drops, and boardwalks, the middle section squirted you out into a stunning series of bermed switchbacks cut deep into the grassy mountainside. With a good view of the trail ahead not obscured by trees, it was a good chance to let the brakes off and allow the Dune Carbon to get going fast.


Dune Carbon Photo by Nathan Hughes
  The new bike is all about stability when the speeds pick up.


Lining up for the turns it's evident that the long wheelbase provides a great deal of stability. It’s very planted, with the suspension keeping the bike settled over the loose rock. The steering feels neutral and surprisingly light when loading up the front end into the berms. I didn’t find that I had to make any radical adjustments to my riding style, but the Dune Carbon does appear to appreciate a bit more weight over the front end to push the front tire in and help initiate the turn.

This is the bit where I should be writing about the Dune Carbon’s climbing prowess, but I’ll confess that I made good use of the nearby chairlift and the free pass, so this box is pretty empty. I was too busy making use of the free lift and getting as many downhill runs logged as possible. A full review will give us more of an insight it its all-round capabilities.

Based on first impressions it’s clear Mondraker has produced a highly capable, fast and stable bike. The enduro category is a hotly contested one right now, but in the Dune Carbon’s corner is the competitive weight, smart design with clever details, and adjustable geometry that means it will appeal to those who like to tune their bikes. First impressions show a lot of promise in the new Dune Carbon, and we can’t wait for an extended ride on it.






149 Comments

  • + 87
 It's all over Nomad. Have a seat.
  • + 10
 Made me laff Smile
  • + 22
 Definitely lots of cool bikes coming out but nothing so rousing I'd want to get rid of my nomad. That said I'm more than ready to see some different bikes around. It's embarrassing grabbing the wrong bike at a race.
  • + 5
 Nope, its still the Nomad for me!!!
  • + 19
 Mondraker, stay away from the crack pipe. Your prices are jokes Smile
  • + 19
 I do not understand the prices when I hear they are entering the direct seller market (at least in germany). You get 2 YTs wirh better spwcs for that price!
  • + 8
 they are the pioneer of one size larger frame.
  • + 4
 Haven't seen or read anything which would cause me to believe that this bike is any better than a nomad. I'd welcome a comment from someone (neutral/professional) who has ridden both.
  • + 1
 The Spartan eats the Nomad for breakfast!!!
  • + 1
 DW? Yeah right!!!!!
  • + 1
 @Jim-laden they're not!
  • + 44
 dune, where's my carbon?
  • + 27
 Where's your carbon, dune?
  • + 12
 Where's dune, my carbon?
  • + 8
 I'd hit that dune-tang.
  • + 19
 yours says dune whats mine say?
  • + 10
 No see your Lebowski. I'm the Dune! Or His Duneness, or Dune-oreeno if you're not into the whole brevity thing
  • + 15
 Let me explain something to you. Um, I am not "Mr. Nomad". You're Mr. Nomad. I'm the Dune. So that's what you call me. You know, that or, uh, His Duneness, or uh, Duner, or El Dunerino if you're not into the whole brevity thing.
  • + 4
 Aannnnnddddd theennnn......
  • + 3
 Im the only one here who cares about the dunes
  • + 4
 @hypermoto we mustve posted our comments at exactly the same time, i swear i didnt copy you hahahaha
  • + 0
 @jaycubzz, you win the internet today Big Grin
  • + 3
 @jaycubzz No worries. Abide Smile
  • + 2
 err who is dune?
  • + 0
 you are the dune to my carbon
  • + 3
 Does the Dune abide?
  • + 0
 That nomad really tied the room together...
  • + 34
 I want a divorce and the money I keep I am going to get a Dune Carbon, will definitely be a better ride.
  • + 47
 it's cheaper to keep her...
  • + 16
 Exactly, keep your wife and with the money you'll save, you could get a Dune
  • + 2
 Give all your bikes to your lawyer.. It'll be quicker
  • + 20
 I've had the possibility to participate in this event and this bike is just stunning! The whole package is so balanced I was faster and faster on every run. A reach of 508mm sounded crazy - and might still - a couple of years ago but it handled like a dream. Hefty pricetag but this is not an average bike - this is comparable to a sportscar which will tear your face off while accelerating or smashing a corner. Big brands out there have a look! This is pretty much the purest racing maschine out there and it's not coming from you.
  • + 6
 I want one. Perhaps the wife will have other ideas...
  • + 3
 Did I hear you say maschin? youtu.be/9Ocyk0OgyWY Wink
  • + 15
 So when the Capra gets reviewed, all people want to say is how much cheaper than the Nomad. When this gets reviewed, people say "nice bike", and yet no one has pointed out that this thing MAKES A GODDAMN NOMAD LOOK CHEAP....
  • - 4
flag jaame (Jun 26, 2015 at 3:51) (Below Threshold)
 Nomads are made in China though aren't they
  • + 3
 @tsheep - Thanks man for saving my time, you said exactly what I was thinking.
  • + 4
 Most companies manufacture their carbon bikes in China, it doesn't make it bad. Anyone know where Mondraker makes their carbon bikes?
  • + 5
 I believe it is Taiwan, Astro Engineering
  • + 17
 Is the price a joke?
  • + 4
 April fools! ...wait, it's June! SHIIIIIIIIIIT!
  • + 5
 I would love to have an article on Pinkbike concerning the "modern" geometry and who it is good for. Because the reviews are very positive, but between the lines I can always read that those bikes are not easy to handle in tight turns, that they handle great at high speed (which in turn means that they handle poorly at low speeds) etc. Recently I had a ride on Rune L (reach 445, I am 5 11) with 27.5 wheels and it felt like a f* train.
  • + 5
 On a large spitfire and i'm only 5.9" (40mm stem but going to try 30mm, seat push forward). Forward geomentry to the way to go, stable at speed, gets the weight over the front on climbs. On tighter, slow down hill tracks you do have to use the rear brake to swing the rear round but thats just fun! Bar turn quicker with the short stem so it really is not a promblem, just have to adjust your riding to a more aggressive nature.
  • + 2
 The large rune is not even particularly long.

All it takes is an adjustment of riding style. Long bikes are good, but there is a limit. You need to find what works best for you and as such if you are considering a bike like this testing one is imperative.

It took me a while to figure out what fits me. I went from a Large Rune (too short), to a Large Alpine 160 (too long) and finally settled on a Large Transition Patrol which seems to fit perfectly.
  • + 0
 I wonder what they'd think of the Marin Attack Trail (don't think they ever reviewed it, just previewed it). Completely different style of bike. Took me a minute to get used to the shorter reach compared to the new ultra-long trendy bikes, but it's so nimble and agile. Climbing position is great due to seat angle and reach. It also feels great over long miles due to the more upright riding position (less back pain). Downhill, riding skills can make up for any perceived loss in stability (which I didn't notice). I can still go fast on it. In fact, I like how quickly I can change direction and whip the rear end around. I don't think you need a limo length bike to ride fast downhill. All this talk of stability of long bikes makes me wonder if we forgot how to ride somewhere along the way. I hate switchbacks on a super long bike too, and we have a lot of them where I live.
  • + 1
 I hate using the dreaded "S" word but from doing my frame swop (and that's keeping f the same components other than stem and dropping to a 1x10 (34T) from a 2 x10 (37T) ) from a meta am to the banshee, all my times have dropped. I fell faster, i feel more confident, and i say i have more fun because of the speed i am hitting things at
  • + 3
 @mattvanders
If you have to use the rear brake in tight turns – you're doing it wrong. If you want to got fast never ever think about steering with a brake around a turn. Long bikes could swung around while putting weight on the front while lifting your back to move it around the corner. Dynamic riding style is key.
  • + 7
 Mondraker, Please Please Please set up distribution in the USA. You tantalize us with your eye candy but we can't easily get our hands on the goods.
  • + 6
 Evans Cycles from across the pond has em' and can ship to the U.S. for free. After reading this Im shopping for one now!
  • + 5
 but then you have to pay duty. I had my 2015 foxy in customs for over a month.
  • + 2
 That's the sort of thing I was afraid of downhere67. I really wanted a Dune but when I factored in price and the potential problems with shipping and lack of local support, I decided against it. If Mondraker becomes local, I may change my mind some day - even if they just become a direct sales company here.
  • + 2
 If you order it from Evans they will knock 20% off the price
  • + 4
 because that is the VAT
  • - 1
 Oh really Sherlock? Is that what it is?
  • + 4
 You are going on the idea that people in N.A. know that your tax is 20% You do not have to be a dick.
  • + 3
 I thought it was obvious that buying from Europe is not going to be a tax worry for north Americans, since you will not have to pay European tax. Someone up in this thread said they don't want to get screwed with import tax. Well to that person, you will save 20% on the euro price before you have to pay duty over there, so it's not an issue.
  • + 2
 Oh it was you
  • + 7
 Holy shit ! If this bike is better in the climbing sections but as fast as the aluminum version was in the downhill ones, you have here a real weapon !!
  • + 4
 Stunning bike. I'm 6'4" with a looong torso, so this bike is really intriguing, but a nearly 50" wheelbase on the XL is a lot of bike to weave around! I sure would like to try one, however. Please send one to me (with Fox 36 RC2) to try. I promise to send it back.
  • + 4
 Same heigh as me... I've recently got the XL in the Foxy, and it's been a revelation. First bike I've had that really feels like it 'fits'. And no issues in the tight stuff at all, just takes a few rides to learn to ride it properly (differently!).
  • + 8
 I'd have my way with that bike
  • + 3
 Looks like a dream bike to me love long top tubes bikes. Would like to try this geometry. Funny that they write the frame is 540 grams ligther 3 times .... thats a good shaving. Love that chip wheelbase stuff and that hole behind the head tube. I like Mondraker bike a lot
  • + 6
 im surpised it doesnt look like a session
  • + 4
 Anyone know how this feels in the air? Seems like the super long reach would encourage staying on the ground. Love the way it looks though.
  • + 2
 I've got the Foxy XR Carbon and it is super stable in the air and can throw it about. Not specifically about the Dune obviously but they do share similar geometry.
  • + 2
 Oh, and I'm definitely a 'back wheel rider' i.e. I hoik the front into the air a lot to manual through sections and just let the back wheel clatter on through, and I've no problem doing that on the Foxy even with it being super long. I do run the 10 mm stem though.
  • + 1
 I've recently bought a banshee spitfire and up sized to a large (5.9" so should be on a medium) but running a 40mm stem and seat push far forward. 615mm in large V 590mm reach. I find it very stable in the air and the bar very easy to tweek for added style. Would of bought a foxy other than the cost and wheel size change
  • + 2
 You can't have your cake and eat it. I've got a corsair which is about 2 feet long and it's fun as Hell but also unstable asHell when the speed gets up
  • + 8
 Where does that cake saying come from any way? I just had some cake and contrary to the saying I did eat it. Who the hell buys cake and then doesn't eat it?!
So, errr, yeah... that might have been off topic a bit. To bring it back, what if cake had a longer reach? would it handle better or only if you had shorter icing on it?
  • + 5
 I could be mistaken, but I believe it means if you eat the cake, you don't have it any more
  • + 5
 $8800 for a 'mid-range' bicycle?
  • + 1
 Different currencies, priced for different economies. Not comparable. That said, it's definitely at the high-end of bike pricing.
  • + 2
 There is a difference between 'mid range' and 'middle of the range'

Mid range = mid priced in overall market

Middle of the range = mid priced option of that SPECIFIC range.
  • + 2
 Notice the 'quotes' I used.
That meant that I quoted the writer word-for-word.
It's definitely NOT 'mid-priced in [the] overall market'
Especially with what you're getting with the YT Capra, I'd call it 'insanely priced' for the overall market
  • + 2
 Neat idea with the flippable tabs to adjust the chain stay length, but perhaps someone could explain how that works in regard to the mech hanger moving with it?
  • + 1
 That's a very good question.
  • + 4
 My guess is that there are 2 hangers, with the hole in different locations.
  • + 2
 Please, the journalist in me pleads for you not to say "...divided some opinions...". Just say some people like it and some people think it's stupid for where they ride.
  • + 1
 That part stuck out to me, too. Since when is Mondraker's forward geometry even "divisive?" Seems to have gotten solid reviews pretty much everywhere. And it seems representative of the larger trend of swapping in shorter stems.
  • + 3
 Solid reviews and fun to try out maybe. But for riders looking for the do it all bike as opposed to a dedicated big mountain enduro bike - maybe not so much. It's interesting that the reviewer rode it like a DH bike, not like a trail bike. Owning one of these may be more like owning a dedicated DH bike. Not something many of us can justify given the terrain available to us.
  • + 3
 The above discussion is one that is not had enough. Buy a bike for the trails you ride 90% of the time, not for the coolness factor. It cracks me up to see people's only bike a big travel trail bike and they live in Ohio.
  • + 1
 A lot of people can't stand the Mondraker geometry. I even know a bike tester who hated one but still it got a good review albeit with a small disclaimer within admitting that it doesn't suit everyone. I was in between two frame sizes and bought into the long bike hype and sized up. Then 3 months later and a few good OTBs I sold and bought the next smaller size and couldn't be happier. Now I'm drifting and boosting like I used to and am also going faster due to having some weight on the front wheel.
  • + 3
 Make it out of cheese if you want but please let it work with my new bottlecage
  • + 3
 Great bike, but too expensive!!!
  • + 1
 it said the highest model is specced with a float x2. in the picture it shows flot x. is that a typo??? I really hope its not.
  • + 3
 Different models.

"Three models will be available, priced from £4699 up to £6599 (USD pricing not available) for the high-end Dune XR that's equipped with a FOX 36 Float FIT Kashima 170mm fork and Float X2 Factory Kashima shock"

"I was paired up with a large sized Dune Carbon RR, which is the £5599 mid-range model that's specced with a FOX 36 Float fork with 160mm of travel and Float X Factory shock"
  • + 2
 That is some long ass reach - even by modern standards. Would be curious to check one out.
  • + 3
 Let's see these 10 and 20mm stems, seems extreme.
  • + 1
 I was thinking same. Dent in handlebar? Pacenti patented it. Big Grin I have seen only 35mm stems in sale...
  • + 1
 Syntace makes a 30mm stem which I think is as short as you can go before the bar makes contact with the steerer
  • + 5
 Mondraker has used them for years. They go on top of the bar.
  • + 3
 They have a stem that looks like a DH stem to get these very short sizes but they raise the front end quite a bit.
  • + 1
 I'm riding the 2013 Dune XR, great bike, and I might get one of these later
  • + 1
 Matt76
Like to know your reasoning. Seriously I would like to know riding impressions between carbon and aluminium for the same bike. What is you experience?
  • + 2
 Is there any plan to distribute Mondrakers in North America (Canada?)?
  • + 1
 Call that bike swiss cheese with all them holes in the frame, i like it tho.
  • + 1
 Spanish cheese?
  • + 1
 spesh enduro has similar design... with even larger "windows" I guess...
  • + 3
 Mondchego
  • + 1
 I'm such a dork for LOLing at Mondchego.
  • + 2
 Pretty Pretty. Plus Mondraker is almost as much fun to say as Devinci.
  • + 2
 I can't wait to never ever be able to afford one of these......
  • + 2
 Looks nice! But I'm sticking to my Nomad!
  • + 1
 I'm over the dune about this bike. But take off the chain, there old fashioned now.
  • + 2
 That's got R.E.A.L. D.O.N.G.
  • + 2
 Gwin's advice for dropping 540 grams: Toss the chain.
  • + 1
 The guy riding in these photos must be better than Gwin, as the bike is pictured with no peddles...
Maybe that's Gwins next trick, riding DH with no peddles?
  • + 22
 I assume you mean pedals? may wanna change your user name too...
  • + 4
 What @Rhanrick said- I'm all for spelling correction on PB, the people on this site don't seem to have picked up grammar and spelling in school.
  • + 3
 Yes - like all those acid-heads who can't even spell "Dude." Someone been peddling to them?
  • + 2
 Definitely the best looking bike on the market at the moment
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike but that shock area is going to be a pain after a muddy ride.
  • + 2
 I'd rather buy this than the Foxy.
  • + 1
 So, a person around 5 and 5" is going to ride a bike with 452mm of reach?
Not even with a zero stem!
Ridiculous!
  • + 0
 That's exactly what I was expecting! Except for internal routing for brake hose....
  • + 1
 Still sticking with my carbon Covert! Can't beat it.....
  • + 1
 At that price I just love ... the bikes I already own !
  • + 1
 Is there a frame only option ?
  • + 1
 A new Race Face Cinch looks to be on its way. An Aeffect.
  • + 1
 Atlas
  • + 1
 Its an Aefect. Check the Mondaraker site.
  • + 1
 *Mondraker
  • + 1
 Was wondering what that was, looks slick
  • + 1
 Father....The Sleeper has Awoken!!!!!!
  • + 2
 So pretty wanna touch it
  • + 1
 OMG! this thing screams SEX! i'm in love.
  • + 1
 whoops wrong neg sorry
  • + 1
 giant reign 1 ftw.
  • - 1
 I would rather have a bike that weighed 540 grams more than this for the very reason it was made of metal.
  • + 2
 We're gonna be able to start writing these for you @Matt76
Or maybe release a coffee table book called '101 carbon digs'.
  • + 2
 Haha truly an odd man, why such extreme carbon hate?
  • + 3
 Lol. l love carbon......as a headset spacer!
  • + 4
 ... I love it as a form of fossil fuel
  • + 1
 PS @tobiusmaximum please do. It would save me the time and hassle!
  • + 1
 @hexhamstu....says the man who rides a metal Orange 224!
  • + 1
 Hahaha, not any more, but my Transition has no more carbon than the orange. If I could afford it I would.
  • + 0
 A loan is needed. This is definitely my new bike.
  • + 0
 Anyone seen a availability date for this?
  • + 0
 No carbon rims?
  • - 2
 weak
  • - 1
 NOMAD
  • - 2
 I've been waiting for this for so long!!! I WANT IT, AND I'LL GET IT!!!
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